Share |
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

FPC is a non-profit organization that serves as a voice for Franklin Park: Inspiring others to care for, explore and enjoy the park. We work to ensure Franklin Park is recognized as the "heart of the city" and treated as the crown jewel of the Emerald Necklace, providing a healthy environment for its surrounding communities where neighbors are actively caring for and using their "big backyard."

Mission Statement

FPC is a non-profit organization that serves as a voice for Franklin Park: Inspiring others to care for, explore and enjoy the park. We work to ensure Franklin Park is recognized as the "heart of the city" and treated as the crown jewel of the Emerald Necklace, providing a healthy environment for its surrounding communities where neighbors are actively caring for and using their "big backyard."

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Apr 01, 2014 to Mar 31, 2015
Projected Income $330,000.00
Projected Expense $330,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Outreach and Arts & Cultural Programs
  • Park Advocacy and Stewardship
  • Youth Conservation and Leadership Crew

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

FPC is a non-profit organization that serves as a voice for Franklin Park: Inspiring others to care for, explore and enjoy the park. We work to ensure Franklin Park is recognized as the "heart of the city" and treated as the crown jewel of the Emerald Necklace, providing a healthy environment for its surrounding communities where neighbors are actively caring for and using their "big backyard."

Background Statement

In the 1970s two activists, one white, Richard Heath and one black, Elma Lewis spearheaded a campaign to stem the decline and change perceptions by cleaning-up and reviving Franklin Park through community stewardship and cultural programming—eventually co-founding the Franklin Park Coalition.  

Over the years, the FPC has continued this legacy with the overarching goal of involving park neighbors and users in advocacy for better maintenance, more resources and sounder management of Franklin Park.  Through volunteer opportunities we have positively directed people who want to do more by rolling up their sleeves--up to 1,000 people annually.  During the last ten years, involving youth in park stewardship and connecting urban youth to this local natural resource has become prime.  We view young people as the future stewards and advocates of the park.  And in light of the growing alienation of people from nature—especially urban youth, we work to develop an awareness of and attachment to this greenspace.  Further as stewards of the largest park in Boston, the Coalition has worked to elevate the status of all of Boston’s natural and opens spaces.  In taking this leadership role via Boston Park Advocates, FPC co-sponsored the first-ever forum of at-large city council candidates to address questions about funding for parks, maintenance, youth programming and cultural events.  This has become a crucial opportunity to place open space issues in the forefront during election years, as in the 2013 mayoral race.    
 
A Coalition staff of at times three full-time and one part-time employee have worked to ensure we produce high quality programs, and garner support for this critical urban resource that provides tranquility, recreation, leisure, arts, and public health benefits to thousands of Boston residents.

 


Impact Statement

Over the past year FPC has had four major accomplishments that overlap on the programmatic, financial and management areas.
 
1. Greens Teens Youth Stewardship Program - We designed and each summer hold a staff training, which involves staff in setting program goals and policies.  By building a committed team, with an extremely high level of "buy-in", we have accomplish a great deal of woodlands stewardship work, developing leadership among youth, and incorporating a lot of fun into the program.   In addition, we have long wanted to gather data about the long-term success of program participants and program impact.  We held our first alumni reunion attended by past program participants from 2008-2011 and gathered valuable information about alumni with regard to college matriculation, further training acquisition and employment status.
 
 2. We have been implementing our strategic plan, which was develop with full board and staff involvement. The document has guided us through a challenging funding climate, giving us a blueprint for operation under three different budget scenarios and a filter for adding new initiatives and activities to our work plan.
 
3. We worked with professional mentor to strengthen our marketing and branding. By asking our donors what they wanted through a survey, we began to communicate with members/donors and potential donors more personally when making appeals. This change resulted in a significant growth in individual giving.  Also through acquiring new tools, such as software, we are now better able to manage donations and work towards a major gift program.
 
For the current year, we hope to continue development of the Green Teens alumni network; take advantage of social media tools; develop a sound fundraising plan that allows us to achieve our strategic goals; and continue to diversify funding and capitalize on the new individual donors garnered from Boston Marathon Charity Team fundraising through great donor stewardship.
 

