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Federation for Children with Special Needs, Inc.

 The Schrafft Center, 529 Main Street, Suite 1M3
 Boston, MA 02129
[P] (617) 236-7210
[F] (617) 241-0330
http://www.fcsn.org
info@fcsn.org
Maureen Jerz
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1975
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2557572

LAST UPDATED: 08/11/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The Federation for Children with Special Needs provides information, support, and assistance to parents of children with disabilities, their professional partners, and their communitiesWe are committed to listening to and learning from families, and encouraging full participation in community life by all people, especially those with disabilities.  

 

Mission Statement

The Federation for Children with Special Needs provides information, support, and assistance to parents of children with disabilities, their professional partners, and their communitiesWe are committed to listening to and learning from families, and encouraging full participation in community life by all people, especially those with disabilities.  

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Nov 01, 2013 to Oct 31, 2014
Projected Income $3,266,224.00
Projected Expense $3,249,707.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Family and Community Engagement Center
  • Family Support Center
  • Health Advocacy Center
  • Parent-Professional Leadership Center
  • Special Education Parent Center

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Federation for Children with Special Needs provides information, support, and assistance to parents of children with disabilities, their professional partners, and their communitiesWe are committed to listening to and learning from families, and encouraging full participation in community life by all people, especially those with disabilities.  

 


Background Statement

In the spring of 1974, a group of Massachusetts parents and advocates gathered around a kitchen table to discuss how they could organize to better assist children with special needs. From this modest beginning, the Federation for Children with Special Needs (FCSN) has since grown into a nationally recognized 501(c)(3) organization that annually serves more than 40,000 Massachusetts families and their children with special needs. The Federation was the nation's first non-profit parent information and training center for special education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The Federation’s mission is to provide information, support, and assistance to parents of children with disabilities, their professional partners, and their communitiesThe Federation has managed dozens ofstate and federal projects over the years, and currently manages fifteen projects providing a variety of supports to families raising children with special needs in the areas of special education, children with special healthcare needs, parental involvement, early intervention, basic rights, inclusion, transition/self determination and improved educational outcomes. The Federation works to reach out to financially and culturally diverse families in need of supports and services, and plays a critical role in providing information and training to parents and families of all communities, including those in the African American, Latino, Brazilian, Haitian, Chinese, North African, and Somali communities, as well as many others.


Impact Statement

During the past year, the Federation received 16,000 phone calls and emails from parents seeking assistance, conducted 600 workshops for over 9,000 parents and professionals at 100 locations throughout the state, and hosted and annual conference (with workshops conducted in four languages) attended by over 900 families and professionals.
 
 Guided by a 5-year strategic plan, in 2016 the Federation seeks to:
  • Provide high-quality information, resources, and training to over 45,000 families of children with special needs, special healthcare needs and children at risk, and their professional partners in Massachusetts;
  • Reach out to culturally, linguistically and economically underserved families in need of our supports and services;
  • Promote the active and informed participation of parents of children with disabilities and special healthcare needs in shaping, implementing, and evaluating public policy that affects them;
  • Work collaboratively with our professional partners to ensure that all children are able to fully participate in their schools and in their communities;
  • Build a diverse, sustainable funding base to support our work.
 

 


Needs Statement

1. In order to maintain our infrastructure and current programming and continue to expand our capacity to reach underserved populations, the Federation, as part of its current strategic plan plans to build and diversify its funding base. We are seeking general operating support to assist us in this goal.

2. The Federation’s Community Outreach and Empowerment Project was developed to assist underserved families in finding information, locating and accessing services, and navigating state agency services. General operating support and program support will help us to sustain this work.

3. The Federation presents approximately 75 trainings onsite annually. We would like to acquire the equipment necessary to outfit our 2 training rooms with podiums, ceiling mounted LCD projectors/Flat screen LCD monitors, presentation quality laptops and independent sound systems.

4. In addition to onsite trainings, the Federation would like to enhance its capabilities in the areas of webinars and podcasts. The organization would like to upgrade its presentation equipment for future broadcasts, including podcasts, by purchasing newer recording equipment (microphones, headsets, laptops).

