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Hyde Square Task Force, Inc.

 30 Sunnyside Street
 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
[P] (617) 524-8303
[F] (617) 524-2747
http://www.hydesquare.org
info@hydesquare.org
Executive Director Dr. Celina E. Miranda
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INCORPORATED: 1991
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3118543

LAST UPDATED: 09/08/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

 

At Hyde Square Task Force, youth are at the heart of what we do. We believe youth have immense potential, yet at the same time research tells us that they face many obstacles.

When HSTF was founded in the late 1980s, a coalition of neighbors and community leaders felt a sense of urgency to address the violence and economic and social challenges facing the Hyde/Jackson Square neighborhood of Jamaica Plain. Today the neighborhood is known as Boston’s Latin Quarter, and while in some ways our community has transformed, many challenges persist.

HSTF now engages over 1,000 youth ages 6–25 in college and career preparation, Afro-Latin arts mastery and cultural enrichment, and community-building initiatives. In doing so, we ensure that youth have the arts and educational opportunities they need and deserve in order to be successful, and that their voices and cultures are valued and celebrated in Boston’s Latin Quarter and beyond.

Our work is guided by our mission: to develop the skills of youth and their families, so they are empowered to enhance their own lives and build a strong and vibrant community.


Mission Statement

 

At Hyde Square Task Force, youth are at the heart of what we do. We believe youth have immense potential, yet at the same time research tells us that they face many obstacles.

When HSTF was founded in the late 1980s, a coalition of neighbors and community leaders felt a sense of urgency to address the violence and economic and social challenges facing the Hyde/Jackson Square neighborhood of Jamaica Plain. Today the neighborhood is known as Boston’s Latin Quarter, and while in some ways our community has transformed, many challenges persist.

HSTF now engages over 1,000 youth ages 6–25 in college and career preparation, Afro-Latin arts mastery and cultural enrichment, and community-building initiatives. In doing so, we ensure that youth have the arts and educational opportunities they need and deserve in order to be successful, and that their voices and cultures are valued and celebrated in Boston’s Latin Quarter and beyond.

Our work is guided by our mission: to develop the skills of youth and their families, so they are empowered to enhance their own lives and build a strong and vibrant community.



FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,841,000.00
Projected Expense $1,840,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • ¡Accíon! Community Theater! (ACT!)
  • Musicians in Community (MIC)
  • Partnerships and Collaborations
  • Paths to College and Careers Program (PCCP)
  • Ritmo en Accíon (REA)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

 

At Hyde Square Task Force, youth are at the heart of what we do. We believe youth have immense potential, yet at the same time research tells us that they face many obstacles.

When HSTF was founded in the late 1980s, a coalition of neighbors and community leaders felt a sense of urgency to address the violence and economic and social challenges facing the Hyde/Jackson Square neighborhood of Jamaica Plain. Today the neighborhood is known as Boston’s Latin Quarter, and while in some ways our community has transformed, many challenges persist.

HSTF now engages over 1,000 youth ages 6–25 in college and career preparation, Afro-Latin arts mastery and cultural enrichment, and community-building initiatives. In doing so, we ensure that youth have the arts and educational opportunities they need and deserve in order to be successful, and that their voices and cultures are valued and celebrated in Boston’s Latin Quarter and beyond.

Our work is guided by our mission: to develop the skills of youth and their families, so they are empowered to enhance their own lives and build a strong and vibrant community.



Background Statement

Incorporated in 1991, Hyde Square Task Force (HSTF) is a nationally-recognized youth development nonprofit based in Boston’s Latin Quarter which serves over 1,000 youth from across the city each year. In the late 1980s, a coalition of neighbors, community leaders, and youth created HSTF to address the endemic violent crime, drug use, and economic and social challenges facing the urban neighborhoods of Jamaica Plain and Roxbury. For over 25 years, HSTF has been engaging children, teens, and young adults ages 6 to 25 in leadership development, college and career preparation and success, arts and cultural enrichment, school-based partnerships, and youth-led community building initiatives. Our work is guided by one fundamental belief: that we can support our youth to transform themselves, and we can support them as they transform our community into a dynamic and vibrant Latin Quarter. HSTF’s mission is to develop the skills of youth and their families so they are empowered to enhance their own lives and build a strong and vibrant urban community.

 

HSTF’s mission is to develop the skills of youth and their families so they are empowered to enhance their own lives and build a strong and vibrant urban community. To achieve its mission, HSTF provides a wide range of holistic programming and supports to our youth. HSTF’s primary goals are as follows:

Arts Mastery & Engagement: 100% of high school-age youth with become master artists in Afro-Latin dance, music, and social justice theater, which will motivate them to invest in their academic and professional future while also enriching our communities.

College & Career Success: 100% of high school-age youth will receive the academic and socio-emotional support and guidance necessary to graduate high school, enroll in college, and earn their post-secondary degree.

Community Building & Civic Leadership: 100% of high school youth and college students will receive the training and support to become civically-engaged and socially conscious adults who will be leaders in their communities. They will use these skills and their arts training to create spaces for community members to come together, and they will contribute their voices to our campaign to transform our neighborhood into Boston’s Latin Quarter.

