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Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety & Health, Inc.

 1532B Dorchester Avenue
 Dorchester, MA 02122
[P] (617) 8257233 x 21
[F] (617) 5060542
www.masscosh.org
[email protected]
Al Vega
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INCORPORATED: 1976
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2614458

LAST UPDATED: 01/05/2017
Organization DBA MassCOSH
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Founded in 1976, Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) engages youth and adult community members as leaders in promoting safe, secure jobs and healthy communities throughout eastern Massachusetts. Through education, leadership development and coalition-building, youth and adults gain the skills and support to address dangerous work conditions and prevent work-related diseases and disabilities. MassCOSH has a special focus on immigrants and other lower-income adults, and young people of color who often work in jobs that are the most unsafe and unhealthy.

Mission Statement

Founded in 1976, Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) engages youth and adult community members as leaders in promoting safe, secure jobs and healthy communities throughout eastern Massachusetts. Through education, leadership development and coalition-building, youth and adults gain the skills and support to address dangerous work conditions and prevent work-related diseases and disabilities. MassCOSH has a special focus on immigrants and other lower-income adults, and young people of color who often work in jobs that are the most unsafe and unhealthy.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2016 to Sept 30, 2017
Projected Income $924,745.00
Projected Expense $911,833.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Immigrant Worker Center
  • Labor Enviromental Health Initiative
  • Teens Lead at Work ([email protected])

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Founded in 1976, Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) engages youth and adult community members as leaders in promoting safe, secure jobs and healthy communities throughout eastern Massachusetts. Through education, leadership development and coalition-building, youth and adults gain the skills and support to address dangerous work conditions and prevent work-related diseases and disabilities. MassCOSH has a special focus on immigrants and other lower-income adults, and young people of color who often work in jobs that are the most unsafe and unhealthy.

Background Statement

MassCOSH was founded in 1972 as an all-volunteer organization by residents in eastern Massachusetts seeking to promote safe, healthy employment. Over the past 35 years, MassCOSH has assisted 28,000 individuals in increasing their ability to earn and maintain a living free from economically devastating work injuries.

In Greater Boston, MassCOSH focuses its efforts on disenfranchised residents - youth, immigrants, and people of color in Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan, Jamaica Plain, East Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, Charlestown, and Chelsea who work in the most dangerous jobs and are most as risk for workplace injuries.

MassCOSH accomplishes its mission through four core initiatives. Teens Lead @ Work provides an empowering environment where teens develop their academic and leadership skills, reach out and engage other teens as well as adult allies, and organize for safe, healthy work including safety from sexual harassment and violence, and strong enforcement of the Child Labor Laws.The Labor Environmental Health Initiative forges winning coalitions between labor and environmental movements to promote environmental health threats, including the replacement of toxic chemicals with safer ones. MassCOSH’s grassroots efforts for healthy schools unites parents, students, unions, and communities to improve school environmental conditions in Boston, throughout Massachusetts and across the country.The MassCOSH Worker Center builds a powerful network of workers who lead successful efforts that result in tangible improvements to working conditions.The Union Initiative fosters a growing network of union leaders and shop floor safety activists that consistently stand against “divide and conquer strategies” that pit union workers against the unorganized, or jobs against the environment.


Impact Statement

Recent MassCOSH Achievements: (1)Created an immigrant-led Worker Center helping over 1,000 low-income immigrant residents access medical treatment, achieve safety improvements, and increase economic security.(2)Through collaboration with Boston Public Schools (BPS), all BPS toxic cleaning products were replaced with green products, enhancing the health of 60,000 custodians, students, and teachers.(3)Teen peer leaders achieved passage of the Child Labor Reform Bill, the first major Child Labor reform in 70 years and establishment of a youth-led Child Labor Task Force to monitor implementation of the law.(4)Initiated the youth-led leadership academy for young workers, bringing together teens from across the state to develop skills in a three-day intensive training and return to their communities to conduct community service projects that demonstrate their new skills and promote safe employment opportunities for youth.(5)Peer leaders developed and launched a new, nation-wide sexual harassment curriculum to youth and young worker programs.(6)Teen peer leaders inspired three Massachusetts state agencies to establish a new requirement that all youth organization grant recipients provide young worker safety training to the thousands of teens they employ.


