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Boston Partners in Education Inc

 44 Farnsworth Street
 Boston, MA 02210
[P] (617) 451-6145
[F] (617) 482-0617
http://www.bostonpartners.org
bostonpartners@bostonpartners.org
Pamela Civins
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INCORPORATED: 1966
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2501341

LAST UPDATED: 08/17/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names School Volunteers For Boston (1966)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Boston Partners in Education (Boston Partners) enhances the academic achievement and nurtures the personal growth of Boston's public school students by providing them with focused, individualized in-school volunteer support.
 
Our theory of change — which we have seen borne out in thousands of cases across more than four decades — is that with the involvement and support of volunteer academic mentors, Boston Public Schools (BPS) students can build the skills and confidence to improve their academic achievement, accelerate their personal growth, and ultimately, stay in school and graduate on time. The primary impacts we hope to achieve are closing the achievement gap, decreasing the dropout rate, and increasing student academic performance within BPS.

Mission Statement

Boston Partners in Education (Boston Partners) enhances the academic achievement and nurtures the personal growth of Boston's public school students by providing them with focused, individualized in-school volunteer support.
 
Our theory of change — which we have seen borne out in thousands of cases across more than four decades — is that with the involvement and support of volunteer academic mentors, Boston Public Schools (BPS) students can build the skills and confidence to improve their academic achievement, accelerate their personal growth, and ultimately, stay in school and graduate on time. The primary impacts we hope to achieve are closing the achievement gap, decreasing the dropout rate, and increasing student academic performance within BPS.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Sept 01, 2016 to Aug 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,494,100.00
Projected Expense $1,484,119.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Big Cheese Reads
  • Math Rules!
  • Power Lunch
  • School Volunteer Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Boston Partners in Education (Boston Partners) enhances the academic achievement and nurtures the personal growth of Boston's public school students by providing them with focused, individualized in-school volunteer support.
 
Our theory of change — which we have seen borne out in thousands of cases across more than four decades — is that with the involvement and support of volunteer academic mentors, Boston Public Schools (BPS) students can build the skills and confidence to improve their academic achievement, accelerate their personal growth, and ultimately, stay in school and graduate on time. The primary impacts we hope to achieve are closing the achievement gap, decreasing the dropout rate, and increasing student academic performance within BPS.

Background Statement

Founded in 1966, Boston Partners enhances the academic achievement and nurtures the personal growth of Boston's public school students by providing them with focused, individualized in-school volunteer support. We recruit, train, place, and support volunteers of all ages and backgrounds to work with Boston Public Schools (BPS) students in grades K-12 during the school day. Our volunteers, known as academic mentors, have touched the lives of thousands of BPS students, making a positive impact on their academic and personal development. The primary impacts we hope to achieve are closing the achievement and opportunity gaps, decreasing the dropout rate, and increasing student academic performance within BPS.

Boston Partners operates four programs (Motivate, Accelerate Math and ELA, Aim High STEM and Humanities, and Power Lunch) and one sponsorship initiative (the Big Cheese Reads) culminating in our annual gala. The support our volunteer academic mentors provide helps students succeed academically and build confidence.

For over 50 years now, we have focused on reaching students who might otherwise "fall through the cracks"—those children who are English language learners, who face economic disadvantages, are struggling academically and personally, and can succeed with the encouragement and guidance of a caring adult academic mentor. Our longstanding knowledge of the Boston Public Schools allows us to further the priorities of the district by doing what we do best: finding struggling students extra support during the school day; and, ensuring that community members can make a significant contribution in Boston by mentoring public school students of all ages. This has been a priority of our since the beginning—now is the time to act locally.

Of the students served in 2016-2017 for whom we have demographic information:: 47% identified as female, 53% as male. Ages of the students: 50% grades K-5, 50% grades 6-12. Student ethnicities: 31% Black, 31% Hispanic, 5% White, 8% Asian, 5% Other/Multi-Racial, and 25% unidentified. English is not the home language of 40% of students. According to BPS, 70% of students are considered economically disadvantaged, which indicates participating in one or more of these state- administered programs: SNAP, TAFDC, DCF foster care, and MassHealth. 

Impact Statement

Boston Partners in Education reached a milestone celebrating 50 years of serving the Boston community in 2016-2017. This year, we were proud to:

- Reach 3,741 K-12 students in 58 schools through the efforts of 517 volunteer academic mentors and Big Cheese readers. Our services are available to all teachers in the Boston Public Schools (BPS).