 

 


Impact Statement

HSTF had an incredible 2016-2017 program year:

  • 1,210 children, teens, and adults engaged in HSTF programs
  • Youth received 1,200+ hours of college a career preparation programming
  • 100% of high school teens were successfully promoted to the next grade
  • 91% of graduating high school seniors enrolled in college or postsecondary training program.
  • Youth received 2,200 hours of arts programs run out of our Youth Community Development Center
  • HSTF youth co-wrote, co-produced, and co-directed El Barrio: Boston's Latin Quarter Musical, a ground-breaking artistic project; they are currently filming and editing a documentary of their artistic process. 
  • 50+ hours of public arts and cultural events in Boston's Latin Quarter neighborhood. 
  • 5,000+ audience members attended HSTF youth performances throughout Boston.

Needs Statement

Our three-year strategic plan identifies several key areas for investment and growth: 

  • Increasing our impact forand the community by refining our program model, documenting the impact of youth-led education and social action efforts, and better preparing our young people to be civically engaged adults.
  • Increasing our impact on Boston Public School students, by increasing the number of children served through school-based dance and music classes, and deepening our partnerships with Boston Public Schools.
  • Increasing the impact of HSTF alumni in their communities, through creating an alumni network, increasing alumni involvement in HSTF activities, and ensuring that at least 25% of alumni are civically engaged in their communities.
  • Increasing organizational sustainability by ensuring our funding base is diverse, enhancing branding and marketing efforts, and establishing strong internal and external systems for evaluation.

CEO Statement

With active partnerships with local schools, health clinics, community centers, and other youth-serving organizations, HSTF’s impact is community-wide – and our youth are at the center of all we do.  HSTF teens develop skills by leading community education efforts on the dangers of tobacco use and conduct exercise workshops with their peers.  They teach dance and promote literacy at neighborhood youth centers and after school programs.  They lead Summer Nights Out and Three Kings Day, events which celebrate culture and bring together residents of different backgrounds.  Our teen leaders also mobilize local youth and residents to make sure their voices are heard in decisions regarding housing, education, health, and public safety. 

Over the years, the efforts of our youth leaders have helped change the face of our neighborhood:  murals brighten walls at Jackson Square and Roxbury Crossing transit stations, local parks have received much-needed renovations, doves painted on sidewalks provide a symbolic message of peace, and vacant lots have been transformed by community-oriented development projects that have created storefront space for small businesses and affordable housing opportunities for low-income families.  An anchor in our community, HSTF was once again named “Best Non-Profit” in a 2012 poll conducted by the Jamaica Plain Gazette.

Our impact has extended far beyond Hyde-Jackson Square.  Our model for youth civic engagement, violence prevention, and “whole child development” has influenced peer organizations as well as policymakers and funders.  Our staff and youth are frequently called upon as experts and examples of effective youth community development.  Our youth-led community organizing efforts serve as case studies, which are taught in college courses and documented in textbooks and journals.  HSTF is also a key contributor in many city and statewide youth development initiatives, including JP Unidos / Jamaica Plain United, the Boston Youth Services Network, the Youth Violence Prevention Collaborative, and the Success Boston Initiative.

The United Way has called our work “cutting edge”.  In 2007, HSTF was presented with the prestigious “Coming Up Taller” Award by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, given each year to the top 15 arts and humanities-based programs in the country.  In 2011, the HSTF was proud to receive the Excellence Award in Advocacy from the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, the Bank of America Neighborhood Builder Award, and the Sun Life Rising Star Award.    

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- Citywide (please select all areas as well)

We are based in Hyde/Jackson Square on the border of Boston's Jamaica Plain and Roxbury neighborhoods. Our community is know as Boston's Latin Quarter.

It is also home to 20,000 youth aged 18 and under. Almost all of our youth attend Boston Public Schools and come from low-income backgrounds. The majority of these youth are Latino or African American. Many are immigrants or children of immigrants, and they speak Spanish as a first language. Most have a C-average in school or lower when they first come to HSTF.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts Education
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

¡Accíon! Community Theater! (ACT!)

ACT! youth use the art of theater to engage audience members in exploring questions and possibilities that are important to our community. With our new resident artist, Christina Marin, a performing arts faculty member at Emerson College and an active member of Escena Latina Teatro, and our Manager of Organizing and Policy initiative and HSTF alumna Vanessa Snow, 18 teens invest hours of theatrical training while providing showcases that engage residents and visitors. They use theatrical performances to create space for open dialogue, and encourage others to participate fully in the process of building a strong neighborhood and in creating a vision for a vibrant community! 
Budget  --
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Theatrical Performances Presenting
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success      
Program Long-Term Success     
Program Success Monitored By      
Examples of Program Success     

Musicians in Community (MIC)

MIC youth use Afro-Latin music to engage individuals and build a sense of community. Working with the resident artist, Cornell Coley of the band Afrika Gente, 35 youth complete a rigorous musical training which allows them to become better individual musicians. MIC youth also form musical ensembles to enchant diverse audiences. Music made by MIC teens will bring people of all ages to together in celebration and build vibrancy in the Latin Quarter and beyond!
Budget  --
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Music Composition
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success      
Program Long-Term Success     
Program Success Monitored By     
Examples of Program Success     

Partnerships and Collaborations

Learn Through Dance (LTD): HSTF is a widely-recognized leader in Afro-Latin performing arts and proudly provides dance instruction to many local BPS Schools during the school day. 

