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Fenway Community Development Corporation

 70 Burbank Street
 Boston, MA 02115
[P] (617) 267-4637 x 25
[F] (617) 267-8591
http://www.fenwaycdc.org
itan@fenwaycdc.org
Iris Tan
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INCORPORATED: 1973
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2666507

LAST UPDATED: 04/01/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Fenway Community Development Corporation (CDC) is a membership organization that works to achieve greater residential stability and diversity in the Fenway neighborhood primarily aimed at meeting the needs of low- and moderate-income residents. We envision the Fenway as an urban village - a model of smart growth and sustainability where both residential and institutional neighbors thrive. Toward this end, we seek to capitalize on the opportunities and address the challenges arising from the Fenway's unique concentration of world-renowned institutions, which are important drivers of the regional economy.

Mission Statement

Fenway Community Development Corporation (CDC) is a membership organization that works to achieve greater residential stability and diversity in the Fenway neighborhood primarily aimed at meeting the needs of low- and moderate-income residents. We envision the Fenway as an urban village - a model of smart growth and sustainability where both residential and institutional neighbors thrive. Toward this end, we seek to capitalize on the opportunities and address the challenges arising from the Fenway's unique concentration of world-renowned institutions, which are important drivers of the regional economy.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $634,166.00
Projected Expense $865,812.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Civic Engagement and Community Organizing
  • Housing Development and Preservation
  • Resident Services & Workforce Development

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Fenway Community Development Corporation (CDC) is a membership organization that works to achieve greater residential stability and diversity in the Fenway neighborhood primarily aimed at meeting the needs of low- and moderate-income residents. We envision the Fenway as an urban village - a model of smart growth and sustainability where both residential and institutional neighbors thrive. Toward this end, we seek to capitalize on the opportunities and address the challenges arising from the Fenway's unique concentration of world-renowned institutions, which are important drivers of the regional economy.

Background Statement

Fenway CDC was founded in 1973 as a response to a string of threats to the neighborhood:
- A flawed urban renewal plan
- An arson-for-profit ring that claimed five lives
- Pressures from institutional expansion, widespread condo conversions, and displacement
- The elimination of rent control in a context of rapidly rising housing costs
- Plans for the construction of a large baseball stadium into the residential area

Success Track Records
Housing Program
1) Developed and preserved nearly 600 mixed-income homes for about 1,500 residents
2) Created the first housing in the U.S. set aside for people with AIDS and HIV

Community Organizing and Planning
1) Trained resident leaders to make positive changes in their neighborhood
2) Led a campaign involving residents to prevent the demolition of Fenway Park and initiating a charrette where nationally known architects, planners, and engineers worked with the community to devise renovation plans. Many were later adopted by the Red Sox.
3) Engaged stakeholders in a campaign to save Bus 55 from being eliminated by the MBTA in West Fenway for two years. This benefited residents, neighborhood employees and visitors, who come from other neighborhoods to the Fenway to learn, work, or play.
3) Collaborated with stakeholders to ensure that Northeastern University increased student dormitory beds from 0 to 1,000 in their 10-year master plan to prevent potential displacement of local residents due to rising rental costs
4) Worked with stakeholders to promote improvement of the Inclusionary Development Policy (IDP) to ensure accountability of affordable housing funds, and saw success when $29M was transferred from the Boston Redevelopment Authority to the Dept. of Neighborhood Dev.

Economic Development
Since 1994, Fenway CDC partnered with the employers in the Longwood Medical and Academic Area to form the workforce development program “Walk to Work”. This program was established out of a need for free career counseling, job placement, education and training referrals, and career advancement services for Fenway residents with no other resources available to them.

Resident Services
Fenway CDC has served over 2,000 residents through counseling, support services and educational programs.

Fenway Family Coalition
In 1994, Fenway CDC launched the Fenway Family Coalition (FFC) to provide families and children with educational, health, and cultural activities, to prevent them from living in isolation.


