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Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.

 40 Baker Bridge Road
 Lincoln, MA 01773
[P] (781) 259-1177
[F] (781) 259-4877
www.lovelane.org
[email protected]
Megan Donovan
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INCORPORATED: 1988
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3139666

LAST UPDATED: 09/08/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

In a fun, supportive environment, Lovelane provides high-quality therapeutic horseback riding to achieve occupational, physical, speech, cognitive and other therapeutic gains, focusing on children with special needs.

Mission Statement

In a fun, supportive environment, Lovelane provides high-quality therapeutic horseback riding to achieve occupational, physical, speech, cognitive and other therapeutic gains, focusing on children with special needs.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,030,350.00
Projected Expense $1,030,350.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Barn Buddies
  • Lovelane Therapeutic Horseback Riding Program
  • Workshops and Partnerships

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

In a fun, supportive environment, Lovelane provides high-quality therapeutic horseback riding to achieve occupational, physical, speech, cognitive and other therapeutic gains, focusing on children with special needs.


Background Statement

Lovelane is a therapeutic horseback riding program that has a dramatic impact on the physical and cognitive development of children with special needs. For 27 years, Lovelane has been committed to providing an individualized program for children with special needs that integrates the pure joy and freedom of riding a horse with the appropriate therapy to achieve the child's specific therapeutic goals.

In 1992 Lovelane was incorporated as a non-profit and grew to become one of the most respected therapeutic riding programs in the area. A successful capital campaign in 2004 enabled the program to move into a permanent home designed exclusively for the special needs population. The facility includes indoor and outdoor arenas, a therapy room, office space, horse stalls and access to outdoor trails. The program more than doubled in size enabling more children to receive services. Today, the program is a testament to the dedication of the Lovelane families and supporters and the hard work of the children whose lives are so impacted by the therapy they receive. Currently, Lovelane provides services to 130 students a week with the help of nearly 200 volunteers.

Lovelane's Therapeutic Program includes 100 weekly 1-on-1 sessions with children whose primary diagnoses include, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, genetic disorders, autism spectrum disorders, hearing and vision impairments, spinal cord injuries, seizure and other neurological disorders as well as a range of developmental delays. Lovelane does not replace other therapies, but is instead an integral component of the child's overall treatment plan.

As our population tends to have multiple therapies, Lovelane integrates the whole child into the goals and objectives. And since children tend to stay in our program for multiple years, goals change. For example, an early goal may be to assist a child to move from walker to independence. Once achieved, a new goal may be to follow directions, practice social skills or ride a bike.

Lovelane currently has waiting list of 200 families. This clearly demonstrates both the need for this unique therapeutic approach, as well as the high quality services provided at Lovelane. Once in our program, children rarely leave before they age out as young adults.

In addition to the core program, 20-30 children join us weekly in an un-mounted therapeutic mentoring program called Barn Buddies; we also offer summer workshops and partnerships with local non-profits such as The Cotting School and The Perkins School for the Blind.

Recently, Lovelane’s strategic plans have focused on our goal of fully funding a long-term Sustainability Fund. This effort was launched in 2012 with the goal of establishing a 5 million dollar, board-advised fund that will serve as a safety net for unexpected capital expenses and help reduce our need to actively fundraise over half of our operating budget on an annual basis. The effort is nearly 90% of the way to its goal and, once funded, the Board of Directors will establish parameters and plans around its use and investment.


Impact Statement

Accomplishments for Fiscal Year Ending June, 2015: Lovelane workshops and Barn Buddies classes were all full to capacity. Twenty–two children moved off of the wait list and into the program.

New staffing and slight reorganization has rejuvenated development and business efficiency and procedures.

Goals for 2016: Introduce 16 month fundraising strategy with goals and measures. For the program, identify and hire two additional instructors and locate two additional horses for the program. Goal for 2017: Complete Sustainability campaign and reach $5 million goal. Continue to develop and strengthen Board of Directors, increasing depth of skill & expertise of membership. Continue to focus on staff development and continuing education opportunities.


Needs Statement

Lovelane’s most pressing need is to recruit top-notch therapists and license riding instructors who can successfully work in our one-on-one client/instructor setting with skill, safety, enthusiasm and creativity.

