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Organization DBA --
Former Names Merrimack Valley Textile Museum (1986)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

An affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, MA, tells America’s story through the art, history, and science of textiles. ATHM holds the world’s largest and most important collections of spinning wheels, hand looms, and early production machines, as well as more than five million pieces of textile prints, fabric samples, rolled textiles coverlets, and costumes. The Osborne Library contains a rich and comprehensive collection of printed, pictorial and manuscript material of interest to researchers in a variety of fields.

Mission Statement

An affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, MA, tells America’s story through the art, history, and science of textiles. ATHM holds the world’s largest and most important collections of spinning wheels, hand looms, and early production machines, as well as more than five million pieces of textile prints, fabric samples, rolled textiles coverlets, and costumes. The Osborne Library contains a rich and comprehensive collection of printed, pictorial and manuscript material of interest to researchers in a variety of fields.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $2,204,785.00
Projected Expense $1,849,759.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Artifact Collections
  • Educational Programs
  • Exhibitions
  • Research and Library Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

An affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, MA, tells America’s story through the art, history, and science of textiles. ATHM holds the world’s largest and most important collections of spinning wheels, hand looms, and early production machines, as well as more than five million pieces of textile prints, fabric samples, rolled textiles coverlets, and costumes. The Osborne Library contains a rich and comprehensive collection of printed, pictorial and manuscript material of interest to researchers in a variety of fields.


Background Statement

Caroline Stevens Rogers, a member of a venerable textile industry family and a hand-weaver and dyer, founded the Merrimack Valley Textile Museum in North Andover, Massachusetts in 1960. It was accredited by the American Association of Museums in 1973. The Museum’s name changed to the American Textile History Museum in 1987 to reflect the broadening scope of our collections and presentations.

In 1992, the Museum purchased the Kitson Building in Lowell, completed renovations and opened to the public in April, 1997. Another change came in 2006, with an agreement to sell part of its building for conversion into mixed-use space including residential lofts, and the home of The Lowell Sun, the region’s daily newspaper. The redesigned core exhibition, “Textile Revolution: An Exploration through Space and Time” opened in 2009. Visitors spin, weave, recycle, and design their way through history, weaving on an authentic hand-loom, maneuvering the controls of a real single-engine plane, and creating their own textile inventions. From a bicycle made from carbon fiber to clothing made from recycled plastic soda bottles, they see firsthand how textiles impact our world every day.

Also in 2009, ATHM announced an affiliation with the Smithsonian Institution. In 2011, the Museum was selected to participate in the Smithsonian Institution’s prestigious “Places of Invention” project – one of only six museums in the country to earn this distinction. “Places of Invention,” a planned 3,500-square-foot exhibition at the National Museum of American History, scheduled to open in 2015, will feature a selection of “hot spots” of invention and innovation—places where a critical mass of inventive people, networks, institutions, funding and other resources come together and creativity flourishes.

ATHM holds one of the world's largest publicly held collections of tools, spinning wheels, hand looms, and early production machines. In 2012, the collection of early textile machines was recognized by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers for its historic significance to 19th century engineering and technology. The textile collections include more than five million pieces of prints, fabric samples, rolled textiles coverlets, and clothing which are accessible on-line through the Chace Catalogue. This catalogue enables visitors to the website to gain access to key portions of its curatorial and storage facilities through the technology of a virtual museum.


Impact Statement

Accomplishments:

ATHM presented four fascinating rotating exhibitions in 2014: Flowers in the Factory, Inventing Lowell, Fiberart International, and Artist Textiles: Picasso to Warhol. Additionally, ATHM’s critically acclaimed travelling exhibition, Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War, was loaned to the New-York Historical Society and the Shelburne Museum.

The Museum was made more accessible to the more than 1,000 visitors that visited for free through programs including Free Super Saturdays, the Highland Street Foundation’s Free Fun Friday, and a new initiative that offers free admission for residents of Lowell and Lawrence in July and August.

