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Sociedad Latina Inc

 1530 Tremont Street
 Roxbury, MA 02120
[P] (617) 442-4299
[F] (617) 442-4087
www.sociedadlatina.org
[email protected]
Alexandra Oliver-Davila
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INCORPORATED: 1968
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2678255

LAST UPDATED: 05/10/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Sociedad Latina's mission is to create the next generation of Latino leaders who are confident, competent, self-sustaining and proud of their cultural heritage. 

Mission Statement

Sociedad Latina's mission is to create the next generation of Latino leaders who are confident, competent, self-sustaining and proud of their cultural heritage. 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,975,049.00
Projected Expense $1,975,049.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Arts and Cultural
  • Civic Engagement: Youth Community Organizing (YCO)
  • Education Programs (Mission Enrichment & Mission Possible)
  • Workforce Development

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Sociedad Latina's mission is to create the next generation of Latino leaders who are confident, competent, self-sustaining and proud of their cultural heritage. 


Background Statement

 

Sociedad Latina works in partnership with youth and families to create the next generation of Latino leaders who are confident, competent, culturally proficient, and self-sustaining. To accomplish this mission, Sociedad Latina has developed an innovative, multi-service delivery model called the Pathways to Success, which engages youth over the long-term (age 11-21) in multi-disciplinary programming to build skills in four areas: Education, Workforce Readiness, Civic Engagement, and Arts & Culture. These four content areas are infused into each program to ensure that all youth who engage with Sociedad Latina have the broad skill sets necessary for success in the 21st century.

Sociedad Latina implements an asset-based approach to youth development, supporting young people to develop positive cultural identities which serve as protective factors, promote resiliency, and continue Latino cultural traditions in our community. Sociedad Latina's success relies on deep partnerships with families who engage with the organization through education, advocacy, arts, and cultural activities.

 

Since 1968 we have pioneered innovative solutions that support positive youth development and train youth to advocate for themselves and their communities. We aim to empower youth and guide them successfully into college and beyond, provide meaningful jobs that build professional and personal skills, and create progressive change in the community.

 

 

Through ongoing research, internal evaluations, community assessments and feedback from youth and families, Sociedad Latina’s youth development model is designed according to best practices in Latino youth programming. All Sociedad Latina programs incorporate long-term youth and family engagement, cultural proficiency, individualized pathways to success, strong and extensive community partnerships, research based evaluations, and wraparound support services. Youth and families at Sociedad Latina are seen as invaluable assets to the community, the organization and our mission. Without young people’s input, leadership, creativity, and vision, Sociedad Latina would not be able to make the community impact it aspires to.


Impact Statement

 

Top Accomplishments from 2016:

• Sociedad Latina’s STEAM Team was one of six nonprofit partners selected for the BoSTEM Expanded Learning Project, an initiative to give all middle school students access to high-quality STEM experiences.
• Our Academy for Latinos Achieving Success program was selected for The Boston Foundation's five-year Coaching for Completion Initiative, which seeks to raise college enrollment and graduation rates among Boston Public Schools graduates.
• Sociedad Latina’s Education Pathway, which guides youth from middle school through the first two years of college, was named one of 230 Bright Spots in Hispanic Education by the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics.
• Sociedad Latina's civic engagement and health education model was recognized as a finalist for the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network's 2015 Nonprofit Excellence Awards in the Innovation category.
• Youth Community Organizers, in partnership with the Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color and Boston Public Schools, launched a Young Men’s Action Group to advocate for the elimination of the opportunity gap facing young men of color in Boston.
• Sociedad Latina was one of 50 finalists across the country for the National Arts and Humanities 2015 Youth Program Award, recognizing our successful approach to creative youth development and the arts.

Organizational Goals for the current year:

Goal 1: To deliver high-quality, individualized youth development programming to young people from low-income families in Boston, with a focus on the Mission Hill neighborhood.

Goal 2: To foster an organizational culture of success expressed in all core programming to prepare young people to succeed.

Goal 3: To support young people’s efforts to identify societal issues that affect their lives and take meaningful social actions to address them.

Goal 4: To provide young people with opportunities to engage in artistic expression and to experience the cultures of their countries of origin.

 


Needs Statement

Top 5 Most Pressing Needs:

1. Permanent and sustainable space for Sociedad Latina's youth programs in Mission Hill
 
2. Expanded case management to better support mental health and social and emotional wellness of youth
 
3.  Professional development to build internal staff leadership 
 
4. Expansion of technology to make data collection and information sharing more efficient 
5. Funding for youth jobs 

CEO Statement

To our Friends, Partners, and Supporters:

When young people come through the doors of Sociedad Latina we ask them to forget the messages they’ve heard in the world that tell them as youth of color in Boston there are no opportunities, no jobs, no college acceptances or scholarships available for them. We ask them to set aside those myths and step into a world of endless possibilities, where their dreams are within reach, no obstacle is too great, and their diverse cultural backgrounds are one of their greatest assets and sources of pride.

As you read this report, remember yourself at 16, 17, 18 years old. What did you dream of? Who did you hope to become? How did you get to where you are today? Who helped you along the way?

Each Youth Leader at Sociedad Latina possesses a unique dream that gives them a sense of purpose and pride as they navigate the inevitable challenges of coming of age in a world that too often tells young people their ideas aren’t important, their cultures aren’t an asset, and their experiences don’t matter.