Music Clubhouse: In partnership with Berklee College of Music and Music & Youth Initiative, HSTF’s Music Clubhouse provides quality music instruction to 150 children and teens who have had little to no exposure to music education.

Dance: In collaboration with professional dancers from local dance companies, we will be able to provide close to 60 children and teens the opportunities to learn a variety of different Afro-Latin dances this year.
 
Boston Makerspace: Our latest collaboration with Boston Makerspace will bring technology to life at Hyde Square Task Force. Starting this year, children, teens and adults will engage in hands-on projects that use some of the cutting edge tech practices in computing, machinery, and digital and electronic art.
Budget  --
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Cultural & Ethnic Awareness
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success     
Program Long-Term Success     
Program Success Monitored By 

    


 

Examples of Program Success    

Paths to College and Careers Program (PCCP)

Through this intensive multi-year program, at-risk teens develop essential early college success skills through project-based learning as they work to build a better community, helping to engage hundreds of other youth through community-building activities as literacy tutors, health educators, arts instructors, and community organizers.  Teens benefit from on-going planning and exposure to college and receive one-on-one support from skilled staff and volunteer mentors.  After graduating high school, these youth are supported through college graduation utilizing our innovative peer-coaching model.  As a result of our long-term, holistic approach, 100% of the seniors enrolled in our intensive youth leadership development program graduate high school and enroll in college, and 80% are on target to graduate college within 3-5 years. 

Budget  $269,744.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Hispanic, Latino Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success 

As part of the process for developing our new three-year organizational strategic plan, we have articulated outcomes and activities for each of our programs over three years (July 1 2012-June 30 2015).  For JEA, our goals are as follows:

  • 90% of high school-enrolled youth are on track to be promoted and to graduate high school within a 4-year span. Indicators include good school attendance, good grades, and engagement in tutoring.
  • 100 % of graduating seniors will successfully be enrolled in college (2 year, 4 year, or certificate program).
  • 90% of college-enrolled youth are on track to graduate college (2 year, 4 year, and certificate program). Indicators include completed credits for graduation and receipt of degree/certificate.
Program Long-Term Success 

The overall goal of JEA is to support the personal, academic and college success of the youth living and/or going to school in Boston’s Hyde-Jackson Square neighborhood, located on the border of Jamaica Plain and Roxbury. 

Our long-term outcomes for youth success are:

  • Youth will succeed in school (grade advancement, high school graduation). 
  • Youth will enroll in and graduate from college.
  • Youth will engage in positive civic and community-building activities as adults.
Program Success Monitored By 

We track youth attendance and retention, retention in school and grade advancement, avoidance of negative behaviors, graduation from high school, progress in college, and college graduation.  We monitor youth mastery of project-based competencies such as critical thinking and organizational skills using the HSTF Youth Community Development Evaluation.  Youth complete research-based pre- and post-surveys measuring the impact of their civic engagement and mentoring activities.  Results are recorded in Efforts To Outcomes performance management software for reporting and analysis.   

Examples of Program Success 

Since 2003, 100% of our youth leaders have graduated high school and 80% have graduated from college within 3-5 years, far ahead of the BPS average, and earning HSTF recognition from Root Cause as a top performer in the area of college preparation and success.  Over the years, many have returned to HSTF as volunteers and staff members – currently 30% of our staff are alumni – continuing their commitment to supporting the success of the next generation of local youth.

To view an individual success story of one of our JEA leaders, Brian Nunez, please click on the "Documents" tab above.

Ritmo en Accíon (REA)

Youth build their mastery in Afro-Latin dance while participating in and leading projects that bring vibrancy to the Boston’s Latin Quarter and beyond. Under the direction of the resident artist, Angie Egea (professional dancer with Masacote Dance Company), and Program Coordinator and HTSF Alumna Jazmin Bernabel, 30 youth undergo hours of intense training in intricate choreographies that challenge their physical and mental stamina. REA teens become ambassadors of the culture and the art form when they perform and teach in the community – especially in spaces where Afro-Latin dance is considered a novelty. 

Budget  --
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Dance
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success     
Program Long-Term Success    
Program Success Monitored By     
Examples of Program Success     

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

HSTF has focused considerable time and attention to analyze and refine all components of existing programs, organizational structures, and processes. 


New program design elements include improved and expanded project-based learning activities, a more clearly-defined target population, and new points of entry for our youth. Youth leaders join one of our long-standing youth teams:  Ritmo en Acción (REA) youth dancers, Musicians in Community (MIC) musicians, and ¡Accíon! Community Theater (ACT!) actors.