ATHM launched a renovated website, making the site more functional, visually appealing and responsive.

The Virtual Textile Project, an open access database for high quality digitally-conserved textile images, digitally captured approximately 15,000 fabrics from ATHM’s sample book collection, ranging from the 1860s to the 1950s.

ATHM strengthened and built new partnerships for educational and outreach programming with organizations including Girls, Inc., Lowell and Lawrence Public Schools, and Phillips Academy.

Goals: 

Expand educational programming to reach new school districts and audiences.

Increase access to the Osborne Library through IMLS grant.

Create greater community engagement with focused rotating exhibitions.

Increase the strength of the endowment through an Institutional Development Campaign.

Expand the capacity of the Museum’s online shop.


Needs Statement

The American Textile History Museum – like most museums in America – has struggled during the past decade with economic downturns and diminished funding in the arts and humanities. Our most pressing concern at this point is to build sustainable annual gifts and develop diversified revenue streams from education, research and retail operations. To do this, we will be utilizing our tremendous collections and resources as well as dynamic permanent and special exhibitions.

Following that, we want to expand and enhance our educational offerings with increased staff and resources to develop curriculum, improve outreach and serve as a resource for a national and international community. ATHM would also like to improve virtual access to our research collections through enhanced technological tools for the website and collections management.


CEO Statement

 

It is my pleasure to welcome you to the American Textile History Museum, where we preserve the past and explore the future of our country through the unique lens of textiles.

It is an exciting and critical time for ATHM, as we seek to undergo a major transformation, forming new partnerships and launching a major fundraising campaign to protect and preserve our unparalleled core collection and ensure we are here to fulfill our mission for generations to come. In early 2016, we have temporarily closed our exhibits to the general public to allow us to focus on this essential transformation.

From the first spinning mill to today’s nanotechnology, the textile industry has been at the forefront of innovation, entrepreneurship and fashion. And ATHM is at the forefront of telling that story.

Affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution, this Museum is an invaluable resource of knowledge about an industry that helped define the course of this country. ATHM holds the world’s largest and most important publicly held collections of tools, spinning wheels, hand looms, and early production machines, as well as more than five million pieces of textile prints, fabric samples, rolled textiles coverlets, and costumes. The Osborne Library alone contains more than 90,000 items including books, manuscripts, periodicals, trade literature postcards, and images.

For those who have visited us, it is no surprise that we earned the Trip Advisor® Certificate of Excellence and were voted Merrimack Valley’s Favorite Museum.

With your support, we will preserve and protect the Museum’s unparalleled core collection of American artifacts and continue to fulfill our mission for generations to come.

We ask that all who share a love of and concern for America’s textile history and heritage to help us ensure ATHM’s future success and donate today. Thank you for helping us to preserve our nation’s past…and our museum’s future.

Warm regards,

 

Todd Smith
Interim Executive Director

 

 


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL

The reach of ATHM is national and international through exhibitions and research. ATHM is an educator and a source of inspiration for people throughout northeast MA, particularly Lowell and Lawrence. Lowell is comprised of 40% minorities; 20% of residents live below the poverty level and 60% of students are eligible for free/reduced lunch. In Lawrence, the unemployment rate is 20%, nearly 60% of residents are minorities, and 84% of students are eligible for free/reduced lunch.

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Museums
  2. Education - Libraries
  3. Science & Technology -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Artifact Collections

The American Textile History Museum houses one of the largest collections of its kind in the world making it an un-parallel resource for the study of American textile history. Historians and textile designers, architects and preservationist, engineers, novelists, and industrial archaeologists are all drawn to the Museum’s collections. The textile and clothing collections include everyday garments, textile samples, textiles, and decorative art objects from the eighteenth century to the present. The tools & machinery collection includes pre-industrial artifacts and tools, industrial and powered machines, and workplace artifacts.
Budget  $110,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  ATHM provides access to its collections through its on-line database, exhibitions, and community programming.
Program Long-Term Success  The collections have continued to grow and support the Museum’s goal of telling America’s story through the art, science, and history of textiles.
Program Success Monitored By  Success is measured by tracking activities such as visitors and researchers both on-site and online.
Examples of Program Success 

There is a steady increase in research inquiries to use the collections and a commitment to make the museum’s collections available through as many avenues as possible.


