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New England Foundation for the Arts Inc.

 145 Tremont Street, 7th Floor
 Boston, MA 02111
[P] (617) 951-0010
[F] (617) 951-0016
www.nefa.org
[email protected]
Sharon Timmel
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INCORPORATED: 1976
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2593591

LAST UPDATED: 06/06/2018
Organization DBA NEFA
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

NEFA invests in artists and communities and fosters equitable access to the arts, enriching the cultural landscape in New England and the nation.

Mission Statement

NEFA invests in artists and communities and fosters equitable access to the arts, enriching the cultural landscape in New England and the nation.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year June 01, 2017 to May 31, 2018
Projected Income $8,920,661.00
Projected Expense $8,800,211.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Creative City
  • Creative Economy
  • Dance
  • International Cultural Exchange
  • New England Presenting & Touring
  • Public Art
  • Theater

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

NEFA invests in artists and communities and fosters equitable access to the arts, enriching the cultural landscape in New England and the nation.


Background Statement

The New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA) was established in 1976 as one of six U.S. Regional Arts Organizations (RAOs) to cultivate the arts regionally and strengthen the national arts infrastructure. Known in the field for innovation and adaptability, NEFA creates systems of support, functioning as a program initiator, incubator, convener, aggregator of resources and information, and builder of creative partnerships among artists, arts organizations, field leaders, researchers, and funders. As a 501(c)(3) public charity with a base of federal and state support and additional funding from corporations, foundations, and individuals, NEFA operates with an annual budget of over $7 million to develop and manage arts initiatives on local, regional, national and international levels.


Impact Statement

As a grantmaker, program initiator, developer of resources, and builder of creative partnerships among artists, arts organizations and funders, NEFA celebrates New England and its characteristic values while playing a national role by distributing model programs, supporting international cultural exchange, and advocating access to the arts for everyone.

Each program and project that is brought to life at NEFA is created with the underlying goal of building a stronger and more dynamic infrastructure for the arts. Through research, documentation, and evaluation, NEFA works to demonstrate the economic impact of the arts, and to enhance public understanding of how the arts contribute to the vitality of communities.


Needs Statement

NEFA plays a unique role in sustaining the arts, and as a nonprofit, the work we do is financed with contributions from individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies. A gift to NEFA is an investment in catalyzing support for the arts in New England and beyond, helping NEFA support artists with the resources they need to create and present their work, and to connect and strengthen the creative sector as a whole.  For more information, please visit www.nefa.org/donate.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Throughout the United States
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
INTERNATIONAL
NEFA serves artists and organizations in New England, throughout the U.S., and internationally.

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts Services
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Creative City

Creative City enables artists to create projects of all disciplines that take place in the public realm in the city of Boston and that integrate public participation into artistic process and presentation. Creative City provides grants, training and technical assistance to artists residing within Route 495 in Massachusetts to site work in the city of Boston. Its design was informed by conversations with artists, curators, producers, and presenters in Greater Boston, as well as a national review of artist support programs and creative place-making. The program supports individual artists, artist collectives, and artistic collaborations in all disciplines and with roots in diverse cultures, forms and aesthetics. Artistic work may be grounded in multiple aesthetics from traditional cultural practices to experimental artistic practice. Creative City seeks to increase cultural equity by valuing the diversity of the city, with special attention to artists in communities that are historically under-served and under-resourced.
Budget  $314,052
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Program plans for Creative City include grantmaking that supports artists to make and share work of all disciplines in spaces that are not conventionally associated with art, or to recast conventional arts spaces to be seen in new ways with different access and opportunity.
Program Long-Term Success  Creative City has a core value that broad access to creative activity is essential to a community, and that direct investment in artists will foster new ways to engage Boston’s diverse communities. Creative City – from application through implementation – is designed to strengthen the capacity of artists to develop proposals and realize their ideas, work with non-arts partners, engage with networks of advocates and share their expertise as part of a learning cohort. All grantees are required to participate in two meetings as part of a learning cohort for purposes of professional development.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is measured through a combination of quantitative feedback from grant and service recipients; qualitative feedback from grantees, panel advisors, field experts, and staff; collateral materials from press and social media. Instruments: grantee reports to collect project statistics and outcomes (e.g. number of performance and community activities, how many youth served by activities, artist fees and project expenses, partnerships developed, audience feedback, marketing and press coverage, audio/video of completed work, collaborator satisfaction); field surveys (workshop ratings, topic suggestions, frequency of contact with staff, program needs); interviews and focus groups (process improvements and policy discussion). Analysis of collected data: comparative and summative reports, website analytics and social media tracking, cross-tabulation of statistics and review of program guidelines, criteria, applications, grantee interim and final reports for internal consistency.
Examples of Program Success  NEFA awarded $78,500 to the first cohort of Creative City grantees, $100,000 to the second cohort, $70,000 to the third cohort, $70,000 to the fourth cohort, and $126,500 to the fifth cohort, for a total of $445,000 granted to public artists in Boston.