Impact Statement

Fenway CDC’s 2013 Accomplishments:
1. Housing Development and Preservation
  • Renovated 36 homes at 64-70 Burbank Street, Boston 
  • Managed 259 homes serving 451 residents 
  • Expanded service area to include Suffolk, Norfolk, Essex, Middlesex, and Worcester 
2. Workforce Development and Resident Services 
  • Helped 35 people access job skills training and placements, and education advancement 
  • Served over 50 people through housing counseling and financial literacy
  • Provided counseling support to help over 100 residents solve tenant-landlord issues 
  • Engaged more than 100 families in Fenway Family Coalition community events 
3. Community Planning and Organizing
  • 180 residents shared neighborhood issues through survey 
  • Advanced Fenway's Urban Village Plan in affordable housing; institution impact; transportation options; and access to community and green space, to improve well-being of residents 
  • Prevented potential displacement of local residents from transient-oriented students by collaborating with stakeholders to gain major improvements in the Northeastern University Master Plan, including the requirement to build 1000 dormitory beds. 
  • Promoted improvement of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA)'s Inclusionary Development Policy (IDP) to ensure better oversight and use of affordable housing funds. A major outcome was the transfer of $29 million of IDP funds from BRA to the Dept. of Neighborhood Development. 
2014 Goals:
1. Increase and preserve the stock of mixed-income housing
2. Educate resident leaders to make positive changes in their neighborhood
3. Promote the improvement of Inclusionary Development Policy to ensure accountability for affordable housing funds
4. Update the Fenway’s Urban Village Plan with community needs and share with public and private stakeholders
5. Improve the well-being of residents through counseling and accessing human services, workforce development program, and education advancement
 

Needs Statement

Fenway CDC is looking for new donors and investors in our work.
1. Our real estate development program creates and preserves new stock of mixed-income housing to meet the increasing needs of low- and moderate-income people.
2. Our civic engagement program educates and trains resident leaders to solve community issues and improve the quality of life of residents (affordable housing, institution impact, transportation, access for people with disabilities, arts and culture, and access to community space and green space).
3. Our workforce development helps low-income residents access adult education, ESOL, job skills training, job placement services, and advance their education. Resident services program helps vulnerable residents access food, shelter, utilities, any other human services to stabilize their life.
4. General operating funds help sustain and expand our operation infrastructure to support programs and services to serve more people in the future.

CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement

Your philanthropic support to the Fenway CDC helps us to continue our work, improve the quality of life of low- and moderate-income residents, and build a vibrant Fenway where you may live, learn, work, or play. As we expand to serve new geographies, we take with us 41-years of success track record. It is truly rewarding for us to see the joy and appreciation of families and individuals who have benefited from our programs and services. This is possible because of our broad base of supporters like you who help us advance our mission!



Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore

Fenway CDC's housing program serves Suffolk, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, and Worcester counties. Our civic engagement, workforce development, and resident services program serve residents from the Fenway and other Boston neighborhoods. 
  

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  2. Housing, Shelter - Housing Development, Construction & Management
  3. Human Services - Family Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Civic Engagement and Community Organizing

Fenway CDC has been at the forefront of community-based planning since the late 1980s with notable success. We have the history of collaboration with community residents, area non-profits, issue-specific interest groups, local institutions, elected leaders, and others to build resident engagement and community power to build a more inclusive and sustainable future for the Fenway. As issues emerge from residents, we help connect different constituencies to organize campaigns that address these issues and challenges. Our activities are guided by a diverse and inclusive coalition that includes individuals and families of low and moderate-income, immigrants, the disabled, community partners and others.
Budget  $158,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
In the short-term, Fenway CDC will continue to educate resident leaders and provide them with the tools (network, process, and knowledge) to solve community issues independently.  
Our resident-led working groups work to improve the following areas:
Affordable housing
Institutional impact
Community and green space, arts and culture
Transportation options and access for people with disabilities
Business community
 
 
 
 
Program Long-Term Success 
In the long-term, Fenway CDC envisions a engaged community of residents, neighborhood businesses, and institutional partners that work collaboratively to build a productive economy. Through civic engagement, community stakeholders have opportunities to share their voices about issues in the neighborhood and participate to make positive changes that improve the quality of life for all.
Program Success Monitored By 

Our community planning efforts will be measured by the number of positive community outcomes achieved, the number of resident leaders trained, and the number of successful community partnerships forged for project development.

Our community organizing efforts will be measured by the number of service-learning programs continued or created in partnership with local institutions, the number of resident leaders trained the number of at-risk residents benefitted from tenant organizing work, and the advancement of our Inclusionary Housing Policy work.
Examples of Program Success 
Through civic engagement, the Fenway CDC has successfully collaborated with residents and community stakeholders to make major improvements in the Northeastern University's Master Plan to include the requirement to build 1,000 student dormitory beds. This prevents displacement of local residents due to the transient students and rising rental costs. 
 
