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Community Change, Inc.

 14 Beacon Street, Suite 605
 Boston, MA 02108
[P] (617) 5230555
[F] (617) 5231847
http://www.communitychangeinc.org
[email protected]
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INCORPORATED: 1968
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2445805

LAST UPDATED: 02/02/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Community Change is to promote racial justice and equity by educating, mobilizing, and organizing white people to challenge structural racism. CCI was founded in 1968, born out of the Civil Rights Movement and the Kerner Commission, which named racism "a white problem."

 

CCI exists because the United States has deeply-rooted systems of privilege for white people at the expense of people of color. Interlocking systems of institutional racism are largely invisible to the white community. CCI does what few organizations are willing to do: shine a spotlight on the roots of racism in white culture to deal with racism at its source and with racism’s impact on communities of color.

Mission Statement

The mission of Community Change is to promote racial justice and equity by educating, mobilizing, and organizing white people to challenge structural racism. CCI was founded in 1968, born out of the Civil Rights Movement and the Kerner Commission, which named racism "a white problem."

 

CCI exists because the United States has deeply-rooted systems of privilege for white people at the expense of people of color. Interlocking systems of institutional racism are largely invisible to the white community. CCI does what few organizations are willing to do: shine a spotlight on the roots of racism in white culture to deal with racism at its source and with racism’s impact on communities of color.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $213,895.00
Projected Expense $181,722.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. Leadership Development
  • 2. Organizing
  • 3. Events
  • 4. Resource Center
  • 5. Training and Consulting

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Community Change is to promote racial justice and equity by educating, mobilizing, and organizing white people to challenge structural racism. CCI was founded in 1968, born out of the Civil Rights Movement and the Kerner Commission, which named racism "a white problem."

 

CCI exists because the United States has deeply-rooted systems of privilege for white people at the expense of people of color. Interlocking systems of institutional racism are largely invisible to the white community. CCI does what few organizations are willing to do: shine a spotlight on the roots of racism in white culture to deal with racism at its source and with racism’s impact on communities of color.


Background Statement

Horace Seldon founded CCI in 1968, shortly after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to address the root causes of racism. As a white man, his awakening to the issues of structural racism in America, energized him to create an exciting and viable response. Now 89 years old, Mr. Seldon is still actively involved in supporting the mission of CCI.

With a special focus on involving white people in challenging systemic racism and supporting self-determination by communities of color, CCI provides an environment and activities where people who are committed to racial equality can work and learn together and inspire one another to continue the fight for social justice. Over the years, our multiracial constituency---literally thousands of people including students, educators, non-profit organizations, faith communities, and social justice workers---has participated in CCI-sponsored action campaigns, forums, training programs, and multicultural arts events.
CCI's office contains a library on racism that was started with the organization and has grown from a few books on a desk to a collection of over 3,000 volumes plus videos and online articles. Now named the Yvonne Pappenheim Library on Racism, it has grown with the organization and has provided a gathering place for the past few decades for the community and those who are interested in issues of race.
CCI volunteers, staff, and constituents have worked to challenge systemic racism wherever we find it: in education, healthcare, public housing, media and the criminal justice system.  We provide training and support for diverse organizations, communities, and individuals throughout the region.  We offer a multitude of events for different populations, strategic goals, and needs.  And we have a growing, multi-faceted online presence. Yet it all springs from that initial vision from 45 years ago.

Impact Statement

2012 Accomplishments:

Planned and held 14 events for learning and action involving a total of 900 participants.

  • Created and participated in 5 conference presentations and panels, involving 215 participants.
  • Prepared and facilitated anti-racist organizational development and workshops to 9 agencies, involving 600 total participants.
  • Provided meeting space, fiscal management, and organizational support to 7 grassroots groups: Prison Working Group, White People Challenging Racism, Student Immigrant Movement, National Organization for Women’s Book Club, History Nuts, Radical Reference, and Occupy Boston Working Groups.
  • Engaged more than 3,000 constituents through our website, email newsletters, Twitter, and Facebook. 