Creative Economy

NEFA's creative economy work supports the creative sector and creative placemaking work by highlighting the rich cultural activity of New England, quantifying its impact, connecting its leaders, and providing opportunities for anyone across the U.S. to apply research frameworks or New England model projects locally. www.CreativeGround.org is NEFA's unique online tool to connect and promote New England's creative economy. CreativeGround has ongoing, real-time tracking of the creative people and places of New England is complemented by periodic in-depth analyses of a particular aspect of the sector. In June 2017, a new report titled Jobs in New England's Creative Economy and Why They Matter was produced as part of NEFA's ongoing effort to assess the current state of the creative economy and its employment trends. Additionally, every two years, NEFA gathers New England leaders who are invested or engaged in leveraging this professional creative sector for arts-based community development. The Creative Communities Exchange (CCX), which rotates to different New England communities, features networking and practical workshops on creative economy and creative placemaking projects. The CCX builds a bridge between the creative sector and community development by providing a peer-to-peer forum to explore the abundant creative assets of New England and share how the creative sector continues to breathe life and opportunity into the region.

 

Budget  $173,223
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

CreativeGround, NEFA’s online tool to connect and promote New England’s creative economy, features in-depth profiles for cultural nonprofits, creative businesses, and artists of all disciplines.

The Creative Communities Exchange (CCX) gathers New England’s creative and cultural community leaders for networking and practical creative economy workshops prepared by their peers. CCX highlights a wide range of successful initiatives from around New England that focus on various elements of the creative economy (e.g. downtown revitalization, policy and planning, creative sector capacity building, leadership, and partnerships), two of which are honored with NEFA Creative Economy Awards. This biennial event rotates to different New England communities.
Program Long-Term Success 

Program goals include providing research, online resources, and convenings to connect, inform, and energize New England’s creative economy while enhancing public understanding of how the creative sector contributes to the vitality of communities.

Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is measured through a combination of quantitative feedback from grant and service recipients; qualitative feedback from grantees, panel advisors, field experts, and staff; collateral materials from press and social media. Instruments: grantee reports to collect project statistics and outcomes (e.g. number of performance and community activities, how many youth served by activities, artist fees and project expenses, partnerships developed, audience feedback, marketing and press coverage, audio/video of completed work, collaborator satisfaction); field surveys (workshop ratings, topic suggestions, frequency of contact with staff, program needs); interviews and focus groups (process improvements and policy discussion). Analysis of collected data: comparative and summative reports, website analytics and social media tracking, cross-tabulation of statistics and review of program guidelines, criteria, applications, grantee interim and final reports for internal consistency.

Examples of Program Success  In June 2017, NEFA gathered community and arts leaders from New England and beyond at the 2017 Creative Communities Exchange to discuss specific strategies organizations are using to leverage the creative sector for community revitalization and growth. Over two days, model creative placemaking projects from around New England were presented and discussed in workshops. The goal of the CCX is for participants to connect with resources from across the region - information, colleagues, inspiration - that are useful in a local context, serving to strengthen the role of the creative sector in the broader community.

Dance

NEFA founded the National Dance Project (NDP) in 1996 to support the creation and touring of new dance works throughout the United States. Now in its third decade, NDP is widely recognized as one of the country's major sources of funding for dance. NDP has invested more than $36 million in funding to artists and organizations to strengthen partnerships and bring dance into communities across the U.S. To date, NDP has supported 359 artists and companies and 787 cultural organizations, helping 668 unique dance works reach more than 2.8 million audience members in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Guam.