In addition to hiring the best teaching staff possible, Lovelane is in need of at least two more horses. As horses age or are need of retirement, Lovelane must make sure that a herd management plan allows for this and for replacement. Ideally, the therapeutic riding barn’s herd should be of a variety of breeds, sizes and gaits so that we can utilize different animals for the benefits of a variety of diagnosis.


CEO Statement

Debby Sabin is the Founder and Executive Director of Lovelane.  She is a licensed and registered Occupational Therapist and a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship and  Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor and Massachusetts Certified Riding Instructor.  She is a former Special Olympics Equestrian Coach.    "I continue to have great pride in what we have built here.  Our mission has remained as clear as ever and we continue to be, in the moment, about one child and his/her family.  It is about our goal to improve the lives of children with special needs - one child at a time.  We respond individually and creatively to the challenges that each family faces and encourage the whole family to become part of our team.  I am as inspired today as I was when I first began this work and I daily see hope light up in the eyes of a new parent as they watch their child accomplish things on horseback that they had previously thought impossible." -Debby Sabin

Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- Harbor Islands
City of Boston- West Roxbury
METROWEST REGION, MA
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
Lovelane serves children throughout the Greater Boston area, both within and outside of the Route 128 circle.  Children come from 34 cities and towns including but not limited to: Somerville, West Roxbury, Waltham, Watertown, Lexington, Newton, Weston, Wellesley, Winchester, Arlington, Acton, Ashland, Belmont, Brookline, Cambridge, Hingham, Needham, Concord & Framingham.  Children from the entire area are welcome and tuition assistance is available.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Barn Buddies

In addition to the core program, 20-30 children join us weekly in an un-mounted therapeutic mentoring program called Barn Buddies.
Budget  $37,780.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Birth Defects, Genetic Disorders & Developmental Disorders
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  For those students who yearn for more than therapeutic riding or those who are not yet ready to be on horseback, Lovelane also has a highly successful unmounted program. ‘Barn Buddies’ meets twice weekly for two hours and offers our students the opportunity to work in the barn with the horses. The program focuses on communication skills, social pragmatic skills, taking responsibility, pre-vocational skills, team work and the chance to bond with fellow program participants as well as the horses in the barn. Eighty-six percent of students go on to the core program where they stay an average of eight years.
Program Long-Term Success 

Programmatic success is documented partially by ongoing enrollment and the extremely small turnover of students. 


Program Success Monitored By 

At intake, we review referral forms from physicians and other therapists. When permission is granted, our instructors will often reach out to physicians to discuss specific activities or issues. We ask parents to provide us with an ‘in your own words’ document which tends to outline both clinical goals and more personal issues and hopes. Lovelane has had children whose clinical goals will include increasing muscle tone, balance and strength but whose family goals might include learning to ride a bike, walking unaided across a stage to receive a diploma or even simply to make a friend.

Instructors track progress towards established goals. Goals are re-evaluated each year and progress reports are distributed to parents. Lovelane also recognizes that there is a significant diminution of services during the late teen years. For this reason, we will continue to provide services to children as long as services are deemed appropriate and helpful by the family and our staff.

Programmatic success is documented partially by ongoing enrollment and the extremely small turnover of students. Much of the success of therapeutic riding is anecdotal. Because our students have multiple interventions, conclusive evidence of the efficacy of one modality is difficult to obtain.
Examples of Program Success 

The positive feedback from parents, teachers, and therapists documented in annual surveys, verifies Lovelane’s impact on our students and their families. Every day at Lovelane we continue to be inspired by the individual progress made by the children we serve, and we are inevitably motivated by their therapeutic gains and personal accomplishments.


Lovelane Therapeutic Horseback Riding Program

Lovelane currently provides therapeutic riding sessions to more than 100 students between the ages of 2 and 22 years old. We serve more than 36 greater Boston area communities. Our students have a wide range of special needs, such as autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, impaired hearing and vision, spinal cord injuries, cancer, or rate genetic disorders. We currently have a waiting list of more than 150 children. The turn-over is very low, so the wait can be long. All our instructors are MA licensed riding instructors and most are certified by PATH International. We have more than 100 active volunteers who assist with the lessons to ensure the safety of the riders.
Budget  $887,751.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Birth Defects, Genetic Disorders & Developmental Disorders
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

Lovelane’s core programming consists of weekly, year-round, one-on-one therapeutic sessions on horseback for 100 students. In the course of a year, Lovelane provides over 4000 individual lessons. A licensed therapeutic riding instructor works closely with the family and other therapeutic and medical professionals to define specific clinical goals dependent on diagnosis. Most of the children served at Lovelane live in a world that focusses on all that they cannot do, at Lovelane, our staff assumes success and our students receive a resounding message of “Yes, you can!”