Educational Programs

ATHM educational programs provide enjoyable opportunities for personal growth and discovery through exposure to information and objects that connect to America's diverse textile heritage and stimulate creativity and problem-solving skills.  Our programs for school age children all conform to state achievement regulations and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) curriculum.
Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success  ATHM’s unique educational programming sees continuously high levels of participation across all areas, with new schools brining students for field trips or guided tours and highly skilled instructors leading textile arts classes and school programs.
Program Long-Term Success  Increased enrollment in programs held on-site. Renewal of the Museum's traveling education program to local schools. Development of curriculum which can serve as a replicable model for other museums and/or schools.
Program Success Monitored By  The Museum tracks program enrollment statistics and gathers feedback from program participants.
Examples of Program Success  We are the only institution locally to offer programs which help Boy Scouts earn the Textile and the new Inventing merit badges. The Inventing merit badge was instituted by the Lemelson Foundation which has a goal of fostering innovation, invention, and entrepreneurship.

Exhibitions

As ATHM undergoes a significant transformation, our exhibits, galleries, and gift shop are temporarily closed to the general public as of January 1, 2016, with access limited to members, private group tours, and educational programs. Access to the collections is available on a limited basis, by appointment only. Please visit www.athm.org for more information.

Budget  $190,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Museums
Population Served Families Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Increases in Museum attendance and membership sales, positive reviews on travel sites, such as TripAdvisor.com, and increases in media coverage indicate growing popularity and reach of ATHM’s exhibitions.

 
Program Long-Term Success  Our exhibitions seek to provide greater public understanding of the innovative development of our country through the teaching tool of textile development. Increased reach will bring national name recognition through word-of-mouth publicity and new financial supporters.
Program Success Monitored By  Museum attendance reports indicate the popularity of our exhibitions. Website and social media analytics as well as press coverage also indicate growing awareness and interest in ATHM exhibitions.
Examples of Program Success  ATHM earned TripAdvisor’s Certificate of Excellence for consistent outstanding reviews. ATHM has received television coverage on WGBH’s “Open Studio”, WCVB’s “Chronicle,” as well as coverage in publications including The Boston Globe, Lowell Sun, New York Times, Boston Herald, Merrimack Valley Magazine, and FiberArt Now. ATHM also saw significant increases in attendance in 2012 and 2013.

Research and Library Programs

The Osborne Library contains a rich and comprehensive collection of printed, pictorial and manuscript material of interest to researchers in a variety of fields. Users include historians of business, technology and labor, textile and exhibit designers, spinners, weavers, architects, filmmakers, textile workers and their families, and the general public. The collections include books, pamphlets, government documents, trade catalogs, advertising material, prints, photographs, insurance maps and business records that document the history of textile production in the United States.
Budget  $70,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Cultural Heritage
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  The Osborne Library has been awarded three two-year IMLS grants between 2008 and 2014 that have enabled us to make a large portion of our collections available through our online catalogue, the Chace Catalogue, and OCLC, an international database. That has increased usage of images and reference requests for more information.
Program Long-Term Success  Improved technological tools, such as a new and upgraded collections database, will enable visitors to the website to have better access to all of our reference and research tools. However, a portion of our collections are still inaccessible to researchers who cannot make a physical visit to the library. An expanded library staff could increase access to this material, particularly in the labor-intensive area of processing manuscript collections.
Program Success Monitored By  Data tracking both in-person and online inquiries, including web data analytics for the Chace Catalogue.
Examples of Program Success  Researchers in the past month have included a college senior researching a specific North Carolina company; an independent scholar researching the material used for slave clothes in the U.S.; a Ph.D. scholar working on museum studies and art history; and a post-doctoral scholar working on a conference presentation on 19th-century medicine, using the details of the treatment of victims of the 1860 Pemberton Mill collapse. Photo image requests in the past month have come from publishers, free-lance authors, an historic house museum preparing an exhibition; and members of the general public doing genealogical research.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Jonathan A Stevens
CEO Term Start Jan 2015
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience


Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Steven Jackson Director of Finance and Administration --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Certificate of Excellence TripAdvisor 2014
Landmark Mechanical Engineering Collection American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2012
Reader's Choice Award - Museums Merrimack Valley Magazine 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
American Association of Museums - Member --
Smithsonian Museum - Affiliate --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
American Association of Museums - 10 Year Accreditation --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 9
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 81%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr J. Matthew Coggins
Board Chair Company Affiliation Enterprise Bank
Board Chair Term Dec 2015 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Judy Canal Lowell General Hospital Voting
Ms. Laurie Carlson Steger Weavers' Guild of RI Voting
Mr. Peter J. Caruso II Prince Lobel Tye LLP Voting
Ms. Peggy Church Volunteer Voting
Mr. J. Matthew Coggins Enterprise Bank Voting
Ms. Gail M Dowd CPA, MBA Eaton Vance Management Voting
Mr. A. Garcia Broadwater Capital Mangement Voting
Mr. Eric A. Lowrey Brown Brothers & Harriman Voting
Ms. Marlene Marchilena Volunteer Voting
Mr. John H Pearson Jr. Pearson & Pearson Voting
Mr. Barrett F. Ripley Troy Mills Voting
Ms. Jan Russell Retired Voting
Mr. George W Shuster Retired Voting
Mr. Karl H Spilhaus National Textile Association Voting
Ms. Ruth Ward Volunteer Voting
Mr. L. McKay Whatley Attorney Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 16
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 10%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Collections
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Investment
  • Personnel

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $2,204,785.00
Projected Expense $1,849,759.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

2008 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $1,831,657 $1,297,088 $985,785
Total Expenses $1,799,050 $1,841,462 $1,821,712

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $54,741 $63,417 $58,090
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $54,741 $63,417 $58,090
Individual Contributions $1,452,901 $910,222 $534,032
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $113,453 $99,863 $99,685
Investment Income, Net of Losses $149,970 $122,358 $282,071
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $57,970 $90,105 $7,279
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $2,622 $11,123 $4,628

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $1,384,265 $1,409,653 $1,478,137
Administration Expense $153,508 $182,396 $146,047
Fundraising Expense $261,277 $249,413 $197,528
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.02 0.70 0.54
Program Expense/Total Expenses 77% 77% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 17% 23% 33%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $8,625,915 $8,394,719 $8,785,281
Current Assets $1,234,803 $1,137,677 $1,216,657
Long-Term Liabilities $60,000 $44,031 $89,421
Current Liabilities $220,953 $222,838 $119,012
Total Net Assets $8,344,962 $8,127,850 $8,576,848

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $2,400,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.59 5.11 10.22

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 1% 1% 1%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Museum is embarking on a multi-year program impacting all areas of the organization to stabilize our financial situation and grow support through diversified revenue streams. Our objective is to enhance ATHM by leveraging our significant Library and Collection holdings to reach wider audiences, develop curriculum, expand programs, promote educational engagement with all ages and generate income to support these activities. This income will come from diverse activities including enhanced and substantive on-line research assistance, contracted in-house research for businesses, genealogical searches, educational programs that serve audiences on-site, on-line, and in the classroom. By having a more robust use of the information available on our collections and archives we will also use images and resources from those holdings to create salable retail objects. We are developing a retail plan and operation to market Museum ‘capital’ both on-site and on-line.

The primary focus of leadership and staff is continual improvement of exhibitions and exceptional educational programming. By accomplishing these goals through multiple venues – onsite, on-line, and in appropriate outside locations – we continue to advance the Museum’s mission to ‘tell America’s story through the art; history and science of textiles.’

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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