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Community Legal Aid

 405 Main Street, 4th Floor
 Worcester, MA 01608
[P] (508) 752-3718
[F] (508) 752-5918
http://www.communitylegal.org
sloy@cla-ma.org
Sarah Loy
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1968
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2446242

LAST UPDATED: 02/11/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names Legal Assistance Corporation of Central Massachusetts (2011)
Central Massachusetts Legal Services, Inc. (1983)
Neighborhood Legal Services of Worcester, Inc. (1970)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

To protect and advance the legal rights of low-income, elderly and other disenfranchised people in order to secure access to basic needs and to challenge institutional barriers to social and economic justice.

Mission Statement

To protect and advance the legal rights of low-income, elderly and other disenfranchised people in order to secure access to basic needs and to challenge institutional barriers to social and economic justice.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2012 to Sept 30, 2013
Projected Income $5,327,211.00
Projected Expense $5,327,211.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Enhancing the Safety of Family Violence Victims
  • Maintaining Access to Healthcare and Government Benefits
  • Obtaining Humanitarian-Based Immigration Relief
  • Preserving Decent and Affordable Housing
  • Protecting the Health, Safety, and Independence of Our Senior Citizens

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

To protect and advance the legal rights of low-income, elderly and other disenfranchised people in order to secure access to basic needs and to challenge institutional barriers to social and economic justice.


Background Statement

Community Legal Aid, Inc. is the state-funded legal aid program that provides free legal services to low-income and elderly families and individuals in central and western Massachusetts. Community Legal Aid was formed in 2011 when Legal Assistance Corporation of Central Massachusetts and Western Massachusetts Legal Services came together.

Community Legal Aid’s mission is to protect and advance the legal rights of low-income and elderly people in order to secure access to basic needs and to challenge institutional barriers to social and economic justice. Community Legal Aid and its predecessor agencies have been providing high quality legal assistance throughout the region for several decades.

Through Community Legal Aid’s effective advocacy in approximately 4,000 cases each year, the region’s most vulnerable residents obtain safe and stable housing, access disability and other benefits programs to stabilize their income, and break free from domestic violence. The vast majority of Community Legal Aid’s clients have household incomes that fall below 125% of the federal poverty level ($2,453 monthly for a family of four). With a dedicated staff of more than 45 attorneys and paralegals, Community Legal Aid provides critical legal representation to clients who cannot afford to pay for a lawyer to assist them with their most basic needs.


Impact Statement

Accomplishments for Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2013:

 
1. Generated a Development Plan in conjunction with Joyaux & Associates, and hired a new Development Director to facilitate the execution of the Plan.
 

2. Concluded a strategic planning process with a Community Listening Sessions Report.

 

3. Continued to serve vulnerable communities throughout central and western Massachusetts, including: assisting families and individuals access the housing of their choice, helping domestic violence survivors secure lawful immigration status; ensuring that low-income families gain access to unemployment and disability benefits and affordable health insurance; and protecting elders from fraud and abuse.

 
4. Successfully integrated technology systems in our four full-time offices: migrated to a new phone system, updated our case management software, and added video- conferencing to each office to streamline inter-office communications.
 

Objectives for Fiscal Year Beginning October 1, 2013:

 

1.    Provide free legal assistance to over 5,000 low-income and elderly residents who could not otherwise afford an attorney, helping them to obtain safe and stable housing; access disability and other lawful benefits; and break free from domestic violence.
 
2.    Further diversify our funding streams by seeking more support from private individuals, corporations, and local foundations.

3.    Enhance opportunities for private attorneys to provide volunteer legal services by assuming responsibility for the regional Volunteer Lawyers Service.
    
4.    Increase collaborative efforts with other nonprofit agencies in order to provide innovative, holistic approaches to serving clients.

5.    Develop an education law practice to focus on ensuring that children are provided with greater opportunities to learn and succeed at school.
 