- Transform our long-running School Volunteer Program into three distinct offerings targeting different settings: Motivate (grades K-2, whole class); Accelerate (grades K-8, small group and 1:1); and Aim High (grades 9-12, small group and 1:1). The new offerings feature updated logic models, metrics, and procedures designed to better capture student needs and simplify the student nomination process for BPS teachers.

- Implement new check in and match monitoring systems for School Partnerships, including regular site visits to classrooms and observing mentors’ interactions with their student(s) and teacher. With new online student nominations forms, we have expedited the process for a teacher to request an academic mentor. The new nomination form has also unexpectedly increased the popularity of one-on-one mentor matches, as opposed to small groups. We also have access to additional student data, like the BPS school climate survey, which measures student attitudes towards learning, adults, and their school environment. This data will give us a greater understanding of how our programs affects the youth we serve.

- Complete work on our 50th Anniversary campaign. We engaged an Encore Fellow to direct the campaign from February 2016 through April 2017 and hired PR firm Denterlein to lead marketing efforts beginning in August 2016. The 50th Anniversary campaign successfully launched in September 2016 at an event featuring Superintendent Tommy Chang at BPS’s central office and continued throughout the year as we celebrated our volunteers’ and our community’s impact on BPS students. The campaign culminated in our 50th Anniversary Gala in April 2017, where we raised a record-breaking $700,000 to support our academic mentoring offerings. Our ongoing “50 Years, 50 Stories” feature can be found on our website: http://bostonpartners.org/category/50-stories/

- Educate teachers about Boston Partners, orient them in how to utilize our services, and demonstrate the impact our volunteers have on their students. For example, our placement team regularly conducts outreach sessions in schools in order to share more information with teachers on how to best utilize our volunteers and services in the classroom.


Needs Statement

Volunteer Recruitment: Boston Partners’ organizational goal is to serve at least 25%, or 750, more students in one-on-one and small group mentoring in the next three to five years. During the 2016-2017 academic year, we received an unexpected increase in teacher requests for one-on-one mentors, which utilize volunteer resources differently than small group matches of 2-4 students. As a result, over 400 students were on a “waitlist” for mentors, as we did not have enough volunteers to meet the demand. The challenge we face is filling these outstanding teacher requests with approximately 300-400 more volunteer academic mentors.

Brand Awareness: Brand awareness is key to reinforcing our organizational identity as a crucial partner in the Boston Public Schools. We want to ensure that administrators, teachers, and BPS partners thoroughly understand and effectively utilize our academic mentoring services. Beyond BPS, we also wish to strengthen our brand awareness for volunteer recruitment, especially in the neighborhoods of our partner schools. Our goal is to increase the number of volunteer academic mentors who are from those immediate communities and who identify as people of color, thus better reflecting the makeup of our students.


CEO Statement

Since 1966, Boston Partners in Education has been dedicated to helping academically at-risk students of the Boston Public Schools succeed in both their schoolwork and their lives. We believe that a quality education is something that should be available to every person. However, in order for that to happen, many resources need to come together: money, time, and caring adults among them. At Boston Partners, we have become adept at weaving these strands together to create a cohesive network of support for our students.

Our volunteer librarians helped the district set up the first central libraries in elementary schools during the late 1960’s. When the “busing crisis” in the city left it unsafe for students to travel to school in the mid-1970’s, our volunteers were there to escort them, too. Today, Boston Partners continues to be on the frontline, now focusing 100% of our efforts on student academic achievement, meeting our young people where they are, in the classroom. These children are the future leaders of our city and our country, and in order to lead effectively, they first need to learn to read, write, problem solve, and think critically. Our volunteers not only provide students with academic support, but they also help build their self-confidence and motivate them to set and reach goals.


Boston Partners has celebrated 50 years of service to our community, and we are looking forward to our future. In September 2015, we launched our latest three-year strategic plan. We want to be serving 750 more students, a 25% increase, in three to five years through one-on-one and small group matches. To do this, we will focus programs on grades K-8 literacy and math, as well as high school humanities and STEM related subjects, addressing the academic and mentoring support needs of elementary, middle and high school students.

