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Organization DBA --
Former Names Boston Adult Literacy Fund (2008)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

At First Literacy, we believe that literacy, functional English skills, and high school credentials are essential in our society. Our mission is to ensure that all adults who live in Greater Boston have educational opportunities that enable them to thrive in their personal and family lives, in the workplace, and in the community. We accomplish this mission by providing:

  • Grants for adult education classes and services;

  • Grants for the development of innovative practices and resources;

  • Professional and leadership development workshops for teachers and other adult education professionals; and

  • Scholarships and mentoring for adults starting college.


Mission Statement

At First Literacy, we believe that literacy, functional English skills, and high school credentials are essential in our society. Our mission is to ensure that all adults who live in Greater Boston have educational opportunities that enable them to thrive in their personal and family lives, in the workplace, and in the community. We accomplish this mission by providing:

  • Grants for adult education classes and services;

  • Grants for the development of innovative practices and resources;

  • Professional and leadership development workshops for teachers and other adult education professionals; and

  • Scholarships and mentoring for adults starting college.



FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $460,000.00
Projected Expense $459,258.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • First Literacy Professional Development Workshops
  • First Literacy Program Grants
  • First Literacy Scholarships

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

At First Literacy, we believe that literacy, functional English skills, and high school credentials are essential in our society. Our mission is to ensure that all adults who live in Greater Boston have educational opportunities that enable them to thrive in their personal and family lives, in the workplace, and in the community. We accomplish this mission by providing:

  • Grants for adult education classes and services;

  • Grants for the development of innovative practices and resources;

  • Professional and leadership development workshops for teachers and other adult education professionals; and

  • Scholarships and mentoring for adults starting college.



Background Statement

History

 

In 1988, a consortium of public and private sector leaders joined together to establish First Literacy (formerly the Boston Adult Literacy Fund) to undertake the critical task of improving and expanding Adult Basic Education (ABE) in Greater Boston. For 24 years First Literacy has helped adults learn to read, write, obtain high school credentials, and gain economic self-sufficiency through targeted support of ABE programs and individual adult learners. First Literacy has:

 
  • Helped over 42,000 adults attain their education goals
  • Awarded 400 scholarships to adults seeking more education
  • Provided many hours of free program development assistance to ABE programs
  • Raised more than $5,000,000 for literacy education


Our grants, program development assistance, and scholarships create a more vibrant community and a more equitable economy -- giving everyone an equal opportunity to achieve the dream of economic self-sufficiency and success.

 

Need Addressed by First Literacy

 

The need for high-quality ABE classes and services is growing, as is highlighted in the report “Breaking the Language Barrier: A Report of English Language Services in Greater Boston,” commissioned by The Boston Foundation and released in March 2011. The report notes that Greater Boston’s English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) providers currently have the capacity to serveonly5% of the over 200,000 immigrants with limited English language proficiency who live in the region.


The Massachusetts Strategic Framework for Adult Basic Education, published in April 2010 by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, states,“access [to ABE programs] is a critical goal, but access without quality is an empty promise.” Because the pressure of thousands of students on waiting lists is a burden on the ABE system, especially on community-based programs, partnering with First Literacy is necessary and desirable in order to provide high-quality and effective services.


Impact Statement

FY 2014 was the first year of our 2013-2015 grant cycle. We supported 19 programs with grants ranging from $5,000 to $15,000 and totaling $225,000. The projects involve 1,254 learners and include ABE classes such as Basic Literacy and ESOL, as well as classes that provide students with educational foundations in health and wellness, learning strategies, and presentation skills. Our grants also included support for educational, career, and personal counseling, and child care. Public funding is unavailable for such services; however, without them many adult learners would not be able to attend classes.


For the third year, we hosted Professional Development Workshops. This year 14 workshops were presented on topics including:

  • Approaches to Managing and Improving Your Students’ Attendance;
  • From Objectives to Assessment: Breathing Life into Your Lesson Planning; and
  • Keeping Your Students Connected and Engaged in the Summer.

Many of the workshops included two sessions, giving participants the chance to test techniques and ideas learned during the first session and then report on the results during the second session. Adult educators from 80 programs participated in 2014.

