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Greater Lynn Senior Services

 8 Silsbee Street, Attn. Rosalie Grattaroti
 Lynn, MA 01901
[P] (781) 599-0110
[F] (781) 586-8587
http://www.glss.net
[email protected]
Rosalie Grattaroti
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INCORPORATED: 1975
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2581129

LAST UPDATED: 09/07/2017
Organization DBA GLSS
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

We believe in the value and integrity of the whole person and base all our activities on this fundamental concept. Greater Lynn Senior Services (GLSS) exists to provide, advocate for, and ensure the provision of a complete and interwoven array of social services, health services, education, and recreational programs for older people in our community in Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant, Saugus and Swampscott. GLSS is committed to the active participation and self determination of seniors in life decisions, and to excellence and mutual respect in all its work.

Mission Statement

We believe in the value and integrity of the whole person and base all our activities on this fundamental concept. Greater Lynn Senior Services (GLSS) exists to provide, advocate for, and ensure the provision of a complete and interwoven array of social services, health services, education, and recreational programs for older people in our community in Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant, Saugus and Swampscott. GLSS is committed to the active participation and self determination of seniors in life decisions, and to excellence and mutual respect in all its work.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $69,580,052.00
Projected Expense $69,992,613.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Hoarding Outreach Program
  • Homeless Elders/Regional Housing Advocacy Program
  • Mobile Mental Health Program (MMH)
  • Older Battered Womens’ Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

We believe in the value and integrity of the whole person and base all our activities on this fundamental concept. Greater Lynn Senior Services (GLSS) exists to provide, advocate for, and ensure the provision of a complete and interwoven array of social services, health services, education, and recreational programs for older people in our community in Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant, Saugus and Swampscott. GLSS is committed to the active participation and self determination of seniors in life decisions, and to excellence and mutual respect in all its work.

Background Statement


Overview

Greater Lynn Senior Services (GLSS) is a non-profit human service agency created in 1975 as a federally designated regional Area Agency on Aging (AAA). We are also state certified as an Aging Services Access Point (ASAP), a designation that authorizes us to provide a broad range of programs to elders in our service area of Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant, Saugus and Swampscott. Every year we help thousands of seniors connect to the services they need: homecare, meals, transportation, housing, an advocate and much more. Through the range of services we offer, 3,000 people depend on us every day to improve the quality of their lives.


General Information

GLSS is the principal information and referral source for elder services for nearly 30,000 persons age 60 and older and their families in its five-town service area—a population that includes all demographic groups, ethnicity, and languages.

 

On an annual basis, GLSS delivers a broad range of in-home assistance services to over 1,500 home care clients, and provides over 300,000 meals to 1,100 seniors, most of whom are homebound. The agency is also the MBTA’s contractor for the North Territory of “The RIDE”—serving 23 cities and towns north of Boston—providing over 600,000 rides annually to disabled persons of all ages.  Several programs—Older Battered Women’s Program and the Homeless Elders/Regional Housing Advocacy program—reach beyond the Agency’s five-town service area assisting seniors in 23 cities and towns throughout the North Shore and on Cape Ann.
 

Other GLSS programs include: Congregate Meals; Elder at Risk (self-neglect); Family Caregiver Support Program; GLSS Senior Transportation; Group Adult Foster Care; Handicapped Children Transport; Health Outreach; Home Care Services; Home-Delivered Meals; Homeless Elders/Regional Housing Advocacy; Information and Referral; Long-Term Care Ombudsman; Money Management Assistance; Care Transitions Intervention; Nursing Home Screening; Older Battered Women’s Program; Protective Services; and Senior Housing On-Site Coordinator Program.  GLSS’ Medicaid Group Adult Foster Care program is the largest in Massachusetts, providing daily in-home assistance to disabled clients 22 and older who are otherwise at risk of nursing home placement.


Impact Statement

1.     Assumed leadership role in regional collaborative effort to develop a program that encourages consumer activation and health self-management to prevent health emergencies and hospitalizations.

 

2.     Assumed leadership role in effort to promote better health for consumers and more livable communities.

 

3.     Success of the Elder Mobile Mental Health Program not only in terms of increased number of clients served, but also its broad recognition as a community resource for clinical services to elders, with referral sources expanding to local hospitals, VNAs, doctors’ officer and housing authorities.