As Superintendent Dr. Tommy Chang reiterated at our joint event with BPS in fall 2016, “Over the years, Boston Partners in Education has provided academic and mentoring support for tens of thousands of students by connecting community members to our young people." Boston Partners volunteer academic mentors are there for students every week during the school year, helping them improve their grades and attendance, as well as gain the confidence they will need en route to on-time graduation and beyond.

Even after 50 years of supporting Boston’s students, there is still work to be done. Ensuring that our youth receive extra support in school is what we do best, and we will continue to serve our community in the years to come.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Boston Partners in Education serves students from any school in the  Boston Public Schools district. We reach BPS students in every neighborhood of Boston, including Allston, Brighton, Charlestown, Chinatown, Dorchester, East Boston, Hyde Park, Mattapan, Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, Roxbury, the North End, the South End, and South Boston, and West Roxbury.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Big Cheese Reads

The Big Cheese Reads Initiative, a sponsorship program linked to our annual Gala, connects middle school students with business, community, and cultural leaders in order to emphasize the important link between literacy and career success. Since its inception in 2004, more than 250 corporate and community leaders have visited classes to support the initiative. “Big Cheeses” visit a middle school classroom at least once during the school year to read a short selection aloud to the class, give a brief personal account of the ways reading and learning have impacted their lives and career achievements, and respond to questions from the students.

The Big Cheese Reads is also a fundraising initiative. Sponsorship helps us continue to provide quality educational assistance and positive adult role models to our city's children. Funds raised through the initiative enable us to recruit, train, place, and support more volunteers in BPS classrooms.
Budget  $147,491.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

In 2014-15, 100 Big Cheese Readers visited 102 classrooms in 26 Boston Public Schools, reading and sharing career advice with over 1,820 students.

Survey data obtained in 2014-15 demonstrated universal satisfaction from teachers and Big Cheese Readers:


  • Over 97% of teachers for whom we received survey data rated the overall program as “very good” or “excellent.”


  • Over 97% of Big Cheese Readers for whom we received survey data also rated the program as “very good” or “excellent.”


We piloted a “corporate outing” model of the Big Cheese Reads in 2014-15, during which leaders from two of our partner companies volunteered side-by-side as “Big Cheeses,” showcasing their close business relationships by reading together in the classroom. The success of this event will allow us to replicate this model moving forward.
Program Long-Term Success 

For participating students, the goals of the program are to:

  • Reinforce their classroom learning by demonstrating the powerful bridge between literacy and career success;

  • Broaden their knowledge of potential career opportunities;

  • Connect with positive, successful role models who serve as examples of the value of learning, hard work, and responsibility.
Since the inception of the Big Cheese Reads, we have hosted readings by executives from State Street Corporation, Harvard University, Boston Financial Data Services, John Hancock, Partners HealthCare, Bank of America, KPMG LLP, and Bank of New York Mellon, among other companies. A number of “Big Cheeses” from the public and arts sectors have also met with students, including Mayor Martin J. Walsh, Keith Lockhart of the Boston Pops, Ray Magliozzi of the popular NPR radio show Car Talk, and Danny Amendola of the New England Patriots.
Program Success Monitored By 
We survey Big Cheese Readers, teachers, and students to gain their feedback on the program's success. In 2014-2015, the Big Cheese Readers and teachers who participated in the program rated it an average of 4.7 out of 5 stars.
 
One one post-visit survey, a student commented: “I never knew that reading could get you places. I wanted to be a basketball player but now I am going to finish school and see where my knowledge leads me. A career in basketball only lasts about 5 years, but knowledge lasts forever.” 
Examples of Program Success 

For more information on the Big Cheese Reads, including perspectives from this year's Gala honoree, other "Big Cheeses" and our Executive Director, please see the following entries on our blog:

- A guest post from 2014-2015's honoree, Jim MacDonald of Fidelity Investments: http://bostonpartners.org/?p=1396

- Celebrating 10 years of the Big Cheese Reads: http://bostonpartners.org/?p=1325
 
- Big Cheese Reads encourage students to "read in between the lines": http://bostonpartners.org/?p=1073 

Math Rules!

Math Rules! targets elementary grade students who are struggling in math. Two to four students are matched with a volunteer math mentor who tutors them in the classroom while math is being taught. Volunteers work under the teacher’s direction and motivate students to strengthen their math performance.