Fenway CDC has played a key role in advocating for improvement of the city's Inclusionary Development Policy to ensure accountability for usage of affordable housing funds for citywide neighborhoods. We saw success when $29M of IDP funds was transferred from Boston Redevelopment Authority to the Department of Neighborhood Development to support affordable housing projects. 
 

Housing Development and Preservation

To date, Fenway CDC has developed nearly 600 units of affordable housing, or 16% of the neighborhood’s affordable housing supply. The majority of our housing units are affordable to families and individuals earning 60% or less than the area median income (AMI). We work closely with local institutions, local government, residents, and private developers to forge partnerships and seek out affordable housing opportunities. Our affordable housing contributed greatly to the neighborhood’s racial and ethnic diversity, with nearly 60% of our units occupied by ethnically diverse minority residents.
Budget  $228,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
Fenway CDC continues to work to provide low- and moderate-income people with safe and affordable homes.
 
During the next five years, the Fenway CDC plans to develop and preserve affordable housing in and beyond the Fenway neighborhood. We will refinance and renovate our Fenway properties located at 71 Westland Avenue and 15-25 Hemenway Street projects. Additionally, we will seek one or two additional properties to add to the Fenway CDC portfolio. We will also continue to seek opportunities to build a pipeline of two to three additional projects in this same five-year period.  
 
Currently, the Fenway CDC is working to develop a residential building with 17 new housing units and preserve a building to create 8 units. Additionally, we are overseeing 7 residential properties with 259 units.

 

Program Long-Term Success 
Fenway CDC's long-term goal is to create or preserve new stock of mixed-income housing to meet the increasing needs of low- and moderate-income people.
 
In July 2013, the Fenway CDC board voted to expand our development area beyond the Fenway to help us meet the challenge of high acquisition costs and competition for locally available property. Enlarging our footprint will allow us to seek out opportunities in other neighborhoods and communities. Our plan is to find and forge collaborations where our experience and skill can add value to the development of a property or enhance a partner’s ability to develop. Our expanded service area includes Suffolk, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, and Worcester counties.
Program Success Monitored By 

Our housing development and preservation work will be measured by the number of people housed, the number of housing units preserved or created, the quality of asset management to ensure residents have safe and affordable homes, and the number of community, institutional and private development partnerships developed.

Examples of Program Success 

Fenway CDC's success track record included development and preservation of near 600 mixed-income homes for thousands of residents. Fenway CDC also created the first subsidized housing in the U.S. set aside for people with AIDS and HIV. 



Resident Services & Workforce Development

Our Resident Services and Workforce Development Program enhance the ability of our residents to pursue goals, maintain stable housing, overcome barriers to success, achieve self-sufficiency, and improve overall quality of life. Through housing counseling and social service support, we empower residents to achieve self-sufficiency and maximize their full potential. The Fenway Family Coalition provides positive role models to youth and support to families and parents raising children and teens in the Fenway. We organize health, educational and cultural events, and activities to improve the wellbeing of residents. Many of these services are provided on site and with multi-lingual options that reflect the diversity of our residents.
Budget  $107,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

Our Program's Short-Term Success:  

Activity 1: Life Stabilization

1.1 Participants will access social benefits or services with assistance from our Resident Services staff to ensure residents are receiving all benefits for which they are eligible.

Activity 2: Education and Employment Skills/Job Readiness

2.1 Each participant will develop a professional résumé and cover letter, complete 20 hours of job searching per week, and participate in 1 to 3 hours of employment counseling. For example, participants may receive services related to interview preparation, how to apply for jobs, job readiness skills, placement assistance, etc.


Activity 3: Economic Stability

3.1 Fifty percent of the participants will secure employment. Participants will increase number of hours worked and/or increase their hourly wages. Residents who do not gain permanent employment will register with a temporary placement agency.

Activity 4: Tenant Advocacy Related Services

4.1 Participants will make tangible progress towards completing the tenant education, financial literacy workshops, life skills workshops, and home-buying workshops to develop healthy habits, improve money management skills, and learn how to deal with life’s adversities more effectively.

Program Long-Term Success  Residents will become financially self-sufficient and lead a healthy and positive life through the education, support services, and counseling provided by the Fenway CDC.
Program Success Monitored By 

Resident Services and Workforce Development Program Success Measurements 

Life Stabilization work will be measured by the number of participants who are able to access one or more social benefits services (e.g., Food Stamps/WIC, Housing Vouchers, SSDI, Health Insurance/Medicaid, Fuel Assistance, Childcare Vouchers and Providers, etc.).