Emotionally the impacts of therapeutic riding are vast, from the success of overcoming fear and anxiety, to the ability to achieve a degree of independence and the powerful self-confidence that comes from mastering a skill and controlling a 700lb animal. Mounted sessions improve range of motion, joint mobility, trunk control, muscle tone, strength, fine and gross motor skills, spatial awareness, speech and language skills and self-esteem. When astride a moving horse, the three-dimensional stride of the horse stimulates the rider and emulates a human's gait. Therapeutic riding uses this movement to work the muscles of the rider and sessions focus on occupational, physical, and/or speech therapies, helping to improve balance, strength, tone, and endurance.

Lovelane does not replace other therapies, but is instead an integral component of the child's overall treatment plan. Therapeutic riding is a growing discipline and a sought-after therapy for a broad range of special needs. It has the respect of the medical community; patients are regularly referred to the program by their physicians. Therapeutic horseback riding is recognized for its success meeting the individual goals of children with a variety of physical, social, cognitive and emotional disorders in the ring and transferring these successes to the child’s life at home and at school. Our objective is to improve each child’s quality of life by incorporating the joy of riding, the emotional impact of working with animals, the freedom of movement that is inherent in this activity and the well-documented clinical successes of therapeutic activities on horseback.

Program Long-Term Success 

With the variety of diagnosis seen at Lovelane, each instructor aims to continually increase measures, gains and goals in conjunction with each individual child and their family to have the greatest impact on the quality of the child’s life. Students who come to Lovelane tend to stay at Lovelane for many years so initial goals once met, often change as the child develops. A child who came to the program to gain strength and coordination to be able to walk might later need social pragmatic skills to encourage confidence to start first grade. Another may want to learn to ride a bike or be interviewed for a first job. These desires can be addressed on horseback through personalized lessons with instructors or therapists. The role that Lovelane can play in a family’s life doesn’t stop in the ring. Instead, the goals worked on at Lovelane are transferable to each child’s life at home and in school.

Because children tend to stay in the program for multiple years, the goals change. A child's early goals may be to move from walker to independent walking and later might be to work on how to interview for a first job, make a friend or ride a bike. This is how Lovelane's one-on-one approach becomes valuable in the life of a child and his/her family. Lovelane takes a "whole" approach and works on life goals within the weekly therapeutic goals.
Program Success Monitored By 

All Lovelane students have documented physical, cognitive or developmental disabilities. Together with families and medical/therapeutic practitioners, we develop individualized, goal-oriented plans for each child. We are committed to providing 1-on-1 sessions (vs. groups) as each diagnosis has its own set of challenges and each child has his/her own goals. An exception might be two students working on socialization skills and treating them in tandem if appropriate. This is most effective with children on the Autism spectrum. The individualized nature of our therapeutic sessions allows the 'therapy team' to bond. Lovelane students have the same instructor and volunteers weekly. We find that this consistency dramatically improves outcomes.

At intake, we review referral forms from physicians and other therapists. When permission is granted, our instructors will often reach out to physicians to discuss specific activities or issues. We ask parents to provide us with an ‘in your own words’ document which tends to outline both clinical goals and more personal issues and hopes. Lovelane has had children whose clinical goals will include increasing muscle tone, balance and strength but whose family goals might include learning to ride a bike, walking unaided across a stage to receive a diploma or even simply to make a friend.

Instructors track progress towards established goals. Goals are re-evaluated each year and progress reports are distributed to parents. Lovelane also recognizes that there is a significant diminution of services during the late teen years. For this reason, we will continue to provide services to children as long as services are deemed appropriate and helpful by the family and our staff.

Programmatic success is documented partially by ongoing enrollment and the extremely small turnover of students. We have children who have been riding at Lovelane for as long as 22 years. Much of the success of therapeutic riding is anecdotal. Because our students have multiple interventions, conclusive evidence of the efficacy of one modality is difficult to obtain. There are, however, many studies published to the overall impact of therapeutic riding.