At Sociedad Latina we work every day to create an organizational culture of high expectations and high aspirations, where youth are valued and celebrated and have space to be proud of who they are and where they come from. We ask youth what excites them, what they see as their strengths, and what they want to accomplish in their lives. Some of them have never been asked before. Some have never been told “you can go to college if that’s your dream.” Others are surprised to learn that there are many, many other pathways to success that don’t include a 4-year college degree and tuition bill.

The good news is that we all have a role to play in the future of Boston’s youth. Each of us can help them to dream big and to see that their own gifts and willingness to work hard - along with holistic support from Sociedad Latina staff, mentors, volunteers, and community partners- can bring their dreams well within reach. With this comes a great responsibility for each of us to look deeper into the hearts and minds of Boston’s young people. Listen to what they have to say. Make space for them at the tables where you sit. Help us to share their stories and change the way young people of color are viewed on the streets of Boston. These faces are the future of our city and we can’t wait to see their dreams come true. 


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Sociedad Latina is a citywide organization that works with youth from greater Boston, with a focus on Mission Hill/Roxbury. Yearly we intensively serve 337 youth and reach 2,000 youth and adults through community events and outreach efforts. Youth are 72% Latino (57% Dominican, 39% Puerto Rican), 19% Black/African American, with the remainder a cross-section of diverse ethnicities. Half of families live or go to school in Roxbury, all live at or below the poverty line (82% very low income).

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Arts and Cultural

Cultural programming is infused organization-wide into all programs to boost academic engagement and original thinking, increase resiliency through connections with family heritage, and promote Latino cultural pride.

Sociedad Latina’s arts and cultural programming provides access to a Music Clubhouse in the heart of Roxbury, including a fully equipped recording studio, performance space, and beat making lab. Youth age 8-21 participate in music lessons (school-day, out-of-school), Saturday visual arts instruction, youth ensembles, and are hired as Youth Artists in an arts mastery and workforce development program.

In addition to instruction, the Clubhouse hosts many events to celebrate Latino heritage and culture. The biggest annual event is Latino Heritage Month, which brings together over 600 community members to learn about the diverse traditions and artistic expressions within the Latino culture, from Brazilian capoeira to Afro-Caribbean conga drumming. 

Budget  $550,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

Through the Clubhouse, youth have a safe and supportive social gathering place that encourages creativity. By boosting academic engagement and self-confidence, developing life skills such as goal-setting, increasing inter-personal skills, and nurturing talent that may have otherwise gone unattended, the Clubhouse contributes to the strengthening of our community.

In 2012:

 

  • 95% of youth reported that because of Sociedad Latina they have a positive connection to their cultural heritage
  • 3 Boston Public high schools and 1 middle school received music instruction through the Music Clubhouse, including a new arts integration model in Fenway High’s Native Spanish Class
  • 3 Berklee College of Music and 1 Massachusetts College of Art & Design students provide instruction and support for the program
  • Sociedad Latina hired a Latino Cultural Arts Program Coordinator to expand and strengthen our Latino arts programming beyond music
  • More than 700 community members attended our Viva Nights summer events

 

Program Long-Term Success  The Clubhouse is a cultural institution in our underserved community, fostering connections between diverse groups of people, increasing vitality, and celebrating and continuing our Latino traditions. It not only promotes arts education equity and builds community support for the arts, but also engages at-risk youth in rewarding educational and cultural experiences that ultimately lead to positive youth development and long-term success.
Program Success Monitored By 
All Sociedad Latina programs are evaluated through our fully customized Efforts to Outcomes database, which allows us to analyze trends, identify program needs, and easily report successes. With ETO we have an almost exclusively electronic format for data collection and tracking (e.g., intakes, assessments, feedback, report cards, attendance). The program enables us to see what works, and helps us consistently improve services. With ETO, we identify the ideal programming dosage needed for outcomes. All staff enter data into ETO and our Evaluation Director analyzes the information. Outcomes and results are shared with our Leadership Team and Board, who make programming decisions. Programming and success is also evaluated by the opinions and assessments of youth participants and their parents.
Examples of Program Success  Oscar Pitre has been with Sociedad Latina for as long as he can remember. He lives in the Mission Main housing, and would often attend cultural events, concerts, and performances with his older brothers who worked at Sociedad Latina. Oscar started performing with the Music Clubhouse in late elementary school, attended the Mission Enrichment afterschool program, and now is a Youth Artist. Oscar has always been passionate about music, and especially the drums. With the help of Sociedad Latina coordinators, he was admitted to Boston Arts Academy, where he started this fall as a 9th grader. Oscar hopes to pursue music as a profession, and credits the experience and support he receives at Sociedad Latina as a major contributor to that dream. “I’ve been a musician for as long as I can remember. Sociedad Latina has helped me to pursue my dream because it gives me new opportunities to perform, learn new instruments and connect with other youth and professional performers.”

Civic Engagement: Youth Community Organizing (YCO)

Sociedad Latina’s award-winning Youth Community Organizing (YCO) program has over a decade-long, successful track record of engaging Boston youth of color in leadership opportunities, empowering them to tackle issues of importance, cultivating their community-organizing skills, and providing them with the tools they need to create community change. While youth learn about social justice issues and the importance of advocating for systems change, YCO integrates innovative youth-development strategies that focus on developing leadership skills, building resiliency, and creating opportunities for self-reflection and personal growth. Each year, YCO hires and trains 35 Youth Community Organizers ages 14 to 21, who in turn engage over 770 youth in youth-identified initiatives. YCOs are at the forefront of positive change for Latinos in Boston.
 