We continue to refine our evaluation systems to better monitor youth progress on an on-going basis, and program regularly review our metrics on a quarterly basis. We believe these efforts are enhancing our ability to engage youth in our programs and help them to succeed.

New program design elements include improved and expanded project-based learning activities, a more clearly-defined target population, and new points of entry for beginning youthyouth leaders then join one of our long-standing youth teams:  Ritmo en Acción youth dancers, Health Careers Ambassadors, Youth Literacy Theater (formerly Youth Literacy Tutors), and Youth Community Organizers. 

We continue to refine our evaluation systems to better monitor youth progress on an on-going basis and use findings to respond to individual needs on a daily / weekly basis.

We believe these efforts are enhancing our ability to engage youth in our programs and help them to succeed.

 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Celina E. Miranda
CEO Term Start Aug 2016
CEO Email celina@hydesquare.org
CEO Experience

Celina has spent her career engaged in work that enables under-served communities to access the resources and opportunities they need for a better future. With more than a decade of experience in philanthropy, she has helped numerous Boston nonprofits secure funding in the service of their mission. She was a member of HSTF’s Board of Directors from 2009 through 2014, and she knows and shares our mission and values. Celina’s professional and educational background, along with her passion for youth, social justice, and education makes her uniquely suited to lead HSTF.

Celina joins HSTF from her position as Senior Program Officer at the Richard and Susan Smith Family Foundation, where she managed grants in education and economic mobility since 2012. Prior to this, she was the Vice President and Charitable Giving Manager for BNY Mellon Public Affairs, where she helped develop an initiative focused on youth aging out of foster care. As a Program Associate at the Hyams Foundation, she managed youth development grants and initiatives.

Celina teaches at Boston University School of Social Work, and is a trustee of the Rutland Corner Foundation, which supports girl-serving programs throughout Greater Boston. She was named a “Boston Latino on the Move” by the Boston Business Journal.

Celina recently received her Ph.D. in Social Work and Sociology from Boston University. Her dissertation research examined the integration of a positive youth development framework in community-based youth organizations. She earned an MSW and Ed.M. from Boston University, and a BA from Smith College in Latin American Literature and Latin American Studies.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr. Kim Comart Sept 2015 Aug 2016
Ms. Yi-Chin Chen Dec 2014 Sept 2015

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Enoes Andújar Director of Finance and Facilities Director of Finance & Facilities Enoes Andujar has been with the organization since 2004, first as ESOL Counsel/Office Coordinator and then as Manager of Finance & Facilities  before being promoted to Director in February 2011. She has a degree in Marketing and Administration from the Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic. Before joining the staff, she was a student in the Task Force’s former English as a Second Language Program. Enoes currently serves as a board member of English for New Bostonians, a public-private-community collaborative initiative with a mission to increase access to high-quality English language learning opportunities for adult immigrant residents of Boston.
Ms. Barbara Civill Director of Development & Communications
Barbara has been with HSTF since 2006 and began working as the Ritmo en Acción Coordinator in 2007. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Human Services and International Affairs from Northeastern University and has spent time studying in South Africa and Mexico. As the REA Coordinator, she was instrumental in planning the first annual Ritmo en Acción Cultural Showcase in 2007. She has also managed other Hyde Square Task Force arts programs, including Learn Thru Dance and the Music Clubhouse. She is dedicated to ensuring that young people have the chance to learn and grow through the arts. She has participated in the Boston Youth Arts Evaluation Project since 2008.
Ms. Brenda Rodriguez-Andújar Director of Arts and Cultural Programs

Brenda has been with Hyde Square Task Force since 2001. A graduate of Regis College, Brenda has more than ten years of experience working with low-income, minority, and immigrant youth and their parents. Prior to joining Hyde Square Task Force, Brenda worked as a teacher in the public school system, specializing in bilingual education. She also worked for three years as an educator for the Boston juvenile court system, where she designed and led programs with high-risk and first-time youth offenders. At Hyde Square Task Force, she is responsible for the development of the Ritmo en Acción youth dance Initiative, which started as a pilot program in 2002. Since the start of the program, it has grown to deliver comprehensive arts and cultural activities to more than 500 children each year. The success of the initiative earned it the prestigious Coming Up Taller Award from the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities in 2007. She was recognized as a Hero Among Us in 2008 by the Boston Celtics and was named one of the 2011 PowerMeter’s 100 most influential people in the Hispanic community in Massachusetts by El Planeta. Brenda uses her professional training and successes to continue to work and invest in the community of Jamaica Plain, where she grew up.