The first year of the First Literacy Lab was successful. The goals of the project include:

  • Promoting and supporting the use of evidence-based ABE instruction and the development of innovative instructional materials and practices;
  • Increasing ABE student learning through the use of evidence-based and newly-developed materials and practices; and
  • Supporting the use of technology in ABE instruction.

The Call for Proposals was released in November and 20 programs responded. We invited 18 of these to come in for an interview. Of these, eight were awarded grants of between $1,200 and $2,500.

Goals for FY 2015 include continuing to support the 19 programs with funds and capacity-building, increasing the number of professional development workshops to 16, and funding another round of First Literacy Lab grants.


Needs Statement

First Literacy supports community-based ABE programs because they are the most effective way to meet the educational and self-development needs of adults in Greater Boston. Adults who seek more basic education have already taken a tremendous step in their process of transformation and First Literacy is here to assist them along the path.

 

Raising funds to support adults as they seek the education they need to improve their lives is a challenge in an area where K-12 education is a priority for many funders.

 

We seek unrestricted funding for our grant-making and program development assistance activities. We need new support for emerging community-based literacy programs. These programs spring from the communities of the adult learners they serve and are committed to helping their neighbors get the skills they need to succeed.


Our Scholars deserve multiple years of support, and with additional funding we could provide two or more years of financial help to more of our scholars. Funding for our mentoring program would allow us to expand it to include mentors for continuing scholars.


CEO Statement

First Literacy believes that acquiring literacy is the first step that adults must take to improve their lives, provide for their families, and have a positive impact on their communities. All of our work is focused on ensuring that adults who want to improve their literacy levels are able to do so without barriers.


The decision to seek further education is quite a personal one for those adults who need to improve their literacy skills. Adult learners know that without high school credentials or functional English language skills, their prospects of economic success are limited. In fact, in many cases a GED or high school diploma is inadequate for the employment opportunities that would provide a living wage. These motivated adults want more education because they need jobs that offer the possibility of advancement. Basic education is often their first step towards economic improvement for themselves, their families, and even their communities.


The general public has a fundamental misunderstanding of adult basic education. It is about basic skills, not recreational enrichment. ABE students contribute to the economy as taxpayers and have the potential to contribute more as their literacy skills and earnings increase. Adult basic education is at the cornerstone of the success of education reform, civic engagement and health care, and other pressing public policy priorities. None of us can afford to live with vast numbers of our neighbors un- or under-educated.



In connection with our recently completed strategic review, we reached out to leaders in adult education, including government officials, program directors, and adult educators. We frequently heard that:


  • Projects funded by First Literacy allow programs to support their learners through traditional and innovative class models, volunteer recruiting and training, educational and career counseling, and childcare services.

  • First Literacy professional development workshops are valued by program teachers and other staff who not only attend workshops but also return to their organizations and share approaches, practices, and materials with their colleagues.

  • Our hands-on technical assistance helps build program capacity.

  • Our college scholarships offer both financial and emotional support to adult learners in Greater Boston.



Board Chair Statement

I support First Literacy because I care about every adult’s basic human right to be able to read and write in English. Literacy is fundamental to life, and First Literacy provides the resources and technical support to the best adult learning programs in the Greater Boston area. By raising private funds and public awareness, First Literacy provides support to these crucial programs, which in turn enhance our adult learners’ lives. Read between the lives is much more than a tagline at First Literacy; it stands for everything First Literacy is about.
Jeffrey P. Beale, President
First Literacy Board of Directors

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
We work to increase educational equity for adults in Greater Boston. Our partner-programs are located in Boston, Cambridge, Charlestown, Chinatown, Dorchester, East Boston, Jamaica Plain, Roxbury, Somerville, South Boston, South End, and Watertown.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Adult Education
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

First Literacy Professional Development Workshops

First Literacy’s professional development workshops are designed to give the programs and program staff the knowledge, skills and resources needed to improve, revise, and expand the classes and services they offer to adult learners. The goals for the workshops are:


  • To contribute to the ongoing professional development of ABE program staff in Greater Boston;

  • To support ongoing development of ABE programs in Greater Boston;

  • To promote the use of best, evidence-based practices among ABE program staff and programs;

  • To draw upon the expertise of experienced ABE staff and help develop new leaders in the field; and

  • To promote networking of ABE professionals in Greater Boston.


Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees At-Risk Populations Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

I wanted to tell you that my staff felt like this was one of the best workshops they’ve ever gone to and I agree. The time flew because the information was relevant. Thanks a lot for all that you do. You definitely have a great grip on what we are looking to learn about in this field. Charlestown Adult Education

 

We thought the First Literacy workshops were good and both complimented and filled in the gaps in professional development being offered by DESE [Department of Elementary and Secondary Education] and ENB [English for New Bostonians]. Several of our teachers attended First Literacy workshops during the year and found them beneficial. El Centro del Cardenal

Program Long-Term Success 

Long-term success would include:


  • a network of programs that regularly share information, strategies and approaches to educating adult learners;

  •  increased professionalism and effectiveness of ABE program staff;

  •  increased effectiveness of ABE programs: student learning gains, transition to employment and higher education, and attainment of personal, family, and community goals; and

  • improvement of community, through higher levels of adult and family education.

     

When educators receive the professional development they need to remain current in their field; when they have a network of other professionals who support one another; and when educators are encouraged to assume leadership positions in the field, their students are the ultimate beneficiaries.

Program Success Monitored By 

Evaluating our professional development workshops is a crucial component in keeping teachers and administrators engaged and coming back. After each workshop session, we survey the participants, using both qualitative and quantitative methods. We then measure how likely the workshop participants will implement the techniques learned, how likely they are to share what they learned with other teachers and administrators in their programs, and the overall effectiveness of the tools and techniques that were presented at the workshop.

 

Feedback is necessary in continuing to offer workshops that are current and beneficial to the adult education community. Thomas Guskey, the leading expert on professional development evaluation, outlines five levels of effective evaluation of professional and leadership development: 1) participant reaction, 2) participant learning, 3) organizational support and learning, 4) participant use of new knowledge and skills, and 5) student learning outcomes. Here at First Literacy, we have modeled the evaluation process of our professional development after Guskey’s first four levels of perspective on evaluation planning, and it has proved to be very useful in assessing the efficacy of our workshops. 

Examples of Program Success 
 

First Literacy Program Grants

Capacity-building grants are awarded to outstanding ABE programs on a two-year cycle. In June 2013, following a competitive application process, we awarded grants for projects to 19 programs in amounts ranging from $5,000 to $15,000 and totaling $225,000. The projects involve 1,200 learners and include core ABE classes such as Basic Literacy and ESOL, as well as classes that provide students with educational foundations in health and wellness, learning strategies, and oral presentation skills. We also support the use of adult peers as mentors and educators, working as teachers’ aides, tutors, and teachers. 

Because we understand the challenges that programs face in providing services, our grants also include crucial support for services such as educational, career, and personal counseling, and child care. Public funding is often unavailable for such services; however, without them many adult learners would not be able to participate in or complete classes.
Budget  $150,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees At-Risk Populations Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

In fy 2014, we supported 19 literacy programs located in Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Watertown. Classes include basic literacy, math, GED/Pre-GED, and computer classes; and services include childcare and personal and career counseling. Collectively these programs educated 1,254 adults. Set forth below is a chart of the progress made by students in classes supported by First Literacy:


•             697 adults made measurable education progress

•             672 demonstrated improved computer skills

•             30 obtained their GED or high school diploma

•             54 entered skills training programs

•             15 entered college

•             69 upgraded their employment

•             185 entered employment

•             188 began to help child(ren)with homework

•             169 increased participation in child(ren)'s school

 

Program Long-Term Success 

Ultimate long-term success would be adequate public funding for all ABE programs thus ensuring that adults would be able to get the education they need in order to be productive residents of Greater Boston.

Because that has not happened in 26 years, First Literacy long-term successes include:

  • Enabling over 42,000 adults to achieve their educational goals and take the next steps toward further education and/or jobs with a future;
  • Helping two emerging programs move from informal tutoring to providing classes taught by trained teachers;
  • Providing childcare services so that hundreds of mothers have been able to attend classes; and
  • Supporting a program model using advanced learners to tutor adults on waiting lists has helped over 5,000 adults.
Program Success Monitored By 

Each year, First Literacy works with programs to ensure that goals articulated in the request for funding are met. We require that programs maintain data, including the number of learners served, the diversity of the learners served by the program as a whole and by the project that we fund, the goals of each learner served, progress made towards their goals, and budget information. We then analyze the year-end data supplied to evaluate both the long- and short-term success of our work.

