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The Community Builders, Inc.

 185 Dartmouth Street
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (857) 221-8600
[F] (617) 6959805
www.tcbinc.org
[email protected]
Jullie Patterson
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INCORPORATED: 1964
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2324773

LAST UPDATED: 11/26/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Community Builders’ (TCB’s) mission is to build and sustain strong communities where people of all incomes can achieve their full potential. We realize our mission by developing, operating, and serving high-quality housing and implementing neighborhood-based models that drive economic opportunity, health and well-being for our residents and the community.

Mission Statement

The Community Builders’ (TCB’s) mission is to build and sustain strong communities where people of all incomes can achieve their full potential. We realize our mission by developing, operating, and serving high-quality housing and implementing neighborhood-based models that drive economic opportunity, health and well-being for our residents and the community.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2017 to Sept 30, 2018
Projected Income $37,390,551.00
Projected Expense $35,052,001.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Choice Neighborhoods
  • Community Life
  • Low Income Housing Tax Credit
  • Neighborhood Stabilization Programs
  • New Market Tax Credits
  • Section 8

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Community Builders’ (TCB’s) mission is to build and sustain strong communities where people of all incomes can achieve their full potential. We realize our mission by developing, operating, and serving high-quality housing and implementing neighborhood-based models that drive economic opportunity, health and well-being for our residents and the community.


Background Statement

TCB was founded in 1964 as South End Community Development and acquired and rehabilitated 11 row houses, including 50 apartments. In 1970, we changed our name to the Greater Boston Community Development Corporation and began to offer development consultation to other local housing organizations. Finally, we rebranded as The Community Builders and expanded our work throughout Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. In 1996, after decades of consulting, TCB changed strategy to focus on comprehensive neighborhood revitalization. Today, TCB has grown to 500 employees across 14 states and Washington, D.C. In 2012, we adopted a Community Life model, a supportive services component, as a platform for our residents and neighborhoods to achieve success, deepening out commitment to not only build, but sustain, strong communities where people of all incomes can achieve their full potential.


Impact Statement

TCB specializes in developing new affordable housing for low and mixed income communities as well as rehabilitating existing projects. Our neighborhood-based model expands beyond the home by forging strategic partnerships with local organizations around our communities, and investing in local businesses and amenities. TCB has also enhanced its existing resident services through our place-based Community Life (CL) program. CL builds resources in multiple ways to achieve impact:

  • We build partnerships with local organizations and stakeholders.
  • Coordinate work with those partners to ensure that all contracted obligations are met.
  • Provide exceptional support services to all of the residents who live in our communities.
  • Integrate the residents living in set-aside apartments with the rest of the community.
  • Leverage TCB’s position and brand as a developer to mobilize broader revitalization.

 

The CL program works by employing on-site staff who build relationships with our residents and develop programs and opportunities that reflect their needs and desires. Staff engage and empower residents to develop goals, and access community resources, as needed. In addition, staff provide ongoing support and follow-up to address obstacles and celebrate successes. CL staff also record individual and program data to measure success. To maximize impact, TCB seeks Community Life staff who are familiar with the communities in which they work, are aware of the strengths and challenges that exist, and the resources from which to draw. This experience enables the CL staff to build trusting relationships with residents and meaningful relationships with partners more quickly and with greater confidence.

Some of our outcomes from the previous year include:

  • 74% of children ages 3-6 in TCB communities are enrolled in quality preschools, compared to just 61% of U.S. households overall
  • 78% of residents in our newly renovated Cincinnati communities now feel safe at home, a 41% increase since 2014. Property crime in the neighborhood dropped nearly 10% this year.
  • 59% of seniors in TCB communities are managing their chronic health conditions; up from 53% in 2015.

 


Needs Statement

American cities, which are some of the most vibrant and diverse places in the world, face tremendous challenges, as do American families. Rising rents and stagnant wages force many low-income families to choose among housing options that range from bad to worse in locations that are isolated from educational and economic opportunity.

TCB's Community Life programming serves 100% low-income and extremely low-income families and seniors. Many of our homes are headed by single women and are located in neighborhoods facing destabilization caused by school turnover, sporadic student displacement, and streets claimed as gang territories.

