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Fenway Community Development Corporation

 70 Burbank Street
 Boston, MA 02115
[P] (617) 267-4637 x 25
[F] (617) 267-8591
http://www.fenwaycdc.org
itan@fenwaycdc.org
Iris Tan
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INCORPORATED: 1973
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2666507

LAST UPDATED: 06/19/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Fenway Community Development Corporation (Fenway CDC) exists to build a future which is economically vibrant, culturally diverse, and holistically healthy for all residents of the Fenway neighborhood.

Mission Statement

Fenway Community Development Corporation (Fenway CDC) exists to build a future which is economically vibrant, culturally diverse, and holistically healthy for all residents of the Fenway neighborhood.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,077,262.00
Projected Expense $1,223,914.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Civic Engagement and Community Organizing
  • Housing Development and Preservation
  • Resident Services & Workforce Development

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Fenway Community Development Corporation (Fenway CDC) exists to build a future which is economically vibrant, culturally diverse, and holistically healthy for all residents of the Fenway neighborhood.


Background Statement

Fenway CDC was founded in 1973 and responded to the following threats in the neighborhood:
- A flawed urban renewal plan
- An arson-for-profit ring that claimed five lives
- Pressures from institutional expansion, widespread condo conversions, and displacement of residents
- The elimination of rent control in a context of rapidly rising housing costs
- Plans for the construction of a large baseball stadium into the residential area

Success Track Records
Housing Program
1) Developed and preserved over 600 mixed-income homes for thousands of residents
2) Created the first housing in the U.S. set aside for people with AIDS and HIV

Community Organizing and Planning
1) Trained resident leaders to make positive changes in their neighborhood and improve lives of other residents
2) Led a campaign involving residents to prevent the demolition of Fenway Park and initiating a charrette where nationally known architects, planners, and engineers worked with the community to devise renovation plans. Many were later adopted by the Boston Red Sox.
3) Engaged stakeholders in a campaign to save Bus 55 from being eliminated by the MBTA in West Fenway for two years. This benefited residents, neighborhood employees and visitors, who come from other neighborhoods to the Fenway to learn, work, or play.
3) Collaborated with stakeholders to ensure that Northeastern University increased student dormitory beds from 0 to 1,000 in their 10-year master plan to prevent potential displacement of local residents due to rising rental costs
4) Worked with stakeholders to promote improvement of the Inclusionary Development Policy (IDP) to ensure accountability of affordable housing funds, and saw success when $29M was transferred from the Boston Planning & Development Agency to the Dept. of Neighborhood Development.

Economic Development
Since 1994, Fenway CDC partnered with the employers in the Longwood Medical and Academic Area to form the workforce development program “Walk to Work”. This program was established out of a need for free career counseling, job placement, education and training referrals, and career advancement services for Fenway residents with no other resources available to them. Fenway CDC placed hundreds of residents into jobs of diverse sectors.

Resident Services
Fenway CDC has served thousands of residents through housing-relating services, counseling, support services and educational programs.

Fenway Family Coalition
In 1994, Fenway CDC launched the Fenway Family Coalition (FFC) to provide families and children with educational, health, and cultural activities, to prevent them from living in isolation.


Impact Statement

2016 Fenway CDC's Accomplishments

Housing Development and Preservation

1. Worked to acquire 52 homes at Burbank Gardens to protect residents from displacements and served 450+ residents by providing affordable homes and housing-related services

 

Resident Services and Workforce Development

2. Provided 241 services to help program participants access job skills training, employment, and education advancement opportunities

3. Provided 219 services to help residents access food stamps, food pantries, case management follow-up, financial education and tenant counseling, and health services

 

Civic Engagement

4. Educated residents and resident leaders and achieved 438 community engagements through planning and organizing on topics relating to affordable housing and gentrification

Fenway’s Fair Foods

5. Distributed 1627 bags of fresh produce to community residents to promote healthy food access.

 

2017 Fenway CDC's Goals

Housing Development and Preservation

1. Continue to provide low- and moderate-income residents with affordable homes and housing-related services

2. Collaborate with private developers and institutions to establish housing partnership

Resident Services and Workforce Development

3. Improve the economic and social well-being of families and individuals by providing social support services, job readiness training and placements, and education and career advancement opportunities

Civic Engagement

4. Develop resident leaders through education and civic engagement and train them to tackle neighborhood issues (eg: gentrification) to improve the quality of life of all community residents

Fenway’s Fair Foods

5. Provide affordable and fresh produce to community residents to promote food accessibility and healthy living


Needs Statement

Fenway CDC is looking for new donors and investors in our work.

1. Our real estate development program creates and preserves new stock of mixed-income housing to meet the increasing needs of low- and moderate-income residents.

 

2. Our civic engagement program educates and trains resident leaders to solve community issues and improve the quality of life for residents (affordable housing, institution expansion impact, transportation access for people with disabilities, access to community space/green space/arts & culture, and improve business community).

 

3. Our workforce development program helps low-income residents access adult education, English Language courses, job skills training and placement, and education advancement programs. We help vulnerable residents access food, transition housing, childcare, utilities, and essential services to stabilize their life.

 

4. General operating funds help to sustain and expand our operation infrastructure to support programs and services to serve more residents.