Needs Statement

As a non profit with a small staff that serves a large constituency with great needs, MassCOSH as an organization needs:
- volunteers who can help with communications, administration, research and engagement in activism
- financial contributions - approx. $140,000 in general operating support or unrestricted contributions to strengthen our ability to be more proactive to urgent needs.
- in-kind contributions of bookkeeping, videography, photography, and food for events
 
 

CEO Statement

As one of the few organizations of its kind in Massachusetts focusing on immigrants’ economic security, health and well-being, MassCOSH is a catalyst for change involving diverse constituencies (labor, women, immigrants, and youth) and movements (labor, environmental, women’s health/reproductive rights, youth and immigrant rights).Strengths of MassCOSH programs that differentiate it from other agencies may include(1) an extensive track record of building the power of low-wage and exploited workers of color and immigrants; (2) the capacity to build a steady stream of new leaders through the ongoing recruitment of new participants and by offering Leadership Institutes on an ongoing basis, linking veteran members with newer ones as mentors;(3) a multi-cultural, multi-generational and multi-lingual board and staff;(4) involvement of constituents in strategic planning, annual planning, and program evaluation; (5) a track record ofmeasurable outcomes achieved through the leadership of those impacted by unsafe conditions – including improved working conditions as well as advancement of professional skills by these participants; (6) the ability to respond to emerging issues, such as hazards associated with green jobs.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA

MassCOSH provides its services to all of Eastern Massachusetts. In Greater Boston, MassCOSH focuses its efforts on disenfranchised residents - youth, immigrants, and people of color in Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan, Jamaica Plain, East Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, Charlestown, and Chelsea who work in the most dangerous jobs and are most as risk for workplace injuries. In all of the low-income target communities, a substantial proportion of workers live in limited English households.

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Alliances & Advocacy
  2. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Civil Rights, Social Action, & Advocacy N.E.C.
  3. Environment - Environmental Education

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Immigrant Worker Center

The Immigrant Worker Initiative builds the power of immigrants and workers of color to mobilize for safe and healthy work conditions by:

  • Providing training to workers to ensure that they know their rights, are able to identify and protect themselves from hazards and can organize for safe and healthy working conditions.
  • Encouraging and supporting collective action by workers from the same workplace or industry.
  • Linking workers with unions and community groups to support workplace-organizing efforts and to address gaps in government protections for immigrant and low-wage workers.
Budget  $136,001.00
Category  Public Safety, Disaster Services, General/Other Occupational Health and Safety Awareness
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Migrant Workers
Program Short-Term Success 

1.     Through worker center-led training sessions, 120 temp workers and other low-wage immigrant workers will gain the critical information and skills needed to engage in direct action organizing and to participate in the public policy-making process

2.     Building on protections called for in the REAL bill, temp workers and other members from all participating worker centers will convene to establish a common platform of rights – A Worker Bill of Rights – to serve as a baseline of demands to employers in all direct action and policy efforts, uniting all marginalized workers: temp, day laborers, and low wage immigrant workers.

3.     Through the leadership of temp workers and support by REAL Coalition allies, workers will initiate collective action efforts against at least two egregious temp employers, securing critical improvements in wages, working conditions, and drawing media attention to temp agency abuses. 

Program Long-Term Success 

The MassCOSH Worker Center is widely recognized as a safe place for immigrants to speak up about abuses and become part of a powerful network of workers demanding safe, decent working conditions. The Worker Center is also a place where workers can be introduced to unions and encouraged to organize for a permanent voice in the workplace through unionization. Immigrant workers lead the worker center, playing a central role in governing the center, recruiting members, educating each other about rights and offering support to strengthen campaigns that result in tangible improvements: unionization, improved health and safety conditions, restoration of wages, and an end to discrimination and abuse. MassCOSH contributes to a vibrant network of Worker Centers, supporting the efforts of existing Worker Centers and fostering the development of new ones in underserved communities.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Worker Center was developed and is guided by a steering committee led by immigrant workers. They elect their own officers and lead three sub-committees (executive, publicity, and campaign). Three steering committee members serve on the MassCOSH Board of Directors. Worker Center members participated prominently in the development of the current strategic plan and were responsible for identifying issues of priority concern. 

A commitment to equal rights for all people permeates MassCOSH’s efforts. MassCOSH promotes inclusiveness by bringing together people of diverse races, ethnic backgrounds, languages, sexual orientations, physical abilities, and ages to work collaboratively to address common problems. Working side-by-side, people often discover powerful ways to overcome common challenges.