Examples of Program Success 

Staff and families report astonishing results; children taking first steps, saying first words, making eye contact, seizures abating and extraordinary increases in muscle tone and strength.

“Emma” has cerebral palsy and had been largely confined to a wheelchair as using her walker was overwhelming and exhausting. After working hard to increase her flexibility and strength, she participated in our annual fundraising road race, walking the ½ mile kid’s fun run using only her walker. Her parents credit therapeutic riding.

“Tomas” was adopted from South America after having been brutally physically abused and abandoned. He sustained such traumatic brain injuries that his delays are significant. He will likely never speak but the staff at Lovelane worked hard to teach him some signs in order to communicate. His mother witnessed his first ‘word’ which was the sign for ‘more’ in his effort to prolong his time on horseback. His mother tearfully realized that it was the first time he had ever truly been able to communicate a clear need to anyone.


Workshops and Partnerships

Lovelane offers summer workshops and partnerships with local non-profits such as The Cotting School and The Perkins School for the Blind
Budget  $12,900.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Birth Defects, Genetic Disorders & Developmental Disorders
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Workshops allow Lovelane to segment weeks of both riding and barn management activities by pairing children to benefit socially, grouping children to create a diverse environment and adding components in which Lovelane riders can pair with their typically development siblings to have the rare opportunity to show off their skill --to share their "expertise" of riding and equine management.
Program Long-Term Success  Workshops allow Lovelane to introduce our programs to other non profits who provide alignable services for children with disabilities. It also allows us to share our programs with typically developing youth creating, we think, a more inclusive-minded generation.
Program Success Monitored By  Lovelane has an excellent safety record and has been able to sell out all weeks provided for workshops and collaborations.
Examples of Program Success  Students who have been introduced to Lovelane through the Perkins School for the Blind, for example have joined our core program and can ride without sight at the canter and over jumps. We have also recruited many students who once participated in our workshops to become part of our volunteer corps.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Challenges facing our organization are that within the next 5 – 10 years, a transition plan will need to be implemented. Work on this has begun but a failed attempt three years ago created problems for the company in both change management and morale that cost the company in money and donors as well as momentum towards goals. Since then and for a variety of reasons, all upper management staff has been replaced and a new culture of cooperation has risen to be the new management spirit. From here the company is in a better position to create a transition plan that defines a timeline, persons involved and pro-active response. In the meantime, donors are being introduced to and cultivated by staff other than the Executive Director so that those relationships can become strong and less reliant on one person. It also points to the fact that donors with a long time loyalty to the current Executive Director will need to be in on the transition plan and that their desires be heard. It should not be expected that all of these donors will continue once a new management team is in place (although there is plans for these conversations too) but new donors will need to be found and that loyalty distributed towards the brand, the staff, the quality of work and the overall culture of Lovelane rather than a relationship with one person.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Debby Sabin
CEO Term Start Dec 1988
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Ms. Sabin is the Founder and Director. She is a Licensed and Registered Occupational Therapist and a Licensed Horseback Riding Instructor (MA) and PATH International Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor. She is a former Special Olympics Equestrian Coach.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Deb Anthony Aug 2013 Mar 2014

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Megan Donovan Director of Business Administration and Finance --
Mr. Stephen Doyle Finance and Accounting Manager --
Ms. Eliza Wall Director of Development --
Ms. Lisa Williams Volunteer Coordinator and Assistant Program Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Strategy in Marketing Award Massachusetts Non Profit Network 2015

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) - Accreditation 2015

Collaborations

Lovelane collaborates in programming with the Cotting School and the Perkins School for the Blind.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