CEO Statement

Message from Leah Camhi, Executive Director of Fenway CDC

Thank you for your interest and support of our work. With your help, Fenway Community Development Corporation is able to improve the economic and social well-being of over 1,000 adults, children, and youth each year. The escalating costs in housing rental and ownership continue to pose challenges for low- and moderate-income families and individuals in the Fenway neighborhood. Unless residents live in affordable homes, they can lack resources to pursue opportunities in education, training, employment, and healthy living. 2016 was an exciting year! Despite facing the challenges of limited land and high cost to build, Fenway CDC successfully worked with the property owners and city and state officials to create an agreement to purchase Burbank Gardens in the Fenway. This will allow us to rehabilitate 52 homes and protect the residents from displacement, as well as preserve the long-term affordability of this mixed-income development. Our housing development and preservation program also provided 450+ residents with homes that are affordable. We helped vulnerable residents to access social services and financial education to stabilize their life. We connected residents with job skills training, employment, and opportunities for education advancement. We launched a Fenway Fair Foods program to give residents access to low-cost, fresh produce and nutrition education. Through civic engagement, Fenway CDC educated and prevented at-risk residents from displacement or becoming homeless. Finally, with an eye toward the future, we collaborated with program partners to suggest improvements in the city’s housing policy, with the goal of creating housing to meet the increasing needs of low- and moderate-income residents. For over 44 years, Fenway CDC has improved the quality of life of thousands of families and individuals in the Fenway and Boston’s surrounding neighborhoods. Through strengthening our partnerships and collaborations, we continue to build a healthier community where residents, institutions, and businesses thrive together. 

Board Chair Statement

Message from Gregory Haig, Board President of Fenway CDC 

Your philanthropic support to the Fenway CDC helps us to continue our work, improve the quality of life of low- and moderate-income residents, and build a vibrant Fenway where you may live, learn, work, or play. As we make progress in our work, we take with us 44-years of success track record. It is truly rewarding for us to see the joy and appreciation of families and individuals who have benefited from our programs and services. This is possible because of our broad base of supporters like you who help us advance our mission!



Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore

Fenway CDC's housing program serves Boston, Suffolk county of Massachusetts. Our civic engagement, workforce development, and resident services program serve residents from the Fenway and other Boston neighborhoods. 
  

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  2. Housing, Shelter - Housing Development, Construction & Management
  3. Human Services - Family Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Civic Engagement and Community Organizing

Fenway CDC has been at the forefront of community-based planning since the late 1980s with notable success. We have the history of collaboration with community residents, area non-profits, issue-specific interest groups, local institutions, elected leaders, and others to build resident engagement and community power to build a more inclusive and sustainable future for the Fenway. As issues emerge from residents, we help connect different constituencies to organize campaigns that address these issues and challenges. Our activities are guided by a diverse and inclusive coalition that includes individuals and families of low and moderate-income, immigrants, the disabled, community partners and others.
Budget  $213,132.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
In the short-term, Fenway CDC will continue to educate resident leaders and provide them with the tools (network, process, and knowledge) to solve community issues independently.  
 
Our Fenway's Urban Village Committee meets monthly to discuss issues relating to the following areas:
- Development of affordable housing
- Mitigating institutional and development impact
- Access to community and green space, arts, and culture
- Transportation options and access for people with disabilities
- Business community
 
 
 
 
Program Long-Term Success 
In the long-term, Fenway CDC envisions a engaged community of residents, neighborhood businesses, and institutional partners that work collaboratively to build a productive economy. Through civic engagement, community stakeholders have opportunities to share their voices about issues in the neighborhood and participate to make positive changes that improve the quality of life for all.
Program Success Monitored By 

Our community planning efforts will be measured by the number of positive community outcomes achieved, the number of resident leaders trained, and the number of successful community partnerships forged for project development.

Our community organizing efforts will be measured by the number of service-learning programs continued or created in partnership with local institutions, the number of resident leaders trained the number of at-risk residents benefitted from tenant organizing work, and the advancement of our Inclusionary Housing Policy work.
Examples of Program Success 
Through civic engagement, the Fenway CDC has successfully collaborated with residents and community stakeholders to make major improvements in the Northeastern University's Master Plan to include the requirement to build 1,000 student dormitory beds. This prevents displacement of local residents due to the transient students and rising rental costs. 
 
Fenway CDC has played a key role in advocating for improvement of the city's Inclusionary Development Policy to ensure accountability for usage of affordable housing funds for citywide neighborhoods. We saw success when $29M of IDP funds was transferred from Boston Redevelopment Authority to the Department of Neighborhood Development to support affordable housing projects. Fenway CDC also collaborated with other non-profits to suggest improvement in the City's Inclusionary Development Policy to ensure that developers contribute substantial affordable housing units or funds for their developments.  
 

Housing Development and Preservation

To date, Fenway CDC has developed over 600 units of affordable housing, or more than 15% of the neighborhood’s affordable housing supply. The majority of our housing units are affordable to families and individuals earning 60% or less than the area median income (AMI). We work closely with local institutions, local government, residents, and private developers to forge partnerships and seek out affordable housing opportunities. Our affordable housing contributed greatly to the neighborhood’s racial and ethnic diversity, with nearly 60% of our units occupied by ethnically diverse minority residents.
Budget  $288,700.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
Fenway CDC continues to work to provide low- and moderate-income people with safe and affordable homes.
 