Needs Statement

Community Legal Aid needs to increase and diversify its funding, as it now faces a severe funding crisis. Community Legal Aid’s largest funding source is the Mass. Legal Assistance Corporation (MLAC), which makes annual disbursements of legislatively-appropriated funding and revenues from the Interest On Lawyer’s Trust Accounts (IOLTA) program to Massachusetts legal aid programs. Both of those funding streams have declined dramatically since 2008, forcing MLAC to drastically reduce its general support grants to Community Legal Aid and other legal aid programs it funds; between FY2008 and today, Community Legal Aid has lost 62% of its general support funding from MLAC. Community Legal Aid’s Board of Directors has allowed the organization to budget a deficit over the past three years, which we have covered with our reserves. In the wake of these difficult fiscal realities, Community Legal Aid has embarked on a variety of fundraising activities intended to diversify its funding streams, including applying for grants from private foundations and corporations and soliciting donations from individuals.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

Community Legal Aid (Community Legal Aid) is the state-funded provider of free civil legal services to the low-income and elderly residents of Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, and Worcester Counties. With responsibility for providing legal services to almost 28% of Massachusetts’ low-income residents, Community Legal Aid is one of the largest legal services providers in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Because of continued declines in the Interest on Lawyers’ Trust Accounts (IOLTA) program – a mainstay of legal services funding – the resources available to serve our clients have decreased substantially over the last three years. Our operations are currently supported with revenue of slightly more than $5.3 million, down from the combined revenue of our predecessor agencies of approximately $7.8 million in 2008. At the same time, the low-income and elderly residents of central and western Massachusetts are suffering from the effects of the turbulent economy and desperately need the services that we offer. 

Notwithstanding these challenges, our staff continues to provide legal services of the highest quality to thousands of needy families and individuals, from the rolling hills of the Berkshires to the urban centers of Springfield and Worcester.


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
CENTRAL REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
BERKSHIRE REGION, MA
Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, and Worcester Counties in Massachusetts

Organization Categories

  1. Crime & Legal - Related - Legal Services
  2. Human Services -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Enhancing the Safety of Family Violence Victims

Domestic violence is a growing problem in our society, and affects people from all segments of our communities. Community Legal Aid is well connected to the many domestic violence service providers in the region, and receives referrals from them on a regular basis.Victims of domestic violence and their children may never be able to live apart from a batterer without child support, safe custody, and visitation arrangements. CLA’s attorneys represent domestic violence victims in family law matters so that they can break free from abuse.

Budget  $1,344,194.00
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Legal Services
Population Served Victims Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 
At least 80% of clients served by this program will have positive outcomes in their cases. An outcome is considered positive if at least two indicators of the outcome have been acheived. These indicators include: deterring future unlawful practices; increasing physical safety; planning for future dignity and safety; removing or preventing guardianship; securing divorce from a batterer; securing or maintaining safe visitation rights; securing or maintaining sole physical custody; vindicating personal rights and dignity.
Program Long-Term Success 
Clients served by this program will live safely and independently from their abusers.
Program Success Monitored By 

CLA measures the effectiveness of its advocacy work by using program-wide outcome measures containing indicators, standards, and action steps. The program’s outcome measures are Housing Stability; Financial Security; Healthcare Access; and Dignity and Safety. These outcome measures were created to measure our success in addressing our clients’ most urgent needs. We use “indicators” to measure whether the outcomes were achieved, “standards” to establish whether indicators were met, and “action steps” to guide us in meeting the standards. A full representation case is considered to have a successful result if at least two indicators are reached for each outcome.

 

When a case is closed, the supervising advocate reviews the case outcomes. When a case does not have two favorable indicators, and is therefore not considered to have a successful outcome, the supervisor may discuss the case further with the advocate.

Examples of Program Success 

For 13 years, Jeanne’s husband, Shawn, kept up an increasingly violent barrage of restrictions, threats, and assaults that left Jeanne injured, terrified and isolated. Jeanne finally gathered the strength to leave, moving into a family shelter with her two children and filing for a divorce. After the court awarded Jeanne temporary emergency custody of the children, she was referred to Community Legal Aid, where Attorney Margery Kennard handled her case. After one year and a two-day divorce trial, with Marge by her side all the way, Jeanne was awarded full physical and legal custody of the children as well as child support.

 

Jeanne says of the assistance she received from Community Legal Aid, “I would not have custody of my kids…if not for Community Legal Aid. Marge truly cared about me and shared in my progress every step of the way; she will always have a special place in my heart.”


Maintaining Access to Healthcare and Government Benefits

Community Legal Aid is the legal arm of the social service organizations that provide a safety net for our region’s most vulnerable residents. As the economy struggles to recover, the number of individuals and families in Massachusetts that need this safety net is growing every year.