Our work in education and employment skills/job readiness will be measured by the number of participants who develop professional résumés and cover letters, who complete 20 hours of job search per week, and who attend 1 to 3 hours of employment-related counseling sessions (e.g. interview preparation, how to apply for jobs, information about basic skills necessary for employment, placement assistance, etc.).

Economic Stability work will be measured by the number of participants who secure employment, who increase the number of hours worked or increase their hourly wage, or who register with a temporary employment agency.

Our success with Tenant Advocacy will be measured by the number of participants who make tangible progress towards completing the tenant education, financial literacy workshops, life skills workshops, and home-buying workshops to develop healthy habits, improve money management skills and learn how to deal with life’s adversities more effectively.

Examples of Program Success 
A quote from Natasha Similien, a program participant:  
"I do not think I would have realized my dream or succeeded and accomplished most of the things I have done without the support services from the Fenway CDC." The program promotes familiy stability and economic self-sufficiency through job readiness, life coaching, training, education, and help in accessing community resources such as housing, fuel assistance, food stamps, and other referrals."

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director . Presently Transitioning
CEO Term Start --
CEO Email itan@fenwaycdc.org
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Richard Giordano Civic Engagement Director Richard Giordano is an experienced community organizer, program director, and former aide to elected officials. He has worked as a community organizer for the Massachusetts Association of CDCs and the HOME Coalition. He has also worked for a State Representative, a Senator and two Boston City Councilors. He is an elected board member of two Community Development corporations for over 20 years and believes that residents need to have an active role in their communities and in government.
Lisa Soli Housing Director

Lisa joined the housing department of FCDC in 2007 after 12 years as a Fenway CDC board officer. With twenty years’ experience in banking before transitioning to asset management and housing development, Lisa manages the FCDC real estate portfolio and works closely with our lenders and investors, contractors, the private development community and FCDC residents. Lisa holds a Bachelor’s degree from Washington University in St. Louis and a Masters in City Planning from Boston University.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporation

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Fenway CDC collaborates with stakeholders from the public and private sectors for our community development work. Our working partners in 2013 comprises of:
Allston Brighton CDC
American Consumer Credit Counseling
Bay Cove Human Services
Berklee College of Music
Boston ABCD
Boston Children’s Hospital
Boston LISC
Boston Tenant Coalition Boston University
Burbank Apartments Tenant Association
Career Collaborative
CEDAC
Chinese Progressive Association
City Life/Vida Urbana
Fair Housing Center of Greater Boston
Fensgate Cooperative
Fenway Health
Greater Boston Legal Services
Harvard Legal Aid Bureau
Harvard Medical School
Hotel Commonwealth
The Hyams Foundation, Inc.
Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corporation
Join for Justice
Ladies Resident Association, at Our Lady’s Guild House
Massachusetts Alliance of HUD Tenants
Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
Mass Senior Action Coalition
Massachusetts Shine Metropolitan Boston Housing Partnership
MIT Department of Urban Studies & Planning
Museum of Fine Arts Neighborhood Access Group
Northeastern University
One Family Scholars Program
Operation P.E.A.C.E.
Roxbury Community College (RCC)
Saint Cecilia Parish Simmons College
Timothy Smith Network (TSN)
United South end Settlements
Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts
Wentworth Institute of Technology
YMCA International Learning Center

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The organization in the midst of an executive transition so there is no executive at this time.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 45
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 71%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Asian
Gender Female: 4
Male: 1
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms Louvere Walker
Board Chair Company Affiliation MathWorks
Board Chair Term June 2014 - June 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ryan Boxill Steward Health Care Voting
Brian Clague Fensgate Chambers Voting
Nikki Flionis MissionSafe Voting
Katherine L Greenough Audobon Circle Neighborhod Association Voting
Gregory Paulson Haig Community Volunteer Voting
Nilda Hughes Community Volunteer Voting
Andre Jones Hillway Realty Voting
Rosie Kamal Community Volunteer Voting
Romin Koebel Retired Voting
John LaBella Housing.Net Voting
Callike Watkins Liu Simmons College Voting
Richard Pendleton Harvard Medical School Voting
Katia Powell American Heart Association Voting
Mallory Rohrig Operation P.E.A.C.E. Voting
Eric Tindahl Oasis Guest House Voting
Louvere Walker MathWorks Voting
Matthew Wildman People's United Bank Voting
Steve Wolf Stantec Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Asian
Gender Female: 9
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Housing and Community Development
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Fenway CDC serves a unique residential neighborhood surrounded by world-renowned institutions. As we continue to see the vibrancy of the neighborhood, we also witness increasing low-and moderate-income families and individuals facing pressures from the rising rental cost and struggle to overcome barriers to move out of poverty.
 