During the next five years, the Fenway CDC plans to develop and preserve affordable housing in the Fenway neighborhood. We will refinance our Fenway property - Lodging House. We will seek one or two additional properties to add to the Fenway CDC portfolio. We will also continue to seek opportunities to build a pipeline of two to three additional projects in this same five-year period.  
 
Currently, Fenway CDC is working on the financing and rehabilitation of Burbank Gardens which comprises of 52 homes. Additionally, we are overseeing 7 residential properties with 259 units to ensure they are physically and financially sustainable in the long term.

 

Program Long-Term Success 
Fenway CDC's long-term goal is to create or preserve new stock of mixed-income housing to meet the increasing needs of low- and moderate-income people and revitalize the neighborhood.
Program Success Monitored By 

Our housing development and preservation work will be measured by the number of people housed, the number of housing units preserved or created, the quality of asset management to ensure residents have safe and affordable homes, and the number of community, institutional and private development partnerships developed.

Examples of Program Success 

Fenway CDC's success track record included development and preservation of over 600 mixed-income homes for thousands of residents. Fenway CDC also created the first subsidized housing in the U.S. set aside for people with AIDS and HIV. Fenway CDC recently acquired Burbank Gardens to protect residents of 52 homes from displacement.



Resident Services & Workforce Development

Our Resident Services and Workforce Development Program enhance the ability of our residents to pursue goals, maintain stable housing, overcome barriers to success, achieve self-sufficiency, and improve overall quality of life. Through housing counseling and social service support, we empower residents to achieve self-sufficiency and maximize their full potential. The Fenway Family Coalition provides positive role models to youth and support to families and parents raising children and teens in the Fenway. We organize health, educational and cultural events, and activities to improve the wellbeing of residents. Many of these services are provided on site and with multi-lingual options that reflect the diversity of our residents.
Budget  $164,075.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

Our Program's Short-Term Success:  

Activity 1: Life Stabilization

1.1 Participants will access social benefits or services with assistance from our Resident Services staff to ensure residents are receiving all benefits for which they are eligible.

Activity 2: Education and Employment Skills/Job Readiness

2.1 Each participant will develop a professional résumé and cover letter, complete 20 hours of job searching per week, and participate in 1 to 3 hours of employment counseling. For example, participants may receive services related to interview preparation, how to apply for jobs, job readiness skills, placement assistance, etc.


Activity 3: Economic Stability

3.1 Fifty percent of the participants will secure employment. Participants will increase number of hours worked and/or increase their hourly wages. Residents who do not gain permanent employment will register with a temporary placement agency.

Activity 4: Tenant Advocacy Related Services

4.1 Participants will make tangible progress towards completing the tenant education, financial literacy workshops, life skills workshops, and home-buying workshops to develop healthy habits, improve money management skills, and learn how to deal with life’s adversities more effectively.

Program Long-Term Success  Residents will become financially self-sufficient and lead a healthy and positive life through the education, support services, and counseling provided by the Fenway CDC.
Program Success Monitored By 

Resident Services and Workforce Development Program Success Measurements 

Life Stabilization work will be measured by the number of participants who are able to access one or more social benefits services (e.g., Food Stamps/WIC, Housing Vouchers, SSDI, Health Insurance/Medicaid, Fuel Assistance, Childcare Vouchers and Providers, etc.).

Our work in education and employment skills/job readiness will be measured by the number of participants who develop professional résumés and cover letters, who complete 20 hours of job search per week, and who attend 1 to 3 hours of employment-related counseling sessions (e.g. interview preparation, how to apply for jobs, information about basic skills necessary for employment, placement assistance, etc.).

Economic Stability work will be measured by the number of participants who secure employment, who increase the number of hours worked or increase their hourly wage, or who register with a temporary employment agency.

Our success with Tenant Advocacy will be measured by the number of participants who make tangible progress towards completing the tenant education, financial literacy workshops, life skills workshops, and home-buying workshops to develop healthy habits, improve money management skills and learn how to deal with life’s adversities more effectively.

Examples of Program Success 
A quote from Natasha Similien, a program participant:  
"I do not think I would have realized my dream or succeeded and accomplished most of the things I have done without the support services from the Fenway CDC." The program promotes familiy stability and economic self-sufficiency through job readiness, life coaching, training, education, and help in accessing community resources such as housing, fuel assistance, food stamps, and other referrals."

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Leah Camhi
CEO Term Start July 2015
CEO Email lcamhi@fenwaycdc.org
CEO Experience

Fenway Community Development Corporation

July 2015 - Present

Executive Director

Joined the team at Fenway CDC to address economic inequality in Boston by strengthening diverse resident leadership and by organizing to bring more affordable housing into the community. Supervise a talented eight member staff and am directly responsible for overseeing housing development, resident services, public relations and marketing, member development and engagement, strategic directions and planning.

 

The Possible Project, Cambridge, Massachusetts May 2010 – May 2014

Founding Executive Director

Hired to launch a new non-profit venture teaching entrepreneurial skills to at-risk youth in Cambridge. Responsible for designing and overseeing build-out of 5000 sq. ft. of meeting and training space, recruiting all staff, developing a managing board of directors, advisory board, and youth advisory committee. Creating necessary infrastructure including internal financial controls, external marketing and branding efforts, and identifying compatible systems for future fundraising efforts.