 

Goals for the Coming Year:

  • Digitize our Resource Library catalog (through the Web Site for Small Libraries). This will enable us to put our entire catalog online, easily manage library users and loans, and enable users to access the catalog from mobile devices.
  • Launch our new Organizing in Suburban Communities project to organize and develop effective anti-racist leadership in suburban, predominantly white communities; to tackle systemic racism issues in the local community that project participants and other community members identify as most important.  We will select and focus training and organizing in two communities in 2013.
  • Expand our Leadership Development program by doubling the number of interns and volunteers, led by our part-time Intern/Volunteer Coordinator.
  • Follow our recently developed fundraising plan to increase revenue, expand program capacity, and ensure sustainability.
  • Double our external, fee-for-service trainings---increasing both the number of people reached and the revenue generated for CCI---by creating new marketing materials and soliciting new clients.

Needs Statement

Our most urgent needs are for increased sustainability, expanded staffing, and new technology. Since 1968, CCI has produced outstanding results with a very small staff, yet we often have to pass up or put off powerful opportunities.

With an expanded full-time staff (only our Executive Director is presently full-time), we are certain that our impact will increase exponentially. We are not a small organization; we merely have a small budget. Our potential is huge!

A fully staffed Community Change would include our Executive Director, Training Coordinator, Development Coordinator, and Director of Organizing, all at full time, and a part-time Office Manager and Intern/Volunteer Coordinator. This is a major expansion, yet it will happen gradually and has already begun during the last year as our budget has grown.

We also have specific technology needs since a huge and growing portion of our work uses new media to challenge racism. Using old machines and software, which often stall or crash, decreases our efficacy. CCI technology needs are: New computers; industry specific software (for our library and fundraising); books and videos for the Resource Center; and audiovisual equipment.

CEO Statement

In 1991, after 16 years of teaching in independent schools and a good deal of personal transformation, it became clear to me that I wanted to do anti-racism work full-time.  A friend of mine who was involved with Community Change (CCI) at its beginning told me that if I wanted to do this work, I needed to meet CCI founder and then-Executive Director, Horace Seldon. I did and I have never looked back. In Horace, and at CCI, I found a place where I could be nurtured and supported in the life-long work of transforming myself so I could effectively work to challenge systemic racism.

Now, 22 years later as Executive Director, I share this experience because it provides a window into the work of Community Change. CCI is the only organization in Greater Boston, and one of the few in the country, with the specific mission of challenging systemic racism. We have steadfastly been doing that since our founding in 1968. CCI does what few organizations are willing to do: shine a spotlight on the roots of racism in white culture in order to deal with racism at its source, as well as in its impact on communities of color.

In our experience, the vast majority of people in the US understand racism as something that individuals do through thought and action rather than viewing it as a system that is foundational to our nation and part of the fabric of who we are. The lens one uses to understand racism has profound implications for the way we think about individuals, relationships, public policy, and our culture as well as the ways in which we understand the persistent racial inequality that pervades our society.

Because you can’t challenge something you don’t know exists, our work, at its core, is about making systemic racism visible. We work to develop and support the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to dismantle racism. We work to shape a new vision for an equitable society by creating the relationships and community needed to bring that vision into reality. We want to be caretakers for that new identity and hospice workers to the old reality.

While CCI is a small organization, we have had a tremendous reach and potential. Over the past 45 years, we have accomplished amazing things with limited resources, working beyond the limits of our capacity. We are working very hard on many fronts to expand our capacity because we know that with the right support we can do far more in the struggle for racial justice.

Board Chair Statement

I have served on the CCI board since 2001, drawn to the organization because it was the only place I found that focused on the role of white people in challenging systemic racism. I got into this work as a white, middle-class parent of children in the Boston Public Schools, where we were the minority and where racial inequities and injustice abounded. I saw all of this up close, every day, and was compelled to do something about it. I soon learned that I had a lot to learn about race, racism, and privilege. CCI has provided a place for this learning.