5. The Federation plans to build and diversify its funding base with a goal of increasing private funding sources to a total of 20% of its budget (currently 15%). General operating support will assist us in building the capacity of our Development efforts.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
STATEWIDE

The Federation for Children with Special Needs serves families of children with special needs living in Massachusetts

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Disabled Persons' Rights
  2. Education - Elementary & Secondary Schools
  3. Health Care - Patient & Family Support

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Family and Community Engagement Center

Projects include: Family and Community Engagement Team, offers education improvement services to districts and schools in Massachusetts, partnering with districts and schools to improve student achievement and school performance through strengthening family and community engagement policies, designing strategies for enhanced family and community engagement and implementing activities directly with families, teachers, administrators, community members and other stakeholders; Recruitment Training and Support Center for Special Education Surrogate Parents ensures that students whose parents are unavailable to participate in educational decision making are provided with a “surrogate parent” for educational decision making. The Family and Community Engagement Center also provides training and technical assistance on family engagement to school districts as a Department of Elementary and Secondary Education approved Title 1 Support Partner and District/School Assistance Provider
Budget  $472,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Families At-Risk Populations K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
Parents and school district personnel in underperforming school districts in MA will understand the importance of family and community engagement in improving student outcomes, and community volunteers will be actively engaged in supporting best outcomes for students with disabilities.
Program Long-Term Success 
Parents and school district personnel in underperforming districts work together to build and implement strong and vibrant family and community engagement policy within the district with a goal of improved student achievement.  Additionally, community members are trained to be educational decision makers for students with disabilities whose parents are unavailable to act in this role.
Program Success Monitored By  The Federation for Children with Special Needs evaluates all of its programming on an ongoing basis. Given that our programming is primarily funded through government grants, we adhere to the extensive reporting requirements of those grants, and evaluation is built in to each project. Goals and specific objectives are set for each of the projects described above, and the Federation uses qualitative, quantitative, formative (ongoing), and summative evaluation strategies to assess the impact of all of its work. Staff members track and evaluate all Federation activities through: computerized data intake system that tracks parent calls; evaluations of all of our workshops, trainings and materials through pre and post evaluation, and random-sample surveys of parents attending workshops and trainings; hits on our website, which is a content rich resource for families; follow-up surveys to assess the quality of our services over the long term; focus groups.
Examples of Program Success 

Curtis Hartman has been a Special Education Surrogate Parent since 2003. He has supported seven students during his career, including an assignment to one student for over nine years. He has been a Mentor and supporter of the Recruitment Training and Center for Special Education Surrogate Parents (RTSC) since its inception in 2011.  He has participated in RTSC webinars, sharing the unique successes and challenges of being a special education surrogate parent.  He plans on using his advocacy skills as a pro bono expert for kids at risk on Cape Cod.


Family Support Center

Projects include: Family TIES of MA, a parent to parent support, information and referral project, funded by the MA Department of Public Health which provides information, referrals, and parent to parent matching to families who have children with special health care needs or disabilities, through six regional Department of Public Health offices; MassCARE, which provides support to women, children, adolescents and young adults infected/affected by HIV/AIDS; Project Launch/ My Child, which provides clinical, diagnostic, prevention and coordination services for children and families living in Boston, with a focus is on early childhood mental health issues; Pathways for Parents, which in collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families (DCF) provides “peer to peer” support and advocacy to parents who have a serious mental health challenges and complex DCF cases with child custody concerns.

Budget  $836,395.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Parenting Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Infants to Preschool (under age 5) People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

Families will feel supported in caring for their child who has special needs, special healthcare needs, or a chronic illness and knowledgeable in finding resources programs and services for their child.

Program Long-Term Success 

Families whose children have special needs, special healthcare needs, or a chronic illness will support other families facing similar challenges and enjoy a higher quality of living, as they address their children’s and family’s unique needs.

Program Success Monitored By  The Federation for Children with Special Needs evaluates all of its programming on an ongoing basis. Given that our programming is primarily funded through government grants, we adhere to the extensive reporting requirements of those grants, and evaluation is built in to each project. Goals and specific objectives are set for each of the projects described above, and the Federation uses qualitative, quantitative, formative (ongoing), and summative evaluation strategies to assess the impact of all of its work. Staff members track and evaluate all Federation activities through: computerized data intake system that tracks parent calls; evaluations of all of our workshops, trainings and materials through pre and post evaluation, and random-sample surveys of parents attending workshops and trainings; hits on our website, which is a content rich resource for families; follow-up surveys to assess the quality of our services over the long term; focus groups.
Examples of Program Success 