 

 Front Door Collaborative, Boston, Massachusetts March 2008-December 2009

Interim Executive Director

Recruited by Metro Boston Housing Partnership to retool this floundering three year initiative launched by the city of Boston in 2006. Successfully re-branded prevention mission of preserving tenancies for those most-at-risk of homelessness by building a network of homelessness prevention service providers, and promoting systemic change of homelessness prevention practices. Administered a 1M emergency assistance fund, oversaw a resource line for Boston residents at risk, organized a training series for new providers (350 trained in first round), disseminated a monthly e-newsletter, Threshold to over 600 providers, and maintained an up-to-date resource directory on our innovative and award winning website.

 

Boston Living Center, Boston, Massachusetts June 2007-March 2008

Development Consultant

Returned to the Center to oversee fundraising and marketing efforts. Successful in getting a new database donated, obtaining volunteer technical assistance to upgrade the Center’s website, and organized a major donor cleansing effort in conjunction with seven other agencies. Applied and was named an official charity of the Boston marathon. Drafted a development plan and timeline for internal and external events, grant submissions, and outreach to major donors and brought back the Center’s celebrated signature event, A Celebration of Life Thanksgiving Dinner. Raised $300K during the second quarter of 07. Recruited and mentored new Development Director.

 

 
Temple Israel, Brookline, Massachusetts February 2006-June 2007

Interim Executive Director

Recruited by board of directors to spearhead major changes for the largest reform synagogue in New England. Revitalized stalled capital campaign resulting in $15M to date. Launched a comprehensive strategic planning process utilizing the balanced scorecard approach. Implemented systems for staff accountability in the areas of human resources and financial policies. Made major facility improvements.

 

 
Boston Living Center, Boston, Massachusetts July 1992-June 2000

Founding Executive Director

Responsible for administrative controls and daily operation of a non-profit community center for 1800 people living with HIV/AIDS. Grew budget from $250k to 2.5m and supervised staff expansion to thirty. Provided financial oversight and led board/staff through successive strategic plans for agency growth. Successfully completed two capital campaigns to move Center from a 2000 square foot floor to a

20,000 square foot building incorporating fifteen HIV and related agencies. Served as staff support for board and governing sub-committees.

 

Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts March 1990-July 1992

Program Director

Developed Heart-to-Heart, a multi-session sexuality education and HIV prevention program for Boston area schools. Oversaw expansion efforts of program in Greater Boston and Central Massachusetts. Recruited, trained, and supervised a team of professional and HIV positive support staff to conduct sessions. Researched new and continuation of funding proposals. Responsible for all program promotion and evaluation.

 

University of Oklahoma August 1987-September 1989

Program Development Specialist

Coordinated and conducted training nationwide on adolescent issues for the National Resource Center for Youth Services. Monitored and developed programs in primary interest areas: suicide prevention, peer leadership, parent/adolescent communication and mediation, and HIV/AIDS issues. Wrote brochures, articles, and resource guides for nationwide distribution and created the Center’s award winning poster.

 

Oklahoma Department of Mental Health 1985-1989

Training Coordinator

Developed and organized intensive training program for TEENLINE, a statewide crisis intervention and referral line for adolescents. Responsible for daily supervision of 80+ phone staff, emergency back-up, program promotion, and networking among public and private agencies. Established a peer leadership program in Oklahoma City high schools that became a model for statewide implementation. Regularly conducted speaking engagements and workshops on teen issues, communication skills, self-esteem building, stress management, and suicide prevention. Continued providing consultation services on a contractual basis until 9/89.

 

Oklahoma Halfway House, Inc. 1980-1985

Program Supervisor

Assisted pre-delinquent and adjudicated teens in returning to school, accessing training, and/or finding employment. Direct supervision of five outreach staff, maintained financial records, and wrote all grants. Regularly conducted survival skills workshops and suicide prevention sessions in community settings.

 

Neighborhood Services Organization, Oklahoma City 1978-1980

VISTA Worker

Assigned to Oklahoma City to assist in developing an alternative education program for school dropouts. Duties included grant writing and promoting community awareness and support. Upon implementation, served as primary counselor for attending students.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Kris Anderson Community Programs Director

Kris has deep roots in the Fenway community, where she grew up. She has more than a decade of experience working with diverse populations and centers her work on connecting low- to moderate-income individuals to social services to improve their quality of life.

Kris wears many hats at Fenway CDC as the Director of Community Programs. She facilitates Fenway Family Coalition (FFC) meetings and oversees the Walk to Work – Workforce Development and Resident Services Programs. Kris is experienced in providing case management and counseling to clients with diverse needs. She is also adept at nurturing relationships with community partners and employers. 

In 2015, Kris was appointed the new Chairperson for the Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) Community Advisory Board (CAB). She represents CAB at the BCH’s Board Committee for Community Service. In April 2016, Kris served on an Advisory Group to assist BCH and Massachusetts Department of Public Health to develop criteria for the allocation of $54 million to improve the health and wellbeing of the most vulnerable families in Greater Boston.