Current campaigns include education reform (Learn Us to Teach US), institutional redevelopment, school lunch reform, and health education in BPS.
Budget  $445,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

 

  • 98% of youth report feeling more important to their community after working on Sociedad Latina’s campaigns
  • Sociedad Latina pioneered a ELL Youth Advisory Board, where 4 YCOs currently sit
  • YCO and long time Sociedad Latina youth Monica Castro was nominated for the Northeastern University Latino/a Center Civic Engagement Award
  • In 2011, YCO Wilmer Quinones was appointed to the only youth seat on Boston’s English Language Learner Task force
  • YCO youth and staff provided a professional development series to a team of teachers from the Tobin K-8 on the importance of cultural proficiency, teaching strategies that view diversity as an asset, and best practices in parent engagement.

  • In 2012, YCOs engaged 14 youth organizations and over 1,700 community members through monthly outreach activities to build support for cultural proficiency campaign
  • In 2010, Sociedad Latina was awarded the Excellence in Nonprofit Advocacy Award from the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network


 

Program Long-Term Success 

As a Latino organization, Sociedad Latina is a leader in the community organizing community on issues affecting the Latino community. We leverage partners and resources within power systems to enact change at the systems level for our community. By training youth on community organizing fundamentals such as social justice and power systems, organizing and base building, and developing policy campaigns and action plans, youth have the skills and knowledge to tackle major issues that affect the larger youth and Latino communities. Sociedad Latina empowers youth as community leaders and gives them a platform from which they can voice their concerns, propose new ideas, and see that changes are made. Led by youth ideas and voice, we are ensuring that systems like Boston Public Schools—a significant force in all Boston youth and families lives—is culturally proficient and providing the highest-quality services to the Latinos community.

Program Success Monitored By  All Sociedad Latina programs are evaluated through our fully customized Efforts to Outcomes database, which allows us to analyze trends, identify program needs, and easily report successes. With ETO we have an almost exclusively electronic format for data collection and tracking (e.g., intakes, assessments, feedback, report cards, attendance). The program enables us to see what works, and helps us consistently improve services. With ETO, we identify the ideal programming dosage needed for outcomes. All staff enter data into ETO and our Evaluation Director analyzes the information. Outcomes and results are shared with our Leadership Team and Board, who make programming decisions. Programming and success is also evaluated by the opinions and assessments of youth participants and their parents.
Examples of Program Success  Vickie Miranda has been a driving force behind the Learn Us to Teach US cultural proficiency campaign. Recently Vickie received the Sun Life Rising Star Award and was honored by the city's Office of New Bostonians with the Youth Action Award. Vickie was nominated by youth for her dedication to progressive community change. "I love being a YCO because I'm helping my community," Vickie says. "I'm letting my neighbors, family, and friends know what's going on and how it affects them, and I'm making a difference." Vickie serves on Brigham and Women's Hospital’s community advisory board, represented Sociedad Latina at a Funders' Collaborative on Youth Organizing conference in Baltimore, and is on the youth advisory board for the Nellie Mae Foundation, where she is developing a student-centered strategy to address the achievement gap. "A lot of what we do as YCOs sheds light on what we are experiencing - things people don't always know about. We're showing how it affects the community.”

Education Programs (Mission Enrichment & Mission Possible)

Two academic programs supported by professional and university partners guide youth on their academic journey from middle school, to high school, to college/career:

 

Mission Enrichment:MEP is a year-round STEM education and enrichment program for 120 youth/year (ages 11-15). Through hands-on, inquiry based projects that connect classroom learning to the real world, youth strengthen academic skills, gain confidence in their STEM abilities, explore the arts, develop strong self-identities, and are supported in-and out-of-school through the critical middle school years.

 

Mission Possible!:academic support and postsecondary success program for 150 in- and out-of-school youth 14-21. Weeknights, seniors and out of school youth receive intensive college application and literacy support, and all other high school students can use MP as for additional homework, test prep, and academic support. Monthly, all youth explore college and career pathways through our college and professional networks.

Budget  600,000
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

 

 

Through Sociedad Latina’s Education Programs, students stay engaged in school, form meaningful and long-term relationships with adults, learn about diverse college and career options, and build 21st Century skills.

Academic Goals:

·        Improve attitudes toward school

·        Prepare youth for postsecondary success

·        Support youth through college/career transitions

·        Increase parent engagement and knowledge

·        Strengthen social-emotional skills

 

In 2012:

  • 100% of seniors entered college or employment within 1-year of graduation
  • 92% of middle & high schoolers were promoted to the next grade on-time
  • MEP was recognized by Boston Public Schools, the Office for English Language Learners, and Boston After School and Beyond as a best practice in engaging Latino middle school students and families in meaningful out-of-school time experiences
  • 90% feel they know more about the college application process

 

 

 

Program Long-Term Success 

Academic programs work to fill the achievement gap experienced by so many Latino youth in BPS. Students report that their diverse cultures are not reflected in BPS curriculum and staff, and that they do not feel connected or valued at school. Sociedad Latina creates a safe, supportive learning environment based on a culturally proficient approach which highly values the personal, cultural and ethnic histories of our participants. As a Latino organization, all aspects of programs are designed to support Latino youth. Academic programs provide case management and individualized education plans to customize support. Small group tutoring with Latino mentors who build academic skills as well as confidence and trust in educators. Youth are also connected to postsecondary pathways with fit their interests and strengths, so that their secondary education is seen as a step toward a larger goal.