While government benefits provide a safety net for out society, the process for accessing them is often fraught with red tape and lengthy delays. Public insurance programs that cover the costs of health care often wrongly deny benefits, jeopardizing a family’s economic stability. Elder or disabled individuals often need assistance in obtaining critically-needed SSI, Social Security, or Medicare benefits. By providing legal services to individuals and families who are wrongly denied any of the full range of government benefits, Community Legal Aid helps people achieve economic stability.

Budget  $801,176.00
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Legal Services
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Elderly and/or Disabled Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

At least 80% of clients served by this program will have positive outcomes in their cases. An outcome is considered positive if at least two indicators of the outcome have been acheived. These indicators include: discharging debt; obtaining or maintaining benefits; obtaining or maintaining earned income; obtaining or maintaining support or alimony; planning for future financial security; securing assets; obtaining medical equipment; obtaining medical transportation; obtaining or maintaining healthcare coverage; obtaining or maintaining medical care; and obtaining or maintaining nursing or rest home coverage.

Program Long-Term Success 

Clients served by this program will obtain or maintain financial security.

Program Success Monitored By 

CLA measures the effectiveness of its advocacy work by using program-wide outcome measures containing indicators, standards, and action steps. The program’s outcome measures are Housing Stability; Financial Security; Healthcare Access; and Dignity and Safety. These outcome measures were created to measure our success in addressing our clients’ most urgent needs. We use “indicators” to measure whether the outcomes were achieved, “standards” to establish whether indicators were met, and “action steps” to guide us in meeting the standards. A full representation case is considered to have a successful result if at least two indicators are reached for each outcome.

 

When a case is closed, the supervising advocate reviews the case outcomes. When a case does not have two favorable indicators, and is therefore not considered to have a successful outcome, the supervisor may discuss the case further with the advocate.

Examples of Program Success 

Cecelia was her family’s sole wage earner. After her car broke down, she could not get a ride to work one day after a big blizzard. Cecelia was fired for a breach of attendance policy. She filed for unemployment compensation and her employer contested the decision. Cecelia found CLA, where an advocate took her case. When her first appeal was unsuccessful, her advocate appealed to the Division of Unemployment’s Board of Review. Her advocate successfully argued that the Review Examiner had incorrectly applied the Division of Unemployment’s own internal policy on loss of transportation, and that the extreme weather was a mitigating factor in Cecelia’s unexcused absence from work. Cecelia won her appeal allowing her family to pay the bills and stay in their home. Cecelia says of the assistance she received from Community Legal Aid, “If I hadn’t come here and if I didn’t have [my advocate] to walk me through the process, I would have been in a lot of trouble. I would have just given up.”


Obtaining Humanitarian-Based Immigration Relief

Central and western Massachusettsis home to many immigrants who are victims of violence and other trauma. Battered spouses, victims of crime or human trafficking, abused and abandoned children, or those fleeing persecution often need legal help when seeking humanitarian-based immigration relief. Community Legal Aid provides assistance that brings them safety, security, and peace of mind.

Budget  $356,078.00
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Legal Services
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

At least 80% of clients served by this program will have positive outcomes in their cases. An outcome is considered positive if at least two indicators of the outcome have been acheived. These indicators include:increasing physical safety; planning for future dignity and safety; vindicating personal rights and dignity.

Program Long-Term Success 

Clients served by this program (immigrant victims of violence and other trauma) will secure legal immigration status.

Program Success Monitored By 

CLA measures the effectiveness of its advocacy work by using program-wide outcome measures containing indicators, standards, and action steps. The program’s outcome measures are Housing Stability; Financial Security; Healthcare Access; and Dignity and Safety. These outcome measures were created to measure our success in addressing our clients’ most urgent needs. We use “indicators” to measure whether the outcomes were achieved, “standards” to establish whether indicators were met, and “action steps” to guide us in meeting the standards. A full representation case is considered to have a successful result if at least two indicators are reached for each outcome.

 

When a case is closed, the supervising advocate reviews the case outcomes. When a case does not have two favorable indicators, and is therefore not considered to have a successful outcome, the supervisor may discuss the case further with the advocate.

Examples of Program Success 

Born in Guatemala, Rosa just 15 years old when she became the unmarried partnerof Manuel, a man twice her age who sexually and physically abused her severely for over twenty years. When Rosa finally took the courageous step of attempting to separate from him, Manuel began to stalk her, repeatedly breaking into her home and assaulting her at her workplace. The Guatemalan police refused to help her. Rosa finally came to the painful conclusion that she should leave Guatemala and seek safety in the United States. Though detained when she arrived, Rosa was eventually released to live with a family member while an immigration judge decided whether she would be permitted to stay. Rosa found Community Legal Aid, where her attorney helped her with her application for asylum. Rosa was granted asylum in August 2011. Rosa says, “From that moment, my life changed. I give thanks that I met [my attorney] and CLA. I don’t know how I could have gone through the whole process without this help.”