Dr. Kenneth Tangvik Director of Engagement and Organizing Director of Organizing & Engagement Dr. Ken Tangvik is one of the organization’s founding members. With twenty-five years' experience as an urban educator, Ken has a Doctoral Degree in Education, specializing in Literacy and Language Arts. He has taught in the Boston Public Schools, is currently a faculty member at Roxbury Community College, and has developed several award-winning programs at the HSTF over the past 15 years. Ken recently wrote a collection of urban short fiction entitled: Don’t Mess with Tanya: Stories Emerging from Boston’s Barriosthat was published by Aberdeen Bay Publishers. Many of the provocative stories in this book are based on experiences Ken had in working with youth at the Hyde Square Task Force.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Best Non-Profit Jamaica Plain Gazette 2012
MNN Advocacy Award Massachusetts Non-Profit Network 2011
Neighborhood Builder Award Bank of America 2011
Rising Star Award Sun Life 2011
Top 100 Places to Work in Massachusetts The Boston Globe 2011
Recognition as one of Boston's best college preparation and success programs Root Cause 2010
Super Civie MassVOTE 2009
Best of JP 2008: Non-profit Jamaica Plain Gazette 2008
Coming Up Taller Award President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities 2007
Coming Up Taller semi-finalist President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities 2006
Founder's Award Alternatives for Community and Environment 2006
Jamaica Plain's Best Nonprofit Jamaica Plain Gazette 2006
Community Leadership Award Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corporation's 2005
Public Health Hero Award The Boston Public Health Commission 2005
Teen Leadership & Achievement Boston's Afterschool for All Initiative 2005
Good City Civic Leadership Award The Boston Foundation 2004
2000 Progressive Leadership Award Commonwealth Coalition 2000
City Excellence Award Boston Management Consortium 1999

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
National Council of La Raza (NCLR) - Affiliate 2006
United Way Member Agency 2001
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations


HSTF partners with multiple stakeholders, including parents and other family members, teachers and guidance counselors, and higher education partners, in order to create a network of support for every teen. 

HSTF is a member of the Boston Youth Services Network (BYSN) and a founding member of JP Unidos / United, a resource and referral network comprised of 14 different youth-serving agencies in our community.  Through our youth-led community education activities, we partner with community centers and after school programs.  We work with several public schools through our school-based initiatives, including the Hennigan and Kennedy Elementary Schools, The English High School, Madison Park High School, Boston Green Academy, Boston Community Leadership Academy, and Fenway High School.  We are also a founding member of the Success Boston Initiative and have strong and effective working relationships with Success Boston partners including uAspire, Bottom Line, Posse Foundation, Freedom House, The Higher Education Information Center, and numerous higher education partners.  We work particularly closely with Bunker Hill Community College and Northeastern University, and host interns from Boston College, Berklee College of Music, Boston University, and other area colleges and universities.

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

HSTF is a high-performing community-based non-profit.  We have 15 full-time, 8 contract staff, and one part-time staff member. Historically more than a dozen program alumni have also served as HSTF staff members. We also employ over 100 teens through our year-round youth leadership programs.  

 

The Hyde Square Task Force is a community-based non-profit with 14 full-time and 5 part-time staff. Dr. Celina Miranda became Executive Director in August 2016, taking over from Interim Executive Director Kim Comart. She is supported by an experienced and dedicated team of four Program Directors, each of whom have served with HSTF for over a decade.

HSTF has developed an organizational Theory of Change which clearly defines how our program structure and activities are linked directly to our mission.  In addition, a Statement of Organizational Values articulates key values and expectations that are shared by staff and participants alike.  Job descriptions include responsibilities that correspond to these values and which are addressed during quarterly and annual employee reviews. 

HSTF has also been very successful in promoting staff to increasing levels of leadership and responsibility, using the same leadership development and peer mentoring approach that helps our teens succeed.  Several staff have advanced from entry level to higher level positions over the years, including Program Director Brenda Rodriguez-Andújar and Director of Finance and Facilities Enoes Andújar, who began at HSTF as an adult English language learner and part-time bookkeeper.  30% of HSTF staff are program alumni who have returned to HSTF to continue their commitment to building a better community.

HSTF’s youth development staff work together as a team. They meet weekly to discuss program successes and barriers, and they engage in quarterly and annual planning to promote enhanced service delivery and establish consistent, high-quality outcomes across all programs.

 

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 15
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 8
Staff Retention Rate % 96%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 9
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 11
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Mark L Saperstein
Board Chair Company Affiliation Consultant
Board Chair Term July 2016 - June 2017
Board Co-Chair Ms. Nashira Baril
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Boston Public Health Commisson
Board Co-Chair Term July 2016 - June 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Rob Arrieta JPMorgan Chase & Co. Voting
Mr. Nelson Arroyo Whole Foods Voting
Ms. Nashira Baril Boston Public Health Commission Voting
Mr. Enerio "Tony" Barros Senior Advisor on Neighborhood Issues to Mayor Martin J. Walsh Voting
Mr. Jonathan Block Block Properties LLC Voting
Ms. Galicia Escarfullery ABCD Jamaica Plain Head Start Voting
Mr. Carlos Garcia BayBoston LLC Voting
Mr. Gordon Gottlieb TDC Voting
Ms. Judi Haber MORE Advertising Voting
Ms. Enna Jimenez Eastern Bank Voting
Ms. Jane Matlaw Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Voting
Mr. Joe O'Farrell Harvard Capital Projects Voting
Ms. Damaris Pimentel Ultra Hair Salon Voting
Dr. Lorna Rivera Gaston Institute for Latino Community Development & Public Policy Voting
Ms. Anny Sanchez Boston Private Bank Voting
Mr. Mark Saperstein consultant (attorney, educator, photographer) Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 9
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 8
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

