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English at Large Inc.

 800 West Cummings Park, Suite 5550
 Woburn, MA 01801
[P] (781) 395-2374
[F] --
http://www.englishatlarge.org
info@englishatlarge.org
Maureen Willis
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INCORPORATED: 1970
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3050593

LAST UPDATED: 09/07/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names Eastern Massachusetts Literacy Council (1970)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

English at Large is a nonprofit that provides individual and small group instruction through a volunteer network to adult immigrants and other newcomers who want to acquire English language skills as they adapt to life in the United States. Our vision is that newcomers to the United States will develop the English language skills and acquire the cultural knowledge needed to fully engage in their communities and fulfill their life goals.

Mission Statement

English at Large is a nonprofit that provides individual and small group instruction through a volunteer network to adult immigrants and other newcomers who want to acquire English language skills as they adapt to life in the United States. Our vision is that newcomers to the United States will develop the English language skills and acquire the cultural knowledge needed to fully engage in their communities and fulfill their life goals.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $174,941.00
Projected Expense $174,941.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Beginner English
  • Conversation Groups
  • One-on-one Tutoring

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

English at Large is a nonprofit that provides individual and small group instruction through a volunteer network to adult immigrants and other newcomers who want to acquire English language skills as they adapt to life in the United States. Our vision is that newcomers to the United States will develop the English language skills and acquire the cultural knowledge needed to fully engage in their communities and fulfill their life goals.


Background Statement

 

Founded in 1970, English at Large is a nonprofit that provides individual and small group instruction through a volunteer network to adult immigrants and other newcomers who want to acquire English language skills as they adapt to life in the United States. Our vision is that newcomers to the United States will develop the English language skills and acquire the cultural knowledge needed to fully engage in their communities and fulfill their life goals.

English At Large serves a diverse group of English language learners (ELLs). In FY13, our learners came from 71 different countries and spoke 52 different languages and dialects. EAL learners are from all over the world, though many of our learners are from Haiti, Russia, Brazil, China, Somalia, Vietnam, Korea, and the Dominican Republic. The English language learners we serve range from new arrivals to United States citizens and the need for language acquisition is unique for each individual.



Impact Statement

 English At Large is a small organization with a big impact. In FY17, with a budget of $192,000 and three full-time staff, we served a total of 550 students with the help of 244 volunteers.

In FY17,

1. 20% of English At Large one-on-one learners got a job or obtained a better job

2. We provided an impressive 4,500 hours of one-on-one instruction to 155 learners from all over the world.

3. Our volunteers included 150 one-on-one tutors, 49 conversation group facilitators, 4 career group facilitators, 3 intake assessors, 17 board and office volunteers,  and 4 Beginner English class teachers

4. 25% of EAL learners increased their involvement in community activities

5. 62 students participated in our Career Access Lab to acquire the skills and tools needed to secure meaningful employment and career advancement.

 


Needs Statement

While statistics demonstrate that immigrants in Massachusetts make up a large percentage of the population, they continue to lack access to services in many key areas. There are approximately 40 million immigrants in the United States (American Community Survey, 2011) and 34% of recent immigrants in Massachusetts live in linguistically isolated households (Immigrant Learning Center, 2012). Another recent report identified that almost half of the total immigrant population in the Greater Boston area aged 16 or older have limited English proficiency (Breaking the Language Barrier, A Report on English Language Services in Greater Boston, The Boston Foundation, March 2011).

With limited ways to communicate with neighbors, employers, childcare providers, doctors and others in the community, new immigrants and refugees face a unique set of social, psychological, educational, and health-related challenges. Learning English and the ability to communicate effectively can mean the difference of over $20,000 in annual earnings, increased benefits in the workplace, home and greater participation and civic engagement in communities. (Breaking the Language Barrier, A Report on English Language Services in Greater Boston, The Boston Foundation, March 2011)

The following examples are just a few of barriers that our learners face:

· Difficulty obtaining employment

· Struggling to adjust to a new environment

· Difficulty in accessing community resources and services

· Trouble advocating for children at school

· Challenges in describing symptoms to a physician or mental health provider

· Trouble presenting as competent and intelligent


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

EAL is the only non-profit organization providing individual and small group English instruction in our service area and addresses a national need at the local level. The English At Large service area covers 21 suburban cities/towns in Middlesex County, including: Acton, Arlington, Bedford, Belmont, Billerica, Boxborough, Burlington, Carlisle, Concord, Lexington, Lincoln, Littleton, Medford, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, Waltham, Wilmington, Winchester, and Woburn. 