When neighborhood or community issues are identified, Fenway CDC works with stakeholders from the public and private sectors to solve the problems through community development services, education, advocacy, community planning, and civic engagement.
 
Fenway CDC works to improve the quality of life of low- and moderate- income people by providing mixed-income housing, with access to amenities such as public transportation, education, healthcare, and arts and cultural activities. We also help them become gainfully employed through job skills training and job placements with institutions in the Longwood Medical and Academic Area. Our support services help them advance their education and career, and access healthcare resources and services for their children/youth.
 
Fenway CDC deeply engages residents and community stakeholders in our work to build a healthier neighborhood. We have over 200 dues-paying members, who reflect the community’s diversity, with low and moderate-income residents and people of color well represented. Members elect the 18 member volunteer board of directors at our annual meeting, as per our organization's by-law and board governance information. There are eight board committees, namely Executive Committee, Finance Committee, Housing Development Committee, Civic Engagement Committee, Urban Village Planning Committee, Fenway Family Coalition Committee, Residents Advisory Committee, and the Nominating Committee. The board and the eight committees meet monthly/quarterly, and they are involved in ongoing planning and oversight of the organization’s work. The community stakeholders assess the needs of the neighborhood and sets strategic direction for the organization’s work, and evaluation of board members.
 
 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $634,166.00
Projected Expense $865,812.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

Audit Documents

2013 FCDC Audited Financial Statements

2012 FCDC Audited Financial Statements

2011 FCDC Audited Financial Statements

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $897,595 $1,186,764 $939,973
Total Expenses $739,144 $769,897 $675,180

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $36,500 $47,824 $63,028
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $36,500 $47,824 $63,028
Individual Contributions $160,277 $100,389 $188,983
Indirect Public Support $28,592 -- --
Earned Revenue $495,971 $776,842 $567,530
Investment Income, Net of Losses $8,418 $6,127 $2,840
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $132,832 $82,788 $108,791
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $35,005 $172,794 $8,801

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $420,313 $517,889 $509,753
Administration Expense $220,381 $155,066 $165,427
Fundraising Expense $98,450 $96,942 $0
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.21 1.54 1.39
Program Expense/Total Expenses 57% 67% 75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 27% 42% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $11,109,615 $11,074,189 $10,854,965
Current Assets $2,356,202 $2,556,455 $1,568,646
Long-Term Liabilities $4,785,750 $4,907,330 $5,163,634
Current Liabilities $121,926 $123,371 $43,945
Total Net Assets $6,201,939 $6,043,488 $5,647,386

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 19.32 20.72 35.70

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 43% 44% 48%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Fenway CDC's board of directors established an unrestricted board-designed reserve fund in 2010. The fund supports and pays for any special initiative or opportunity, and the organization's operation deficits for the year.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Fenway CDC has developed a five-year Community Investment Plan in 2013 and submitted it to the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development.  

Housing Development and Preservation

To date, Fenway CDC has developed and preserved nearly 600 units of affordable housing, which constitute 16% of the neighborhood’s affordable housing supply. About 57% of our residents earn less than 30% of the area median income (AMI).

Goal 1: Expand Housing Development and Preservation

During the next five years, the Fenway CDC plans to develop and preserve affordable housing in and beyond the Fenway neighborhood to serve the increasing needs of low- and moderate-income people.

Goal 2: Expand Service Area

In July 2013, the Fenway CDC board voted to expand our development area beyond the Fenway to help us meet the challenge of high acquisition costs and competition for locally available property. Enlarging our footprint will allow us to seek out opportunities in other neighborhoods and communities. Our plan is to find and forge collaborations where our experience and skill can add value to the development of a property or enhance a partner’s ability to develop. Our expanded service area includes Suffolk, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, and Worcester counties.

Community Planning and Organizing

As issues emerge from residents, we help connect different constituencies to organize campaigns that address these issues and challenges. Our activities are guided by a diverse and inclusive coalition that includes elders and families of low and moderate-income, immigrants, the disabled, community partners and others.