 

Budget  $2,841,592
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Artists' Services
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Program plans for the National Dance Project include grantmaking through Production Grants and Touring Awards, which support the development and touring of new contemporary dance work; Production Residencies for Dance, which support the refinement of new dance projects in later stages of development in order to produce works that are more fully realized and ready to tour; and Presentation Grants, which support up to 50% of the artistic fee for the presentation of NDP projects. 
Program Long-Term Success 

NDP is interested in supporting work that reflects the evolving environment for dance, including but not limited to projects that push aesthetic boundaries and reflect the cultural and aesthetic diversity alive in dance today; nurture long-term and multi-faceted partnerships between choreographers and presenters, leading to the highest quality possible in the production values for the completed work; are interdisciplinary, enabling choreographers and dance artists to partner with creators in other artistic forms or explore hybrid art forms; enable choreographers and dance artists to experiment with new technologies in the creation of work and to explore new ways of engaging audiences in all stages of a dance work’s development and presentation; involve choreographers and dance artists from a range of career stages, and expose audiences, and U.S.-based choreographers, to international work of outstanding quality and originality, primarily through NDP Touring awards.

Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is measured through a combination of quantitative feedback from grant and service recipients; qualitative feedback from grantees, panel advisors, field experts, and staff; collateral materials from press and social media. Instruments: grantee reports to collect project statistics and outcomes (e.g. number of performance and community activities, how many youth served by activities, artist fees and project expenses, partnerships developed, audience feedback, marketing and press coverage, audio/video of completed work, collaborator satisfaction); field surveys (workshop ratings, topic suggestions, frequency of contact with staff, program needs); interviews and focus groups (process improvements and policy discussion). Analysis of collected data: comparative and summative reports, website analytics and social media tracking, cross-tabulation of statistics and review of program guidelines, criteria, applications, grantee interim and final reports for internal consistency.

Examples of Program Success 

FY17 National Dance Project grantmaking included 19 production and general operating support grants totaling $972,900; 150 presentation grants totaling $836,491; 8 grants totaling $150,000 for production residencies for dance; 11 grants totaling $21,459 for French-US Exchange Curatorial Travel in Dance and 4 grants totaling $48,000 for French-US Exchange in Dance projects; 40 grants totaling $37,800 for New England choreographers through the New England Dance Fund; and 1 NEFA Special Projects grant totaling $2,500.


International Cultural Exchange

Center Stage (www.centerstageUS.org) harnesses the power of the performing arts to increase cross-cultural understanding. Center Stage is a public-private partnership produced by NEFA with general management by Lisa Booth Management Inc. (LBMI), and is an initiative of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, launched in 2012. Through Center Stage, performing arts ensembles from abroad participate in individual, month-long, custom-designed performance residencies in 5-7 communities across the U.S. Tours provide the opportunity to foster mutual understanding and engage the American people in cultural diplomacy while providing participating artists exposure, professional growth, and the opportunity to directly experience America and Americans for themselves. Center Stage Season Three brought artists from Algeria and Tanzania to the U.S. for tours in 2016 and artists from Pakistan to tour in 2017. Center Stage Season Four will bring five ensembles from Egypt and Ukraine for tours in 2018.

 

Budget  $260,261
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified US& International
Program Short-Term Success 

Fueled by a mission of cultural exchange and engagement, Center Stage is about much more than performance tours for artists from abroad. Each tour is carefully designed to match artists with communities across the U.S. With an emphasis on person-to-person exchange, interactions off-stage are as important as what happens in formal performances. Opportunities for artists and communities to meet, talk, share, and learn from one another as citizen diplomats introduce artists to the diversity of America – its geography, its people, ideas and cultures – and Americans to the artistic and cultural diversity of the artists’ home countries, with interactions continuing after the artists have returned home.

Program Long-Term Success 

Center Stage builds on NEFA’s longstanding commitment to the value of cultural exchange across international borders. Tours reach a broad representation of U.S communities, with long term goals of fostering cross-cultural understanding and engaging the American people in cultural diplomacy while providing artists from abroad with opportunities to meet, interact, and develop relationships with Americans, and share their experiences upon their return home.

Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is measured through a combination of quantitative feedback from grant and service recipients; qualitative feedback from grantees, panel advisors, field experts, and staff; collateral materials from press and social media. Instruments: grantee reports to collect project statistics and outcomes (e.g. number of performance and community activities, how many youth served by activities, artist fees and project expenses, partnerships developed, audience feedback, marketing and press coverage, audio/video of completed work, collaborator satisfaction); field surveys (workshop ratings, topic suggestions, frequency of contact with staff, program needs); interviews and focus groups (process improvements and policy discussion). Analysis of collected data: comparative and summative reports, website analytics and social media tracking, crosstabulation of statistics and review of program guidelines, criteria, applications, grantee interim and final reports for internal consistency.

Examples of Program Success  Through Center Stage, 154 artists and 24 ensembles from Algeria, Haiti, Indonesia, Morocco, Pakistan, Tanzania, and Vietnam have introduced Americans to a diversity of forms, expressions and aesthetics that make up their nations’ rich and diverse cultures. More than 140,000 Americans will have enjoyed direct in-person interactions with these artists on-stage and off, through performances in traditional and non-traditional venues, in addition to workshops, master classes, and artist-to-artist exchanges in local communities. One artist participant commented, “I got to see Americans in a different light altogether.I found those certain people, especially among artists, who think and feel beyond borders. Who believe in the reality of a human collective – my hope was fulfilled.”

New England Presenting & Touring

New England Presenting and Touring programs support the New England presentation of performing artists of all disciplines from the region and around the globe, and provide professional development and technical assistance to presenters throughout the six New England states. Current grantmaking programs include Expeditions Touring, Expeditions Tour Planning, New England States Touring, and New England Presenter Travel.
Budget  $368,854
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Program plans include grantmaking through Expeditions, which funds multi-state New England tours of high quality performing artists from across the globe, New England States Touring, which makes grants to New England presenters for engagements by artists from other New England states, and the Presenter Travel Fund, which provides monetary assistance to arts programmers or curatorial staff in New England so that they may investigate new or unfamiliar artists or ensembles.

Program Long-Term Success  Program goals include increasing capacity of New England organizations who hire artists and the capacity of New England artists to effectively engage community audiences; facilitating exchange among and between New England artists and arts organizations to strengthen collaboration; and encouraging New England artists and organizations to challenge the expectations of New England arts audiences through new contemporary work and innovative means of increasing engagement with artists. For more information, please see the program goals for Expeditions, New England States Touring, and New England Presenter Travel, at www.nefa.org.
Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is measured through a combination of quantitative feedback from grant and service recipients; qualitative feedback from grantees, panel advisors, field experts, and staff; collateral materials from press and social media. Instruments: grantee reports to collect project statistics and outcomes (e.g. number of performance and community activities, how many youth served by activities, artist fees and project expenses, partnerships developed, audience feedback, marketing and press coverage, audio/video of completed work, collaborator satisfaction); field surveys (workshop ratings, topic suggestions, frequency of contact with staff, program needs); interviews and focus groups (process improvements and policy discussion). Analysis of collected data: comparative and summative reports, website analytics and social media tracking, cross-tabulation of statistics and review of program guidelines, criteria, applications, grantee interim and final reports for internal consistency.

Examples of Program Success  FY17 grantmaking included 32 Expeditions grants totaling $211,493; 49 New England States Touring grants totaling $96,603; 24 Presenter Travel grants totaling $14,166; and 2 Expeditions planning grants totaling $11,500.

 


Public Art

NEFA's Public Art program places artists at the heart of community and civic life, supporting programs and projects that engage artists and communities as collaborators in creating site specific work through grantmaking, field building, and professional development.
Budget  $120,000
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Artists-in-Residence
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Goals for Public Art include grantmaking through Fund for the Arts, which awards funding for public art projects where professional artists create new, site-specific, contemporary artwork in collaboration with community-based nonprofit organizations in the Greater Boston area, and professional development services through the Public Art Discussion Series and other networking opportunities.

Program Long-Term Success 

Through all of our services to the public art field, NEFA seeds public art work that has at its center engaging artists to work closely with community organizations on projects that involve and impact a wide range of communities.  We continue in conversations with the public art community as we shape program activities for the future.

Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is measured through a combination of quantitative feedback from grant and service recipients; qualitative feedback from grantees, panel advisors, field experts, and staff; collateral materials from press and social media. Instruments: grantee reports to collect project statistics and outcomes (e.g. number of performance and community activities, how many youth served by activities, artist fees and project expenses, partnerships developed, audience feedback, marketing and press coverage, audio/video of completed work, collaborator satisfaction); field surveys (workshop ratings, topic suggestions, frequency of contact with staff, program needs); interviews and focus groups (process improvements and policy discussion). Analysis of collected data: comparative and summative reports, website analytics and social media tracking, cross-tabulation of statistics and review of program guidelines, criteria, applications, grantee interim and final reports for internal consistency.

Examples of Program Success  In the past decade, Fund for the Arts has granted over $1.3 million to public artists in Boston. 

Theater

The National Theater Project (NTP) promotes the development of artist-led, ensemble, and devised theater work while extending the reach and life of these projects through touring. Through its Creation and Touring Grants, NTP directly supports artists and nonprofit organizations in the creation and touring of new theater works around the country. Since its launch in 2010, NTP has distributed crucial funding to artists and presenters, and is one of the few funding sources for devised theater in the country. To date, 57 new theater works have been supported; touring of those works has reached 42 different states across the U.S. In addition to the Creation and Touring, NTP supports artists and the field through several initiatives and supplemental grants, including regional convenings which bring together artists, presenters, arts service organizations, and presenters to discuss issues in creating and presenting theater within their region; cohort meetings between grantees and NTP advisors to build relationships and support their projects; Presentation; Presenter Travel; and Transition grants to support artist sustainability post-NTP supported touring.

Budget  $1,849,314
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Artists' Services
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Program plans for the National Theater Project include grantmaking through Creation & Touring Grants, which provide funds for creation and touring of collaborative, devised theater projects; Presentation Grants, which support up to 50% of the artistic fee for NTP projects; and Presenter Travel grants.
Program Long-Term Success 

NTP is particularly interested in supporting work that reflects the evolving environment for theater, including but not limited to projects that: Expose audiences to artist-led, ensemble, devised theater work of outstanding quality and originality; push the aesthetic boundaries and reflect the cultural and aesthetic diversity alive in theater today; nurture long-term, productive, and multifaceted partnerships between project and development partners, leading to the highest quality possible in the production of the completed work; have an understanding of touring devised work and strategies for creating a tour; offer the potential for deeper community engagement; and enhance the creation of a national network of presenters, producing theaters, and ensemble theaters with venues that will increase the potential for touring.

Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is measured through a combination of quantitative feedback from grant and service recipients; qualitative feedback from grantees, panel advisors, field experts, and staff; collateral materials from press and social media. Instruments: grantee reports to collect project statistics and outcomes (e.g. number of performance and community activities, how many youth served by activities, artist fees and project expenses, partnerships developed, audience feedback, marketing and press coverage, audio/video of completed work, collaborator satisfaction); field surveys (workshop ratings, topic suggestions, frequency of contact with staff, program needs); interviews and focus groups (process improvements and policy discussion). Analysis of collected data: comparative and summative reports, website analytics and social media tracking, cross-tabulation of statistics and review of program guidelines, criteria, applications, grantee interim and final reports for internal consistency.

Examples of Program Success  FY17 National Theater Project grantmaking included 6 creation and touring grants totaling $330,000; 39 presentation grants totaling $353,490; 21 presenter travel grants totaling $9,880; 4 capacity building grants totaling $30,000; and 10 transition grants totaling $80,000.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Please see NEFA’s 2018-21 Strategic Plan at https://www.nefa.org/strategic-plan-2018-2021

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Cathy Edwards
CEO Term Start Jan 2015
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Cathy Edwards joined the New England Foundation for the Arts as executive director in January, 2015. Ms. Edwards came to NEFA from the International Festival of Arts & Ideas in New Haven, CT, where she served as director of programming from 2006 - 2014. Previously, she was artistic director of Dance Theater Workshop in NYC and artistic director of the Time-Based Art Festival at the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA). Edwards brings deep knowledge about the field and the challenges and opportunities ahead for NEFA. She has served on numerous grant-giving and funding panels for such organizations as the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, Connecticut Culture and Tourism, United States Artists, the Japan Foundation, the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation and Creative Capital. She has served on the governing boards of the Association of Performing Arts Professionals, Movement Research, and the National Performance Network. She holds a B.A. in Humanities from Yale College.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Rebecca Blunk 2004 2014
Sam Miller 1995 2004