Examples of Program Success 

A temp agency in Chelsea was not paying overtime, was charging exorbitant transportation rates, and was exposing workers to toxic chemicals and dangerous machinery. The workers filed a complaint with the Attorney General, connected with an attorney from MassCOSH’s legal committee to file a class action lawsuit, and enlisted community supporters to pressure the temp agency. As a result, nearly 200 immigrants received overtime pay and were no longer charged for transportation. MassCOSH partnered with Greater Boston Legal Services, temp workers and community groups to file the Temp Workers Right To Know Bill. (2) Scaffolding workers were being exploited through wage violations. With the help of MassCOSH and a pro bono attorney, they filed a complaint with the Attorney General and a class action lawsuit. As a result, they received $70,000 in back wages and the employer agreed to follow the wage and hour laws, which benefited more than 50 workers.


Labor Enviromental Health Initiative

Workers' exposure to toxics is significantly reduced through MassCOSH's support of health and safety organizing and public policy victories. MassCOSH successfully forges winning coalitions between labor and environmental movements to combat environmental health threats and replace toxic chemicals with safer ones. MassCOSH's grassroots organizing for healthy schools unites parents, unions and communities to improve school
environmental conditions in Boston, throughout Massachusetts and across the country. As a result of MassCOSH's work, a Blue/Green alliance between labor and environmental health groups flourishes in Massachusetts and becomes a national model for coalition-building.
Budget  $99,455.00
Category  Public Safety, Disaster Services, General/Other Occupational Health and Safety Awareness
Population Served Other Economic Level
Program Short-Term Success 
  1. Engage labor groups in efforts that substitute safer alternatives for toxic chemicals on the shop floor and expand union involvement in the policy efforts of the Alliance for a Healthy Tomorrow (AHT).
  2. Recruit safety professionals trained by TNEC into MassCOSH and utilize their expertise to support the health and safety efforts of unions, immigrants, and teens
  3. Pass legislation that replaces the state’s most hazardous chemicals with safer alternatives, requires safer cleaning products for public buildings and eliminates the most flammable chemicals used by floor finishing workers, in partnership with the Alliance for a Healthy Tomorrow and other community/labor coalitions.
Program Long-Term Success 
1. Educate and mobilize
2. Develop leaders and peer educators
3. Build alliances to effect change in public policies
4. Maximize the visibility of workers ability to improve working conditions through the use of less toxic chemicals
Program Success Monitored By  Our success is determined by surveys, interviews with workers, and workplaces reporting that they will eliminate the use of toxic chemicals that can impact workers health and safety
Examples of Program Success 
  • On Friday, July 2, Governor Patrick signed into law a landmark bill banning the commercial use and sale of a highly flammable wood floor finishing product linked to tragic home fires that left three floor finishers dead and dozens of families without homes across the Commonwealth.
  • In 2005, custodians in four Boston Public Schools successfully led pilot projects substituting hazardous cleaning products with "green" cleaning products, targeting schools with high rates of asthma. MassCOSH, worked in partnership with the BUAC, the Boston Custodial Union and the Boston Public Schools Department to develop and evaluate the pilots, paving the way for city-wide green schools.
 
 

Teens Lead at Work ([email protected])

Teens Lead @ Work provides an empowering environment where teens develop their academic and leadership skills, reach out and engage other teens as well as adult allies, and organize for safe, healthy work including safety from sexual harassment and violence, and strong enforcement of the Child Labor Laws.
Budget  178,501
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success 

In the long term, MassCOSH fosters a strong youth justice movement linked with immigrant, women’s and labor movements to build the power to demand economic justice and gender and racial equity. We also expect our efforts to: (1) lead to a deterrence of Child Labor violations as a result of increased enforcement. (2) Youth and adults gain greater awareness that teens need jobs and have a right to jobs that are free of dangers such as sexual harassment, sexual assault and other forms of workplace violence. (3) As a result of youth-led efforts, employers enact policies that promote safety and prevent sexual harassment and violence.

Program Success Monitored By 

MassCOSH’s evaluation process ensures that [email protected] stays on course, reaches its anticipated outcomes, and guides staff and peer leaders in making needed adjustments. Peer leaders, with oversight from staff:1.Review meeting minutes, evaluation forms plus/delta process from meetings/workshops, and sign in sheets.2.Complete a pre-participation and post-participation assessment to identify what skills and outcomes they would like to achieve and compare the assessment with their achievements.3.Document achievements and conduct a quarterly program assessment.4.Participate in a 360 degree evaluation – providing constructive feedback to peers and staff. 5.Document any changes in policies (both stopping protections from becoming weakened and strengthening protections), and track Child Labor Law data on increased complaints, increased responsiveness and/or improved policies/procedures by the Attorney General.