Colleen Fitzpatrick Community Organizer Colleen works with the Organizing Committee to identify resident concerns and address them. She has been involved in organizing since graduating from Williams College in 2012, first as an advocate for LGBT rights in her home state of Maine and then as a union organizer with SEIU Local 888 here in Boston. Her experience in these movements has taught her about the power of bringing people together to create positive changes in their community.
Richard Giordano Civic Engagement Director Richard credits one of his parish priests, Fordham University, and the student-run Mexico Project for making him into a political and community activist, and he credits his sociology degree for making him a critical thinker. Over the course of his career, Richard has briefly been a public utilities investigator, a case worker, a NYC cab driver, an iron worker, and an aide to four different elected officials, but he has always been a community activist. In 1990, Richard discovered he could actually get paid to fight for things he believed in when he became the first staff community organizer for the Mass Association of CDCs. Since that time, he has remained involved in the community development field as a board member of two CDCs and as the Community Organizing Director for Fenway CDC since 2013.
Richard loves the Fenway community whose long history of activism has helped shape the neighborhood in powerful ways and continues to do say to this day.
Andre Jones Housing Director

Andre oversees and manages the Fenway CDC’s ongoing efforts to develop and maintain housing for low- and moderate-income families and individuals. He explores and implements innovative solutions and approaches in order to contribute to ensuring the continued stability and diversity of the Fenway neighborhood. Andre began his career with the organization as a board member and subsequently served as a Vice President on the Executive Committee as well as Chairman of the Housing Committee. A resident of Jamaica Plain and a graduate of Boston College and Cornell Law School, Andre brings an activist heart to a mission that chose him.
Margarita Mateo Operations Manager --
Michelle Reinstein Finance and Administration Director Michelle manages Fenway CDC’s finances and human resources and oversees administration. She joined the organization in the late 90’s as a volunteer and later became staff. She has helped with a range of projects including event planning, housing development project management and eventually bookkeeping. She has a background in architecture, and her interest in urban spaces brought her to Boston. She lived in the Fenway when she first moved to the city and later bought a condo on the Mission Hill/JP line after taking a Fenway CDC sponsored “Homebuyer 101” class.
Lisa Soli Senior Asset Manager

After more than two decades in banking, Lisa joined the staff at Fenway CDC in the Housing Department. She had previously been on the board, serving in various officer positions over a twelve year period. As board chair she shepherded the organization through the challenges presented by proposed massive developments in the East and West Fens. Through successful planning and organizing efforts Fenway Park remained as is and the 60 story tower planned for Mass Ave and Boylston was halted. She also brought a renewed focus on the finances of the organization as Treasurer, overseeing a strategic planning process that ended in a dramatic right-sizing of the organization as well as conceptualizing and chairing a successful, new fundraising event that has become an annual favorite.

Lisa briefly served as interim executive director during a leadership transition shortly after joining the staff. In her housing capacity she has overseen and redeveloped one of the most productive CDC real estate portfolios in the city, putting Fenway CDC on a strong financial footing.

Iris Tan Marketing and Development Director

Iris manages the resource development activities of Fenway CDC, which includes event planning, grants management, organizational branding, and internship program. She also cultivates positive relationships with supporters to increase the funding, resources, and talent available to advance the work of Fenway CDC.

Iris works with many renowned institutions of the Fenway–including the Boston Red Sox–and the business community to organize fun and meaningful events that support Fenway CDC’s mission and financial needs. She has overseen the Fenway Ball Gala, Fen-tastic Fest, and Taste of The Fenway since 2013.

Iris was raised in Singapore and earned a Bachelor of Commerce Degree with majors in marketing and management from Murdoch University, Australia. Her dream to learn and work in the United States came true when a scholarship brought her to Boston where she earned her MBA from Hult International Business School. Prior to joining Fenway CDC, Iris worked as an event planner at Asian Community Development Corporation of Boston where she organized sports, business, and entertainment events.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Ricanne Hadrian Award for Meaning Community Engagements Massachusetts Community Development Corporation 2016

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporation

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Fenway CDC collaborates with stakeholders from the public and private sectors for our community development work. Our working partners are:
 