In 2014-15, Math Rules! matched 252 grade 2-5 students in 10 BPS schools with 64 volunteer academic mentors. These children improved their math and core subject area grades while also building their self-confidence.
Budget  $160,957.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
In 2014-2015, Math Rules! matched 252 students in 10 Boston Public Schools (BPS) schools with 64 volunteers – totals that marked a 25% increase in the number of students served and a 30% increase in volunteers from the previous year. 

Our volunteer retention rate also increased, climbing from 53% in 2013-2014 to 55% in 2014-15.

 
Program Long-Term Success 

The goal of Math Rules! is to help BPS students in grades 2 through 5 develop strategic mathematical thinking and build the fundamental number skills and a love of the subject, which they'll need to be successful in math at the secondary level and beyond.

Our long-term vision is that Math Rules! students will pass their math MCAS/PARCC exams, improve their grades, attendance, and attitude toward school, and eventually graduate from high school on time. The program is also intended to help close the achievement gap between minority and white students and foster multi-year supportive mentoring relationships.
Program Success Monitored By  To evaluate the impact Math Rules! has on students, Boston Partners collects report card grades and analyzes each student's grade changes in math and in other core subjects over the course of the year. Boston Partners also surveys math mentors and teachers during the school year. Teachers complete surveys for each student in the program at the beginning and end of the school year. Finally, students take pre- and post-mentee surveys to determine how their attitude and confidence about math has changed over the year. We also ask students to provide feedback about their experiences working with a math mentor over the year.
Examples of Program Success 

Of the Math Rules! students for whom we received complete outcome data in 2014-15, the year-end results were as follows:

  • 60% of students improved their math grade-point average (GPA).

  • 71% of students improved their overall GPA.

  • 62% of 2014-15 Math Rules! students improved their “School Leadership and Student Development” GPA

Of the Math Rules! teachers and volunteers for whom we received survey data in 2014-15, the year-end results were as follows:

  • 97% of teachers said Math Rules! was “excellent” or “good” at improving their students’ academic achievement; the same figure was true for improving students’ self-confidence.


  • 85% of volunteers reported that working with their students was “excellent” or “good” at improving students’ overall academic performance. Eighty-eight percent of those volunteers said the program was “excellent” or “good” at improving students’ arithmetic skills.
Finally, this video testimonial from Ms. Sheung, a math teacher at the Quincy Elementary School, illustrates the impact of Math Rules! volunteers on students’ achievement:http://youtu.be/d02TNp-6uIg

Power Lunch

Power Lunch sparks enthusiasm for reading in kindergarten through third grade students by matching them with volunteer reading mentors from participating corporations in the Boston area.

In Power Lunch, a volunteer reading mentor and student meet during the child's lunchtime once a week. The volunteer talks with and listens to the child, reads aloud to the child, and encourages the child to share in his or her enthusiasm for books. Volunteers encourage children to develop an interest in reading, expose students to new ideas and experiences, help students articulate their thoughts through conversation, and build students' self-esteem and confidence.

Each reading mentor serves as a role model, providing guidance in school and career choices while encouraging an enthusiasm for books and reading. During their weekly meetings, reading mentors and their students read aloud, play word games, talk about common interests and hobbies and, of course, have fun!
Budget  $153,582.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  In 2014-15, Power Lunch reached 103 grade K-3 students in eight BPS schools, matching them with 187 corporate volunteers from 16 area companies. In total, our students and volunteers logged an estimated 4,000 hours of Power Lunch time between October and June. Forty-four percent of 2013-14 volunteers also served in 2012-13, a high retention rate that speaks to the success of the program’s goal of matching students with the same volunteers for multiple years.
Program Long-Term Success 

The goal of Power Lunch is to inspire young children to develop a love of reading in a confidence-building setting. Long-term outcomes for students include:

  • A lasting love of reading and learning;

  • More developed reading skills and measurable increases in their enthusiasm for reading;

  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem;

  • Increased classroom participation; and

  • Stronger communication skills, especially with adults.

Through their mentoring sessions, Power Lunch volunteers help young students build the fundamental literacy skills and self-confidence they’ll need to succeed in secondary school and beyond. According to “Double Jeopardy,” an Annie E. Casey Foundation report released in April 2011 based on a longitudinal study of how third-grade reading levels and poverty impacted high school graduation, “one in six children who are not reading proficiently in third grade fail to graduate from high school on time.” For participating students, Power Lunch is one more activity during the school day that helps them build a crucial early start toward on-time graduation.