HSTF has a dedicated Board of Directors with extensive community-based experience and commitment.  The Board provides oversight to the entire organization and includes members with strong political, legal, financial and management skills.  Board President Mark L. Saperstein lives in Jamaica Plain has been on the Board since 2005, and he has been an active volunteer (and phenemenal photographer) since 2000. Vice-President Nashira Baril (Boston Public Health Commission), a former JP resident, has been on the Board since 2003. Treasurer Galicia Escarfully (ABCD Jamaica Plain Head Start) joined the HSTF Board in 2014 and is a proud alumna. Secretary-Clerk Jane R. Matlaw (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) serves on many boards and is in many community groups, and she is also a field instructor at the Boston College School of Social Work. 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $2,559,823 $1,265,392 $3,617,751
Total Expenses $1,961,848 $2,022,816 $2,800,294

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,267,086 $509,786 $1,349,779
Government Contributions $235,704 $93,568 $176,403
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $235,704 $93,568 $176,403
Individual Contributions $142,522 $315,398 $280,174
Indirect Public Support $174,471 $182,249 $189,117
Earned Revenue $126,796 $78,504 $100,470
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,439 $1,657 $1,808
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $610,805 $84,230 $1,520,000

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,379,950 $1,353,872 $1,832,299
Administration Expense $240,319 $306,947 $270,341
Fundraising Expense $135,799 $172,090 $236,649
Payments to Affiliates $205,780 $189,907 $461,005
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.30 0.63 1.29
Program Expense/Total Expenses 70% 67% 65%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 16% 12%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $4,398,118 $3,835,689 $4,649,271
Current Assets $1,993,865 $1,826,425 $3,331,348
Long-Term Liabilities $808,322 $814,340 $850,191
Current Liabilities $147,761 $177,289 $197,596
Total Net Assets $3,442,035 $2,844,060 $3,601,484

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose We hope to raise funds to fully renovate our Youth Community Development Center (YCDC), located in the historic Cheverus Building, into a fully accessible, safe, and vibrant space for our teens.
Campaign Goal $2,500,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates July 2012 - Jan 2017
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $2,500,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 13.49 10.30 16.86

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 18% 21% 18%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

HSTF has established strong and effective fundraising and financial management practices that have continued to sustain our operations despite a troubled economy.  We have more than 60 different sources of public and private funding, including many long-term funders, and are not dependent on any single revenue source.  We have developed strong and reliable financial management practices, including close oversight by our Director of Finance and monthly review by senior management and Board.  We maintain a strong cash flow and strive for a minimum 6-month cash reserve.  Our solid fiscal practices have earned us the role of fiscal agent for various program partnerships and community groups for funds totaling over $300,000 per year.   

It is part of our regular program and financial planning process to closely monitor expenses and fundraising performance and develop realistic contingency plans in the event of an expected shortfall.  This includes monthly review of financial statements, long-term cash flow projections, and careful analysis of fundraising performance. 

Like many non-profits, HSTF has responded to the economic downturn of recent years by reducing costs. We have done so without reducing services or eliminating programs; in fact, we have continued to expand services in the areas of college preparation and support, school partnerships, and arts and academic enrichment.  Key savings included our purchase in 2010 of the Cheverus Building (home to the HSTF Youth Community Development Center) which helped reduce our occupancy costs by approximately $5,000/month. 

We have a 3=three-year strategic plan which prioritizes developing and maintaining strong relationships with our funders to sustain our funding partnerships over time.  We are also increasing our efforts to secure individual donations, corporate sponsorships, and contract-for-service opportunities, which together make up about 20% of our current annual revenues. 

We are also in the early stages of a $6 million capital campaign in support of the renovation of the Cheverus Building, home to our youth community development programs since 2007.  

Please note that, as of July 2013, the Hyde Square Task Force has changed its fiscal year from January-December year to a July-June, to better reflect our annual program operations.  Our most recent audit covers the period July 1, 2014 - July 30, 2015. 

 

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data in the charts and graphs above is per the nonprofit's audited financials and reflects Hyde Square Task Force, Inc. (HSTF) only. In 2013, this nonprofit changed its fiscal year from a Jan. 1 - Dec. 31 fiscal year to a July 1 - June 30 fiscal year. As such, the FY13 990 and audit posted above reflect six months, Jan. 1, 2013 - June 30, 2013, and that data is not included in the charts and graphs. 
 
The Other revenue category, for FY16, FY15 and FY14, includes capital grants.
 
The Affiliate expense category for FY16, FY15 & FY14 includes grants to Jamaica Plain Arts and Civic Center, Inc. (JPACC). Per the FY14 audit, JPACC and HSTF are related through common Board control.
 
The administration expense category for FY16 and FY15 includes pre-development costs and impairment of donated artwork.
 