Allston Brighton CDC
Bay Cove Human Services
Berklee College of Music
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Massachusetts Bay
Boston ABCD
Boston Children’s Hospital
Boston Ground Water Trust
Boston Healthcare Careers Consortium
Boston Public Health Commission
Boston Planning and Development Agency
Boston STRIVE
Boston Temple SDA Church
Boston Tenant Coalition
Brigham & Women’s Hospital
Burbank Apartments Tenant Association
Career Collaborative
CEDAC
CHAPA
Chinese Progressive Association
City Life/Vida Urbana
City of Boston’s Jobs & Community Services
Commonwealth Workforce Coalition
Department of Neighborhood Development
Dimock Center
Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative
Fair Foods
Emerald Necklace Conservancy
Fensgate Cooperative
Fenway Alliance
Fenway Civic Association
Fenway Community Center
Fenway Family Coalition
Fenway Health
Greater Boston Legal Services
Harvard Legal Aid Bureau
Holy Trinity Orthodox Church
The Hyams Foundation, Inc.
Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Dev. Corp.
Jewish Vocational Services
JobNet/The Work Place
JP Tree of Life
LISC
MASCO
Martha Elliot Health Center
Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development
Massachusetts Alliance of HUD Tenants
Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations
Massachusetts Housing Investment Corporation 
MassHousing
Northeastern Crossing
Northeastern University
One Family Scholars Program
Operation P.E.A.C.E.
Peterborough Senior Center
People’s United Bank
Project Hope
Right to The City
Roxbury Community College
Saint Cecilia Parish Church
Simmons College
South End Community Health Center
South End Neighborhood Service Center
Susan Bailis Assisted Living
TD Bank
Timothy Smith Network
Training Inc.
United South End Settlements
Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts
United Way of Mass. Bay & Merrimack Valley
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Whittier Street Health Center
YMCA Huntington
YMCA International Learning Center 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 45
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 88%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Asian
Gender Female: 8
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr Gregory Haig
Board Chair Company Affiliation Operation ABLED
Board Chair Term May 2011 - May 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ryan Boxill Steward Health Care Voting
Brian Clague Fensgate Chambers Voting
Nikki Flionis MissionSafe Voting
Katherine L Greenough Boston Red Sox Voting
Gregory Paulson Haig Operation ABLED Voting
Iola Key The Community Builders Voting
John LaBella Housing.Net Voting
Callie Watkins Liu UMass Boston Voting
Sheneal Parker Framingham Public School Voting
Katia Powell Black Girl Nutrition Voting
Mallory Rohrig Operation P.E.A.C.E. Voting
Rosaria Salerno Former Clerk, City of Boston Voting
Mathew Thall Community Development Housing Consultant Voting
Eric Tindahl Oasis Guest House Voting
Matthew Wildman People's United Bank NonVoting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 8
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Housing and Community Development
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Fenway CDC serves a unique residential neighborhood surrounded by world-renowned institutions. As we continue to see the vibrancy of the neighborhood, we also witness increasing low-and moderate-income families and individuals facing pressures from the rising rental cost and struggle to overcome barriers to move out of poverty.
 
When neighborhood or community issues are identified, Fenway CDC works with stakeholders from the public and private sectors to solve the problems through community development services, education, advocacy, community planning, and civic engagement.
 
Fenway CDC works to improve the quality of life of low- and moderate- income people by providing mixed-income housing, with access to amenities such as public transportation, education, healthcare, and arts and cultural activities. We also help them become gainfully employed through job skills training and job placements with institutions in the Longwood Medical and Academic Area. Our support services help them advance their education and career, and access healthcare resources and services for their children/youth.
 
Fenway CDC deeply engages residents and community stakeholders in our work to build a healthier neighborhood. We have over 150 dues-paying members, who reflect the community’s diversity, with low and moderate-income residents and people of color well represented. Members elect the 15 member volunteer board of directors at our annual meeting, as per our organization's by-law and board governance information. There are eight board committees, namely Executive Committee, Finance Committee, Development Committee, Housing Development Committee, Fenway's Urban Village Planning Committee, Fenway Family Coalition Committee, Residents Advisory Committee, and the Nominating Committee. The board and the nine committees meet monthly/quarterly, and they are involved in ongoing planning and oversight of the organization’s work. The community stakeholders assess the needs of the neighborhood and sets strategic direction for the organization’s work, and evaluation of board members.
 
 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $930,367 $897,595 $1,186,764
Total Expenses $1,272,224 $739,144 $769,897

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $56,000 $36,500 $47,824
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $56,000 $36,500 $47,824
Individual Contributions $169,585 $160,277 $100,389
Indirect Public Support $59,200 $28,592 --
Earned Revenue $466,987 $495,971 $776,842
Investment Income, Net of Losses $9,363 $8,418 $6,127
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $156,535 $132,832 $82,788
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $12,697 $35,005 $172,794

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $956,825 $420,313 $517,889
Administration Expense $178,625 $220,381 $155,066
Fundraising Expense $136,774 $98,450 $96,942
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.73 1.21 1.54
Program Expense/Total Expenses 75% 57% 67%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 31% 27% 42%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $10,713,058 $11,109,615 $11,074,189
Current Assets $2,386,540 $2,356,202 $2,556,455
Long-Term Liabilities $4,697,092 $4,785,750 $4,907,330
Current Liabilities $155,884 $121,926 $123,371
Total Net Assets $5,860,082 $6,201,939 $6,043,488

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 23.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 15.31 19.32 20.72

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 44% 43% 44%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Fenway CDC's board of directors established an unrestricted board-designed reserve fund in 2010. The fund supports and pays for any special initiative or opportunity, and the organization's operation deficits for the year.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Fenway CDC updated our three-year Community Investment Plan from 2017 to 2019 and submitted it to the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development.  

 

Housing Development and Preservation

To date, Fenway CDC has developed and preserved over 600 units of affordable housing, which constitute more than 15% of the neighborhood’s affordable housing supply. Over 50% of our residents earn less than 30% of the area median income (AMI).

Goal 1: Expand Housing Development and Preservation

During the next five years, the Fenway CDC plans to develop and preserve affordable housing to meet the increasing needs of low- and moderate-income residents.

 

Community Planning and Organizing

As issues emerge from residents, we help connect different constituencies to organize campaigns that address these issues and challenges. Our activities are guided by a diverse and inclusive coalition that includes elders and families of low and moderate-income, immigrants, the disabled, community partners and others.