Goal 1: Building Community Leadership Capacity

Build community leadership capacity by engaging residents and emerging leaders and empowering them with the knowledge and tools to make positive change in their neighborhood.

Goal 2: Updating the Fenway’s Urban Village Plan

Update the Fenway’s Urban Village Plan that was created in 1999 by Fenway CDC. This resident-led plan, which features the needs of the community, will be shared with private and public entities when planning and evaluating development proposals throughout the Fenway and comment on them in the City’s formal review process.

Goal 3: Equitable Inclusionary Housing Initiative

Fenway CDC has taken the lead on efforts to reform and improve policies to ensure the development and preservation of affordable housing. We continue to advance our work on behalf of low and moderate-income residents to ensure affordability in all neighborhoods of Boston and the surrounding areas.

Goal 4: Tenant Organizing

Improve the quality of life of residents through education and creating collective power by working together in groups, unions, associations, and coalitions.

Resident Services and Workforce Development Program

Our services and programs help to enhance the ability of our residents to pursue goals, maintain stable housing, overcome barriers to success, achieve self-sufficiency, and improve overall quality of life.

Goal 1: Life Stabilization and Well-being

Residents will attain the life conditions needed to take steps toward greater economic stability and well-being.

Goal 2: Education and Employment Skills/Job Readiness

Residents will gain the job skills and educational credentials needed to secure and retain living wage employment.

Goal 3: Economic Stability

Residents will increase their job-readiness skills to enable them to participate successfully in the labor force.

Goal 4: Tenant Services

Residents will access to social benefits, case-management, and service referrals.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Fenway CDC's work aligns with the larger community vision and strategy. Our Community Investment Plan activities are aligned with the Community Vision and Strategy through our partnership with residents and stakeholders, integration of processes and sharing of resources. We also ensure that our activities are aligned with the work of the Department of Housing and Community Development, the Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and Health Resources In Action, an organization that aims to improve healthy lives and sustainable communities.  
 
Our community planning and housing development program activities address affordable housing, mitigating impact of institutional expansion, development of neighborhood businesses, community safety, quality of life improvements, home ownership, gentrification, and protecting assets from predatory lending practices. These issues are critical in transforming our vulnerable Fenway neighborhood into a strong, viable community. Our workforce development program collaborates with social service and community organizations to improve job access and quality employment for low-income residents. Our Resident Services focus on maximizing income and increasing residents’ future financial assets and the wealth of low-income families. We provide housing counseling, training on financial literacy, provide information on affordable consumer financial services, and assist residents in planning for future home ownership. We also provide services that help residents build, repair, and leverage credit as well helping locate affordable housing.
 
Our Financing Strategy consists of expanding real estate projects, expanding funding sources, strengthening and increasing existing funding, and improving operational efficiency. 
 
 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Collaborative Efforts to Support Implementation
 
Housing Development and Preservation
Fenway CDC continues to forge partnerships with private developers and institutions to increase the stock of mixed-income housing. We will provide housing expertise to working partners in the Suffolk, Norfolk, Essex, Middlesex, and Worcester counties. Additionally, we continue to advocate for improvement of the city's Inclusionary Development Policy to ensure accountability in the usage of affordable housing funds in Boston neighborhoods.
 
Civic Engagement and Community Planning
Fenway CDC continues to build community leadership capacity by conducting community meetings and trainings for residents and stakeholders through Fenway's Urban Village Committees. We impart knowledge and tools (framework, process, system, and policies) to empower our residents and stakeholders to make positive changes in the neighborhood.
1) Affordable Housing: A sufficient and varied housing supply
2) Transport and Access: Increase public transportation and improved access for the disabled
3) Community Space, Open Green Space, and Arts & Culture Working Group: Improve community facilities and access, maintain open green space, and provide access to local cultural institution
4) Institutional Impact: Mitigate the risk of gentrification which may displace residents
5) Business Community: A healthy business community serving local residents and visitors, while providing employment opportunities.
 
Resident Services
Fenway CDC has developed partnerships and collaborations with the following local non-profits and other Community Based Organizations: ABCD Parker Hill/Fenway Neighborhood Service Center, Career Link, Jewish Vocational Services, Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, YMCA International Learning Center, Career Collaborative, United South End Settlements, Northeastern Center of Community Service and The Work Place. These partnerships create a network of support throughout Boston. These partnerships also provide localized career and life-stabilization services to Fenway residents as well as helping residents secure the training and employment services necessary to secure employment in the Boston area and ensure long-term success in their fields.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?