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Adult Education
  2. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Beginner English

Our primary focus for Beginner English classes is to serve English language learners in the high needs communities of Waltham and Medford. Our program focuses on survival English, to teach words and phrases necessary for day to day life.  Offered on college campuses at Brandeis and Tufts Universities, the program is facilitated by student volunteers. 


Budget  $10,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success  Participants will increase their vocabulary for daily life.
Program Long-Term Success  Basic English participants will gain the language skills and cultural knowledge necessary to navigate their immediate environment.
Program Success Monitored By  Participant self-reporting.
Examples of Program Success 

English At Large met with Kelley Cronin of the Acton Housing Authority and Sharon Mercurio and Beverly Hutchings of the Acton Council on Aging to discuss the needs of their non-English speaking seniors. We learned that few if any of the non-English speakers use the resources of the Senior Center. Ms. Cronin felt that a class targeted to the seniors in the housing complex, held on-site, would make a big difference to their ability to function in the community. In the fall of 2013, in collaboration with the Acton Housing Authority, English At Large began a Basic English class for residents at Windsor Green, a senior resident community.


Conversation Groups

 

Because many participants do not speak English in their homes and interact with few native English speakers, this program provides a critical opportunity to practice spontaneous, spoken English in a supportive group setting and make valuable connections with other English language learners in their community. Oftentimes, conversation groups are the only place where participants can comfortably speak English spontaneously. Relationships are formed as both facilitators and limited English speakers successfully get their meanings across.

EAL’s Conversation Groups provide language practice not often available in the traditional language classroom setting. At a Conversation Group, no single person assumes the teacher role. Facilitators do not teach lessons on structured speech. Instead, they provide opportunities to share cultural and personal information relevant to the group so that group members can communicate with confidence.

 

Budget  15,000
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Adults
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term success is measured by a 80% positive feedback from participant evaluation forms.
Program Long-Term Success  70% of learners leaving the program will report an increase in English language skills.
Program Success Monitored By  End of the semester evaluation forms.
Examples of Program Success 
One conversation group participant stated, "All the things you did give me confidence and let my English improve and progress. Before I attend this group, I don't dare to say English and always rely on my daughter to handle everything. But now I dare to deal with everything by myself, like going to hospital to see my doctor or going to the traffic office to change my senior card."
 
In 2011 and 2012, English At Large completed 83 volunteer-led conversation groups, each with 6 - 12 intermediate to advanced learners. 

One-on-one Tutoring

English At Large uses a creative learning model for English instruction. We believe that the one-to-one tutoring setting ensures the personalized attention necessary to understand and capitalize on each learner’s strengths as a foundation for addressing their individual needs. Each program volunteer meets individually with an adult learner 2hrs/week and provides English language instruction that targets each learner’s goals. These goals may include obtaining employment, starting on a path to citizenship, and learning to better advocate for their children in the school system.

 

Along with 12 hours of training from English At Large, tutors are trained to draw on their own use of English as a foundation for personal instruction, and receive ongoing training and support throughout the year. Tutors use real-life communication skills that learners can use immediately in their daily lives. Using this creative approach, English At Large is able to keep program costs down while simultaneously serving a large number of learners (85 tutor/learner pairs at any given time).

Budget  $165,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Adults Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Learners will improve their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills by at least 20% by the end of their two-year program.
Program Long-Term Success 
Immigrants in our 21 town area can speak, understand, read and write English as proficiently as a native speaker
Program Success Monitored By 
Federally approved assessment tests administered annually and monthly tutor reports.
Examples of Program Success 
In FY11 and FY12, 51% of our learners were employed, over 30% have increased civic or community involvement, 36% have found jobs or made progress in their current jobs, and 26% have increased involvement in their children's education. 
 
Testimonies from learners:
"I think this is a great idea for people like me to have this support to improve our English. I not only learn English, I learn American culture and American holidays and can learn traditional life." - EAL Learner
 
"I always thought my problem in this language is my accent, and I didn't care if I made a mistake. When I started with my tutor, I changed my mind and since then I got more respect in my job, and I try harder to make people understand what I said." - EAL Learner
 
"Tutoring is important and challenging work. The gift of our language is one of the most important things we can give. Many of those who don't speak English are unable to get jobs they have qualifications for." 
 