Our Board Education Committee is actively involved, reviewing applications, attending site visits, and reporting their findings to the full Board. Our Community Advisory Council, composed of literacy teachers and other literacy practitioners, and our staff visit each program at least once a year and prepare a detailed site visit report which is shared with the programs and the Board. We analyze the data reported in the year-end reports and forward the results to the Board and Community Advisory Council.

Examples of Program Success 



First Literacy Scholarships

First Literacy is the only organization in Greater Boston that awards scholarships to adults who have completed basic education or English language programs and are continuing on to higher education. The students receive First Literacy scholarships in recognition of their educational achievements and potential, community service, and perseverance in the face of hardships. Living on low wages with few documented skills, these adults face problems of job insecurity, poor health care, and housing and transportation problems. What resonates from all First Literacy Scholars is their resolution to improve their lives through education. In order to increase the students’ chances of success in school, First Literacy pairs each with a mentor who is a former scholarship recipient. Mentors support students’ efforts to succeed in college, to do well in their classes, and to reach their goals.
Budget  $40,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Adults At-Risk Populations Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success 
The 2013 scholarship recipients have been surveyed. Currently all are still in school pursuing Associates degrees. Our mentoring program is designed to help scholars persist by pairing them with scholars who have been in school for one or two years and understand the challenges that the new students face.
 
When our scholarship recipients persist and succeed in college due to their First Literacy scholarship and the mentoring that we provide, the program is deemed to be successful.
Program Long-Term Success 

We have awarded 400 Scholarships since 1990. When applying for a First Literacy Scholarship, applicants share their long-term goals which include becoming an accountant, a teacher, a paralegal, a social worker, and a nurse.

Our Scholars tell the success of this program best:

“I am a single parent and primary role model of my 12 year old daughter. I have lived in Cambridge since birth… Parenting, working, and family caretaking has been my life. I have purposefully created education opportunities for my daughter. I recognized my own yearning for an education which had to be delayed while I raised my brother, was caretaker for my mentally ill mother, and created an independent self-supporting business. With your scholarship, I can now attend college. I have gotten all A's and am using what I learned in business classes to improve the way I run my small business.”

Rosaline, First Literacy Scholar and student in a First Literacy supported program

Program Success Monitored By  Tracking the progress of First Literacy’s Scholars has not been an easy task. In the past four years, we have made great strides in developing relationships with our most recent Scholars, inviting them to speak at events, and including them as guests at our outreach and fundraising events. Each is personally interviewed at least once during the year by our Director of Programs. Scholars who apply for second year funding must share their transcripts with us.
Examples of Program Success 

Silvia, a 1999 First Literacy Scholar, has shared her success with us:

 “I was born in Boston. I dropped out of school in my senior year. I am determined to get an education, to make progress for myself and for my baby. I want my baby to be proud of me. I wanted to work in the medical field, hopefully in genetics. Your scholarship helped me attend college.

I’m proud that I got my Associates degree in 2003 and have a full-time job at MGH. My daughter is doing really well in preschool, and we love to read together. I was in my second semester at UMass as full-time evening student pursing my dream of studying genetics. I have a 4.0 average. None of this would have been possible without help from First Literacy. Thank your donors and tell them my education lets me use my talents productively.”

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Fund raising is First Literacy’s biggest challenge. We find it difficult to raise funds for services designed for the adult learner. As mentioned earlier, there is a misconception about adult basic education. There is a tremendous need for classes and services which provide adults an opportunity to improve their literacy skills in order for them to move on with their lives. Although the need is well-documented, in an area that focuses its philanthropy on K-12 education and workforce development, making a case for basic education is difficult. It is also difficult to make a case for First Literacy’s support of ABE programs. In order to qualify for funding from public sources, ABE programs are required to show funding from other sources, generally accounting for at least 20% of their budget. Many of First Literacy’s partner-programs simply do not have the staff to do more than rudimentary fundraising. ABE programs rely upon First Literacy for financial support and program development assistance because, while requiring clear measurable outcomes supported by data, First Literacy realizes that effective ABE programming sometimes requires more flexibility than public funding sources allow.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Skye Morrison Kramer
CEO Term Start July 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Skye Morrison Kramer became Chief Executive Officer of First Literacy in July 2010. As CEO, she is responsible for overall management and operations of First Literacy. Prior to assuming the position, Ms. Kramer was Executive Director of the Brookline Education Foundation for 13 years. The Brookline Education Foundation (BEF) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving Brookline’s commitment to excellence in public education.
 