Program Success Monitored By  All Sociedad Latina programs are evaluated through our fully customized Efforts to Outcomes database, which allows us to analyze trends, identify program needs, and easily report successes. With ETO we have an almost exclusively electronic format for data collection and tracking (e.g., intakes, assessments, feedback, report cards, attendance). The program enables us to see what works, and helps us consistently improve services. With ETO, we identify the ideal programming dosage needed for outcomes. All staff enter data into ETO and our Evaluation Director analyzes the information. Outcomes and results are shared with our Leadership Team and Board, who make programming decisions. Programming and success is also evaluated by the opinions and assessments of youth participants and their parents.
Examples of Program Success  Taydavia Martinez is a perfect example of how Sociedad Latina's Education Programs invests in youth with supportive, long-term engagement. Taydavia has been a Sociedad Latina participant for over 8 years from middle school to college, most recently as a College Mentor teaching assistant in the middle school program she started in. “Through my work at Sociedad I’ve become more independent, improved my work ethic and how I communicate with others. When I was off-track junior year of high school and wanted to give up, staff at Sociedad Latina had my back and kept pushing me forward.” Taydavia is currently in her sophomore year at Wheaton College, where she received nearly a full tuition scholarship for her academic merits and community involvement. “Sociedad Latina has always been there for me and I know they always will be.”

Workforce Development

Youth ages 14-21 can apply for Sociedad Latina’s workforce development program. Youth undergo a comprehensive workforce readiness curriculum which includes workshops on resume and cover letter writing, professional dress, communication strategies, and interview skills, as well as 21st century skills from our customized curriculum designed by Sociedad Latina in 2010. They apply to internship teams (healthcare, health education, community organizing, music, or arts), where they work in paid positions for 30 weeks for minimum 7.5 hrs a week and receive ongoing training. The program also includes career exploration, case management (including follow-up support after youth complete the program), and academic support and postsecondary planning through Mission Possible. Our membership in the Boston Youth Service Network provides an extensive range of outside services to participants that address barriers to success, such as mental health, housing, childcare, or legal issues.

Budget  $875,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

 

  • In the summer of 2012, 15 Youth Leaders completed internships at 5 different hospitals
  • In 2012, Sociedad Latina expanded paid Youth Leader internship positions from 150 to 217
  • In 2013, through deepening partnerships with employers, we expanded external internship sites to include a law office, an elected official’s office, and Harvard University.
  • For the last 3 years, 100% of high school seniors graduated high school and went on to college or full time employment within 1 year. Current Alumni are attending Boston College, Bridgewater State, Wheelock College, Bunker Hill, Suffolk University, and more. Alumni work for organizations like Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, New England Baptist Hospital, and the Boston Foundation
  • 95% of youth report that because of Sociedad Latina, they are more confident in their ability to keep a job
  • 93% feel more like a leader

 

Program Long-Term Success 

Youth and advocates in the city of Boston fight each year to preserve the youth jobs budget which perpetually faces drastic cuts; in 2011 more than 10,000 summer youth jobs were eliminated. Research shows that the more work experience a person acquires year to year beginning in their teens, the more likely they are to continue working consistently in the future. Work experience creates critical human capital for youth, especially for those youth living in poverty. Sociedad Latina’s workforce development program’s primary goal is to connect at-risk youth with the training and opportunities to become self-sufficient adults and overcome cycles of poverty in today’s increasingly competitive job market. Participants gain hands-on, worksite experience and comprehensive wrap-around services provides an integrated approach to academic, life, and work readiness skills development. 

Program Success Monitored By  All Sociedad Latina programs are evaluated through our fully customized Efforts to Outcomes database, which allows us to analyze trends, identify program needs, and easily report successes. With ETO we have an almost exclusively electronic format for data collection and tracking (e.g., intakes, assessments, feedback, report cards, attendance). The program enables us to see what works, and helps us consistently improve services. With ETO, we identify the ideal programming dosage needed for outcomes. All staff enter data into ETO and our Evaluation Director analyzes the information. Outcomes and results are shared with our Leadership Team and Board, who make programming decisions. Programming and success is also evaluated by the opinions and assessments of youth participants and their parents.
Examples of Program Success  Through Health Careers for Youth, a workforce development track, Luilli Guzman has launched a career in healthcare where he can take advantage of his “people person” personality to help others. After high school graduation, Luilli wanted to go to college, but wasn't able to get a financial aid package that made it possible. He was considering construction or auto body work, but when he began working with Sociedad Latina his hospital internship convinced him he had found a niche for himself. He decided a career in healthcare was perfect. After a successful internship at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, this year the hospital hired Luilli. HCFY provided college access support and help securing a financial aid package, and now he's working part-time while attending Roxbury Community College. "I really have Sociedad Latina to thank for everything," he says. "They really gave me what I needed to get on this path."