Needs Statement

  1. A part-time health and fitness staff person to organize activities and a farmers’ market.
  2. Sponsors for FPC outdoor cultural performances and special events
  3. Young staff members who can develop, take on greater responsibilities and transition into senior management roles.
  4. Additional staff during busy seasons to prevent “burnout.”
  5. A volunteer team of neighbors who work on woodlands stewardship and at special events.

CEO Statement

A Franklin Park Coalition board member often refers to us as “The Little Organization That Could.” As stewards and advocates for the biggest greenspace in Boston, there is so much potential and it is hard to turn down an idea for a new program, a restoration project, or a community partnership. Our community base is not just our constituency and membership, but also our idea-machine. When I first came to FPC as executive director ten years ago I heard over and over again about the significance of the Elma Lewis Playhouse in the Park. With community involvement, including many who were active on stage or behind the scenes with the first Playhouse, we revived this beloved summer performance series. Likewise, in neighborhood and block association meetings around the park, elders kept urging for the park to be more of a resource for young people – thus the inception of our Youth Conservation Crew and summer jobs for 20 teens. Today, ideas keep coming from those who love the park and use it everyday.

While it doesn’t feel unique to us--it's just who we are--for others across Boston our diversity is remarkable. Our Board is primarily made up of people of color and spans generations. We have longtime Boston residents who grew up coming to Franklin Park on weekends and newcomers who are excited to have a forest in the city.

 

 


Board Chair Statement

I was born and raised in the Roxbury section of Boston and on Sundays in the spring my family would go to Franklin Park. I can remember the organ grinder, the elephants, giraffes and hippopotami.   Elma Lewis Playhouse in the Park became a main attraction and we would all attend the wonderful events put on by the Playhouse.

Even though I moved to the suburbs to raise my son, I continued to attend not only the Elma Lewis Playhouse events, but also the annual spring Kite Festivals.

After thirty years of suburban living, I moved back to Boston. However, I hungered for the trees and tranquility that I left. So, when the opportunity arose, I bought a house across the street from one of the country’s best urban parks. Excited and proud of my choice, I sought to look for a way to be involved with the park's stewardship.

I received a call from an old friend and FPC Board member who welcomed me back to the city; she also asked if I was interested in being on the Franklin Park Coalition Board of Directors as there was an opening. I jumped at the opportunity. Once on the Board I realized that there were challenges to overcome—mainly economic. The cost of arts events and the desire to renovate the original site of the Elma Lewis Playhouse has been one of great challenges. Entertainment, whether it be music, dance, or oratory expression is an important aspect of life. It brings together diverse cultures and communities. 

The other challenge we face as a Coalition is to empower our membership of lower and moderate-income residents to fight for their park. As we have built our membership and influence over the four years that I have been involved, I have seen the park become well maintained and cared for on my daily walks. This year, after a strategic planning process, we are working to bring newcomers to our Board of Directors who can leverage funds and political clout. We have an exciting list of potential board members who are connected to the park and our communities.

As a community activist and retired schoolteacher, it has been an honor to serve as President of the Franklin Park Coalition board and offer my leadership to this organization that collectively cares about ensuring that the park remains vibrant and that young people play a role in the park’s future.


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
City of Boston- Citywide (please select all areas as well)
Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan, Jamaica Plain and nearby Boston neighborhoods

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
  2. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Community Outreach and Arts & Cultural Programs

With the intent of offering something for everyone and promoting Franklin Park as a place for exploration and recreation, FPC produces a host of public events throughout the year.  Our signature event is the free summer outdoor performance series, Playhouse in the Park.  Playhouse ensures culturally relevant high quality music and performance concerts reach the diverse community surrounding and also provides an important venue for youth performance troupes.
 
Additionally, FPC hosts a series of season events that bring people of all ages to the park for active outdoor recreation.  At the Fall Festival, festival goers hike and climb trees using harnesses and ropes; at the Winter Snow Festival, they snowshoe, sled and ski; and at the Kite and Bike Festival they ride and fly.
 