A Vietnamese parent contacted Family TIES, needing support for her child with autism. The parent received the support and information she needed, and then became aware of other Vietnamese families in the Greater Boston area who also had autism. The parent attended the Federation’s Parent Consultant Training Institute and built her own understanding of the educational opportunities available for her child. She began working to support these families, helping them find resources in the community, running a support group for the families, connecting them with other project staff (Parent Training and Information Center) to help with education supports and services. Recently, this parent wrote to Boston Mayor Tom Menino, requesting his help and support through theMayor's Autism Initiativeand Autism Task Force, in addressing some of the overwhelming needs of Vietnamese parents of children with Autism in the Boston Public Schools.


Health Advocacy Center

Projects include: Mass Family Voices, the MA chapter of a national network speaking on behalf of children with special health care needs, which builds capacity for family partnerships and supports partnership activities between managed care organizations and parents around improved access to services and supports; Family-to-Family Health Information Center, offers health care information and support to families of children with special needs in navigating various systems to enable their children to live in the community and actively participant in decision making; Mass Family Voices collaborates with Massachusetts’ Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) Quality Demonstration Grant partners in developing and enhancing authentic  family-professional partnerships through participation in the Children’s Health Quality Coalition and the National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality (NICHQ) medical home initiative.

Budget  $129,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Patient & Family Support
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 
Families whose children have special healthcare needs will be supported in finding information, resources, and services for their child.
Program Long-Term Success 
Families whose children have special healthcare needs will become informed regarding accessing healthcare services for their child, and will become active participants in guiding the direction of healthcare policy as it affects children with special healthcare needs and their families.
Program Success Monitored By  The Federation for Children with Special Needs evaluates all of its programming on an ongoing basis. Given that our programming is primarily funded through government grants, we adhere to the extensive reporting requirements of those grants, and evaluation is built in to each project. Goals and specific objectives are set for each of the projects described above, and the Federation uses qualitative, quantitative, formative (ongoing), and summative evaluation strategies to assess the impact of all of its work. Staff members track and evaluate all Federation activities through: computerized data intake system that tracks parent calls; evaluations of all of our workshops, trainings and materials through pre and post evaluation, and random-sample surveys of parents attending workshops and trainings; hits on our website, which is a content rich resource for families; follow-up surveys to assess the quality of our services over the long term; focus groups.
Examples of Program Success 
As a parent of a child with complex medical, behavioral and developmental needs, Cristin reached out to the Family-to-Family Health Information Center years ago to get information on how to obtain necessary services to help her child. Through the family navigators who staffed the phone lines and the community she found on the Mass Family Voices list serve, she learned of opportunities to grow her advocacy skills. Today, she is actively engaged in the design, implementation and evaluation of health care systems as part of the Mass Family Voices team, and supports other family leaders to do the same. As part of her work, she recently launched a virtual network called the Mass Family Voices Wisdom Council as a way to connect and build capacity and skills among family leaders in the Commonwealth.

Parent-Professional Leadership Center

Projects include: the Massachusetts Association of Special Education Parent Advisory Councils, a statewide project which provides information, training, and networking opportunities to special education parent advisory councils; Advancing Parent-Professional Leadership in Education provides a collaborative training model to ensure the participation of parents in systemic efforts to improve educational outcomes for children with disabilities; MASS FOCUS Academy provides professional development, training, technical assistance and knowledge dissemination of evidenced-based practices that improve post-school outcomes for youth with disabilities; The Partnership Project, which is a collaboration with MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and other community partners to expand professional development of educators and develop model sites to support the development of tiered systems of supports that will improve outcomes for all students.   