She holds a BA from Loyola University, New Orleans; participated in the NCCJ’s LeadBoston leadership development program; and has held a variety of nonprofit leadership positions in Greater Boston.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Joanne Appleton Arnaud 1989 June 2010

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Michael D. Feher Director of Programs The First Literacy Director of Programs, Michael Feher, M. Ed., has been a professional in Adult Basic Education (ABE) for over 20 years. In that time, he has worked as a teacher, coordinator, and administrator and has been active in numerous ABE forums, including the Massachusetts ABE Directors’ Council and the Public Policy Committee of the Massachusetts Coalition for Adult Education. Mr. Feher has taught university Remedial English and Composition classes, a wide variety of ESOL classes in a broad range of levels to international students, and ESOL to immigrant and refugee populations in California and Massachusetts. He has also taught U.S. Citizenship Preparation classes as well as Literacy, Pre-Adult Secondary Education classes, and Adult Secondary Education/GED Preparation classes to native and non-native English speakers. 

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jeffrey P. Beale
Board Chair Company Affiliation Eaton Vance Investment Managers
Board Chair Term June 2005 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Simone Auster Rebuilding Together Boston Voting
Jeffrey P. Beale Eaton Vance Voting
Benton Berman Liberty Mutual Insurance Company Voting
Michael Duca Cambridge Trust Company Voting
Lisa Hughes WBZ-TV Voting
Vinay Mehra WGBH Voting
Vinay Mehra WGBH Voting
Robert Mitchell Jr. Concord Festival of Authors Voting
Karen Morrissey Cabot Corp., retired Voting
Ann Noble-Kiley Community member Voting
James Nolan Citibank Voting
Michael Ricciuti K & L Gates Voting
Kenneth Rossano Korn/Ferry International Voting
Walter Row III Eaton Vance Investment Managers Voting
Rinnelle Hilton van Ee Community member Voting
Christopher Walsh Cassidy Turley Voting
Mayor Martin Walsh City of Boston Exofficio

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Joan Abbot BEST Hotel Training Center NonVoting
Lori D'Alleva Charlestown Adult Education --
Marianna Geraskina El Centro del Cardenal NonVoting
Lee Haller English for New Bostonians NonVoting
Danielle Mendola Boston HERC --
Janet Nicholas Mass DESE-retired NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 15
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1 Indian
Gender Female: 6
Male: 11
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 85%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 25%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Education
  • Executive
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $460,000.00
Projected Expense $459,258.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2014 Review

2013 Review

2012 Review

2011 Review

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $668,218 $505,361 $391,144
Total Expenses $601,261 $625,566 $609,927

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $472,476 $181,931 $145,963
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $167,031 $89,959 $-323
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- $204,723 $218,505
Revenue In-Kind $28,711 $28,748 $26,999
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $471,103 $480,237 $478,679
Administration Expense $40,978 $45,548 $45,648
Fundraising Expense $89,180 $99,781 $85,600
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.11 0.81 0.64
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 77% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 19% 26% 23%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $1,018,294 $942,972 $1,063,938
Current Assets $100,982 $92,092 $73,087
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $29,229 $20,864 $21,625
Total Net Assets $989,065 $922,108 $1,042,313

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $858,642.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 20.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 3.45 4.41 3.38

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

First Literacy is working to reverse a few negative fundraising years. When the current CEO began in July 2010, she was met with the news that First Literacy had lost $200,000 in long-term grant funding. The organization has been working diligently to replace that much needed funding, including expanding special events income, and improving outreach and stewardship of the loyal donors, many of whom have supported First Literacy since its creation.

The Corporate Spelling Bee is the best kept secret in Boston and is First Literacy’s signature fundraising event. In 2010, it raised a little over $100,000. In 2011, it raised $205,000 and in 2014, it raised close to $250,000.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's reviewed financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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