In a 2008 retrospective study polling seventh- and eighth-graders who had participated in Power Lunch in elementary school, 90% of respondents said that Power Lunch changed their attitude about reading, and 100% said they would recommend Power Lunch to other students.
Program Success Monitored By  To evaluate the success of Power Lunch, we administer pre- and post-program surveys to students examining attitudes toward reading, school, and class participation. We then compare the results of these surveys to gauge student progress over the school year. Volunteers receive regular check-in emails to gauge how students are performing academically, behaviorally, and motivationally. Teachers complete annual surveys on students' progress and the effectiveness of the program. We also track the number of students and volunteers served; the number of books read; and our volunteer retention rate. Where possible, we collect student report cards to analyze literacy grade improvements. Hard copy surveys are distributed by school-based Site Coordinators and analyzed by the Power Lunch Program Manager and other staff using a custom tool. This year, we began using GetFeedback.com to administer online surveys and analyze responses in our salesforce.com database.
Examples of Program Success 

Of the Power Lunch students, teachers and volunteers for whom we received survey data in 2014-15, the year-end results were as follows:

  • 77% of Power Lunch students increased their Writing & Listening GPA, while 75% improved their overall GPA.


  • 64% of students reported at the end of the year that they felt better about reading than they reported at the beginning of the year, or maintained their highest rating of “Love it!” about reading on our year-end survey.


  • 85% of teachers claimed that Power Lunch was good or excellent at improving their student(s)’ overall academic performance; 75% reported that Power Lunch was good or excellent at improving their student(s)’ classroom behavior; 93% stated that Power Lunch was good or excellent at increasing their student(s)’ self-confidence; and 81% said that working with our volunteers was good or excellent at building skills in their students who are below grade level in reading.


  • 69% of volunteers reported that working with their students was good or excellent at improving his/her willingness to read aloud during their sessions; 81% claimed that working with their students was good or excellent at increasing his/her self-confidence; and 73% reported that working with their students was good or excellent at making him/her more interested in reading.

School Volunteer Program

Our School Volunteer Program (SVP) provides academic mentors to K-12 students who have been nominated by their teachers, either one-on-one or in small groups. Volunteer academic mentors work with students in reading, writing, and math, helping them to improve their grades and to achieve their goals on standardized tests such as the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS). In addition to helping students build academic proficiency and test-taking skills, mentors help them to improve their social and study skills, verbal/speaking skills, self-confidence, and ability to work with other students.
Budget  $342,368.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
In 2014-15, the SVP matched 818 students in 55 BPS schools with 232 volunteer academic mentors.

Feedback from our End of Year survey showed that most volunteers and teachers have a positive experience with our program.

- 71% of the SVP volunteers who responded to our survey reported that working with their students was good or excellent at improving the student's’ overall academic performance.

- 79% of the survey respondents reported that they looked forward to working with their students regularly, and 75% felt that they had a good match.

91% of the SVP teachers who responded to our survey claimed that working with our volunteers was good or excellent at improving students’ academic performance and increasing students’ self confidence. Of the teachers who responded, 93% would recommend their volunteer participate in the program next year. 
Program Long-Term Success 

The School Volunteer Program (SVP), our largest and longest-running program, matches volunteer academic mentors throughout the school year with students in grades K-12 across the city in response to teacher requests. Its primary draw, unique among Boston education organizations, is that any BPS teacher, with principal/headmaster permission, can request a volunteer to provide academic help for their students in 1-on-1, small group, or, for grades K-2 only, whole class settings.

Teachers nominate students based on identified needs, such as lack of confidence or underdeveloped English language proficiency. Students work on literacy, math, and occasionally other subjects like history and science. In the majority of cases, volunteers work with students for one hour per week, in school during the school day, over the course of the school year.

The SVP is intended to help close the achievement gap and promote on-time graduation through building fundamental academic skills and providing students supportive, dedicated role models.
Program Success Monitored By 
Because of the large reach of the SVP and the variety of needs and grade levels it serves, standardizing metrics across matches is difficult. However, this year we are piloting collecting detailed outcome data for SVP students at selected schools, including grades, attendance, and promotion rates. We also survey volunteers and teachers to assess student progress. At the high school level, we collect MCAS passing rates from selected schools who participate in Aim High, a sub-program of the SVP targeted at MCAS and graduation preparation.
 