Examples of Program Success 

Since its founding, [email protected] has received numerous awards. This past December, [email protected]’s coordinator received the Red Wagon Award from the Americorps Promise Fellow for her “extraordinary commitment to youth development.” Peer leaders received the John O’Connor Youth Activism award from Jobs with Justice, in recognition of their groundbreaking sexual harassment campaign, the Take a Stand Award from the Boston Women’s Fund, and awards from Breath of Life Dorchester (BOLD), and the North Shore Labor Council.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Al Vega
CEO Term Start Oct 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience For close to 20 years, Al Vega has worked primarily in youth development with a focus on strengthening the skills and leadership of Boston's through history to become more engaged citizens in their communities. He joined MassCOSH in 2009 in an administrative role and quickly became involved in many of MassCOSH's programs (Teens Lead at Work, Healthy Schools Initiative and the Immigrant Worker Center) through health and safety trainings ( body and hazard mapping, workers rights, presentations, etc.) and helping directly in campaigns that directly impacted the most vulnerable workers from various communities in the city and state. More recently, Al has taken on a greater administrative role at MassCOSH where he will strengthen and create new relationships with partners and foundations that support our work. He has extensive experience working with coalitions (unions, community organizations, worker centers and government agencies), which are crucial to the work of MassCOSH and is key for the organization to be recognized in the community and have national visibility. Al was the Treasurer of the National COSH (The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health) Executive board for 4 years and is also a member of United Steel Workers Local 9358. His leadership has been recognized over the past 2 years as he was nominated to the Executive Board of the Massachusetts AFL-CIO, he received the 2015 League of United Latin American Citizens Man of the Year Award and just this fall was given the 2016 Tony Mazzocchi Award from the Occupational Safety and Health Section of APHA (American Public Health Association)
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms Milagros Barreto Worker Center Coordinator --
Ms Jenny Fernandez Youth Coordinator --
Ms Tolle Graham Labor & Environment Coordinator --
Mr Jeff Newton Communications and Membership Coordinator --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
OHS- Tony Mazzocchi Award American Public Health Association 2016
Man of the Year - Al Vega League of United Latin American Citizens 2015
-- American Lung Association 2014

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 8
Number of Volunteers 155
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 78%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 10
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms Elissa Cadillic
Board Chair Company Affiliation Boston Public Library
Board Chair Term Jan 2015 - Jan 2017
Board Co-Chair Antonio Nunes
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2016 - Jan 2018

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms Carol Bates Retired- OSHA Voting
Ms. Elissa Cadillic Boston Public Library/AFSCME Council 93 Voting
Ms Diana Ceballos Harvard University Voting
Mr Sean Flaherty Keches Law Voting
Ms Janiya Gethers-Pinckney Community Volunteer Voting
Mr Daki Grant Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Melissa King Daughter of worker killed on the job Voting
Ms Esther Loayza Community Volunteer Voting
Ms Nancy Luc 1199SEIU Voting
Ms Maritza Mandraque Community Volunteer Voting
Mr Shawn Nieheily Ironworkers Local 7 Voting
Mr Antonio Nunes Community Volunteer Voting
Ms Ann O'Connor Labor Management Cooperation Trust Voting
Ms Rachel Smit Fair Work P.C. Voting
Ms. Jessica Tavares [email protected] Voting
Ms Samara Walker Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 12
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 70%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2016 to Sept 30, 2017
Projected Income $924,745.00
Projected Expense $911,833.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $659,753 $987,755 $630,586
Total Expenses $891,011 $886,226 $815,713

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $405,120 $303,267 $188,310
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $405,120 $303,267 $188,310
Individual Contributions $216,024 $634,470 $388,717
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $36,566 $47,607 $51,569
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,043 $2,411 $1,990
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $788,305 $787,746 $698,246
Administration Expense $57,349 $40,122 $47,315
Fundraising Expense $45,357 $58,358 $70,152
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.74 1.11 0.77
Program Expense/Total Expenses 88% 89% 86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 6% 12%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $446,052 $672,542 $568,327
Current Assets $357,968 $581,392 $486,414
Long-Term Liabilities $5,000 $0 $5,000
Current Liabilities $75,634 $69,753 $68,342
Total Net Assets $365,418 $602,789 $494,985

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.73 8.34 7.12

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 1% 0% 1%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from Foundations and Corporations are listed under Individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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