In my paid work, I have worked with nonprofits across the US, including as an organizational development technical assistance provider and board trainer. I offered to serve as co-chair of the CCI board in 2007, as I saw that it needed some serious support and intervention. Back then, meetings lacked structure, continuity, and active participation. The board included individuals who were very committed to CCI’s mission, but not very involved in governance or organizational oversight. It included members who I literally never met.

Over the last 6 years as co-chair and then chair, I have worked with the board and Executive Director to boost board participation, recruit new, active board members, reactivate committees, and take a stronger role in partnering with staff to frame, steer, and evaluate CCI’s work. I am proud that we now have a fully functional and active board, one that works closely and productively with staff, and one that is engaged in planning and oversight roles that are a nonprofit board’s main responsibility. For example, we now hold an annual retreat in which we assess organizational progress and evaluate ourselves as a board.

CCI’s many successes over the years, despite its many challenges, have come from the commitment of its staff. Paul Marcus has been steady, caring, and thoughtful in juggling the many roles of an Executive Director of a very small organization. He has done brilliantly at bringing in volunteers to enable the organization to accomplish so much more than its paid staff ever could. He works well with board, staff, and volunteers, ensuring that everybody feels valued.

Our greatest challenge continues to be maintaining and expanding our capacity. We have skilled and committed staff who work very hard for too little pay. For years, this felt like a “chicken and egg” dilemma---we lacked the capacity to do the planning, fundraising, and evaluation necessary to attract increased funding. I am optimistic that we are turning the corner on this challenge.  We decided to hire someone with a strong financial management background to work with us to create our current strategic plan. We hired him with the intent of focusing our plan on financial sustainability.
As a result, we have secured several large individual donations specifically to allow us to take the next big step to grow the organization. We have a new program in the works that builds on our strengths and will enable CCI to expand our base of support while increasing our impact. We have already begun to expand our staff. The board, committees, and staff are working closely together to ensure that our programmatic, financial, and personnel planning are both aligned and sustainable.

Geographic Area Served

STATEWIDE

Constituents include people of color and white people; people with and people without educational and economic privilege; women and men; straight and LGBT people; adults of all ages.

CCI works throughout Greater Boston, both regionally and locally across the region, in communities large and small, urban and suburban.  For example, we have recently trained and supported local initiatives and partners in Winchester, Belmont, and Boston's Allston-Brighton neighborhood.

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Intergroup/Race Relations
  2. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

1. Leadership Development

Through partnerships with area colleges, we engage academics and students in varied ways.  Each year, 15-20 CCI college student interns work, learn, and build critical skills.  They are involved in training, fundraising, organizing, library development, and other areas.

 

These internships are powerful, resulting in heightened understanding of systemic racism and strategies to overcome it.  They bring about a dedication to anti-racism goals in the interns’ chosen fields and in their personal lives.  We also involve high school students, usually focused on specific projects that promote both awareness of racism and leadership and organizing skills.

 

CCI often serves as fiscal sponsor for fledgling organizations, e.g. Dorchester People for Peace, White People Challenging Racism (Cambridge), Social Justice Education, Blackstonian (Boston).  Our assistance to these groups goes beyond financial management; we nurture them through organizational development, networking, and planning.

Budget  $16,818.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Adults Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

The CCI internship experience is both broad and deep. Our interns develop in three areas: disposition, knowledge, and skills. We think of these three areas as how we would like our interns to “be” (disposition), what we would like them to “know” (knowledge) and what we would like them to be able to “do” (skills).

Program Long-Term Success 

Interns return to their schools, work and communities and take action to make changes for racial equity and justice.

Interns organize events.
Interns influence those in power or otherwise take action.
Interns engage in further learning and research.
Program Success Monitored By 
Long-term goals will be evaluated using surveys distributed one, two, and five years after the internships.
 