 
Examples of Program Success 

The SVP’s broad reach is its greatest strength: Because any teacher in any BPS school can request help, we can direct volunteer aid to students most in need of support, across the district. It also allows teachers to target volunteer support to students of all ages and in multiple subject areas. However, the program’s reach also presents challenges to our small organization, including managing hundreds of volunteers and teacher requests annually and obtaining, analyzing, and sharing student outcome data from BPS.

Our goal going forward is to transition the School Volunteer Program into a more agile, manageable model — one that both addresses the needs of BPS students and teachers, and also allows us to comprehensively report the quantitative and qualitative impact of volunteer support on students’ growth. Ultimately, this will allow us to serve more students, providing them with the academic and mentoring support they need.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Pamela C. Civins
CEO Term Start Jan 2006
CEO Email pcivins@bostonpartners.org
CEO Experience
Pamela Civins, Executive Director of Boston Partners in Education, is responsible for leading the organization, ensuring that day-to-day management is strong. This includes strategic planning and ongoing academic programming, operations and financial management, as well as staff management and development. In addition, Pamela serves as Boston Partners' primary ambassador to a broad range of constituents. Pamela brings to the position over 15 years of education experience within the nonprofit sector, including managerial oversight of education and literacy programs for girls and women in Pakistan, Nepal and India during her time at World Education, Inc. in Boston. Just prior to joining Boston Partners in Education in January 2006, Pamela held the position of Co-Executive Director at the National Center for Fair & Open Testing in Cambridge, MA. The national nonprofit's work focused on education policy with regards to assessment and testing reform in the US K-12 and post secondary schools. Pamela began her passion for volunteer service through the United States Peace Corps in Nepal, teaching English to students in the Nepali public school system and training incoming Peace Corps volunteers to teach English as a second language. Since moving to the Boston area in 1998, she has continued to volunteer her time, and is currently a member of the steering committee of DotOUT in Dorchester, as well as an academic mentor for Boston Partners. Pamela received her BA from the University of Colorado, a MIIM (Masters in Intercultural & International Management) from the School for International Training, and a M.Ed from Harvard University.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr. Joel H. Lamstein July 2005 Dec 2005
Ms. Frances Moseley Sept 2003 July 2005

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Pamela Civins Executive Director --
Ms. Judy Harrington Director of Development --
Mr. Jim Laudisio Director of Operations --
Ms. Erin McGrath Program Director --
Mr. Marc Saunders Director of Education & Training --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 13
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 539
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 83%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 14
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Disability Insurance
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Inland Marine and Mobile Equipment
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Directors and Officers Policy

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Michael V. McKenna
Board Chair Company Affiliation AT&T
Board Chair Term June 2016 - June 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Joseph C. Antonellis Retired, State Street Corporation Voting
Mr. Gregory Ayres Brainshark, Inc. Voting
Ms. Sandra Best Bailly Simmons College Voting
Ms. Pamela Boone State Street Corporation Voting
Ms. Marion Colombo TD Bank Voting
Mr. John Durocher Salesforce.com Voting
Dr. Frances Esparza Boston Public Schools Voting
Ms. Beth Gragg Independent Training Consultant Voting
Mr. John Heveran Liberty Mutual Insurance Voting
Ms. Meg Jordan Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Alok Kapoor Fidelity Investments Voting
Mr. Joel H. Lamstein John Snow Inc. & World Education Inc. Voting
Mr. Darrin Lang LABUR Voting
Mr. Michael LeBlanc Illumio Voting
Mr. Nicholas A. Lopardo Susquehanna Capital Management LLC Voting
Mr. Ivan Matviak State Street Global Exchange Voting
Mr. Martin J. McDonough Mondi Akrosil, LLC Voting
Mr. Michael McKenna AT&T Voting
Mr. Steven J. Pellegrino sjpellegrino & co. Voting
Mr. John Plansky Strategy& Voting
Ms. Emmanuelle Renelique Awakening Excellence Adult Day Health Center Voting
Ms. Edwidge Sacco KPMG LLP Voting
Mr. Robert P. Sacco IBM Voting
Mr. Jay A. Shuman Boston Financial Data Services Voting
Ms. Janet C. Smith Putnam Investments Voting
Mr. Andrew Thorne PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Voting
Mr. Paul Weiss PW Capital Partners Voting
Mr. Jib Wilkinson Deloitte Consulting LLP Voting
Mr. Brad Wilson StoneTurn Group Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 23
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 9
Male: 20
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 48%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 97%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 41%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Marketing
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,157,047 $1,251,661 $1,153,108
Total Expenses $1,167,995 $1,067,016 $979,515