Goal 1: Building Community Leadership Capacity

Build community leadership capacity by engaging residents and emerging leaders and empowering them with the knowledge and tools to make positive change in their neighborhood.

Goal 2: Updating the Fenway’s Urban Village Plan

Share the Fenway’s Urban Village Plan that was updated in 2015 by resident leaders, faciliated by Fenway CDC. This resident-led plan, which features the needs of the community, will be shared with private and public entities when planning and evaluating development proposals throughout the Fenway and comment on them in the City’s formal review process.

Goal 3: Equitable Inclusionary Housing Initiative

Fenway CDC has taken the lead on efforts to reform and improve policies to ensure the development and preservation of affordable housing. We continue to advance our work on behalf of low and moderate-income residents to ensure affordability in all neighborhoods of Boston and the surrounding areas.

Goal 4: Tenant Organizing

Improve the quality of life of residents through education and creating collective power by working together in groups, unions, associations, and coalitions.

 

Resident Services and Workforce Development Program

Our services and programs help to enhance the ability of our residents to pursue goals, maintain stable housing, overcome barriers to success, achieve self-sufficiency, and improve overall quality of life.

Goal 1: Life Stabilization and Well-being

Residents will attain the life conditions needed to take steps toward greater economic stability and well-being.

Goal 2: Education and Employment Skills/Job Readiness

Residents will gain the job skills and educational credentials needed to secure and retain living wage employment.

Goal 3: Economic Stability

Residents will increase their job-readiness skills to enable them to participate successfully in the labor force.

Goal 4: Tenant Services

Residents will access to social benefits, case-management, and service referrals.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Fenway CDC's work aligns with the larger community vision and strategy. Our Community Investment Plan activities are aligned with the Community Vision and Strategy through our partnership with residents and stakeholders, integration of processes and sharing of resources. We also ensure that our activities are aligned with the work of the Department of Housing and Community Development, the Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and Health Resources In Action, an organization that aims to improve healthy lives and sustainable communities.  
 
Our community planning and housing development program activities address affordable housing, mitigating impact of institutional expansion, development of neighborhood businesses, community safety, quality of life improvements, home ownership, gentrification, and protecting assets from predatory lending practices. These issues are critical in transforming our vulnerable Fenway neighborhood into a strong, viable community. Our workforce development program collaborates with social service and community organizations to improve job access and quality employment for low-income residents. Our Resident Services focus on maximizing income and increasing residents’ future financial assets and the wealth of low-income families. We provide housing counseling, training on financial literacy, provide information on affordable consumer financial services, and assist residents in planning for future home ownership. We also provide services that help residents build, repair, and leverage credit as well helping locate affordable housing.
 
Our Financing Strategy consists of expanding real estate projects, expanding funding sources, strengthening and increasing existing funding, and improving operational efficiency. 
 
 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Collaborative Efforts to Support Implementation
 
Housing Development and Preservation
Fenway CDC continues to forge partnerships with private developers and institutions to increase the stock of mixed-income housing. We had successfully advocated for improvement of the city's Inclusionary Development Policy to ensure accountability in the usage of affordable housing funds in Boston neighborhoods. We will continue to work with community residents to identify and tackle neighborhood issues (such as gentrification) and engage residents to address those issues.
 
Civic Engagement and Community Planning
Fenway CDC continues to build community leadership capacity by conducting community meetings and trainings for residents and stakeholders through Fenway's Urban Village Committees. We impart knowledge and tools (framework, process, system, and policies) to empower our residents and stakeholders to make positive changes in the neighborhood. They share voices at community meetings on how the impact of institution and private development expansion in the neighborhood affect the quality of life of residents.
1) Affordable Housing: A sufficient and varied housing supply
2) Transport and Access: Increase public transportation and improved access for people with physical disabilities
3) Community Space, Open Green Space, and Arts & Culture Working Group: Improve community facilities and access, maintain open green space, and provide access to local cultural institution
4) Institutional Impact: Mitigate the risk of gentrification which may displace residents
5) Business Community: A healthy business community serving local residents and visitors, while providing employment opportunities.
 
Resident Services and Workforce Development 
Fenway CDC has developed partnerships and collaborations with the following local non-profits and other Community Based Organizations: ABCD Parker Hill/Fenway Neighborhood Service Center, Career Link, Jewish Vocational Services, Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, YMCA International Learning Center, Career Collaborative, United South End Settlements, Northeastern Center of Community Service and The Work Place. These partnerships create a network of support throughout Boston. These partnerships also provide localized career and life-stabilization services to Fenway residents as well as helping residents secure the training and employment services necessary to secure employment in the Boston area and ensure long-term success in their fields.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Fenway CDC serves over 1,000 residents each year, approximately 500 through housing program, 300 through resident services and workforce development program, and 200 through civic engagement program. We track the number of people served, services provided, and number of positive community outcomes for each year and include in our annual report. We submit monthly reports to the board and conduct weekly standing meeting with the executive director to review our program milestones.   

Fenway CDC maintains records of all of the work that we conduct both with residents and with non-residents and records related to property acquisition and management. Because much of our funding is secured through public and private grants, we are experienced at reporting data on a regular basis to demonstrate the ongoing nature and effectiveness of our work. We understand the importance of ensuring that our goals are specific, attainable, and measurable.  