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Qingjian Shi
CEO Term Start Jan 2013
CEO Email qj@englishatlarge.org
CEO Experience

Ms. Shi has dedicated much of her life to creating positive and meaningful social change. Qingjian is a trained educator, facilitator, public speaker, strategic planner and capacity builder and her passion is in empowering under-served communities. Qingjian was previously the director of education and outreach at the Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence where she conceptualized and implemented a program engaging Asian American young people to become leaders in their communities and voices of anti-violence. 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Adam Bolonsky Program Manager --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
ProLiteracy America 1970
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 300
Number of Contract Staff 5
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Mixed Race
Gender Female: 4
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Catherine Corliss
Board Chair Company Affiliation Partners Health
Board Chair Term July 2013 - June 2014
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Coleman Carden Loan officer, Winchester Cooperative Bank Voting
Catherine Corliss Community Volunteer --
Gary Fallick No Affiliation Voting
Evan Fitzpatrick Bain Capital Voting
Laura Henry Community Volunteer --
Violeta Jeliazkova Owner, VN Publishing Voting
Phyllis Lasky Community Volunteer --
James Linderman Faculty member, Bentley College Exofficio
Ludy Liu Community Volunteer --
Jill Shuman Faculty Member, Tufts University School of Medicine Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $174,941.00
Projected Expense $174,941.00
Form 990s

2014 Form 990

2013 From 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2014 Financial Review

2013 Financial Review

2012 Financial Reivew

2011 Financial Review

2010 Financial Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $188,609 $177,009 $226,701
Total Expenses $181,865 $186,759 $209,310

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $100,000 $100,000 $113,060
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $100,000 $100,000 $113,060
Individual Contributions $65,069 $50,788 $71,459
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $2,636 -- $2,533
Investment Income, Net of Losses $502 $581 $652
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $14,875 -- $14,502
Revenue In-Kind $5,527 $13,831 $24,495
Other -- $11,809 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $145,683 $93,727 $139,347
Administration Expense $16,304 $71,058 $25,283
Fundraising Expense $19,878 $21,974 $44,680
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 0.95 1.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 50% 67%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 15% 22%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $119,414 $112,670 $123,845
Current Assets $116,081 $112,670 $123,845
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $119,414 $112,670 $123,845

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs is per the organization's Reviewed Financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

English At Large is a unique provider of English language instruction. 

Our vision is that newcomers to the United States will develop the English language skills and acquire the cultural knowledge needed to fully engage in their communities and fulfill their life goals.


Instead of teaching from textbooks, our tutors and facilitators uses our learners’ narratives as the guide for teaching. Our unique approach is inspired by the Language Experience Approach – a tool that provides immediate language skills tailored to our learners’ needs. English At Large is a small organization with a big impact. With 4 staff, we serve over 600 learners a year with the support of our volunteers. 

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Just as no two learners are alike, English At Large does not have a one-size fits all curriculum. Our learners have different learning styles, different rates for processing information, and varying degrees of comfort when speaking a new language. Because each individual learner is unique, our tutors are trained to use a variety of teaching approaches. But the very first thing that tutors must accomplish is to find out everything they can about who their learners are, where they come from, their experience with learning English, their hopes for using English, and how English can be used to achieve their life goals.

Language Experience Activity (LEA) has been considered an effective strategy for working with adults with limited literacy because it connects oral communication to meaningful. Linking the learner’s actual experiences and concerns with engaging lessons allows learning to be contextualized and relevant. English At Large places a high value on the learner narrative. Therefore, EAL programs utilize the learner’s experience as the “textbook” for learning English. Lesson plans are created using the learner’s immediate environment. When learners are able to learn material that is relevant to their daily life, they are more likely to remember the lesson. Thus, at EAL, English is taught through context: the learner who is pregnant learns vocabulary and grammar relevant to pregnancy, hospital visits, and visits to her OB/GYN. Similarly, the father who juggles two jobs while supporting his family, and whose wife also works, learns words and concepts like childcare, aftercare, and Head Start. Learners are immediately taught the language skills that apply to their ongoing individual needs, and in the order that their needs arise. In short, the beauty of our program is how extensively and continually volunteers are trained to teach English that is immediately applicable to a learner’s own current situation, as well as those situations learners are likely to face in the future.

Using these approaches, the participant’s learning experience goes well beyond learning vocabulary and understanding grammar. The majority of EAL’s program volunteers are long-time residents of our service area. They are experts in their community’s educational systems, shopping centers, human services, recreational areas, libraries…etc. Volunteers are trained to address learner needs that extend beyond language: how to explore community resources applicable to their interests and needs (daycare for children, access to higher education and job training, etc.). Through our program, our learners gain cultural knowledge and communication skills that are necessary for success in the United States. This way, the process of learning English becomes a richer experience beyond the classroom.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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