Budget  $483,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Families General/Unspecified K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
Through training and support, parent leaders and their professional partners have the knowledge and information they need to effectively partner in the best interest of all students, especially those with special needs.
Program Long-Term Success 
Through training and support, parent leaders and professional partners become collaborative partners in the education of all children, especially those with disabilities, ensuring inclusive opportunities and better outcomes for every children.
Program Success Monitored By  The Federation for Children with Special Needs evaluates all of its programming on an ongoing basis. Given that our programming is primarily funded through government grants, we adhere to the extensive reporting requirements of those grants, and evaluation is built in to each project. Goals and specific objectives are set for each of the projects described above, and the Federation uses qualitative, quantitative, formative (ongoing), and summative evaluation strategies to assess the impact of all of its work. Staff members track and evaluate all Federation activities through: computerized data intake system that tracks parent calls; evaluations of all of our workshops, trainings and materials through pre and post evaluation, and random-sample surveys of parents attending workshops and trainings; hits on our website, which is a content rich resource for families; follow-up surveys to assess the quality of our services over the long term; focus groups.
Examples of Program Success 
In spring of 2012 a call from Malden came into FCSN’s MassPAC office – can you help us get our Special Education Parent Advisory Council (SEPAC) back on track?  New people bring new ideas but it is sometimes hard to let go of old ways.  After a few phone calls and an on-site meeting with MassPAC, the  SEPAC was ready to move forward and choose the Federation’s APPLE Institute to bring together all of the SEPAC parent leaders with the Special Education Administrator to create an action plan for the school district.  During the three day APPLE workshop, the team outlined several goals and objectives to engage the Malden SEPAC in outreach to families of children with special needs.  The SEPAC Executive Board recently met with Malden’s Mayor and the Superintendent of Schools to discuss the SEPAC’s mission and programs for the Malden community.  The SEPAC has also established an online presence with a website and Facebook page.  Definitely back on track!

Special Education Parent Center

Projects include: Parent Training and Information Center, which under the Individuals with Disability Education Act, provides information, support, technical assistance and workshops to MA families of children with disabilities and the professionals who work with them; Transition/Planning a Life, serves students with disabilities in Boston, Worcester, and Springfield, and brings together state and community partners as well as local high schools to improve the post-school outcomes of students with significant disabilities;Community Outreach and Empowerment Project, which seeks to increase assistance and support to families of children with special needs whose ability to access education and healthcare information and services is complicated by race, class, language, and/or poverty; Parent Consultant Training Institute, an eight-week training offering an opportunity for MA parents and professionals to learn more about state and federal Special Education laws and process.

Budget  $614,655.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Parenting Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 
Through our parent information, support and technical assistance projects, parents of children with special needs will gain the knowledge, skills and understanding necessary to make decisions about their child’s education.
Program Long-Term Success 
Through our parent information, support and technical assistance projects, parents of children with special needs will be confident in advocating on their own for appropriate educational supports and services for their child.
Program Success Monitored By 

The Federation for Children with Special Needs evaluates all of its programming on an ongoing basis. Given that our programming is primarily funded through government grants, we adhere to the extensive reporting requirements of those grants, and evaluation is built in to each project. Goals and specific objectives are set for each of the projects described above, and the Federation uses qualitative, quantitative, formative (ongoing), and summative evaluation strategies to assess the impact of all of its work. Staff members track and evaluate all Federation activities through: computerized data intake system that tracks parent calls; evaluations of all of our workshops, trainings and materials through pre and post evaluation, and random-sample surveys of parents attending workshops and trainings; hits on our website, which is a content rich resource for families; follow-up surveys to assess the quality of our services over the long term; focus groups.

 

Examples of Program Success 
Recently a Portuguese-speaking parent whose child has ADHD called the Federation requesting support.  The child was on a 504 plan, which was not working. The child’s behaviors disrupted the class, and the child was not learning. The Federation guided the parent in requesting an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education services. The evaluation was done, however the school’s finding was that the child was not entitled to an IEP. The Federation’s Portuguese Outreach Coordinator was able to attend the meeting with the parent and helped the parent get a reversal of the school’s decision. Today the child has an IEP and the school has created a behavioral plan to teach the child to comply with the rules and gain organizational skills.  The child is now making effective progress and doing well in school.  

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

 

 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Richard Robison
CEO Term Start Apr 1997
CEO Email rrobison@fcsn.org
CEO Experience

Richard J. Robison has served as the Executive Director of the Federation for Children with Special Needs since April of 1997 and has over twenty years experience in the fields of non-profit management, special needs family support, special education policy and advocacy and disability awareness. Prior to joining the Federation, Mr. Robison served as Director of Community Relations, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Developmental Services (formerly DMR). Mr. Robison is the Past President of the Board of Directors of the National Down Syndrome Congress and has served on several national and state boards and commissions, representing the needs of children with disabilities and their parents, including as Past Chairperson of the Massachusetts Department of Education’s Statewide Advisory Council on Special Education. Locally, he is in his fifth term on theSudbury,MASchool Committee. Mr. Robison holds a BA fromNorthernIllinoisUniversity, and both a Masters and Doctorate of Ministry from Palmer Theological Seminary. He and his wife, Dotty, are the parents of three young adult children, two of whom have Down syndrome.