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

The mission of Hyde Square Task Force (HSTF) is to develop the skills of youth so that they are empowered to enhance their lives and build a strong, vibrant community in Hyde-Jackson Square, a neighborhood that is known as Boston’s Latin Quarter. Our vision is a dynamic, peaceful urban society where at-risk young people acquire the skills they need in order to succeed in life and to advocate effectively for themselves and their communities.

Our major organizational goal is to transform our urban community through transforming our teens. Our Jóvenes en Action (Youth in Action) model is a synthesis of youth development, arts/culture, community development and community organizing. Through their experience in our program, youth develop the life skills and knowledge to succeed in school and get into college. Drawing upon the proud Afro-Latin heritage of our community, our youth use art to develop artistic and leadership skills and a social consciousness as they engage community-based cultural projects, and in community organizing campaigns.

The target population for the recruitment of our core teens is 14-19 year olds who attend non-exam Boston Public high schools and have a C or lower average. These youth either live, go to school, and/or have roots in the Jamaica Plain and Roxbury neighborhoods. HSTF teens reflect the population of this area which is predominantly low-income Latino and African-American, with immigrants from Latin American, the Caribbean, and Africa.


HSTF knows it has achieved success in its youth programs when the individual lives of teens are positively changed and when our social justice campaigns impact both the Latin Quarter and Greater Boston.

Specifically, HSTF knows that it is succeeding with our teens when they:

1. Succeed in high school and college

2. Develop artistic skills in either dance, music or theater

3. Develop leadership skills

4. Engage themselves in community development and social justice work.

We will know we are successful in our community development work when:

  1. City and state-wide funding for arts programs increases.
  2. More public and private investments are made in Boston’s Latin Quarter.
  3. There are increased cultural offerings available to working families in Boston’s Latin Quarter.
  4. The Blessed Sacrament Church building is developed to include a performance/event space that is accessible to the community.
  5. HTSF Youth Community Development Center (YCDC) is renovated up to code and has greater capacity to serve more youth and their families
  6. The Latin Quarter of Boston is recognized as a destination similar to Chinatown and the North End.
  7. The $250 million Jackson Square Development project is completed and includes a major youth facility

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Teens, particularly the disengaged at-risk teens that HSTF recruits, have an abundance of energy and they need to discover an activity, a hobby, an interest into which they can invest physically, emotionally, intellectually and spiritually, which will provide empowerment as the navigate their challenging and critical adolescent years. We have found that arts provide this anchor that allows an at-risk teens to find their voice and then find joy and purpose as they undertake the work that arts demand.

We believe the power of arts can unleash Boston urban youths’ potential and creativity so they can take leadership in creating safe and vibrant communities. Arts provide adolescents a means to connect emotionally with others and deepen their understanding of the human condition. We are reminded daily how the arts allow youth to understand the value of personal drive and discipline as they develop their confidence and shine for themselves, their peers, their families, and their audiences.

Engagement in the arts ignites youth and with that spark, HSTF college prep staff channel the energy necessary to fire-up the youth motivation in school and envision their future as college students and civically engaged artists/citizens.

In addition to transforming individuals, the arts also transform communities. Having a vibrant arts and cultural scene makes a neighborhood safer and more interesting, livable and humane. Arts can positively change the trajectory of a community, spur economic growth and create warm, quality interactions among residents of all ages, and between residents and visitors. Critically, by encouraging our youth to embrace their Afro-Latin heritage through their art, they can root Afro-Latin culture firmly with our neighborhood, allowing the community to grow and flourish rather than gentrifying and dislocating our long-term, lower income neighbors.

The activities of the Hyde Square Task Force that support this community-based arts/cultural strategy are:

  • Teens develop their artistic and performance skills in either dance, music or theater.
  • Teens learn life and academic skills through having one-to-one mentors, receiving academic tutoring, college preparation, and college success/retention activities.
  • HSTF staff and youth organize a wide variety of cultural and community building activities in the Latin Quarter such as concerts, outdoor Zumba, Salsa street parties, and regular pop-art arts activities.
  • Teens engage in organizing community-based cultural activities and in social justice campaigns on issues related to their lives and the lives of their peers and family members.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

HSTF has a wealth of internal and external strengths that include the following:

A History of Success: As a community-based non-profit, HSTF has a 25-year history of transforming youth and transforming community. HSTF was formed in the late 1980s out of a community organizing initiative at a time when the Hyde-Jackson Square neighborhood was labeled the “cocaine capital of New England” by the Boston Police. Since then we have worked to develop a culturally and economically vibrant Latin Quarter. Our work is featured in a recent book published by Oxford University Press entitled Youth-Led Community Organizing, by Boston University Professor Melvin Delgado, who devoted a full chapter to describing the HSTF organizing model. There is also a chapter about HSTF organizing model in a recent book, Juvenile Justice: Advancing Research, Policy, and Practice by Francine Sherman and Francine Jacobs, published by John Wiley & Sons in 2011. Our youth organizers have made headlines through a wide range of provocative actions and organizing victories over the past 15 years in areas of affordable housing, youth-police relations, arts funding, community development, education and tobacco control.