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

2012 was a year to remember at Sociedad Latina. We broke ground on new projects and program expansions, and we maintained high quality, data-driven and community-based services. As partners in our work, the youth we serve are at the heart of our undertakings. It is an exciting time at Sociedad Latina, as we continue to enhance our programming and better serve our community’s youth. We are proud to offer many new opportunities, including:

 

Cultural Arts expansion: In 2013, Sociedad Latina will develop the creative abilities of young artists through hands on training in four art forms (Photography, Public/Visual Arts, Music, and Filmmaking) in which youth, families, and community partners have expressed interest. Through the creative process of their chosen medium, youth develop leadership skills and learn how to collaborate and manage their own projects. By creating and protecting artistic space and resources in the heart of our Roxbury community, we seek to impact not only the lives of our young clients, but also health and vibrancy of our neighborhood.

 

Focus on vocational pathways: In addition to exposing youth to opportunities in various job sectors, we also want to ensure that they have the necessary information to pursue those careers. Demystifying career tracks provides youth with access to new opportunities. Drawing from best practices used in our college access curriculum, Sociedad Latina will work to provide increased information on vocational career pathways for youth interested in pursuing vocations.

Increased STEM:In 2012 MEP expanded to offer students opportunities to explore STEM concepts and careers through hands-on, inquiry based learning. MEP STEM clubs are gender specific to foster a safe space for both girls and boys to learn new STEM concepts, step outside of their comfort zones, and experiment with exploration, innovation, creativity and curiosity. This space is also conducive to language development for many ELLs as they practice English with new vocabulary words and concepts. Through interactive activities, role models, worksite visits, and family outreach, Sociedad Latina builds a strong network of support for youth to expand their career options, build interest, instill confidence, and diversify our future workforce.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Alexandra Oliver-Dávila
CEO Term Start Jan 1999
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Sociedad Latina is led by Alexandra Oliver-Davila, Executive Director since 1999. Alex has provided innovative leadership during her tenure, growing the organizational budget by more than four times, expanding board membership and participation, and forging cross-sector collaborations with dozens of partners, including colleges, hospitals, corporations, foundations, and Boston Public Schools. Under Alex’s leadership, Sociedad Latina has built and maintains the infrastructure to operate a growing menu of programs and meet the needs of our target population. In 2012 Alex received a Doctorate of Honors from Emmanuel College. She was awarded the Hispanic Heritage Leadership Award by the New England Patriots. In 2007 Alex was honored as a Barr Foundation Fellow; the program recognizes Boston’s most gifted and experienced leaders. Throughout her career, Alex has received honors from Mayor Thomas Menino, the Freedom House, the Hyde Square Task Force, the Boston Celtics, Boston Police Department, and Boston City Council, among others. Alex sits on the Board of Directors for Margarita Muniz Academy, the first two-way bilingual Spanish-English high school in Boston. She is a representative on the Workforce Investment Youth Council, and Community Advisory Boards for Children's Hospital Boston, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Families United in Education Leadership (FUEL), New England Baptist Hospital, Boston After School and Beyond, Boston Private Industry Council and Boston Public Schools’ Wellness Committee.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Lydia Emmons Director of College & Career Pathways Lydia Emmons earned her undergraduate degree in Urban and Community Studies and Public Policy from the University of Connecticut and she holds certificates in Youth Trauma Response and Non-Profit Leadership. Lydia was a participant of the 2016 Massachusetts Education Policy Fellowship Program through the Rennie Center for Education Research & Policy. She joined Sociedad Latina in 2009 as a Highland Street Corps Ambassador of Mentoring and was then hired as a Workforce Development Coordinator. As Director of College & Career Pathways, Lydia oversees the Education and Workforce Development programs, evaluates program components, and liaises with Boston Public Schools and higher education partners.
Mr. Juan Maldonado Director of Arts, Culture & Civic Engagement Juan Maldonado earned his undergraduate degree in Professional Music, with a concentration in Music Education, from Berklee College of Music. Prior to joining Sociedad Latina, Juan founded and directed a music school near Boston. Juan is a skilled musician, appearing in events such as the Monterey Jazz Festival, Bean Town Jazz Festival, Duke Ellington Jazz Festival, Sarasota Jazz Festival, and Heineken Jazz Festival. In 2014, Juan was awarded the Berklee Urban Service Award for his outstanding work with youth in Boston and was recently selected as a chair for Boston Creates--a community-wide effort to harness creativity and build a shared vision for arts and culture in Boston. As the Director of Arts, Culture, & Civic Engagement, Juan oversees all community arts and engagement initiatives, manages program staff, and develops curricula. Juan is bilingual in English and Spanish.
Ms Laura Simocko Director of Development Laura Simocko received her undergraduate degree in Peace & Conflict Studies from Colgate University and an M.Phil. in Race, Ethnicity, Conflict from Trinity College Dublin. Her previous experience includes direct service and development roles at the Immigrant Legal Advocacy Project of Maine, Catholic Charities Maine, and Academia Europea Dominicana. At Sociedad Latina, Laura is responsible for fundraising, oversight of evaluation and marketing, and supervising development staff.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Hispanic Heritage Leadership Award to Alexandra Oliver-Davila New England Patriots 2012
Honorary Doctorate to Alexandra Oliver-Davila Emmanuel College 2012
John Mudd Youth Advocates of the Year (YAY!) Award Massachusetts Advocates for Children 2012
Northeast Affiliate of the Year National Council of La Raza 2012
Rising Star Award, jointly honored Sociedad Latina’s Mission Possible program and Vickie Miranda, a longtime Youth Leader Sun Life Financial 2012
Associate Director Dinanyili Paulino-Rodriguez selected to Podermetro list of the 100 most-influential leaders in Massachusetts Latino community El Planeta 2011
William L. Boyan Award for Excellence in Community Health Children's Hospital Boston 2011
Best Practices User Guide on Youth Engagement Center for Disease Control and Prevention 2010
Civie Mass Vote 2010
Excellence in Nonprofit Advocacy Award Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2010
Selected as a model for national workforce development programs for Latino youth; asked to present at national NCLR conferenc National Council of La Raza (NCLR) 2010
Civie Mass Vote 2009
Only community-based organization in the city selected to participate in the Community Learning Initiative that leverages and aligns resources among schools, libraries and community centers. Boston Public Schools 2009
Executive Director Alexandra Oliver-Dávila selected to Podermetro list of the 100 most-influential leaders in Massachusetts Latino community El Planeta 2008