Finally,  FPC brings people to the park for nature hikes, bird walks, and history tours. Through the Circle the City collaboration we will close roads, connecting our park to the neighborhoods for active recreation.
Budget  $70,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Families General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 
Over the next twelve months, seasonal festivals and Circle the City activities will bring hundreds of new park users to Franklin Park and double the visits of current users for active recreation.  
 
Elma Lewis Playhouse in the Park will break attendance records and draw 800 or more to evening concerts.
 
 
Program Long-Term Success 
Franklin Park remains a attracting and safe greenspace attracting thousands of people on summer weekend and throughout the year for arts and cultural programming as well as for recreation and passive use.  The surrounding community realizes the potential and importance of the park as a place for health and fitness activities creating more contact between young people and nature and improving the health and wellness of the surrounding community that suffers greatly from health disparities.
 
Elma Lewis Playhouse in the Park morning shows featuring youth performers will inspire children from young families and summer camps to at most, pursue arts education--continuing Elma Lewis' legacy or at minimum, become lifelong lovers of live arts performances.
Program Success Monitored By 
Franklin Park Coalition will measure success of programs by documenting the number of participants who attend events.  A major measure of success is creating access and getting folks in the park.
 
Further, FPC will provide survey cards and online survey to find out what people think of events, how to improve them and whether we are achieving our goal of getting people to the park for arts, humanities or active recreation.  For example we would ask questions about whether they had been to the park before or ever attend a Playhouse in the Park concert.  For a history, we'd ask what they learned about park history and for recreation activities we would ask how often they used the park for recreation in the past and whether they would increase their use of the park for biking, jogging, walking, etc.
Examples of Program Success 
Some of the comments we have had from the Fall Festival are, "I've been to the park, but had no idea this wilderness area existed.  It almost feels like you're in the Blue Hills."
 
In history tour evaluations, attendees commented,  

Park Advocacy and Stewardship

Galvanize park neighbors, users and community members through public meetings and action alerts to advocate for best practices in park maintenance, city funding for Franklin Park, and attention to needed capital improvements.   Recruit, train and supervise these same citizens along with area youth in park stewardship and woodland preservation to clear invasive species, rehabilitate trails, remove trash from woodlands, amend soil and replant native trees and shrubs in the over 200 acres of park woodlands.
Budget  $60,000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Population Served General/Unspecified Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of the year, the next round of park capital improvements, such as path repaving will commence. Over the course of the year, volunteers will clear 20 acres of invasive and plant 300 trees, shrubs and groundcover plants. 
Program Long-Term Success  Through community involvement, park management and longterm woodlands health will be improved.  This improvement will be demonstrated in park appearance or upkeep and a woodlands with thriving trees of young and mid-age to replace dead and dying old growth.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored documenting participants in park advocacy programs and volunteer stewardship opportunities.  Additionally FPC compares appearance of maintenance problem areas or areas where work is performed using before and after photos, GIS mapping and tables of restoration and maintenance progress.
Examples of Program Success 
  • Repaving of paths in disrepair
  • Rehabilitated ballfields
  • New Plantings in woodlands
  • Invasive species cleared from woodlands 

Youth Conservation and Leadership Crew

FPC launched a youth conservation crew to address the surrounding community’s desire to involve young people in park stewardship, provide them with meaningful jobs, and stem the dramatic rise in violence among Boston’s youth.  Since the first group of 10 teens, we now train and employ up to 25 youth annually. 

Goals and Objectives

·       Provide hands-on training, meaningful paid jobs, and skill-building to inner-city youth from low-income households and communities of color.

·       Connect program participants and alumni to further training, internship and employment opportunities.

·       Assist with higher education and environmental career opportunities through mentorship, college recommendations, application assistance, and self development and career workshops.

·       Provide wilderness adventure or recreational experiences that promote and extend environmental stewardship beyond city limits.