We assess intern changes in anti-racism disposition, knowledge, and skills through surveys administered at the start and end of their internship period at CCI. These surveys enable participants to measure their status in each of the three areas of anti-racism development.  At the end of the internship, we aggregate and analyze the data for all interns.
Examples of Program Success 

One intern's statement (typical of most interns!):  "I am only really now coming to understand how incredible and life-changing my summer at CCI has been. One of the first metaphors for racism that I ever learned, that it is the smog we breathe and cannot help but ingest, most accurately captures what this experience has meant to me. Being at CCI has been like having the opportunity to breathe air purified of ignorance. For the first time, I was able to be in an environment in which no comment was considered too trivial or oversensitive to be discussed and analyzed in terms of racial power and privilege. Furthermore, having the opportunity to conduct workshops with the other interns served as a great opportunity for me to examine my understanding of race and racism, and check in with my own dispositions on such topics. Outside of the office, it is a constant struggle to find this sort of space and remain aware."

-Gabe Beckermen, CCI Intern 2012 

2. Organizing

CCI organizes and supports anti-racism groups and coalitions in communities throughout the region.  We help groups to pursue local goals and share their triumphs and challenges with groups in other communities.

CCI works in coalitions to advocate on issues with racial dimensions, such as CORI (criminal records) reform, fair housing, and access to education and health care.  We also maintain a volunteer Rapid Response Team that acts quickly when breaking news involves racial issues.

CCI’s new Organizing in Suburban Communities initiative targets specific Greater Boston communities with major need and opportunity for local anti-racism education, coalition-building, and actions.  CCI plays a vital role in this work, but leadership and decision-making must bubble up from the community itself.  OSC is a major focus for CCI expansion in the next 3 years as we plan to develop teams in six communities; these teams will support each other and engage in other, regional anti-racism work as well.

Budget  $21,020.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Formation and maintenance of Transformation Teams in target communities committed to work over the long-term for racial justice and equity in their communities and beyond.

Provision and support of strategic anti-racist organizing in selected suburban communities.

Support, opportunities, and tools provided for individual and community transformation.

Increased knowledge by residents of racism and anti-racism strategies to effectively organize in their communities.

Expanded networks of anti-racist organizers and organizations in suburban communities for long-term mutual support.
Program Long-Term Success 

New consciousness and commitment among residents of target communities to take action against racism and its devastating effects.

Increased number of CCI members willing and able to mobilize and organize locally for racial justice.
Program Success Monitored By 

We will document all organizing activities in each target community, numbers and analysis of participants, networks formed, and levels of activity.

We will document specific racial justice issues tackled in each target community and across communities and the result of actions on each issue.

Senior CCI staff will conduct focus groups with diverse samples of target community participants and non-participants to assess changes.

Project participants will complete surveys in order to assess individual, community, and institutional changes resulting from project organizing.
Examples of Program Success  Organizing in Suburban Communities is a new initiative and does not yet have data on program success.

3. Events

CCI and its diverse local and national partners sponsor many events.  They inform anti-racism activists, community and institutional leaders, and scholars and expand the greater community’s awareness of racism, underlying currents of racism, and strategies for change.  Equally important, they empower participants through mutual support and bonding to a community of anti-racism activists.  Simply put, they convert learning into action.

 

Throughout the year, we sponsor meet-ups, brown-bag lunches, conferences, film series, awards ceremonies, and special events.  They involve an array of co-sponsors (e.g. local colleges, the Mass. Commission Against Discrimination), speakers, target audiences, and topics.  A growing number of events are held online, e.g. online brown-bags.  We find that digital events can especially reach, energize, and involve younger people, including white, suburban young adults, a pivotal group in combating systemic racism today.

Budget  $25,090.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Expanded levels of activity in one-time and continuing education, mobilization, and other events, including online events.

Increased numbers and levels of participation in these events.

Participant satisfaction with the quality and impact of the various events.