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- $301,178 $368,595
Government Contributions $81,250 $80,000 $80,000
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local $81,250 $80,000 $80,000
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $427,790 $195,493 $159,511
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $506 $503 $339
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $491,736 $509,319 $468,637
Revenue In-Kind $152,231 $162,233 $69,850
Other $3,534 $2,935 $6,176

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $856,359 $745,650 $739,733
Administration Expense $84,466 $156,183 $106,030
Fundraising Expense $227,170 $165,183 $133,752
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.99 1.17 1.18
Program Expense/Total Expenses 73% 70% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 23% 15% 12%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $761,225 $774,346 $586,520
Current Assets $671,538 $663,150 $569,291
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $1,803 $3,976 $795
Total Net Assets $759,422 $770,370 $585,725

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
State Street Corporation $218,330.00
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Boston Public Schools $80,000.00
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Anonymous Individual Donor $54,100.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 372.46 166.79 716.09

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graph above is per the organization's audited financials. Additional revenue breakout detail was provided by the nonprofit for Foundation & Corporation funding for FY15 & FY14.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Boston Partners in Education enhances the academic achievement and nurtures the personal growth of Boston’s public school students by providing them with focused, individualized, in-school volunteer support. It is our vision that with the commitment and involvement of the entire community, all students in Boston will develop the skills, self-confidence and motivation to recognize and achieve their full potential. To accomplish this, we recruit, train, place, and support community and corporate volunteers of all ages and backgrounds to serve as academic mentors in the Boston Public Schools (BPS) to students in need. In 2016-2017, we matched over 3,700 students in 58 BPS schools with 517 academic mentors.

Our theory of change — which we have seen borne out in thousands of cases across five decades — is that with the involvement and support of volunteer academic mentors, Boston Public Schools students can build the skills and confidence to improve their academic achievement, accelerate their personal growth, and ultimately, stay in school and graduate on time.

We focus on reaching students who might otherwise "fall through the cracks"—those children who have gaps in their learning, are struggling academically and personally, and can succeed with the encouragement and guidance of a caring academic mentor. The primary impacts we hope to achieve are:

  • Closing the achievement and opportunity gaps between minority and white students

  • Decreasing the dropout rate

  • Increasing on-time graduation rates

  • Increasing student academic performance within BPS

Our immediate goal — as highlighted in our latest three-year strategic plan launched in 2015-2016 — remains to serve 25% more students in one-on-one and small group mentor matches in the Boston Public Schools within the next three to five years.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Boston Partners’ growth goals are centered around our strategic plan, launched in September 2015. The outcomes of the strategy will allow Boston Partners in Education (Boston Partners) to expand our services to connect hundreds more BPS students with academic mentors from the community.

The culmination of several consulting engagements, our plan has four key goal areas:

  • Programming: Redesign our programs so we provide academic mentor support to 25% more students, while improving the quality of each program, over three years.

  • Marketing and Communications: Expand our reputation as a leader in K-12 student support and heighten awareness of our in-class academic mentoring services among multiple constituencies.

  • Development: Hit specific fundraising targets to meet programming and marketing goals.

  • Governance: Ensure our Board of Directors is actively engaged; is committed to transparency and has adopted best practices for nonprofit governance; is inclusive and diverse in membership; maintains a strong leadership team; and fulfills its fiduciary responsibilities.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Boston Partners made several key organizational investments to enable success. Major accomplishments have included:


  • Refined our program data evaluation. We converted to all electronic nomination forms, simplifying the process for teachers to nominate students for academic mentors, as well as creating more accurate nominations. We have already experienced an increase of requests for one-on-one mentors, indicating need for our services. Our Partnerships staff increased communication with volunteer academic mentors and teachers to at least monthly check-ins via email, as well as phone calls and in-person meetings. Partnerships staff also conducted classroom observations to ensure that mentor-mentee matches are performing at high quality and that volunteers are properly supported by the school partners. This 2016-2017 school year, we will have access to BPS’s School Climate Surveys, enabling us to compare Accelerate ELA students’ engagement in school and learning against their peers’.