 
Budget  $80,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of the 6 week youth stewardship training and job program, teens 
Program Long-Term Success 
After serving on the youth conservation crew, 90% of teens will complete high school or obtain their GED; 70% will enter college, seek further training or obtain full time employment; and 75% will change their attitudes about environmental steward and incorporate stewardship and wilderness recreation into their lifestyle. 
Program Success Monitored By  We gather self-reported data through social media and by survey Youth Stewardship Program alumni.
Examples of Program Success  Based upon survey results:

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

I first came to the Franklin Park Coalition when there were no staff and the annual budget was $40,000. Our big event was an annual spring clean up. It didn’t take long to assess the potential and I was off and running – talking to every community group I could find, stopping people in the park to engage them, and learning park history. As a regular (but ignorant) park user myself, I couldn’t believe the rich connections, history, and cultural significance of Franklin Park.

 

The last decade has been one of luck, perseverance, initiative, and community-building. Foundations have been very generous and our annual budget gradually increased to $350,000 year, supporting a team of 4-5 staff and a year-round calendar of programs and advocacy. From the Winter Snow Festival to the Kite & Bike Festival, Elma Lewis Playhouse in the Park to the Youth Conservation Crew, and park history tours and family nature activities, we have worked to bring more people into the park and offer “something for everyone.”

Since the recession and in part due to foundation changes in Boston, our financial situation has altered. While funders wax enthusiastically about our work and the impact we have on the park and on our community, their boards have decided to fund climate change on a larger scale, or national programs, or different “green” projects like local food initiatives. As an organization we are working to diversify our funding, increase our individual donor base, and try new strategies. This is our final year a Boston Marathon Charity Team and have a wonderful team of runners who are reaching out to their friends and neighbors to help raise money for the park. Through the initiative of some of these runners, we started what will become an annual fundraising event, the Franklin Park Turkey Trot.

Although challenging, it is also an exciting time as we work to tackle this new arena and make the Franklin Park Coalition sustainable for the next decade. The importance of our work as advocates for this historic greenspace and the popularity of our programs has not waned – we persevere for our community, for the trees, and for the young people we hope will take over as the next generation of park activists.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Christine Poff
CEO Term Start Mar 2002
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Ms. Poff holds a MSW degree in community organizing and planning. She has held leadership positions for over 20 years in community-based organizations performing executive management, resource development, advocacy and outreach, community organizing, and program development.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Lanae Handy Deputy Director Ms. Handy holds an MCP in Urban Studies and Planning.  She has worked in non-profit management and programming for the last 15 years manging projects, fundraising and developing programs.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Best of Business Award - Roxbury Small Business Small Business Community 2013
Best Non-Profit Jamaica Plain Gazette 2010

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

I first came to the Franklin Park Coalition when there were no staff and the annual budget was $40,000. Our big event was an annual spring clean up. It didn’t take long to assess the potential and I was talking to every community group I could find, engaging people in the park and learning park history.

The last decade has been one of luck, perseverance, and community-building. Foundations have been very generous and our annual budget gradually increased to $350,000 year, supporting a team of 4-5 staff and a year-round calendar of programs and advocacy. From the Winter Snow Festival to park history tours and family nature activities, we have worked to bring more people into the park.

Over the past few years, in part due to the recession and in part due to foundation changes in Boston, our financial situation has altered. While funders wax enthusiastically about our work and the impact we have on the park and on our community, their boards have decided to fund climate change on a larger scale, or “green” projects like local food initiatives. As an organization we are working to diversify our funding, increase our individual donor base, and try new strategies. This year we were chosen as a Boston Marathon Charity Team and have 15 wonderful runners who are reaching out to their friends and neighborsWe are adding new Board members who can leverage resources.

Although challenging, it is also an exciting time as we work to tackle this new arena. The importance of our work and the popularity of our programs has not waned – we persevere for our community, for the trees, and for the young people we hope will be the next generation of park activists.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 500
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % 67%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration No