Impact of various events on participant awareness and commitment to action.

Expanded participation in overall CCI membership and activities as a result of various events.
Program Long-Term Success 

Increased disposition, knowledge, and skills by event participants regarding racism and strategies of anti-racism education, organizing, and action.

Long-term awareness and commitment among event participants to take action against racism.

Increased number of CCI members willing and able to mobilize and organize locally and regionally for racial justice.
Program Success Monitored By 

Project staff will document all events of all kinds, numbers (estimated when necessary) and analysis of participants, and levels and types of activity.

Most events will include some form of brief written feedback from participants, including assessment of individual and group impacts of events.

Senior CCI staff will interview a diverse sample of participants in varied activities to obtain their levels of satisfaction, perceived impact on themselves and others, perceived long-term impact, and suggestions for improvement.
Examples of Program Success  --

4. Resource Center

CCI has amassed an unparalleled body of print and multimedia information on race, racism, and anti-racism work.  We disseminate this through our Resource Library and an expanding online presence (see communitychangeinc.org, which averages 1,500 hits/month).  The Library is used often by partner organizations, interns, journalists, students, and scholars. It is well-known among many area colleges

 

We also use Constant Contact email service to keep in touch with many partner organizations and individuals, notifying them of events, issues, and opportunities.

 

In the next 3-5 years, we plan to expand social networking and other digital applications of the Resource Center and also to work with partners to create a regional Racial Justice Think Tank.

 

Ultimately, the Resource Center is not just about information but the many ways CCI and others can use this information to expand true awareness of racism and commitment to and effective action around anti-racism strategies and actions.

Budget  $13,343.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Expanded numbers of Resource Library users.

Expanded number of subscribers to our email newsletter and alerts.

Expansion in the number of forms and number of participants in various social networking and other online communications, including use of diverse content at our website.
Program Long-Term Success 

Use of the Library by an increased number of people, resulting in expanded racism awareness and anti-racism education, organizing, and action.

Expanded participation---in numbers and breadth and depth of involvement---in various channels of social networking and other digital applications.

Initial steps to plan and develop the Racial Justice Think Tank.
Program Success Monitored By 

Project staff will count numbers of Library users and types and levels of usage.

We will count the number of users of our website, varied channels of social networking, and other online anti-racist activities.

We will obtain feedback, including levels of satisfaction and suggestions for improvement, from Library and online/digital participants.
Examples of Program Success  --

5. Training and Consulting

CCI trains leaders who can influence policy, hiring, and organizing and apply anti-racism strategies to diverse institutions, fields, and communities.  Last year, we engaged over 600 people and, indirectly, their circles of influence.  Trainings are tailored for specific needs and generate systems for continued support.

Trainings are not just informative; they are transformative!  Time and again, participants tell us they’ve been deeply empowered and energized toward whatever hard work lies ahead.

We provide training and technical assistance (TTA), customized for each diverse client organization.  Some of these groups focus on racism; more often they have other missions, but realize that they need to deal with race and diversity, internally or among their consumers, constituents, or community.

TTA may be a one-time intervention, but it is more often long-term and multi-faceted.  We often connect the client to “peer” organizations that have successfully faced similar issues.

Budget  $43,654.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Expanded number of training participants.

Expanded number of organizations and affiliated individuals participating in technical assistance.

Participant satisfaction with the quality and impact of training and technical assistance.

Expanded participation in overall CCI membership and activities as a result of various events.

Expanded CCI income from training and technical assistance fees.
Program Long-Term Success 

Training will increase participants’ disposition, knowledge, and skills by event participants regarding racism and strategies of anti-racism education, organizing, and action.

Technical assistance will increase organizations’ commitment and capacity to take action against racism, within and/or outside of their organizations.

As a result of training and technical assistance, the number and levels of activity of CCI members and participants in anti-racist activities will increase.
Program Success Monitored By 

Project staff will document numbers of individuals and organizations participating in training and technical assistance.