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
National Council of La Raza (NCLR) - Affiliate 2008
United Way Member Agency 1991
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

 

 

Sociedad Latina partners with a wide variety of employment, educational, institutional, and community partners across Boston. Our partners recognize Sociedad Latina’s ability to implement high quality programs, develop strong leaders, and leverage resources.

Our network includes Success Boston, college completion initiative aimed at Boston Public School students; the Boston Youth Service Network (BYSN), a network of alternative education and workforce readiness partners serving non-traditional students; and the Mission Hill Youth Collaborative (MHYC), a Mission Hill coalition of community-based organizations and institutions. Both BYSN and MHYC are innovative networks of partners which Sociedad Latina was integral in establishing. These collaborations amplify our work by enabling us to leverage resources, align programs and services city-wide, and share ideas to make our work more efficient and effective.

Employer partners (Longwood Medical Area, ALPFA, State Street, Wellington, Liberty Mutual) support Sociedad Latina through youth internships, professional mentoring, workforce readiness, career exploration activities, and monetary gifts. Our 12 college partners have increased off-site space, college mentors, consultants, research-based curricula, events, and scholarships.

 

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 16
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 150
Number of Contract Staff 200
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 15
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 13
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Blanket Personal Property
Automobile Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Renter's Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Marta Rivera
Board Chair Company Affiliation Consultant
Board Chair Term Jan 2011 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Patricia Flaherty Mission Hill Neighborhood Housing Services Voting
Mr. Jaime Lopez The Barr Foundation Voting
Ms. Cecilia Mendez Massachusetts College of Art and Design Voting
Ms. Marta Rivera Boston Foundation Voting
Mr. John Smith Fair Housing Center of Greater Boston Voting
Mr. Ramon Soto Office of Mayor Thomas Menino Voting
Ms. Zakiya Thomas Boston Ballet Voting
Mr. Noel Torres Curtis Hall Community Center Voting
Mr. Yorling Valdez T-Mobile Voting
Mr. Freddie Velez Youth Opportunity Boston Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 8
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As in the rest of the nation, Boston’s Latino community is booming. Since 1990 the Latino population has increased by 53.6%, and Latinos now comprise 42% of Boston Public School students – the fastest growing demographic. Though these numbers present opportunity and promise, they also represent an urgent need. More than 1 in 5 Latino youth in Boston aged 16-24 are disconnected (not engaged in work or school), the highest rate of 25 major US cities. Our Mission Hill/Roxbury neighborhood has the highest rate of disconnection (16%) of all Boston neighborhoods. Short- and long-term effects of youth disconnection are social exclusion, limited skills and education, fewer employment opportunities, limited professional connections, lower lifetime earnings, poor physical and mental health, and feelings of powerlessness. Our youth and families struggle from within one of the greatest academic, medical, and technological hubs in the world.

Young Latinos are vibrant, hard working, and entrepreneurial, but the system is failing them. Now is a critical time in our community to provide the youth services we do.

Recognized by Boston Public Schools, elected officials, and business and community leaders through numerous accolades and partnerships, Sociedad Latina has emerged at the vanguard of youth service organizations in Boston. As a Latino organization, we affirm positive cultural identities and focus on Latino’s assets, strengths, and individuality by addressing cultural and linguistic barriers facing Latino youth through bilingual programming, targeted language supports, and a culturally proficient approach that breeds resiliency, self-acceptance, strong cultural identities, and tolerance of others. With more than 40 years of experience, expertise, and measurable results, we know how to meet our community’s needs, address challenges, and empower Latino youth to grow into competent, confident, self-sustaining adults who lead positive change in the community.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $2,496,776 $1,467,862 $1,963,094
Total Expenses $1,769,264 $1,757,879 $1,888,574

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,650,245 $739,621 $1,437,029
Government Contributions $592,402 $409,090 $246,638
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $592,402 $409,090 $246,638
Individual Contributions $27,208 $13,279 $15,715
Indirect Public Support $89,280 $93,000 $73,174
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $9,059 $4,120 $4,777
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $128,582 $208,752 $185,761
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,429,230 $1,310,698 $1,415,811
Administration Expense $277,119 $354,666 $318,572
Fundraising Expense $62,915 $92,515 $154,191
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.41 0.84 1.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses 81% 75% 75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 7% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $2,205,514 $1,462,457 $1,776,406
Current Assets $1,993,110 $1,343,175 $1,365,411
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $61,554 $46,009 $69,941
Total Net Assets $2,143,960 $1,416,448 $1,706,465

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose Secure a permanent home for Sociedad Latina by buying our current building and making the necessary changes.
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates Sept 2017 -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 32.38 29.19 19.52

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financially summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financial statements.
 