Successful programs constantly reorganize and respond to the shifting needs of the community. As such, the Community Life model is predicated on resident input; they drive the process from start to finish. Before CL staff seek partners and programs, they run TCB’s Resident Asset and Needs Assessment (RANA) to identify the specific strengths and needs of the community. Staff then generate the Community Success Plan (CSP), a framework that incorporates the assets and needs into unique community objectives. Resident input continues even after partners are consulted and programs are implemented via the annual Community Life Questionnaire (CLQ). The CLQ is administered in-person by trauma-informed CL staff, and allows residents to continually assess and shape the compliment of programs offered, to ensure they are being run effectively.

The Community Life Core Objectives are:
  • Objective 1: 75% of 3-6 y/o are enrolled in quality pre-school
  • Objective 2: 60% of young adults ages 16-25 are on a path to success
  • Objective 3: 80% of eligible residents are registered to vote
  • Objective 4: 50% of residents have checking or savings accounts.
  • Objective 5: Increase the number of households earning wages by 5% annually

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

NATIONAL

TCB builds and serves homes in 14 states: Massachusetts; Connecticut; Delaware; Illinois; Indiana; Kentucky; Maryland; Michigan; New Jersey; New York; North Carolina; Ohio; Pennsylvania; Rhode Island; Virginia; as well as the District of Columbia.

Organization Categories

  1. Housing, Shelter - Low-Income & Subsidized Rental Housing
  2. Human Services -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Choice Neighborhoods

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Budget  --
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General None None
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Community Life

TCB uses a Community Life (CL) model as a platform for residents and neighborhoods to achieve success, with measurable outcomes and delivery in six practice areas: youth development and violence reduction, education, workforce development and asset building, and social engagement, and health and wellness. The CL place-based model identifies major impact at three levels – the family, the community, and the neighborhood. Our unique access to households of all incomes allows us to meet people at home and connect them with resources tailored to their needs and assets. We engage local partners whose expertise and experience expands opportunities for success. We work collaboratively with our residents, and build on their strengths to access high quality programming. We leverage community engagement, data and evidence-based practice to understand needs and develop effective strategies that improve educational, social and economic success for our neighborhoods, half of whom are children and youth.

Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

 CL empowers families and neighborhoods to achieve success and address the challenges of intergenerational poverty. We use an evidence based approach to achieve impact, with impressive results.

Some of our outcomes from the previous year include:

  • 74% of children ages 3-6 in TCB communities are enrolled in quality preschools, compared to just 61% of U.S. households overall
  • 78% of residents in our newly renovated Cincinnati communities now feel safe at home, a 41% increase since 2014. Property crime in the neighborhood dropped nearly 10% this year.
  • 59% of seniors in TCB communities are managing their chronic health conditions; up from 53% in 2015.

Program Long-Term Success 
CL works to achieve six core objectives for residents in our communities:

  • Education- Countdown to Kindergarten: 75 percent of children ages three to six are enrolled in quality pre-school;
  • Youth Development- Young and Gifted: 60 percent of young adults ages 16-25 are on a path to success through enrollment in school, post-secondary education, armed services or employment;
  • Workforce Development- Activating Earners: Increase the number of households earning income by 5 percent each year;
  • Asset Building- Finance Fundamentals: 50 percent of residents have bank accounts, debit cards or matched savings accounts;
  • Community Engagement- Savvy Citizens: 80 percent of eligible residents are registered to vote and 70 percent of seniors participate in programs reducing social isolation
  • Housing Stabilization- Keeping Families at Home: 75 percent of families at risk of losing housing stay housed and 60 percent of older adults age in place

Program Success Monitored By 

CL services are ongoing throughout the year and we operate on a fiscal year from October 1 – September 30. TCB is actively engaged in monitoring and evaluating CL and is currently further developing our programming as a result. The monitoring and evaluation process begins with the Resident Asset & Needs Assessment (RANA), a survey to help our Development staff assess the needs of residents and potential residents in the focus areas of CL. The survey looks at workforce development, financial education and asset building, youth development and education, community characteristics, health and wellness, and relocation needs. The results of this survey informs our Community Success Plans, which outlines outcomes, objectives, and strategies to address the needs determined in the RANA. TCB then assesses progress towards outcomes using the Community Life Questionnaire (CLQ). The CLQ collects the following household data: demographics, voting, employment, education, community involvement, safety, health/wellness, transportation, opinions about the community, and access to technology. 

This annual survey is administered in-person using an interview format by a trauma-informed CL staff person. The data is entered at the site and compiled, aggregated and analyzed by TCB’s evaluation staff to share with partners and outside agencies. Other data points such as annual earned income are acquired during the lease recertification process.

TCB utilizes Social Solutions’ Efforts to Outcomes (ETO) tracking and performance management software to measure the success of its youth programming. ETO is tool that helps us connect partner information together with TCB Community Life operations to better serve our communities and surrounding neighborhoods. Additionally, ETO allows us to track neighborhood-wide indicators (school enrollment, household income, voter registration, etc.), to analyze the achievements of our residents and property within the broader neighborhood context. ETO also enables tracking in real-time, allowing our cohort of partners and providers to assess what is working, refine operations and practices, and improve performance in a cycle of continuous sharing and collaborative learning.

Examples of Program Success 
We have seen great success in all our CL focus areas, but one particular area in which we have seen great strides is our youth development work in Chicago and Cincinnati. This programming centers on engagement and violence prevention and has seen remarkable results. Due to these efforts in Cincinnati, 78% of residents report feeling safe in their homes, an increase from only 41% in 2014. In Chicago, we have connected youth to a wide array of opportunities, including sports programming, mentoring, after-school programming, homework help, health and wellness workshops, excursion activities, home away camp, and paid summer internships. Some of our Chicago outcomes include: 
 

  • Community safety initiatives have boosted youth confidence and built trusting relationships between law enforcement and youth
  • Homework help and mentoring has given youth an outlet that not only encourages good study habits, but has instilled anger management skills
  • Mentoring has also provided youth with positive role model and opened a health dialogue between community members, family, staff, and among the youth themselves
  • Health and fitness programs have helped improve youth self-esteem and instilled healthy habits and knowledge
  • Art programming has exposed youth to music, storytelling, painting, and more, providing another healthy outlet
  • Internships for our young adults have provided leadership opportunities that have empowered them and broken down barriers between staff

 We plan to expand this programming to other sites, including the Boston area, modeling after this successful work in Cincinnati and Chicago.

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Low Income Housing Tax Credit

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Budget  --
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General None None
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Neighborhood Stabilization Programs

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Budget  --
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General None None
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

New Market Tax Credits

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Budget  --
Category  Community Economic Development
Population Served Other Minorities None None
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Section 8

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Budget  --
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Other Minorities None None
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Bart Mitchell
CEO Term Start July 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Bart Mitchell is president and CEO of The Community Builders, Inc. (TCB), the country’s largest nonprofit developer of mixed-income housing. He was appointed to the post in 2012. Mitchell has a distinguished career in community development that began as a housing and economic development advisor to the Mayor of the City of Boston in the 1980s. He first joined TCB in 1989 as a director of finance and served as project manager for complex urban developments at TCB for six years. In 1996, he left TCB to serve as chief operating officer of Beacon/Corcoran Jenison Partners, developing HOPE VI communities in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic United States. He later founded Mitchell Properties LLC, a developer and owner of high-quality residential and mixed-use real estate ventures. Mitchell returned to TCB in July 2010 as the company’s chief operating officer. Mitchell has a Master of Public Policy degree from the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government with a concentration in finance and urban development policy. Mitchell also holds Bachelor of Arts degree from Williams College with Highest Honors in political economy. He is a member of the Boston Air Pollution Control Commission and the New Lease board of directors. He has also served as an active board member of several educational institutions, including Williams College in Williamstown, Mass., The Winsor School in Boston and The Park School in Brookline, Mass.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Jacqueline Alexander Director of Development, Mid-Atlantic --
Stephanie Anderson Garrett Vice President of Communications & Fund Development --
Beverly Bates Senior Vice President of Development --
Jeff Beam Director of Development, Cincinnati Office --
Tony Berthod Portfolio Operations Director --
Livia Bourque Vice President of Operations --
William Bransky Vice President of Operations --
Tom Buonopane Vice President of Finance & Asset Management --
Sean Caron Chief of Property Operations --
Eliza Edelsberg Datta Regional Vice President of Development, New England --
Robert Fossi Regional Vice President of Development, Mid-Atlantic --
Elizabeth Gonzalez-Suarez Vice President of Community Life --
Terri Hamilton Brown Regional Vice President of Development, Midwest --
Jeff Heisler Vice President of Design/Construction --
David Jones Vice President of Human Resources --
Jonathan Klein General Counsel & Senior Vice President --
Steve Lodi Vice President of Operations --
Susan McCann Regional Vice President of Development, New York & New Jersey --
Gladys Medder Director of Community Life, Mid-Atlantic --
Jullie Patterson Director of Fund Development --
Juan H. Powell Director of Development, Mid-Atlantic --
Sonya Prear Vice President of Asset Management --
Mick Vergura Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President --
Morgan Wilson Vice President of Development Operations --
Will Woodley Director of Development, Chicago Office --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Best Real Estate Deals of 2016 Washington Business Journal 2017
The Eddy's Care Award St. Peter's Partners of New York 2017
Vincent J. Mastrofrancisco Partners in Programs The Boys and Girls Club of Schenectady 2017
Vision Award for Community Impact Urban Land Institute 2017
Affordable 100 National Affordable Housing Management Association 2016
Charles L. Edson Tax Credit Excellence- Honorable Mention Affordable Housing Tax Credit Coalition 2016
Excellence in Historic Rehabilitation J. Timothy Anderson Awards 2016
Property Owner Appreciation Award Metropolitan Boston Housing Partnership 2016
The Polk Bros. Foundation Affordable Rental Housing Preservation Award Chicago Neighborhood Development Awards 2016
Top 50 Affordable Housing Finance Magazine 2016
Top 50 Affordable Housing Developers Affordable Housing 2016
$40M New Market Tax Credits Award U.S. Department of Treasury Community Development Financial Institutions Fund 2015
Housing Giants Professional Builder's 2015
Jack Kemp Excellence in Affordable and Workforce Housing Award Urban Land Institute 2015
OH-KY Construction Summit Award Excellence In Economic Inclusion- Design & Planning The Abercrombie Group 2015
Reader's Choice Winner: Master-Planned/Mixed Use Affordable Housing Finance 2015
Affordable 100 National Affordable Housing Management Association 2014
Communities of Quality National Recognition Program National Affordable Housing Management Association 2014
Community of Excellence Award Rental Housing Association 2014
Distinction Award for LIHTC Development that Best Demonstrates Financial Innovation Novogradac Journal of Tax Credits Development 2014
Neighborhood Development Award for Outstanding For-Profit Neighborhood Real-Estate Project LISC Chicago 2014
Reader's Choice Finalist: Urban Affordable Housing Finance 2014
Top 50 Affordable Housing Finance Magazine 2014
$25M New Market Tax Credits Award U.S. Department of Treasury Community Development Financial Institutions Fund 2013
Minority-and Women-Owned Business Enterprise Performance Award MassHousing 2013
Reader's Choice Finalist: Rural Affordable Housing Finance Magazine 2013
$29.5 Choice Neighborhoods Implementation Grant HUD 2012
Annual Vision Award National Housing & Rehabilitation Association 2012
Community Development Real Estate QLCI of the Year Award Novogradac Community Development Foundation 2012
J. Timothy Anderson Award for Excellence in Historic Rehabilitation The National Housing & Rehabilitation Association 2012
National Communities of Quality Award for Exemplary Development for Single-Room Occupancy Housing National Affordable Housing Management Association 2011
National Communities of Quality Award for Exemplary Development of the Elderly National Affordable Housing Management Association 2011
National Communities of Quality Award for Outstanding Turnaround of a Troubled Property National Affordable Housing Management Association 2011
$5M Capital Magnet Fund Award U.S. Department of Treasury Community Development Financial Institutions Fund 2010
$78M Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 HUD 2010
Landscape Awards- Suburban Finalist Institute of Real Estate 2010
Award for Excellence Finalist Urban Land Institute 2009
Housing Heroes Charter One Bank 2009
Bruce Abrams Good Neighbor Award Chicago Association of REALTORS 2008
Charter Award: Neighborhood, District, Corridor Scale Congress for New Urbanism 2008
Housing CT Award Connecticut Mortgage Bankers Association Affordable Housing Committee 2008
J. Ronald Terwilliger Workforce Housing Models of Excellence Award Urban Land Institute 2008
Award for Environmentally Friendly Affordable Housing ENERGY STAR 2007
Governor's Award for Excellence In Affordable Housing Indiana Association for Community Economic Development, Indiana Coalition on Housing & Homelessness Issues, Indiana Housing & Community Development Authority, and the Federal Home Loan Bank 2007
Honorable Mention 12th Annual Connecticut Real Estate Awards 2007
National Communities of Quality Award for Outstanding Management National Affordable Housing Management Association 2007
Preservation Award Hartford Preservation Alliance 2007
Reader's Choice Finalist: Family Affordable Housing Finance 2007
Smart Growth Award: Planned Mixed Use Pioneer Valley Planning Commission 2007
Community Excellence Award - Mullti-Family Development - 50 units or more and Best of Show Smart Growth 2006
Community Impact Award National Equity Fund, Inc & LISC 2006
Finalist for Best Managed Affordable Housing Community Institute of Real Estate Management, Kentucky Chapter 2006
Golden Leaf Award for Community Appearance - Award of Merit for Residential Properties Durham City-County Appearance Commission 2006
Merit Award - Project/Community Development Category Keep Indiana Beautiful, Inc. 2006
Grand Award Builder's Choice Awards 2005
Reader's Choice Finalist: Master-Planned Communities Affordable Housing Finance 2005

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

TCB is part of the Avondale Children Thrive initiative, which was selected by a coalition of 12 funding organizations to participate in the BUILD Health Challenge, a national program that puts multi-sector community partnerships at the foundation of improving health for everyone. The Cincinnati-specific project will focus on maternal and child health and serve residents in the Avondale neighborhood. BUILD awards funding, capacity building support, and access to a national peer-learning network. The program emphasizes cross-sector collaboration among local non-profit organizations, hospitals, and public health departments to address upstream conditions that create opportunities for better health. BUILD selected Avondale Children Thrive because of its Bold, Upstream, Integrated, Local, and Data-Driven (BUILD) ideas to improve the health of its residents. 
 
Along with the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the Cincinnati Health Department, TCB will work to identify and implement innovative solutions to community challenges. BUILD's $250,000 two year grant will improve the partnership's capacity to improve maternal and child health in Avondale. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 475
Number of Part Time Staff 35
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 163
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 18
Caucasian: 223
Hispanic/Latino: 71
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 18
Other (if specified): Two or more races
Gender Female: 248
Male: 245
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Brian L.P. Fallon
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Davis Companies
Board Chair Term Feb 2006 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Andrew Altman Streetscape Partners --
Mary Jo Bane Harvard Kennedy School --
Audra Bohannon Korn Ferry --
Brian L.P. Fallon The Davis Companies --
Jesus Gerena Family Independence Initiative (FII) --
Jonathan Keyes Retired --
Sara Jean Lindholm Retired --
Edward H Marchant Harvard Kennedy School --
Louis S Mercedes Jones Day --
Patrick Nash Retired --
James Riccio MDRC --
Hipolito Roldan Hispanic Housing Development Corp. --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Governance and Nominating
  • Human Resources / Personnel
  • Real Estate

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2017 to Sept 30, 2018
Projected Income $37,390,551.00
Projected Expense $35,052,001.00
Form 990s

2015 TCB 2015 990

2014 TCB 2014 990

2013 TCB 2013 990

Audit Documents

2016 TCB 2016 Audit

2015 TCB 2015 Audit

2014 TCB 2014 Audit

2013 TCB 2013 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $98,997,150 $64,437,816 $61,427,525
Total Expenses $96,562,985 $82,748,246 $57,324,211

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $9,305,810 $671,288 $4,478,632
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $9,305,810 $671,288 $4,478,632
Individual Contributions $637,615 $1,109,463 $644,002
Indirect Public Support $7,500 $12,634 $23,250
Earned Revenue $70,403,363 $62,113,402 $55,523,316
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,616 $15,283 $8,786
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events -- $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $18,640,246 $515,746 $749,539

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $91,158,238 $76,585,483 $51,290,536
Administration Expense $5,404,747 $6,162,763 $6,033,675
Fundraising Expense -- $0 $0
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.03 0.78 1.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses 94% 93% 89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $147,884,734 $130,183,609 $131,642,593
Current Assets $95,837,023 $84,979,933 $88,009,812
Long-Term Liabilities $61,126,418 $43,811,185 $40,180,847
Current Liabilities $53,664,535 $55,464,513 $41,829,149
Total Net Assets $33,093,781 $30,907,911 $49,632,597

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.79 1.53 2.10

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 41% 34% 31%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, for 2015, the Other category includes income from related organizations. Please see the 2015 audited financials for details.
 
In fiscal years 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 the auditors issued a qualified opinion because legally-separate for-profit entities sponsored by the Company are not reported within the basic consolidated financial statements. Please review the audited financial statements for more details.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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