We will count the number of individuals who will potentially be indirectly affected by each technical assistance client, e.g. the organization’s workforce, consumers, constituents, or community.

We will obtain feedback, including levels of satisfaction and suggestions for improvement, from training and technical assistance participants.

We will document the amount of income generated by training and technical assistance fees.
Examples of Program Success  --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Paul Marcus
CEO Term Start June 1997
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

He co-taught and taught the “History and Development of Racism in the United States of America” at Boston College for over 30 semesters and is currently an adjunct faculty member at the Simmons College Graduate School of Social Work where he teaches "Dynamics of Racism and Oppression." He has had extensive experience planning and conducting workshops and trainings for wide variety organizations and communities. He has worked with organizers and educators from all across the country exploring and challenging the role of white people in perpetuating and maintaining white supremacy, racism and white privilege. 

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Louis Enriquez Esq. Jan 1995 May 1997
Horace Seldon Apr 1968 Dec 1995

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

 

 

 

Much CCI work is done in collaboration. Our role is to foster leadership in partner organizations and communities and to support their priorities.

We are in regular dialog with communities of color, where partners repeatedly stress the need for anti-racism work that deeply engages white communities.

Our partners include Asian-American Resource Workshop, Greater Bos. Civil Rights Coalition, Chinese Progressive Society, Union of Minority Neighborhoods, Centro Presente, Irish Intl. Immigration Center, Encuentro Diaspora Afro, Commonwealth CORI Coalition, Bos. Workers Alliance, Bos. Parent Organizing Network, Boston Tenants Coalition, United Native Americans of New Eng., Bos. Society of Vulcans, City Life/Vida Urbana, School-to-Prison Pipeline Work Group, Winchester Multicultural Network, Belmont Against Racism, Student Immigrant Movement, and several area colleges.

Recent organization consulting clients include: New Eng. United Methodist Conference, Community Action of Western MA, Bos. Teachers Union School, Sisters of Notre Dame, and Cambridge Dept. of Human Service Programs.

We provide fiscal sponsorship and other support to fledgling groups such as Dorchester People for Peace, White People Challenging Racism, Social Justice Education, Blackstonian, and Occupy Boston Working Groups.

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 30
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms Sue Naimark
Board Chair Company Affiliation Naimark Consulting
Board Chair Term Jan 2007 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mary Antes Retired Voting
antonieta gimeno Community Educator and Trainer Voting
Meck Groot Justice Ministries Voting
Paul Madden Debate League Coordinator Voting
Christopher Messinger Boston Mobilization Voting
Sue Naimark Naimark Consuting Voting
Stephen Pereira Retired Voting
Erica Satin-Hernandez Student Voting
May Takayanagi Retired Voting
Jimi Two Feathers Community Volunteer Voting
Ernestine Washington Retired Voting
Mark Watson Keel Asset Management Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Personnel
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $213,895.00
Projected Expense $181,722.00
Form 990s

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $164,450 $127,287 $126,163
Total Expenses $131,718 $125,638 $120,358

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$29,157 $17,700 $28,389
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $120,156 $88,683 $79,022
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $14,916 $20,717 $18,696
Investment Income, Net of Losses $221 $187 $56
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $86,873 $99,059 $94,451
Administration Expense $21,984 $13,466 $14,069
Fundraising Expense $22,861 $13,113 $11,838
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.25 1.01 1.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses 66% 79% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 15% 12% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $55,577 $25,269 $22,646
Current Assets $55,577 $25,269 $22,646
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $2,643 $5,067 $4,093
Total Net Assets $52,934 $20,202 $18,553

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 21.03 4.99 5.53

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s.  For FY 2012, 2011 & 2010 Administrative and Fundraising expense totals were obtained from the Form PC documents on file with the state of Massachusetts, and from details provided by the organization. Revenue breakout in relation to Foundation and Corporation funding was provided by the organization for all three fiscal years.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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