An opportunity and a challenge for Lovelane is that children tend to stay in the program for years and the turnover in clientele is very small. This speaks to the efficacy of the work and the love for and loyalty to the program from our families but it also means that our pool of donors does not grow very quickly so a challenge is to introduce what we do to a new audience. Identifying new donors, cultivating them and having them are ambassadors for our work is a main focus of the next 3-year strategic plan. The business/development team has written a strategic plan that breaks this multi-step process down into measureable and attainable goals.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 21
Number of Volunteers 200
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 95%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 20
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 20
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr Gustav Beerel
Board Chair Company Affiliation Customized Energy Solutions
Board Chair Term Jan 2015 - Jan 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Gretchen Albertinie Elementary School Teacher Voting
Mr. Gustav Beerel B Energy Group Voting
Mr. Wil Catlin Real Estate Voting
Ms. Kathleen Collins MSPCA Voting
Ms. Beth Creavin Harvard Pilgrim Voting
Mr. John Downing Convexity Voting
Mr. Mark Julien Kronos Voting
Ms. Winky King Dog Watch, Inc. Voting
Ms. Rose Ann Miller Harvard Graduate School Voting
Ms. Susan Payne Volunteer Voting
Ms. Debby Sabin Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Voting
Ms. Joanna Schmergel Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Joe Silva MSPCA Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Lynn Dayton Dayton Home NonVoting
Ms. Corinne Grousbeck Grousbeck Family Foundation NonVoting
Mr. Brian Kelly Autism Speaks NonVoting
Ms. Kim Pallotta Community Volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Elsie Rodney Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program NonVoting

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. Allie Schwartz MD Mass General NonVoting
Harry Webster MD Tufts Medical Center NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 2
Other (if specified): 1 persons with disabilities
Gender Female: 8
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 40%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Compensation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Succession planning on the board and on the staff will be our key focus over the next two years. While adding depth to our instructor pool, cross training administrative and program staff will allow the next leaders to take on more supervisory roles. For the board, skill sets will need to be added to the board while continuing to engage those with exceptional institutional knowledge.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,030,350.00
Projected Expense $1,030,350.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audited Financials

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,134,563 $1,728,710 $1,803,598
Total Expenses $1,221,202 $1,761,376 $1,341,704

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $548,622 $269,656 $480,905
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $512,277 $518,057 $531,731
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-27,481 $122,095 $546,239
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $78,266 $791,798 $210,931
Revenue In-Kind $24,897 $42,593 $38,078
Other $-2,018 $-15,489 $-4,286

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $808,970 $810,584 $887,751
Administration Expense $243,840 $234,472 $198,352
Fundraising Expense $168,392 $716,320 $255,601
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.93 0.98 1.34
Program Expense/Total Expenses 66% 46% 66%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 27% 67% 37%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $7,708,395 $7,828,371 $7,944,798
Current Assets $4,733,328 $4,685,633 $4,617,319
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $367,683 $401,020 $484,781
Total Net Assets $7,340,712 $7,427,351 $7,460,017

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
Grousbeck Trust $60,000.00
Allyson & Edward DeNoble $160,101.00
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
Daniel Revers $50,000.00
Daniel and Lise Revers $150,000.00
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
The David P. Wheatland Charitable Trust $27,500.00
Kim and Jim Pallotta $125,100.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 60.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 12.87 11.68 9.52

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

A fundraising event called The Hoedown is held biennially showing a severe increase in fundraising costs every other year. The income from this event is spread out for operations for the two year period.  And while it is listed that Lovelane does not have a traditional endowment, Lovelane does have a board advised sustainability fund currently at 5.1 million. The spending plan allows for interest to be used for emergencies, capital or operational expenses. This fund does have a spending plan which designates a cap of 4%, and is applied to the trailing 12 quarter average market value. Lovelane has not needed to inititate the spending plan. 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Lovelane provides one-on-one, individually designed therapeutic sessions for children with special needs, focusing not only on physical, occupational and cognitive goals but by attending to the "whole child. Primary diagnoses among the 130 weekly students include, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, genetic disorders, autistic spectrum disorder, cancer, as well as physical and developmental delays. Students range in age from 2 – 22.

When astride a moving horse, the three-dimensional stride of the horse stimulates the rider and emulates a human's gait. Therapeutic riding uses this movement to work the muscles of the rider and sessions focus on occupational, physical, and/or speech therapies, helps improve balance, strength, tone, and endurance.

Lovelane has always been mission driven and focused on pediatrics which means that quality is our constant. Our programming success comes from hiring the best therapists and therapeutic riding instructors and using an athletic, well-trained herd. Because students tend to stay in our program for eight years or more, goals for that individual change. What may have been a desire to move from walker to more independence may be achieved at which time, the new goal may be to make a friend or ride a bike.