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Leslie Moore
Board Chair Company Affiliation College Bound Dorchester
Board Chair Term Apr 2013 - Mar 2017
Board Co-Chair Ms. Sandy Bailey
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Co-Chair Term Apr 2013 - Mar 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Corey Allen Boston Public Schools Voting
Mr. Marc Almanzan Mass Energy Voting
Mr. Blair Campbell Sappi Fine Paper Voting
Mr. Jerel Ferguson Merrill Shoe Company Voting
Ms. Vicma Lamarche Verizon Voting
Mr. Jay Lee City of Boston Voting
Ms. Sierra Morton College Bound Dorchester Voting
Ms. Debbie Munson Pearson Publishing Voting
Ms. Kate Peppard Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Carolina Prieto Sociedad Latina Voting
Mr. Rickie Thompson Boston Public Schools Voting
Mr. Carleen Tucker Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 81%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Community Outreach / Community Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Nominating
  • Public Policy/Advocacy

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

I first came to the Franklin Park Coalition when there were no staff and the annual budget was $40,000. Our big event was an annual spring clean up. It didn’t take long to assess the potential and I was off and running – talking to every community group I could find, stopping people in the park to engage them, and learning park history. As a regular (but ignorant) park user myself, I couldn’t believe the rich connections, history, and cultural significance of Franklin Park.

 

The last decade has been one of luck, perseverance, initiative, and community-building. Foundations have been very generous and our annual budget gradually increased to $350,000 year, supporting a team of 4-5 staff and a year-round calendar of programs and advocacy. From the Winter Snow Festival to the Kite & Bike Festival, Elma Lewis Playhouse in the Park to the Youth Conservation Crew, and park history tours and family nature activities, we have worked to bring more people into the park and offer “something for everyone.”

 

Over the past few years, in part due to the recession and in part due to foundation changes in Boston, our financial situation has altered. While funders wax enthusiastically about our work and the impact we have on the park and on our community, their boards have decided to fund climate change on a larger scale, or national programs, or different “green” projects like local food initiatives. As an organization we are working to diversify our funding, increase our individual donor base, and try new strategies. This year we were chosen as a Boston Marathon Charity Team and have 15 wonderful runners who are reaching out to their friends and neighbors to help raise money for the park. We are adding new Board members who can leverage resources.

 

Although challenging, it is also an exciting time as we work to tackle this new arena and make the Franklin Park Coalition sustainable for the next decade. The importance of our work as advocates for this historic greenspace and the popularity of our programs has not waned – we persevere for our community, for the trees, and for the young people we hope will take over as the next generation of park activists

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Apr 01, 2014 to Mar 31, 2015
Projected Income $330,000.00
Projected Expense $330,000.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2013 Review

2012 Review

2011 Review

2010 Review

2009 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $168,958 $249,044 $284,024
Total Expenses $186,456 $260,842 $334,185

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $168,871 $216,754 $259,938
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- $5,322 --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $87 $86 $100
Membership Dues -- $26,690 $23,756
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $192 $230

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $131,532 $188,556 $259,651
Administration Expense $31,779 $30,294 $37,119
Fundraising Expense $23,145 $41,992 $37,415
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.91 0.95 0.85
Program Expense/Total Expenses 71% 72% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 14% 19% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $570,452 $559,086 $575,683
Current Assets $570,452 $559,086 $575,683
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $2,726 $5,831 $630
Total Net Assets $567,726 $553,255 $575,053

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 12.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 209.26 95.88 913.78

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Over the past few years, in part due to the recession and in part due to foundation changes in Boston, our financial situation has altered. While funders wax enthusiastically about our work and the impact we have on the park and on our community, their boards have decided to fund climate change on a larger scale, or “green” projects like local food initiatives. As an organization we are working to diversify our funding, increase our individual donor base, and try new strategies. This year we were chosen as a Boston Marathon Charity Team and have 15 wonderful runners who are reaching out to their friends and neighbors. Fortunately, the Boston Athletic Association Charity Team program allows us to raise funds and engage a whole new group of individual donors for two more years.  We will build upon this base of individual donors and begin to tap into a younger generation of donors and volunteers, as well as donors who are new to us who have the resources to become potential major gift contributors.  Finally, we are adding new Board members who can leverage resources through professional and person contacts. 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
For the fiscal year 2011 audit, the independent auditors issued a qualification to their opinion regarding personnel and multi-functional costs allocated to programs and supporting services. Please review the Auditors opinion for further information.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--