Housing Development and Preservation

Our housing development and preservation work will be measured by the number of people housed, the number of housing units preserved or created, the quality of asset management, and the number of community, institutional and private development partnerships developed.

Community Planning and Organizing

Our community planning efforts will be measured by the number of positive community outcomes achieved, the number of resident leaders trained, and the number of successful community partnerships forged for project development.

Our community organizing efforts will be measured by the number of service-learning programs continued or created in partnership with local institutions, the number of resident leaders trained, the number of at-risk residents helped by tenant organizing work, and the advancement of our Inclusionary Housing Policy work (as noted in Section 3, Goal 3).

Resident Services

Life Stabilization work will be measured by the number of participants who are able to access one or more social benefits services (e.g., Food Stamps/WIC, Housing Vouchers, SSDI, Health Insurance/Medicaid, Fuel Assistance, Childcare Vouchers and Providers, etc.). We will also track the number of residents who utilize the “Fair Foods” program each month and ensure residents are aware of the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables at an extremely reduced cost.

Our work in education and employment skills/job readiness will be measured by the number of participants who develop professional résumés and cover letters, who complete 20 hours of job search per week, and who attend 1 to 3 hours of employment-related counseling sessions (e.g. interview preparation, how to apply for jobs, information about basic skills necessary for employment, placement assistance, etc.). Additionally, we will measure the number of small business owners/entrepreneurs who participate in or access workshops and educational programs provided by Fenway CDC and our partners.

Economic Stability work will be measured by the number of participants who secure employment, who increase the number of hours worked or increase their hourly wage, or who register with a temporary employment agency.

Our success with Tenant Services will be measured by the number of participants who make tangible progress towards completing the tenant education, financial literacy workshops, life skills workshops, and home-buying workshops to develop healthy habits, improve money management skills and learn how to deal with life’s adversities more effectively.

Fenway CDC serves over 1,000 people each year through our programs and services. We track the number of services provided and the number of people served. In 2016, we achieved the following positive outcomes.
 
Housing Development and Preservation 
• 259 homes maintained • 17 residents educated to prevent displacement • 15 program partners collaborated to improve the city’s housing policy
 
Education and Workforce Development
241 Services Provided • 79 helped with résumés and cover letters • 77 received career planning assistance • 35 placed into jobs • 17 received vocational training certificates • 15 received financial education and housing counseling • 8 placed through temp agencies • 8 enrolled in HiSet (High School equivalency) • 1 graduated from 4-Year College • 1 graduated from 2-Year College
 
Social Services
219 Services Provided • 58 assisted in accessing food stamps • 57 registered for food pantries • 40 benefited from case management • 24 received financial and/or tenant counseling • 23 assisted with housing • 17 referred to mental health services
 
438 Community Engagement through Planning & Organizing
 • 250 educated about social issues • 70 attended Boston Planning and Development Agency community meetings • 45 attended 6 tenant meetings to learn about tenant rights and homeless prevention • 40 trained on Inclusionary Development Policy, Community Preservation Act, and Article 80 • 25 attended 8 inclusionary housing meetings to recommend improvements for the city’s housing policy • 8 Fenway’s Urban Village Committee members commented on proposed developments
 
Accessing Fresh Produce
1,627 bags of fresh produce distributed to residents through Fenway Fair Foods
 
Building Stronger Families and Community
• 119 individuals and 37 businesses participated in our Halloween celebration • 150+ people registered for our Career & Resource Fair • 50 residents attended Apple Picking outing • 63 attendees at Latino community events (knitting, salsa, and jewelry making classes and networking) • 25 parents attended annual Mother’s Day Brunch • 10+ attendees at each of the 6 Fenway Family Coalition meetings • 150 members and supporters attended our annual meeting 
 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Fenway CDC developed the following short-term, mid-term, and long-term outcomes for our work. Each year, we continue to improve our service delivery process to meet the changing needs of our clients - residents and program participants. Fenway CDC marks 45 years of improving lives and building community in 2018. As we continue to move towards another decade of growth, we continue to assess our internal operational strengths and weaknesses and identify areas of improvements to achieve greater community impact. We are working towards  the goal of establishing a new strategic plan to build our organization's capacity to ensure we have a blueprint to build future growth to benefit the community. We have learnt that our strong community partnerships resulted in our accomplishments of success milestones and will continue to strengthen our collaborations with program partners and funders. We also recognize the importance of developing successful leadership transition plans for our work.  

 

Short-Term Results

1. Residents live in homes that are safe and affordable

2. Residents have support resources, motivation, knowledge, and skills to seek job and advance education

3. Residents and community

4. Stakeholders are engaged to share their voices and plan their neighborhood
(where they learn, work, or play)

 

Mid-Term Results

1. Residents have stable lives and can focus to build future financial assets.

2. Residents and community stakeholders are deeply engaged to improve their lives and the neighbor-hood.

3. Residents stay in the community and have access to housing, jobs, transport, and recreation.

4. Institutions and businesses

5. Serve visitors and residents and create jobs.

 
Long-Term Results
1. Residents live longer.

2. The community is cohesive and diverse.

3. The economy is prospering and sustainable.