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Sociedad Latina’s mission is to create the next generation of Latino leaders who are confident, competent, self-sustaining and proud of their cultural heritage.


Our organizational goals are:

1. To deliver high-quality, individualized youth development programming to young people from low-income families in Boston, with a focus on the Mission Hill/Roxbury neighborhood.

2. To foster an organizational culture of success expressed in all core programming to prepare young people to succeed.

3. To support young people’s efforts to identify societal issues that affect their lives and take meaningful social actions to address them.

4. To provide young people with opportunities to engage in artistic expression and experience the cultures of their countries of origin.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Founded in 1968, Sociedad Latina promotes Latino leadership and creates a Boston community that supports youth success through our holistic “Pathways to Success” positive youth development model. We provide young people ages 11-21 with ongoing training and support to develop their leadership skills and offer real-life opportunities to put their learning into practice. Moreover, the model serves as a structure to motivate and empower youth to map their own progress towards college, career and community leadership.

Through Pathways to Success, we connect youth to ten years of intensive, free, year-round programming that uses culturally and linguistically responsive and sustaining practices to capitalize on strengths and assets, such as bilingualism, high aspirations, resiliency and strong family and community ties. Our approach works in partnership with families and a wide network of cross-sector partners to build young people’s skills and knowledge in the following areas:

  • Education: Supports youth and their families on their academic journey from middle school through high school and on to postsecondary education. Provides tutoring, academic skill building, postsecondary pathways guidance and individual academic case management to youth ages 11-21.
  • Civic Engagement: Organization-wide campaigns led and supported by youth ages 14-18 and their families.
  • Workforce Development: Provides training, career exploration, hands-on work experience and professional mentoring to prepare Latino youth ages 14-21 for success in diverse career fields.
  • Arts & Culture: Exposes youth ages 8-18 and their families to opportunities to create art (music, dance, media arts) and celebrate Latino culture and heritage.

Our strategies are:

  1. Capitalize on youth and family assets, including bilingualism, high aspirations and strong community ties

  2. Make holistic investments in youth and families, partnering from grade 6 through the first two years of college or career

  3. Affirm positive cultural identities that build resiliency and continue Latino cultural traditions in our community

  4. Support the development of social-emotional skills that foster youth leadership and long-term success

  5. Engage families across the organization, recognizing that they are the single most important factor in youth success


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Sociedad Latina’s programming meets the needs of Boston’s underserved Latino youth by implementing a culturally-based approach that includes: reaffirming Latino’s strengths, long-term investment, family engagement, diverse pathways to success and flexible engagement. We reaffirm Latino’s strengths by addressing cultural and linguistic barriers through bilingual programming, targeted language supports, and a culturally relevant curriculum. Youth with strong cultural identities are more likely to have increased resiliency, a key factor to success in college and careers. Our long-term investment in youth from age 11-21 allows us to support youth and families through critical transition periods, such as entering high school and college or careers. As parents and families are the single most important factor in youth success, we engage them in all aspects of our programming.

Another strength of our organization is its leadership. For more than twenty years, Sociedad Latina has been ed by Executive Director Alexandra Oliver-Dávila. Alex has worked to create a community that supports and values young people and believes in their ability to create positive social change. As Executive Director since 1999, Alex has transformed Sociedad Latina into a cutting-edge, data-driven youth development organization. Under her leadership, Sociedad Latina has quadrupled its budget, expanded board membership, increased the total number of youth and families served, broadened programming, and developed our Pathways to Success model.

Alex serves the Board of the National Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color (COSEBOC); the National Institute for Latino School Leaders; the National Council of La Raza as Affiliate Council Representative for the Northeast region; the Advisory Board for Boston Children's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston After School & Beyond, Boston Public Schools’ Opportunity and Achievement Gaps Task Force, as well as Co-Chairs for the Greater Boston Latino Network (GBLN). In 2016, Alex was selected for a three-year term on the Boston School Committee.

Sociedad Latina partners with a wide network of employment, educational, institutional, and community partners across Boston in order to implement high quality programs, develop strong leaders, and leverage resources. Some of our partnerships include: Success Boston, a college completion initiative aimed at increasing the number of Boston Public Schools students completing college; the Boston Youth Service Network, a network of alternative education and workforce readiness partners serving non-traditional students; the Mission Hill Youth Collaborative, a coalition of community-based organizations and institutions that promotes the wellbeing of Mission Hill’s residents; the Latino College and Career Access Network that seeks to increase the employability of young Latinos and connect them to economic opportunity structures in Boston; and the Greater Boston Latino Network, a collective effort to address historical underrepresentation of Latinos in leadership roles across Boston and Massachusetts.