 

 

Goals

 

1.     Ensure that all consumers remain living safely in the community pursuing the lifestyle of their choice.

 

2.     Promote better health outcomes and more livable communities through consumer activation, effective problem solving and care coordination

 

3.     Better marketing outreach and education about programs we operate so we can reach more consumers, with a special emphasis on multicultural outreach.

 

4.     Integrate communication within the organization and across organizations, including embracing technical solutions.

 

5.     Support and develop expanding capacity through extended hours.


Needs Statement

To meet our goal of ensuring that all consumers remain living safely in the community pursuing the lifestyle of their choice, we need to continue the following programs that reach the most vulnerable that have had recent cuts of over $200,000 in outside funding:

a.      Homeless Elders/Regional Housing Advocacy Program, which reaches beyond our five-town service area helping seniors on the North Shore and Cape Ann who have been displaced or are in jeopardy of losing their homes.

b.     Nutrition/Meals on Wheels, which provides a nutritious daily meal to 1100 vulnerable elders, many of whom are unable to adequately prepare food for themselves.    

c.      Protective Services, which helps over 400 elders annually who are victims of abuse or neglect.

 

To achieve better marketing outreach to the public and better integration of communications across organizations and within the agency, we need to build a communications infrastructure (intranet, web, multimedia) and provide the training that is needed to create and access the communications. While still in development, we anticipate this will cost more than $15,000.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Northeast Massachusetts Region

Primarily serve, Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant, Saugus, and Swampscott.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Senior Centers/Services
  2. Health Care - Home Health Care
  3. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health & Crisis Intervention NEC

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Hoarding Outreach Program

Hoarding Disorder has been included in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders in the 2013 DSM V edition. It is characterized by persistent difficulty discarding possessions regardless of their actual value and/or difficulty non-acquiring items. This difficulty is due to a perceived need to save and distress associated with non-acquiring or with discarding. These symptoms often affect the person’s living area so that some rooms cannot be used for their intended purpose or impede their ability to carry out social, occupational or other important areas of functioning. We often notice these symptoms first when a person is elderly because this may be the first time they have let someone into their home if they are having some other kind of difficulty. Also they have had years of accumulating possessions so the quantity becomes overwhelming.

GLSS initiated the program in 2010, to address the growing need of those who hoard. The program aims at helping clients to understand why they have these tendencies and how they can overcome them. The program provides one-on-one and family counseling in the home for GLSS area residents 60 years and older (and occasionally under 60) for whom clutter or a need to collect possessions have taken over their lives. It also provides supportive advocacy and mediation with landlords and others, support groups, referrals to services such as heavy chores, home care, and Meals on Wheels. Further, clients are provided with opportunities to learn and grow through cognitive change; developing insight; prioritizing, and problem-solving skills. Training and consultations with housing authorities, police and other first responders, Boards of Health and other vendors within the GLSS communities are also provided. In 2012 the program was enhanced by starting 10 week de-Clutterers’ Groups. These clients are then followed up in a bi-monthly peer support group in which they continue practicing the skill that they have learned in the psycho-educational De-Clutterer’s group and continue to get support around their attempts to change their behavior
Budget  $70,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Meetings: The three groups met weekly for 10 weeks.

Category

Spring 2014

Fall 2014

Spring 2015

Combined


Peer Group

Hoarding Rating Scale

32%

45%

40%

33%

 

n/a

Clutter Image Rating Scale

n/a

n/a

24%

24%

 

n/a

Increased insight

90%

70%

83%

81%

 

83%

More self-esteem

80%

60%

30%

57%

 

85%

Less stressed

80%

70%

50%

66%

 

67%

More determined to try again

80%

100%

80%

87%

 

82%

Decision making

80%

90%

83%

84%

 

87%

Learned self-motivation tools

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Support group helped motivate

90%

80%

100%

91%

 

83%

Less isolated

20%

50%

40%

37%

 

77%

More able to enjoy being at home

n/a

50%

33%

41%

 

62%

Would join the group again

88%

100%

100%

97%

 

100%

Program Long-Term Success 

Hoarding is a chronic and persistent mental health disorder which people continue to struggle with for the rest of their lives. We often get a second referral from a case manager or from the housing authority for a client we worked with previously, because the client has not met the inspection goal and they would like to continue treatment. Generally, however, these clients are doing much better at managing their hoarding, are continuing to meet in support groups for emotional, education and social support. