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Organization DBA --
Former Names FEDERATED DORCHESTER NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSES INC (2009)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Serving nearly 1,000 students annually, our mission is to equip Dorchester students with the attitude skills and experience to graduate from college.

Our vision is to use intentional educational interventions as a means to transform both individual lives and the entire neighborhood of Dorchester. We do this by:

1. Providing academic and social-emotional support and mentoring for youth who are furthest off-track on the path to college;
2. Setting the high expectation of college graduation.

Mission Statement

Serving nearly 1,000 students annually, our mission is to equip Dorchester students with the attitude skills and experience to graduate from college.

Our vision is to use intentional educational interventions as a means to transform both individual lives and the entire neighborhood of Dorchester. We do this by:

1. Providing academic and social-emotional support and mentoring for youth who are furthest off-track on the path to college;
2. Setting the high expectation of college graduation.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2014 to Sept 30, 2015
Projected Income $6,637,516.00
Projected Expense $6,634,924.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • College Connections
  • Early Education
  • Out-of-School Time

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Serving nearly 1,000 students annually, our mission is to equip Dorchester students with the attitude skills and experience to graduate from college.

Our vision is to use intentional educational interventions as a means to transform both individual lives and the entire neighborhood of Dorchester. We do this by:

1. Providing academic and social-emotional support and mentoring for youth who are furthest off-track on the path to college;
2. Setting the high expectation of college graduation.

Background Statement

College Bound Dorchester, established in 1965 under the name Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses, is an institution built to help improve the lives of Dorchester residents. For much of our history, we provided locals with vital services like childcare, elder care, adult education, healthcare, and food pantries. In 2008, College Bound embarked upon a strategic plan that positioned the agency to drive neighborhood transformation through a strategic focus on educational and social-emotional interventions. As a result, we changed our mission and vision to fully commit to helping Dorchester residents accomplish one single community-catalyzing goal for young people – college graduation.  On February 1, 2010, we adopted ‘College Bound Dorchester’ as our new name and commitment to providing a placed-based, education-centered solution for neighborhood transformation.

We believe that intentional educational interventions have the power to change both individual lives and entire neighborhoods. We provide high quality, intensive educational programs to proven risk students; specifically targeting students who are both highly disengaged and off-track, and have the ability to significantly impact the behaviors of their peers. We call them “Core Influencers”. We aim to target enough Core Influencers – supporting their transition to, and graduation from, college – to “tip” the neighborhood toward success – setting college graduation as the expectation not the exception. The new college-going culture will produce more job-ready young people who will bring their personal and professional skills back to their communities.

We have grown to serve 985 students through our Prevention and Intervention programs:

1. Prevention Support: serves students aged three months through 13 years old, and includes our: Early Education and Out-of-School Time programs.
2. Intervention Support: targets students who are furthest off-track from college success, aged 14 to 27 years old, and includes our: Alternative Middle School and flagship College Connections programs.

Impact Statement

 College Bound Dorchester is proud to report the following accomplishments for the 2013-14 program year:

College Connections Program (ages 14 – 27)

  • Empowered 41 students to enroll in college (32% increase)
  • 80 students currently enrolled in college with a 53% college retention rate
  • Recognized by Social Investment Research, a division of Root Cause, as a high performing organization for college access. The award highlighted the College Connections program’s comprehensive approach to academic preparation and enrichment, college aspiration and knowledge, and financial aid and planning.

Out-of-School Time Program (ages 6 – 13)

  • 99% of Out-of-School Time students were promoted to the next grade level on time

Early Education Program (ages 3 months to 5)

  • 100% of Early Education students were at or above their grade level in literacy

 

 
What sets us apart?

Innovative, Place-Based Model: We developed a holistic, academic and social-emotional model that meets students where they are in order to get them back on track. College Connections proves that off-track students can succeed in high school and college but they must be challenged to do so with: 1) high expectations, 2) personal accountability and 3) the consistent support from highly-trained, community mentors called College Readiness Advisors (CRA).

Deep Mentoring Connections: CRAs are from the community and share similar life experiences to our students. Their community connection and fundamental understanding of our students’ experiences means they are able to: 1) help students through learning challenges, and 2) serve as a tangible model for how students can improve their lives.


Needs Statement

We provide intensive academic and social-emotional support tailored to meet the needs of the furthest off-track students (formerly incarcerated, well-below grade level, behavioral issues, etc.). We are currently in Year 3 of our five-year strategic growth plan. Our strategic priorities reflect our efforts to increase our scale without sacrificing program quality, fidelity or outcomes. Through the plan, we will: Increase Outcomes; Increase Scale; Improve Systems; and Increase Organizational Capacity for Community Change. This requires significant effort and collaboration to build staff, program and bricks-and-mortar capacity.
 
Capacity Building & Technology Enhancements:
  • Expand College Connections program facilities – Cost: $150,000
  • Improve Early Education facilities – Cost: $25,000
  • Technology enhancements– Cost: $30,000
  • Improve evaluation systems (e.g. Efforts-to-Outcomes) – Cost: $20,000
  • Build community partnerships to facilitate growth – Cost: $75,000
Professional Development:
  • Increase staff training and certification – Cost: $500,000
  • Expand College Readiness Advisor Fellowship Institute: Cost: $445,000
Board Development & Increased Individual Giving:
  • Develop Fundraising Board (3 to 5 new members per year)
  • Hire one-time Individual Giving consultant – Cost: $30,000
  • Increase visibility and marketing through targeted PR & media efforts – Cost: $60,000

CEO Statement

We believe in the brilliance of the young people and families we target – those who have failed and dropped out of other programs, are gang involved, have a violent conviction or lack the “right attitude or motivation. Most organizations tend to neglect these students as too disengaged or disruptive to succeed. At College Bound, these are the students we want. We have an unwavering belief that, regardless of their situation or zip code, they have the ability and potential to succeed.

Society places high expectations and invests in students from wealthier communities or those deemed motivated and smart enough to succeed. We are the only organization to extend these same high expectations and investment to proven-risk youth (who are least likely to succeed and previously most disruptive) from low-income communities like Dorchester. Highly disengaged and disruptive students are everywhere – Newton, Wellesley, Roxbury, Dorchester. However, neighborhoods like Dorchester have a large enough concentration to create a negative culture of disruption. Our theory of change is anchored in the idea that if we target enough of these disengaged young people, and set them on a positive path of college graduation, that starts to become the dominant culture – with disengagement and lack of a high school or college credential no longer the norm but the exception.

We provide academic support but that’s just one piece of the puzzle. We train community members to teach students about personal accountability, setting and achieving goals, grit, self-discipline, citizenship, etc. – with sustained support until they earn their first degree. We meet our students where they are and, through deep mentoring relationships, community connection and consistency, we get them back on track.

Our flagship College Connections program is helping young people gain the academic and social-emotional skills to graduate from college – students who didn’t think that was possible. They are the individuals who will transform their communities. Dorchester is just the tip of the iceberg. The plan we have developed can be replicated across the US but for now, Dorchester is our model. By 2017, at least 100 students, who previously presented as “problems”, will matriculate to college each year – on the road to being positive influencers in the neighborhood.

Sincerely,
 
Mark Culliton
CEO 

Board Chair Statement

At College Bound Dorchester, we believe and invest in big ideas that challenge the status quo. In 2010, we asked ourselves “what has the ability to change not only individual lives and families but entire neighborhoods?” We changed our mission, name and vision to reflect our belief that intentional educational programs have that transformative power – setting higher standards and positive cultural norms for communities.

Our model is built on the idea that to transform an impoverished community, you need to target the students who are both most disruptive and disconnected, and have the ability to influence their peers. We call them “Core Influencers”. These “Core Influencers”, once on a positive path of college graduation, have the ability to “tip” the neighborhood towards success. Dorchester has the lowest academic achievement and highest rates of violence and poverty in Boston. This is where we do our work and our students are those who most believe are least likely to succeed. But we know, and have seen, our students excel.

We started with a big idea and now we are seeing the real and lasting impact begin to emerge. Last year, 85% of students in our Early Education programs enrolled in kindergarten or first grade having mastered all age-appropriate standards for math and English-language arts; and 97% of Out-of-School Time students showed improved literacy and conflict resolution skills. Our intervention program, College Connections, continues to impact a growing number of proven-risk youth. The number of students who have enrolled in college has grown from 28 students in 2012 to 41 in 2014 (a 46% increase). We now serve 550 students, with 80 currently enrolled in college. Research by Bain INSPIRE shows our students would have less than 1% chance of matriculating to college without our intensive transition coaching support. College enrollment and graduation is no longer only a goal; it is our promise to all of our students – and to all the youth of Dorchester.

 Sincerely,
 
Sean Curran
Board Chair 

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (please select all areas as well)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston

College Bound Dorchester serves the neighborhood of Dorchester, Boston’s largest, most diverse and most underserved neighborhood. Less than 25% of the adult population has a college degree, 40% of students drop out of school, and 30% of residents live below the poverty line. In the Bowdoin-Geneva of Dorchester, where College Bound Dorchester focuses its efforts, only 58% of adults have graduated from high school, and 11% of adults have college degrees.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Education - Adult Education

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

College Connections

College Connections engages students, aged 14-27, in the Bowdoin-Geneva area of Dorchester, and supports them in matriculating to college. College Connections intentionally recruits students who are academically and socio-emotionally off-track, and are furthest from the path to higher education. Participants include middle school students referred by public schools, high school students failing core courses, young people who have left school, and students for whom English is a barrier to academic advancement. We provide highly structured one-on-one mentoring and on-going support through five College Connections pathways: 1) High School support, 2) Foundations (high school credential/HiSet) support, 3) Bridge to College support, 4) College Support, and 5) ESOL support. The gains students make is the result of their deep mentoring relationships with highly-trained College Readiness Advisors (CRA) – who are from the community and share similar life experiences.

Budget  $2,797,878.00
Category  Education, General/Other Remedial Programs
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

 College Connections employs a two-faceted approach, developing students’: a) academic and work skills and, b) motivation and positive attitude towards life success. The following outcomes measure intermediate benchmarks on the path to neighborhood transformation. We will be successful in 2015 if we:

  • Increase the number of eligible students matriculating to college to 60 (46% increase)
  • Ensure at least a 50% retention rate for students who have matriculated
  • Ensure 80% of students will reach or exceed grade level English Language Arts & Math benchmarks
  • Ensure 80% of students are proficient in social-emotional benchmarks and competencies
  • Ensure 75% of students will reach two personal goals
Program Long-Term Success 

Our ultimate goal is to transform the neighborhoods of Dorchester through education. College Connections serves the young people who are furthest off-track on the path to college, and prepares them for success in college and in the workforce. The program is designed to positively impact the lives of a small percentage of the most disengaged young people will drive communities toward a tipping point in which college completion is the expectation rather than the exception. By 2017, we will grow the program to serve 880 students, with 100 formerly off-track young people matriculating to college each year as a result of their participation in College Connections. The new college-going culture will produce more job-ready young people who will bring their personal and professional skills back to their communities. The economic benefits of a college-educated workforce will transform the landscape of Dorchester.

Program Success Monitored By 

College Bound Dorchester is committed to ongoing assessment to maintain a high level of quality for all our programs. Spearheaded by the Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Operating Officer, and the Evaluation and Impact Manager, College Bound Dorchester is data-driven, from aggregate outcome reports to individual assessments. Program staff members are also responsible for owning the assessment and learning process for their students. College Bound Dorchester measures goals through a suite of tools, including Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS), College Board’s Accuplacer, Pearson’s myFoundationsLab, and College Bound’s internal Social and Behavioral rubric. To ensure organizational in data collection, we use Social Solutions’ Efforts to Outcomes online performance management database to measure all student and program data and outcomes.

 

Examples of Program Success 

College Connections was recognized by Social Investment Research, a division of Root Cause, as a high performing organization for college access. The award highlighted its comprehensive approach to academic preparation and enrichment, college aspiration and knowledge, and financial aid and planning.

The number of students who have enrolled in college has grown from 28  in 2012 to 41 in 2014 (a 46% increase). We now serve 550 students, with 77 currently enrolled in college (53% retention rate). Research by Bain INSPIRE shows that our matriculation rate of 27% is more than 50% higher than the overall matriculation rate of US GED recipients (ages 18 – 29). This data shows that our students would have less than 1% chance of matriculating to college without our intensive transition coaching support.

I think what separates College Bound from other programs is family. Education was not celebrated in my family; success was not encouraged in my neighborhood. I had no foundation to stand on and crime quickly became my crutch. I dropped out of high school, I sold drugs, and my future began to fade. College Bound didn’t just prepare me for my GED and kick me out the door. They gave me a foundation to stand on. I now had positive role models who showed me how important education was, not just for me, but for my community!” – John Smith-St. Cyere, College Readiness Advisor, College Bound Dorchester


Early Education

The Early Education program includes a center-based preschool located in Dorchester (ages 2.9 – 6); and a network of ten home-based providers throughout Dorchester, Roxbury, Hyde Park, Roslindale and Mattapan that provide a developmentally appropriate environment to support the academic, social, and emotional growth of children (ages 3 months and 2 years). The program is nationally accredited to meet Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care guidelines. The program provides developmentally appropriate activities to students that are linked to clear MA Preschool Standards. The program uses Teaching Strategies GOLD and the Children’s Literacy Initiative’s Blueprint for Literacy to support students’ academic, social, emotional and physical health and ensure that each child a strong foundation in literacy and language development, two key components of school success. Upon completion of our program, students are ready to successfully transition to Boston Public Schools. 

Budget  $2,725,818.00
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

A number of objectives have been set to ensure that students are on track for academic success. We will be successful in 2015 if:

  • 85% of students will be at or above their developmental level in the following domains: social-emotional, physical, language, cognitive, literacy, mathematics
  • 85% of students will enroll in kindergarten or first grade having mastered all age-appropriate standards for math and English-language arts; 15% of students will enroll with service plans

The Early Education program recognizes that parents are critical partners in their child’s educational success and has set the following parent engagement goals for 2015:

  • 75% of parents will attend at least one event over the course of the year
  • 100% of parents will engage in student progress discussions
Program Long-Term Success 

Ensuring that students graduate from college is our mission, and the measurement by which success will be assessed in the long-term. We recognize that Early Education students are many years away from college graduation, and as such this will be a difficult goal to track. We have established a partnership with Boston Public Schools’ Department of Extended Learning Time, After-school and Services (DELTAS) to track student progress through high school graduation. We will work to maintain relationships with students and their families, and collect information regarding their academic success through college graduation.

We aim to gradually shift the program towards Dual Enrollment (where more than 50% families are participating in both Prevention and Intervention programs by 2017). The youth served in College Connections can benefit from sending siblings or children to our Early Education and Out-of-School Time programs – can focus on their education while ensuring the younger generation is on track to become “college bound”.

Program Success Monitored By 

Student progress is tracked utilizing the data organization system, Social Solutions’ Efforts to Outcomes. Academic goals are measured utilizing a combination of progress reports, report cards, student records and staff observation. Social-emotional outcomes are tracked utilizing staff observation. Our partnership with Boston Public Schools’ Department of Extended Learning Time, After-school and Services (DELTAS) allows College Bound educators to review students’ electronic school records. Utilizing this system, we will track student progress through high school graduation.

Examples of Program Success 

The Early Education program was named one of the top 10 centers in Massachusetts to successfully prepare children for school by Social Investment Research, a division of Root Cause.

When KJ first entered College Bound’s Early Education program she was very quiet and attempted little-to-no interaction with the other students. She was unable to hold a pencil, and had difficulty identifying colors, shapes, numbers or letters. Since her time with College Bound, KJ has learned to identify all of the upper and lower case letters and can even write full sentences. In addition, KJ is able to read full sentences and sounds out words with which she is unfamiliar. Furthermore, she is able to add simple numbers both on paper and in her head. College Bound educators also worked closely with KJ to build her confidence, and as such she is much more social with both her peers and other adults.


Out-of-School Time

The Out-of-School Time (OST) program, licensed by the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care, provides a safe, nurturing environment for children ages 6-13 year-round – after-school, during school breaks and summer. Our model provides 1:1 mentoring and small-group support focused on: structured academic and social-emotional curricula, social-recreation and hands-on learning activities. We provide interactive academic activities to ensure that youth receive the support they need for academic success, including: art, science, math and literacy, poetry, photography and computer classes. The social-recreational component serves as a constant, stable social outlet for students. Children participate in league sports such as indoor hockey and basketball; instructional sports and games such as ping-pong and billiards; arts and crafts; peer leadership groups; community service projects; and field trips. 

Budget  $1,106,243.00
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

A number of objectives have been set to ensure that students are on track for academic success. We will be successful in 2015 if:

  •  100 percent of students will be promoted to the next grade level on time
  • 100% of students will exhibit improved literacy skills
  • 90% of students will exhibit improved conflict resolution skills

The OST program recognizes that parents are critical partners in their child’s educational success and has set the following parent engagement goals for 2015:

  • 75% of parents will attend at least one event over the course of the year
  • 100% of parents will engage in student progress discussions
Program Long-Term Success 

Ensuring that students graduate from college is College Bound Dorchester’s mission, and ultimately the measurement by which success will be assessed in the long-term. College Bound recognizes that Out of School Time students are still many years away from college graduation, and as such this will be a difficult goal to track. We have established a partnership with Boston Public Schools’ Department of Extended Learning Time, After-school and Services (DELTAS) to track student progress through high school graduation. We will work to maintain relationships with students and their families, and collect information regarding their academic success through college graduation.

 

We aim to gradually shift the program towards Dual Enrollment (where more than 50% families are participating in both Prevention and Intervention programs by 2017). The youth served in College Connections can benefit from sending siblings or children to our Early Education and Out-of-School Time programs – can focus on their education while ensuring the younger generation is on track to become “college bound”.

Program Success Monitored By 

Student progress is tracked utilizing College Bound’s recently implemented data organization system, Social Solutions’ Efforts to Outcomes. Academic goals are measured utilizing a combination of progress reports, report cards, student records and staff observation. Social-emotional outcomes are tracked utilizing staff observation and information reported by students, which is primarily collected via the National Research Center’s (NRC) Youth Outcomes Toolkit. NRC works nationally with youth organizations to measure their effectiveness in improving students’ academic, social-emotional and conflict resolution skills.

Examples of Program Success 

In 2014: 99% of students were promoted to the next grade level on time; 78% of  students exhibited improved conflict resolution skills (decrease in incident reports); and 72% of parents attended at least one family engagement event.

When Aaliyah first came to College Bound’s OST program, she was in the second grade, but was performing below her age-appropriate reading level. In fact, Aaliyah was only reading and comprehending at a kindergarten level. We worked with Aaliyah to improve her reading skills. She has improved her reading skills to a first grade reading level, is able to read books on her own and sounds out challenging words that she encounters. Aaliyah’s family has reported that she is performing much better in school as a result of the OST staff’s efforts. Her teacher has reported that for the past two months, Aaliyah has completed 100% of her homework assignments.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Mark Culliton
CEO Term Start Mar 2007
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Mark Culliton has extensive experience leading organizations through growth and change, previously serving as Vice President for Business Development at Lighthouse Academies, where he helped to grow the organization from one school serving 120 students into a network of schools that serves more than 2,300 students in nine campuses. Prior to joining Lighthouse Academies, he served as the Chief Operating Officer of BELL, a non-profit organization providing after-school and summer enrichment programs to 1,500 elementary school children. Mark has a commitment to the strategic non-profit model, having been a founding board member of Boston Preparatory Charter Public School. Mark has a personal commitment to the community of Dorchester, where he has lived with his family for over 10 years, and has two children in the Boston Public Schools. Mark has a Bachelor of History degree from the University of Michigan and an MBA from Yale University.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Michelle Caldeira Director of Development

Michelle Caldeira joined College Bound Dorchester’s Development Team in February 2012. Prior to her work at College Bound, Michelle was the Director of Development at Pine Street Inn where she developed and led the organization’s private fundraising strategy, providing planning, design, execution and analysis of its annual fund campaigns. In her last two years with Pine Street, Michelle oversaw fundraising initiatives to secure more than $5 million, surpassing fundraising goals by 3% for each the last five years. Prior to her employment with Pine Street Inn, Michelle worked for the Dimock Center where she personally oversaw the solicitation of over $500,000 annually through private and corporate foundations, and coordinated the Major Gift Annual Appeal that raised an additional $250,000. Michelle is a Board Member of AbekaM and the José Mateo Ballet Theatre. Michelle earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Binghamton University in New York. She is a Dorchester resident. 

Mr. Mark Culliton Chief Executive Officer

Mark Culliton has extensive experience leading organizations through growth and change, previously serving as Vice President for Business Development at Lighthouse Academies, where he helped to grow the organization from one school serving 120 students into a network of schools that serves more than 2,300 students in nine campuses. Prior to joining Lighthouse Academies, he served as the Chief Operating Officer of BELL, a non-profit organization providing after-school and summer enrichment programs to 1,500 elementary school children. Mark has a commitment to the strategic non-profit model, having been a founding board member of Boston Preparatory Charter Public School. Mark has a personal commitment to the community of Dorchester, where he has lived with his family for over 10 years, and has two children in the Boston Public Schools. Mark has a Bachelor of History degree from the University of Michigan and an MBA from Yale University.

Ms. Peggyanne Ecclesine Chief Program Officer

Peg Ecclesine, is responsible for oversight of College Bound’s Early Education and Out-of-School Time programs. Prior to joining College Bound, Peg served as the Chief Academic Officer and Vice President of School Development at Lighthouse Academies Inc., a not-for-profit charter school management organization. At Lighthouse, Peg’s responsibilities included oversight of the development, implementation and evaluation of the academic program, including teacher and school leader professional development for network schools in Chicago, New York, Washington D.C., and Indianapolis. Peg successfully led the process for the approval of charter schools in Detroit and Milwaukee.  Previously, Peg was an elementary and middle school teacher, instructional coach, and Regional Education Director for an educational management company. Peg has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary and Special Education from Providence College and a Masters of Arts in Sociology and Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. She is a Dorchester resident.

Mr. Matt Gallup Chief Talent Officer

Matthew Gallup is responsible for overseeing human resources, professional development and evaluation/assessment. Most recently as an educational consultant, Matt reviewed pre-kindergarten programs in New York City, implemented a teacher evaluation system in Hillsborough County, Florida and served as the Interim Director of Gloucester Community Arts Charter School. In addition, Matt spent three years at Lighthouse Academies, as the Director of Executive Recruitment and the Regional Director at schools in New York City and Washington, D.C. Matt has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from Providence College and a Master of Arts degree in Education from the University of Connecticut. Matt is a Dorchester resident. 

Ms. Brenda Rodriguez Chief Financial Offier

Brenda Rodriguez, Chief Financial Officer, oversees College Bound Dorchester’s finance strategy, compliance, and operations, including Accounting & Finance, Budgeting, Technology & Facilities. She brings experience in financial reporting, internal controls and process improvement in both the nonprofit and for-profit sectors. She started her career in public accounting at PwC, moving on to various finance leadership roles at the New York Times Company and as the head of finance for Boston.com. Most recently, Brenda was a Principal at The CFO Center. She currently serves as Treasurer for Harbor Health Services, a $60M community health organization serving over 28,000 patients, and is the Board Chair of Diamond Girls Boston. Brenda holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Boston University, and an MBA from Duke University. Brenda is a Dorchester resident. 

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Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Community Partnership Award Mutual of America 2012
Community Quarterback Eastern Bank 2012
Community Social Capitalist SCI Social Capital Inc 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 3 Year Accreditation --

Collaborations

 

College Bound Dorchester is fortunate to have a solid group of community partners to work with students who need assistance beyond the scope of the organization’s programs.

  • Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC) is an official College Bound partner. Through relationships between College Bound and BHCC administrators, many College Connections students matriculate to BHCC, which provides space for College Bound College Readiness Advisors to meet with students. BHCC also offers courses to College Connections students on College Bound’s premises.
  • Roxbury Community College (RCC), and the South Bay House of Corrections, partner with us to provide College Connections at South Bay to ensure that young people who have made mistakes but are motivated to change have a pathway from incarceration to college enrollment at RCC.
  • Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology (BFIT) provides a specialized recruitment process to their program for College Connections students interested in technology and engineering.
  • uAspire (formerly ACCESS) familiarizes College Connections students with financial aid requirements for college entrance and helps them to identify potential funding and loan sources.
  • College Bound’s CEO, Mark Culliton, attends monthly meetings of the Bowdoin-Geneva Alliance. Along with a dozen other local agencies, College Bound assesses the types of interventions most beneficial to the community. Through this medium, College Bound is assured that its efforts are not duplicated, are necessary and are offered to the most appropriate students via partner referrals.
  • Jumpstart provides literacy skill-building activities to the Early Education program.
  • Stand for Children and Boston Public Schools refer students to the Early Education and Out-of-School Time programs.
  • Year Up works with College Connections students to ensure that they have employment opportunities and multiple outlets to college.
  • Family Nurturing Center provides critical social-emotional services for all College Bound students
  • We are an active member of the Boston Youth Service Network (BYSN), a group of community based organizations that work collaboratively to provide alternative education and employment pathways for youth aged 16 to 24. BYSN utilizes the power of partnership and pooled resources to strengthen and align a community-based system of education, workforce development and youth development services to positively engage proven-risk youth and move them toward economic self-sufficiency.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 52
Number of Part Time Staff 25
Number of Volunteers 19
Number of Contract Staff 10
Staff Retention Rate % 92%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 46
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 5
Caucasian: 21
Hispanic/Latino: 11
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 4
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 65
Male: 22
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Automobile Insurance
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Business Income
Commercial General Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Crime Coverage
Day Care Center/Nursery School
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Fiduciary Liability
General Property Coverage
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Life Insurance
Professional Liability
See Management and Governance Comments
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Workplace Violence
Accident and Injury Coverage

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Sean Curran
Board Chair Company Affiliation Principal, Waterville Consulting
Board Chair Term Sept 2014 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Paul Connolly Retired, First Vice President & COO, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston Voting
Mr. Sean Curran Principal, Waterville Consulting Voting
Mr. William Darling Chairman, Woodstock Corporation Voting
Mrs. Erin E. Deemer Biogen Idec Voting
Mrs. Laura Gassner Otting Principal, Nonprofit Professionals Advisory Group Voting
Mr. David Guadagnoli Partner, Sullivan & Worcester, LLP Voting
Mr. Orin Gutlerner Match Education Voting
Mr. James Judge Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Treasurer, NSTAR Voting
Mr. Lee Michael Kennedy President, Lee Kennedy Company, Inc. Voting
Mr. Jon Lemelman Riverside Partners Voting
Ms. LeBone Moses Financial Services Advisory Manager, Ernst & Young Voting
Mr. Tom O'Donnell Inspection Engineer, City of Boston Voting
Mr. Mike O'Toole President, PJA Advertising and Marketing Voting
Mr. James Rooney Executive Director, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority Voting
Mr. Lewis Segall Partner, Sullivan & Worcester, LLP Voting
Mr. Simon Taylor Waterville Consulting Voting
Mrs. Janelle Woods-McNish Community Relations Specialist, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Foundation Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Robert J. Baum Robert J. Baum, PC NonVoting
Councilor John Connolly Boston City Councilor At-Large NonVoting
Mr. Michael T. Cowhig Senior Counsel, Covidien NonVoting
Representative Linda Dorcena-Forry MA State Representative NonVoting
Mr. David Doyle Financial Service Professional, Derby Street Financial Services NonVoting
Mr. Todd Frampton Regional Sales Manager, Thomson Reuters NonVoting
Ms. Evie Frost Community Volunteer NonVoting
Mr. Norman W. Gorin Retired, CFO and Managing Principal, The Analysis Group NonVoting
Mr. Joseph Hanley Attorney, McDermott, Quilty & Miller LLP NonVoting
Senator Jack Hart MA State Senator NonVoting
Mr. Mark Hinderlie Hearth, Inc. NonVoting
Mr. Alan Issokson President, H. Levenbaum Real Estate NonVoting
President Jackie Jenkins-Scott Wheelock College NonVoting
Mr. Scott McCue Head of School, Boston Preparatory Charter Public School NonVoting
Mr. Michael Monahan Business Manager, IBEW Local 103 NonVoting
Mr. John Moukad Principal, In-Context Consulting NonVoting
Mr. Peter Munkenbeck Community Volunteer NonVoting
Mr. Daniel Passacantilli Blue Front Telecom Group, LLC NonVoting
Mr. Robert Perez Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Cubist Pharmaceuticals NonVoting
Mr J.P. Plunkett Executive Vice President & Partner, Nai Hunneman NonVoting
Councilor Ayanna Pressley Boston City Councilor At-Large NonVoting
Mr. Peter C. Read Community Volunteer NonVoting
Mr. John Ritchie Retired, Superintendant, Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School NonVoting
Mr. Eric Robinson Principal, RoDe Architects NonVoting
Mr. Oscar Santos Superintendant, Randolph Public Schools NonVoting
Ms. Marie St. Fleur Chief of Advocacy and Strategic Investment, City of Boston NonVoting
Mr. Steve Tritman Community Volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Joan Wallace-Benjamin President & CEO, The Home for Little Wanderers NonVoting
Representative Martin Walsh MA State Representative NonVoting
Councilor Charles Yancey Boston City Councilor NonVoting
Mr. Paul Zintl Chief Operating Officer, Partners in Health NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 13
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 75%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $5,902,389 $5,019,232 $5,176,535
Total Expenses $5,872,198 $5,013,717 $5,169,414

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,300,797 $1,212,422 $1,082,009
Government Contributions $3,479,503 $3,021,520 $3,395,674
    Federal -- -- --
    State $2,965,039 $2,782,280 $3,211,728
    Local $368,716 $122,442 $95,057
    Unspecified $145,748 $116,798 $88,889
Individual Contributions $231,729 $200,943 $122,612
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $416,166 $197,403 $247,165
Investment Income, Net of Losses $1,725 $2,117 $2,448
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $393,510 $292,225 $250,390
Revenue In-Kind $75,283 $84,198 $66,377
Other $3,676 $8,404 $9,860

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $4,671,862 $3,896,646 $4,118,021
Administration Expense $762,668 $763,179 $678,131
Fundraising Expense $437,668 $353,892 $373,262
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.01 1.00 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 78% 80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 8% 7% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $3,125,807 $2,454,940 $2,231,402
Current Assets $1,781,582 $1,457,905 $1,258,681
Long-Term Liabilities $515,170 $460,706 $477,587
Current Liabilities $1,201,997 $615,785 $380,881
Total Net Assets $1,408,640 $1,378,449 $1,372,934

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.48 2.37 3.30

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 16% 19% 21%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.  Revenue breakout detail was provided by the nonprofit for fiscal years 2014, 2013 and 2012.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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