  • Initiated organization rebranding. In this multi-step process to revitalize the Boston Partners in Education brand, we successfully launched a redesigned website in spring 2015 with the help of a Common Impact grant and volunteers from Fidelity Investments. We have again engaged Common Impact and volunteers from John Hancock to redesign our printed collateral to market standards, using our new brand colors, refreshed images, and redesigned academic mentoring offerings. This partnership with John Hancock will continue through summer 2017 and result in several new printed marketing pieces: a volunteer recruitment brochure, teacher recruitment brochure, corporate opportunities brochure, and pop-up sign for outreach events. Furthermore, we will host a Harvard Business School Community Action Partners (CAP) Brainstorm consulting session in October 2017 to strategically map the steps we need to take to continue our rebranding.

  • Expanded our staff, prioritizing opportunities to broaden our programming, marketing, and development. The Partnerships staff who manage our academic mentoring programs now include four full-time Partnerships Managers, the most we’ve ever hired on staff. This staffing complements our organizational goals of serving 750 more students in the next three to five years. In February 2017, we added our new Corporate Relations Manager to the development team. This role now prospects and maintains our partnerships with local corporations, particularly in fundraising for our annual gala, the Big Cheese Reads Initiative, and Power Lunch.
    We have again been granted three full-time AmeriCorps members for 2017-2018, including a Development Coordinator who will focus on the major gifts program; a Branding Coordinator who will embed the Boston Partners brand in our school partners and community; and another AmeriCorps Ambassador of Mentoring to conduct outreach in our target neighborhoods. By FY18, we anticipate creating a full-time staff position for community outreach. We also concluded a successful engagement with an Encore Fellow who served as the 50th Anniversary Coordinator.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

To ensure progress against our strategic plan goals, we have:

  • Established milestones and timelines for each action item in each of the five goal areas and created customized tracking systems to share updates and adjust as needed;

  • Incorporated strategic plan work into weekly check-ins, monthly team meetings, and regular staff and Board meetings; and

  • Created staff/Board committees for all goal areas to provide oversight and guidance.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Major accomplishments include:

  • Remodeled the School Volunteer Program into three separate programs, each with problem statements, logic models, and SMART goals:

    • Motivate targets early childhood development needs in grades K-2, providing a whole-class academic mentor.

    • Accelerate supports students grades K-8 in one-on-one or small group matches in math and ELA.

    • Aim High supports high school students grades 9-12 in one-on-one or small group matches in STEM and humanities subjects.

  • Redesigned our volunteer and teacher check-in process, leading to increased engagement and better match quality.

  • Worked with the Boston Public Schools’ Office of Data and Accountability to design a streamlined process for obtaining student and parent permission to collect outcome data.

  • Launched the new electronic student nomination process and online form in August 2016. The new process provides teachers a simpler, more intuitive, and more targeted interface for nominating students who are appropriate matches for academic mentor intervention, at both the elementary and secondary level.

  • Identified several “Performance Partners” schools — partner schools with high levels of engagement in our programs that serve as models for how our services can benefit students.
    We selected three schools out of the 63 where we have mentors our 2016-2017 Performance Partners: The Chittick Elementary School in Mattapan, the Burke High School in Dorchester, and the Jackson/Mann K-8 School in Allston. As we pilot new mentoring approaches in these schools, our ultimate goal is to reach more students across the city.

  • Researched strategies for volunteer recruitment and retention and developing SMART goals for increasing volunteer engagement and satisfaction. Building strong, multi-year relationships with volunteers is crucial to increasing match quality and school engagement. Our AmeriCorps Ambassador of Mentoring (AOM) who has served as Community Engagement Coordinator this year has increased outreach in our target neighborhoods of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. In addition to attending annually-scheduled recruitment events, she has deepened relationships with local businesses and residents who may not have known that Boston Partners supports their neighborhood children and schools. This work will be continued and developed with the renewed AOM role in 2017-2018.

  • Successfully engaged an Encore Fellow to lead our 50th Anniversary campaign planning for a 15-month engagement. As a member of the development team, she led several of the 50th Anniversary Gala Board of Directors committees. She also supported the planning of “friendraiser” parties and Leadership Breakfasts to strengthen the potential donor networks of the Board. Her efforts contributed to our record-breaking $700,000 raised during the 50th campaign.

  • Enlisted the services of Denterlein, a Boston-based public relations firm, to help build our brand visibility and promote volunteerism and support.