Preserving Decent and Affordable Housing

Since the housing crisis began in 2008, the number of homeowners across the country who have lost their homes to foreclosure has exploded, increasing every year. Since that time, Community Legal Aid has similarly seen a significant increase in the number of people coming to us for help with foreclosure cases. At the same time, our client communities face barriers finding decent, affordable rental housing.

When a couple faces foreclosure, when a family is being wrongly evicted from its home, or when a person is unlawfully denies a rent subsidy that would keep her housing affordable, Community Legal Aid gives them help that stabilizes their housing and keeps them from homelessness.

Budget  $1,023,724.00
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Legal Services
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  At least 80% of clients served by this program will have positive outcomes in their cases. An outcome is considered positive if at least two indicators of the outcome have been acheived. These indicators include:combating discrimination; excluding a domestic abuser from the home; improving living conditions; obtaining emergency shelter; obtaining or retaining affordable housing; planning for future housing stability; preserving home ownership; retaining possession of tenancy; securing additional time; and waiving rent arrears.
Program Long-Term Success 

Clients served by this program will retain or obtain safe and affordable housing.

Program Success Monitored By 

CLA measures the effectiveness of its advocacy work by using program-wide outcome measures containing indicators, standards, and action steps. The program’s outcome measures are Housing Stability; Financial Security; Healthcare Access; and Dignity and Safety. These outcome measures were created to measure our success in addressing our clients’ most urgent needs. We use “indicators” to measure whether the outcomes were achieved, “standards” to establish whether indicators were met, and “action steps” to guide us in meeting the standards. A full representation case is considered to have a successful result if at least two indicators are reached for each outcome.

 

When a case is closed, the supervising advocate reviews the case outcomes. When a case does not have two favorable indicators, and is therefore not considered to have a successful outcome, the supervisor may discuss the case further with the advocate.

Examples of Program Success  The Damons were facing foreclosure on their home in Uxbridge after Michael, an Iraq war veteran, could not return to work due to a hip condition. After their mortgage's adjustable rate rose drastically, the house was foreclosed and the family was threatened with eviction and homelessness. The couple then turned to us. With the help of their lawyer, the Damons were able to prevent the eviction and stay in their home. Their lawyer continued to help them as they explored the options of renegotiating their mortgage or buying the house back from the lender, Countrywide. Lisa Damon credits legal aid with keeping her family in their home. "Honestly," she says, "I don't know where my husband and two children would be without their help."

Protecting the Health, Safety, and Independence of Our Senior Citizens

As Americans live longer, the chance that they will need civil legal services at some point is growing. Community Legal Aid partners with dozens of senior centers, elder service providers, and state agencies who refer elders seeking help with their most basic needs—ensuring safety and dignity and getting adequate food, shelter, and medical care.We target our services to vulnerable elderly clients including those who are low-income, disabled, homebound, institutionalized, or living in rural areas.

Budget  $934,705.00
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Legal Services
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

 

At least 80% of clients served by this program will have positive outcomes in their cases. An outcome is considered positive if at least two indicators of the outcome have been acheived. These indicators include: improving living conditions; obtaining emergency shelter; obtaining or retaining affordable housing; preserving home ownership; retaining possession of tenancy; securing additional time; waiving rent arrears; discharging debt; obtaining or maintaining benefits; obtaining or maintaining earned income; securing assets; obtaining medical equipment; obtaining medical transportation; obtaining or maintaining healthcare coverage; obtaining or maintaining medical care; obtaining or maintaining nursing or rest home coverage; and planning for future healthcare needs; deterring future unlawful practices; increasing physical safety; planning for future dignity and safety; removing or preventing guardianship; securing divorce from a batterer; and vindicating personal rights and dignity.

Program Long-Term Success 

Clients served by this program will live safely and independently, retain or obtain safe and affordable housing, and obtain or maintain financial security.

Program Success Monitored By 

CLA measures the effectiveness of its advocacy work by using program-wide outcome measures containing indicators, standards, and action steps. The program’s outcome measures are Housing Stability; Financial Security; Healthcare Access; and Dignity and Safety. These outcome measures were created to measure our success in addressing our clients’ most urgent needs. We use “indicators” to measure whether the outcomes were achieved, “standards” to establish whether indicators were met, and “action steps” to guide us in meeting the standards. A full representation case is considered to have a successful result if at least two indicators are reached for each outcome.