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Martha Zeigler 1974 1997

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Tom Hamel Director of Finance

Tom Hamel joined the Federation in August of 2012 in the Director of Business and Finance role.  Mr. Hamel has 15 years of experience evaluating, redesigning and implementing effective financial systems for non-profit organizations, including 10 years in the director role at Generations Incorporated and Health Leads.  He has demonstrated compliance with all federal and state rules and regulations accompanying state and federal grants and contracts through leading  over 15 audits, including an Inspector General audit.  Tom has also served on the board of Outdoor Explorations and Grace Episcopal Church, and founded an organization to support families (like his own) that are affected by Treacher Collins Syndrome.  Mr. Hamel is the recipient of the 2004 AmeriCorps Alums National Spirit of Service Award.   Tom and his wife are parents of 3 children.

Maureen Jerz Director of Development  Maureen Jerz joined the Federation in October 2010. Ms. Jerz has over twenty years experience in special needs family support, policy and advocacy and ten years experience in non-profit fundraising. Before joining the Federation, Ms. Jerz held positions in clinical healthcare, children’s mental health, child and family homelessness and foundation and corporate giving. She holds a BA in Biology fromMerrimackCollege, and an MSPA from theUniversity of Massachusetts, McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies. Ms. Jerz is also the parent of two children, one of who has special needs.
John Sullivan Associate Executive Director, IT and Operations  John Sullivan, Director of Information Technology and Operations, has over 15years experience in computer technology. Since 1994, Mr. Sullivan has designed and trained staff in the use of intake systems and resource databases. Mr. Sullivan is very knowledgeable regarding issues concerning web accessibility and best practices to ensure websites are accessible to all visitors. He is also well-informed with regard to Internet security and has successfully implemented an e-commerce component to the Federation’s website. He has conducted specialized workshops at national and regional conferences on computerized data systems and the use of technology in agency-wide management of Parent Centers. As the parent of two children, one with Down syndrome, John has experience with special and regular education within the context of standards-based education reform and in the operation of the Massachusetts Parent Training andInformationCenter.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 18
Number of Part Time Staff 24
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 29
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): African
Gender Female: 40
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Anne M. Howard
Board Chair Company Affiliation Fitchburg State
Board Chair Term Mar 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Susan Arndt Community Volunteer Voting
Philomena Asante M.D. Boston Public Health Commission Voting
Nicole Baumer M.D. Boston Children's Hospital Voting
Daniel T.S. Heffernan Kotin, Crabtree & Strong Voting
William Henderson Director Emeritus NonVoting
Anne Howard Fitchburg State College Voting
Melanie Perkins McLaughlin Community Volunteer Voting
Joseph Petner Retired Voting
Teresita Ramos Massachusetts Law Reform Institute Voting
John Reichenbach Lessac Technologies Voting
Leo Rotman River Financial Group, LLC Voting
Patricia Schram M.D. Pediatrician Voting
Michael Weiner Commonwealth Financial Group Voting
James Whalen TA Associates Realty Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Personnel

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $3,189,291 $3,202,635 $3,054,246
Total Expenses $3,095,958 $3,062,108 $2,900,915

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $2,576,417 $2,590,169 $2,349,883
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $2,576,417 $2,590,169 $2,349,883
Individual Contributions $205,285 $189,192 $311,650
Indirect Public Support $40,593 $41,142 --
Earned Revenue $212,099 $193,823 $220,547
Investment Income, Net of Losses $242 $239 $140
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $138,673 $173,747 $157,846
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $15,982 $14,323 $14,180

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $2,419,707 $2,435,746 $2,296,101
Administration Expense $534,648 $485,692 $463,550
Fundraising Expense $141,603 $140,670 $141,264
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.03 1.05 1.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 80% 79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 5% 5% 5%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,137,356 $1,035,390 $885,292
Current Assets $1,137,356 $1,035,390 $885,292
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $146,321 $137,688 $128,117
Total Net Assets $991,035 $897,702 $757,175

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 7.77 7.52 6.91

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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