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Jug Chokshi Director of Finance and Administration --
Jane Preston Deputy Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Angel Award International Society for the Performing Arts 2015
National Funders Award Theatre Communications Group 2014

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 21
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 5
Other (if specified): Decline to Respond
Gender Female: 18
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Dr. Lawrence J. Simpson
Board Chair Company Affiliation Berklee College of Music
Board Chair Term July 2013 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Christal Brown INSPRIT dance company, Middlebury College Voting
Taylor Ho Bynum Tri-Centric Foundation, Dartmouth College Voting
Andrew Cornell Attorney Voting
Amy Zell Ellsworth Philanthropy Voting
Geoffrey Hargadon UBS Financial Services Voting
John Henry MarlinSpike, LLC Voting
Douglas Keith Lincolnshire Advisors Voting
Virginia Lupi New Hampshire State Council on the Arts Voting
Karen Mittelman Vermont Arts Council Voting
Barbara E. Murphy Education Voting
Chip Newell NewHeight Group --
Kristina Newman-Scott Department of Economic & Community Development, State of Connecticut Voting
Julie Richard Maine Arts Commission Voting
Elizabeth Theobald Richards The Opportunity Agenda Voting
Randall Rosenbaum Rhode Island State Council on the Arts Voting
Lawrence J. Simpson (Board Chair) Berklee College of Music Voting
Ann Smith Featherstone Center for the Arts Voting
Pamela Tatge Jacob's Pillow Voting
Edward Wendell Finance Voting
Marco Werman BBC Worldwide/Public Radio International Voting
Lisa Wong Harvard Medical School --
Carrie Zaslow Rhode Island LISC (Local Initiatives Support Corporation) Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Sandra Burton Williams College --
Sara Coffey Vermont Performance Lab --
Molly Davies AM Foundation --
Maurice Decaul Theatre Communications Group --
Pamela Diamantis Curbstone Financial Management Corp --
Stephen Duprey The Duprey Companies --
Ana Flores Earth Inform Studio --
David Howse ArtsEmerson --
Karina Kelley McFarland Johnson --
Felicia Knight The Knight Canney Group --
Liana Krupp Krupp Family Foundation --
Angie Lane Red River Theatres --
Rania Matar Rania Matar Photography --
Roberta McCulloch-Dews Mayor's Office, City of Pittsfield, MA --
Denise Menton Attorney --
Frank Mitchell The Amistad Center for Art & Culture --
Mariko Silver Bennington College --
Sydney Skybetter Brown University --
Anita Walker Massachusetts Cultural Council --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 16
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 12
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Audit
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Diversity & Inclusion
  • Executive
  • Investment
  • Trusteeship

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $12,584,501 $2,602,379 $6,948,278
Total Expenses $7,779,532 $6,540,045 $7,050,187

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,382,056 $1,140,792 $1,227,021
    Federal $1,277,176 $1,035,683 $1,115,199
    State $104,880 $105,109 $111,822
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $9,967,806 $1,169,849 $5,229,407
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $321,581 $71,578 $289,608
Investment Income, Net of Losses $913,058 $220,160 $202,242
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $6,579,364 $5,339,681 $5,850,006
Administration Expense $724,543 $714,988 $740,523
Fundraising Expense $475,625 $485,376 $459,658
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.62 0.40 0.99
Program Expense/Total Expenses 85% 82% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% 21% 7%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $24,413,733 $19,736,015 $23,899,612
Current Assets $13,757,303 $11,089,257 $11,206,825
Long-Term Liabilities -- $415,755 $258,653
Current Liabilities $2,378,568 $2,090,064 $2,155,769
Total Net Assets $22,035,165 $17,230,196 $21,485,190

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 4.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.78 5.31 5.20

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 2% 1%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Please see NEFA's 2018-21 Strategic Plan at https://www.nefa.org/strategic-plan-2018-2021


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Please see NEFA's 2018-21 Strategic Plan at https://www.nefa.org/strategic-plan-2018-2021


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Please see NEFA's 2018-21 Strategic Plan at https://www.nefa.org/strategic-plan-2018-2021


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Please see NEFA's 2018-21 Strategic Plan at https://www.nefa.org/strategic-plan-2018-2021

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Please see NEFA's 2018-21 Strategic Plan at https://www.nefa.org/strategic-plan-2018-2021