 

When a case is closed, the supervising advocate reviews the case outcomes. When a case does not have two favorable indicators, and is therefore not considered to have a successful outcome, the supervisor may discuss the case further with the advocate.

Examples of Program Success 

Sharon, 66, has been caught up in the bureaucracy and complexities of the Medicaid and Medicare insurance programs her entire life. Born with cerebral palsy,Sharon has always had myriad health challenges and has needed care by numerous medical professionals, as well as a variety of medicines, to maintain her health. Sharon’s latest challenge involved a medication that she had taken for years, but which was recently denied by Medicare. Without this particular medicine, she was unable to move around easily, and, as her quality of life declined, she became depressed and fearful about her future. With help from her CLA advocate, Sharon got Medicare to reverse its decision and grant her coverage for her medicine. Sharon says, “Just because I am disabled, Medicaid and Medicare think I won’t fight back. If CLA didn’t fight for me, I wouldn’t have a life at all. With their help, I have been able to stay in my own home, not have to live in a nursing home, and have a normal life.”


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In addition to the five program areas of legal work we provide (listed above), Community Legal Aid has a number of special projects that provide innovative solutions to the region’s legal issues. These include:

Family Advocates of Central Massachusetts, a project in which Community Legal Aid and medical providers work in partnership to improve family health. Community Legal Aid attorneys train medical providers to screen for legal issues that negatively affect their patients’ health, and the providers then refer their patients to Community Legal Aid for the legal advocacy necessary to resolve the issue.

Worcester Fair Housing Project – Community Legal Aid attorneys conduct education workshops on fair housing laws for tenant groups, social service providers, landlords, and other community members; train civil rights investigators to “test” whether housing discrimination is occurring locally, and provide legal assistance to residents of Worcester County who have experienced housing discrimination.

The Honorable Harry Zarrow Homeless Advocacy Project – Community Legal Aid staff, working in partnership with private attorneys in Worcester County, help residents of homeless shelters with their legal issues or serve as consultants to shelter and social service agency staff so that they, in turn, can help their homeless and at-risk consumers.

Housing Court Intervention Project –Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden Counties – Through this project, tenants facing eviction trials in the housing court meet with a Community Legal Aid attorney to receive help with completing paperwork, engaging in mediation, and trying their cases. As fewer people can afford the services of a private attorney, this project plays a key role in ensuring that tenants get meaningful access to the justice system.

Probate and Family Court Lawyer for the Day – Community Legal Aid administers this program, through which members of the Worcester County Bar Association volunteer their time at Worcester Probate and Family Court, assisting litigants in drafting pleadings and explaining how to prepare and present their cases in court.

Western New England University School of Law Clinic – During the school year, Community Legal Aid hosts a clinic through which Western New England University law students spend time at Community Legal Aid helping clients with their cases. Students put their skills to practice in context, take primary responsibility for their professional work, and learn about ethics and professionalism, all while providing an invaluable service to Community Legal Aid’s clients.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jonathan L. Mannina Esq.
CEO Term Start Apr 2006
CEO Email jmannina@laccm.org
CEO Experience