Engagement in Arts and Culture: Over the years, we have found that the arts not only transform individual youth, but arts also create excitement, hope, and energy for the entire community. We have partnered with Tito Puente Latin Music Series, Meta Movement, Hacha y Machete Dance Company, Boston Ballet, Jose Mateo Dance Theatre, Arts Emerson, Honk Festival, Porch-Fest, the Connolly Library, Berklee College, and a multitude of artists and musicians to organize arts workshops and performances for thousands of residents each year. We have also partnered with over a dozen Boston Public Schools and several youth centers and childcare centers to deliver high-quality arts programming to hundreds of students during in-school time, after-school programming, and during the summer.

Location: HSTF is located in the heart of Boston’s Latin Quarter on the Blessed Sacrament Campus in Jamaica Plain and with youth, residents and local businesses, we have developed the following vision for this neighborhood:

· A safe, clean and economically, racially, linguistically, and culturally diverse neighborhood.

· A dynamic, diverse, locally-owned/managed business district that includes Latin foods, goods, services, and specialty shops.

· A hub for the development and celebration of Latin and Afro-Latin art that also creates cross-cultural artistic opportunities and supports emerging artists.

· A place for public art, open spaces and lively street cultural events that project a “Latin flavor” and enhance local businesses.

· The home of a thriving Arts/Cultural/Civic Center in the former Blessed Sacrament Church building that creates community through an exciting variety of events, programs, and activities.

· A stimulating destination for local residents, families and tourists where all feel welcome, energized, and engaged.

Ownership of Community Assets: HSTF owns the Cheverus Building, now called the HSTF Youth Community Development Center, where we run most of our programs. The building has become one of the major centers for Afro-Latin arts in the Greater Boston area. Also, HSTF owns the iconic Blessed Sacrament Church building – “The Jewel of the Latin Quarter” – and has plans to develop this building into an arts/cultural center with performance and event space.

Relationships with local residents and businesses: Many of our board members are local residents and small business owners in the Latin Quarter. HSTF has developed strong relationships with Hyde-Jackson Main Streets and the Hyde-Jackson Business Association through working on joint projects. In addition, HSTF is part of the Jackson Square Partners LLC, the entity that is overseeing the $250 million transit-oriented development in Jackson Square.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Each year we set specific indicators to monitor progress. For example, our current indicators are:

· 50% of teen artists (theatre, dance, music) will meet Level I artistic benchmarks

· 50% of teen artists (theatre, dance, music) will meet Level II artistic benchmarks
 
·Teen arts performances will reach 9,000 audience members per year in 85 performances

· 75% retention rate of YCD youth

· 100% of YCD youth on track to graduate on time

· 100% of seniors successfully enroll in post-secondary education

· 85% of college student graduate from college on time

· 40% of YCD youth engaged civically outside of HSTF program

· $1 million is invested in the Latin Quarter from private and public sources

· To track the progress on these indicators, we utilize:

· Tracking of youth high school report cards

· Tools to measure artistic skill development of youth

· The Youth Community Development Survey to monitor and evaluate leadership and life skills of teens

· Sale Force Cloud Database tracks all of our youth through their college years.

· Data that captures the number of cultural events and the people attending them in the Latin Quarter

· The amount of city, state, federal, and private resources dedicated to the development of the Latin Quarter

· The public policies and budgets changed as a result of our youth organizing campaigns.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Hyde Square Task Force has taken on many programs and activities to serve low-come youth and their families over the past two decades. At this point in time, we have focused and aligned our programs and we feel that we have developed a winning formula that we will continue to refine and improve. Our Jóvenes en Accion model simultaneously develops our individual youth while working to develop the community we call Boston’s Latin Quarter.

There are two areas in our youth development model that we need to further explore and clarify. The first is program flexibility. Many of our youth have to work extra jobs to help pay bills at home while others may choose to play a seasonal sport at their high schools. We need to figure out how to be as flexible as possible in the scheduling and other aspects of our programming to allow for maximum flexibility that is aligned with teen lives.

The second issue we need to revisit is our academic policy. Currently the youth are required to consistently improve their grades when they are with us. However, some youth, while excelling artistically in our arts programs, are not making immediate academic progress in their high schools. We need to find the right balance in this policy so that youth are both motivated to channel their new found energy into academics and are able to continue to participate in the arts programs.

In our community development work we have three major challenges:

  1. In our Capital Campaign for the Youth Community Development Center we have raised 78% towards our goal of raising $2.4 million. The challenges will be to raise the remaining funds and also find temporary program space during the construction period.
  1. HSTF recently purchased the iconic Blessed Sacrament Church and it will require between $5 million and $8 million in investment. We are currently seeking development partners for a mixed development that will include a performance/events space that is accessible to the local community.
  1. HSTF is part of the Jackson Square Partners LLC, which is overseeing a $250 million transit-oriented development in Jackson Square. One of the key pieces in this project is a recreational center that will have both an in-door turf field and a skating rink. This project will cost at least $20 million and only $6 million has been raised so far from the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, so there will need to be a major capital campaign and political support.