We also work with a network of employer partners, which includes the five Longwood Medical Area Hospitals, Prince Lobel LLC, Turner Construction, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Trust, Huntington Theater, the offices of our local government representatives, and several others. These partners support Sociedad Latina through youth internships, professional mentoring, career exploration activities, career panels, skill building opportunities, and monetary gifts. Through our education partnerships, which includes Boston Public Schools, the Colleges of the Fenway, Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology, Berklee College of Music, Bunker Hill Community College and several others, we have access to resources such as off-site space, college mentors, consultants, financial aid workshops, student outreach, scholarship opportunities, and consultation on curriculum and program implementation.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Sociedad Latina evaluates the success of our programs by using a variety of evidence-based evaluation tools, which are tracked through our fully customized Efforts-to-Outcomes (ETO) database. Assessment tools selected are designed specifically for youth development programs and have been integrated into our database. Our primary tool is the Youth Outcomes Toolkit, an evidenced-based evaluation tool, to assess and monitor youth progress in our key outcome areas, such as life skills, sense of self, cultural responsiveness and college readiness, amongst others. In addition, we measure program attendance, school attendance, report cards, diplomas/GED-HiSETs, GPA, postsecondary applications completed, FAFSA completed, postsecondary acceptances, financial aid awards, college enrollment and college transcripts, credits earned, and work status. For middle school youth participating in STEAM Team, the STEM Common Instrument is used to measure interest and engagement in STEM and the Survey of Academic Youth Outcomes (SAYO) is used to measure changes in engagement in learning, problem solving skills, and relationships with peers/adults. Results reported allow us to track individual youth progress, monitor program quality, and analyze which efforts have the greatest impact on high school completion, college access, work readiness and postsecondary persistence outcomes.

In 2016-2017, we achieved the following outcomes:

Goal 1: Youth earn a high school diploma or GED

Objectives:

  • 100% of youth remained in school or reengaged in an academic program
  • 95% of seniors graduated or earned a GED
  • 100% achieved on-time grade promotion
  • 83% increase or maintain high academic achievement
  • 83% of youth reported better understanding the impact that academic success has on future plans

Goal 2: Youth are prepared for success in their postsecondary pathway of choice

Objectives:

  • 95% of youth increased 21st century skills
  • 88% of youth increased knowledge of postsecondary pathways
  • 87% completed an apprenticeship
  • 100% of seniors applied to 5 postsecondary programs
  • 75% of career-bound youth secured long-term employment

Goal 3: Youth successfully transition to college or careers

Objectives:

  • 90% successfully transitioned to college or a career
  • 85% of Alumni persisted through 2 years of college or career

Goal 4: Youth strengthen social-emotional skills

Objectives:

  • 95% of youth reported having positive relationships with adults
  • 90% of youth showed increased resiliency


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Every year, Sociedad Latina partners with 1,000 youth from across Boston and reaches and additional 4,000 youth and families through cultural events and academic activities. Our programming brings together and strengthens the Latino community in Boston. In addition, due to its long-term holistic approach model, 75% of youth stay with us for 3+ years. We also stay in touch with Alumni and invite them to events or to participate as volunteers. Some of our alumni success stories include:

Ricardo started working with Sociedad Latina as a Youth Community Organizer when he was only fourteen. He worked on the Boston Tobacco Advisory Project (a city-wide initiative with the Boston Public Health Commission to determine if tobacco advertising was targeting youth) and organized Mission Hill residents to push for equitable community development. Ricardo credits Sociedad Latina with getting him to “think about college at a young age and understand the importance of building a resume.” After graduating from high school in 2010, Ricardo attended Boston College and continued to pursue his passion for politics, public service and public health. Last year, he was hired to work for Senator Elizabeth Warren in her Washington D.C. office. In this role, he still uses his experience as a Youth Community Organizer: “Organizing showed me the potential for policy change to impact people’s lives for the better. The impact of the experience of working in the community and talking to people out in the streets has been huge for me in my career.”

Jameel J., a Haitian-American alumni that participated in Sociedad Latina programming throughout high school and college, will complete his Opticianry degree from Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology this spring. Jameel was an active member of the Sociedad Latina family in high school, excelling in both our music and youth entrepreneurship programs. During his entrepreneurship class, he developed “Ordinary Kings” as his capstone project, a company that sells t-shirts with social justice phrases on them. He later launched his idea and is already selling products. Jameel also worked closely with our staff while in college and utilized on-campus support services to remain on track for degree completion. With this high level of dedication, he has already secured a full-time job in his career field after graduation.

Other accomplishments include:

  • In collaboration with the Boston Public Schools’ Office of Opportunity & Achievement Gaps, Sociedad Latina launched the Young Men's Advisory Council working with middle and high school young men of color to address the achievement and opportunity gaps in BPS.

  • Sociedad Latina's Youth Community Organizers (YCOs) have been successful in advocating for the integration of cultural proficiency into BPS policies and reports, such as the Wellness Policy and the “Opportunity and Equity” report.

  • Sociedad Latina was a finalist for the Youth Organizing Award from the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, recognizing our efforts to push for culturally proficiency and student-centered learning in Boston Public Schools.

  • Sociedad Latina helped pass a city ordinance that limits the amount of storefront advertising of tobacco products, unhealthy food and drinks and alcohol.

Despite Sociedad Latina’s and the community’s efforts, Latinos still face a number of challenges to succeed in Boston: poverty, health disparities, language barriers, discrimination, under-performing schools, lack of representation in Boston Public Schools, and others. As an organization, we still have a long way to go, especially because the Latino community in Boston and their challenges lack visibility. The Latino high school graduation rate, despite increases in the last years, is still the lowest across racial/ethnic groups; and the wage gap between Latinos and non-Latinos is very wide. We still have to work to guarantee that every youth graduates from high school ready to succeed in his/her chosen postsecondary pathway.