Jonathan Mannina joined the Community Legal Aid's predecessor, Legal Assistance Corporation of Central Massachusetts, in 1998. He became Executive Director in 2006, and remains as Executive Director at Community Legal Aid. As Executive Director, he leads and directs the overall operation of CLA in compliance with the policies and guidelines established by the Board of Directors. Before becoming Executive Director, Mr. Mannina served as LACCM's Litigation Director, supervising and coordinating LACCM's litigation and handling cases in both state and federal court. Before coming to LACCM, Mr. Mannina worked at Silver Golub & Teitell, a leading plaintiff’s firm in Connecticut, where he litigated employment discrimination, medical malpractice, and complex personal injury cases at the trial and appellate levels. Mr. Mannina has been a member of the board of directors of the Central Massachusetts Housing Alliance for a number of years and also serves on the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination Advisory Board. In addition, he served in the past as the chair of the City of Worcester's Community Development Advisory Committee. Mr. Mannina is also a member of the Worcester County Bar Association's (WCBA) Housing Court and Federal District Court Committees, and is a member of the WCBA’s Executive Committee. Mr. Mannina is licensed to practice in the state courts of Massachusetts and Connecticut, the U.S. District Courts of Massachusetts and Connecticut, and the First and Second Circuit Courts of Appeal. Mr. Mannina received his J.D. from Georgetown University School of Law, and his B.A. in Philosophy and Economics from Georgetown University.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 55
Number of Part Time Staff 8
Number of Volunteers 15
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 93%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 43
Hispanic/Latino: 13
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 48
Male: 15
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? No
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Gayle Flanders Weiss Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Unum Corporation
Board Chair Term Jan 2012 - Jan 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Donna Agure Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Michael P. Angelini Esq. Bowditch & Dewey Voting
Mr. Charles R. Casartello, Jr. Esq. Pellegrini, Seeley, Ryan & Blakesley Voting
Ms. Brenda S. Doherty Esq. Doherty Wallace Pillsbury & Murphy Voting
Mr. Francis A. Ford Esq. Attorney At Law Voting
Dean Arthur R. Gaudio Esq. Western New England University School of Law Voting
Mr. Justin P. Gelinas Esq. Gelinas and Ward, LLP Voting
Hon. John M. Greaney (Ret.) Retired Voting
Ms. Felicity Hardee Esq. Bulkley, Richardson & Gelinas Voting
Hon. Herbert H. Hodos (Ret.) Retired Voting
Ms. Susan Mailman Coughlin Electrical Contractors Voting
Hon. James B. McElroy (Ret.) Retired Voting
Mr. John T. McInnes Esq. Dingman IP Law Voting
Ms. Debra Moncrieffe Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Eugene P. O'Donnell, Jr. Esq. Fletcher Tilton, PC Voting
Ms. Deborah S. Orzack Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Sally Osei-Tutu Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Aurelina Peguero Community Volunteer Voting
Hon. Gail L. Perlman (Ret.) Retired Judge Voting
Ms. Maria M. Rivera-Ortiz Esq. Massachusetts Family Law Group, PC Voting
Mr. Todd Rodman Esq. Seder & Chandler Voting
Ms. Marline Ruiz Community Volunteer Voting
Dr. Linda D. Sagor M.D. UMass Medical School Voting
Mr. John A. Shea Esq. Lian, Zarrow, Eynon & Shea Voting
Ms. Beverly Spring Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Ingrid Tassy Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Natasha Torres Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Gayle Flanders Weiss Esq. Unum Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 22
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 16
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 62%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 74%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2012 to Sept 30, 2013
Projected Income $5,327,211.00
Projected Expense $5,327,211.00
Form 990s

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2012 Audited Financial Statements

2011 Audited Financial Statements

2010 Audited Financial Statements

2009 Audited Financial Statements

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $5,071,769 $3,613,732 $2,467,477
Total Expenses $4,580,043 $2,914,925 $2,618,851

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$3,743,984 $2,091,959 $1,634,514
Government Contributions $815,413 $494,292 $467,386
    Federal $772,043 $418,393 $391,257
    State $35,075 $75,899 $76,129
    Local $8,295 -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $138,327 $110,480 $78,724
Indirect Public Support -- $147,744 $123,727
Earned Revenue $245,809 $163,518 $140,240
Investment Income, Net of Losses $17,840 $10,735 $19,188
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $110,396 $595,004 $3,698

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $3,929,443 $2,537,296 $2,305,359
Administration Expense $553,866 $329,551 $291,216
Fundraising Expense $96,734 $48,078 $22,276
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.11 1.24 0.94
Program Expense/Total Expenses 86% 87% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 2% 2% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $2,808,045 $2,228,361 $1,417,091
Current Assets $2,387,489 $1,777,301 $1,098,706
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- --
Current Liabilities $479,820 $391,862 $279,399
Total Net Assets $2,328,225 $1,836,499 $1,137,692

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) Mass. Legal Assistance Corp. $3,112,644.00
Mass. Legal Assistance Corp. $2,297,749.00
Mass. Legal Assistance Corp. $1,285,480.00
2nd (Source and Amount) U.S. Dept. of Housing & Urban Dev. $374,431.00
U.S. Dept. of Housing & Urban Dev. $237,933.00
U.S. Dept. of Housing & Urban Dev. $234,966.00
3rd (Source and Amount) Mass. Bar Foundation $297,625.00
Mass. Bar Foundation $243,508.00
Mass. Bar Foundation $243,292.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 5.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.98 4.54 3.93

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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