Lovelane has been in operation since 1988 and although the program has grown to serve over 130 per week, Lovelane has grown to capacity. The parameters of space, number of horses and available land means that growth is not our long-term plan. Our long term plan is to devote our energies towards improving the lives of and making a dramatic impact on each and every child who comes to Lovelane.

A waitlist of over 200 speaks to the desire in our community for this type of therapy and its growing acceptance by the medical community.

Lovelane is $4.3 million towards a $5 million goal in a board advised sustainability fund. Once reached the board will implement a spending policy from which our annual budget may be funded, or capital expenditures paid for or emergencies paid for with the interest from the funds in the sustainability account.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Completing our sustainability campaign will increase Lovelane’s reserve fund to $5 million. Interest income of $250,000 annually can supplement our annual operating budget. We are then able to re-invest our own earned income into the program and better secure our long-term future. This puts our focus on the children in the ring; our mission.

This business model reduces fundraising expenses, increases staff efficiency and allows for more of our energies to be put into our mission.

We must continue to care for our ten-year-old, state-of-the-art facility to keep it in impeccable condition for years to come. This plan will better prepare Lovelane for the unexpected. And, as is always our priority, this plan allows Lovelane to continue our commitment to providing financial assistance.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Lovelane has a successful track record for fundraising having completed a $5 million capital campaign to build and move into the facility it now inhabits. In addition to this, Lovelane has raised and invested $4.3 million towards its $5 sustainability goal—the final $700,000 is definitely within reach by 2017. Efforts towards completion include major donor cultivation and plans for a successful Hoedown which is a fundraiser held every two years. This fundraiser has raised as much as $400K in the past and monies raised beyond the goal are put towards sustainability. A new look at the Hoedown and some new strategies for improving attendance, sponsorship opportunities and tighter scrutiny of the expense budget will allow for greater possibility of success. Along with that, a new development/business team is finding a new approach to donor cultivation through research, database examination, a wider net of communication and social media. This active approach means the development/business staff is engaged in the concept of completing the fund. However, if all fundraising stopped, with the investment return rate of 5%, Lovelane would still meet its goal within three years.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

All Lovelane students have medically documented physical, cognitive or developmental disabilities. Together with families and medical/therapeutic practitioners, we develop individualized, goal-oriented lesson plans for each student. We are committed to providing 1-on-1 sessions (vs group) as each diagnosis has its own set of challenges and each child has his/her own set of goals. Parents are encouraged to bring their child's other health practitioners to a lesson so that we can integrate methods that they are using into the lessons we are providing.

Occupational therapists on staff visit a variety of lessons weekly to determine if there are other resources or techniques required for the individual, providing the instructor that outside eye with a medical background. Notes are written on each lesson for each student. Medical documentation is required each year so that we can ensure that riding is not nor has become a contraindication to the diagnosis. Instructors write notes after each session and track progress towards established goals. Goals are re-evaluated each year and progress reports are distributed to parents. Lovelane also recognizes that there is a significant diminution of services during the late teen years. For this reason, we will continue to provide services to children as long as services are deemed appropriate and helpful by the family and our staff.

Finally, parents are asked to respond to an annual satisfaction survey and staff pays close attention to all feedback in an effort to improve services.

Staff and families alike report astonishing results; children taking first steps, saying first words, making eye contact, seizures abating and extraordinary increases in muscle tone and strength.

Programmatic success is documented partially by ongoing enrollment and the extremely small turnover of students. We have children who have been riding at Lovelane for as long as 22 years. Much of the success of therapeutic riding is anecdotal. Because our students have multiple interventions, conclusive evidence of the efficacy of one modality is difficult to obtain. There are, however, many studies published to the overall impact of therapeutic riding.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

To acquire the level of quality that Lovelane expects to achieve each day requires a well-trained, professional staff of therapists and riding instructors who have the advanced skill and horsemanship along with a knowledge base of therapeutic interventions to get the most out of each lesson. Such employees are hard to find. Although Lovelane pays a higher wage than many similar organizations, the work is intense, the applicant pool is small and replacing instructors is difficult. In addition to this, finding horses who can tolerate this type of work is also a challenge. We bring horses in on a trial basis but sometimes horses find that after six months, they just aren’t suited to the job. A herd of athletic, healthy horses of different sizes and gaits is necessary for a successful program. An efficient, cost-effective way to find and keep staff and horses has not yet been accomplished nor has an idea been developed to tackle the issues.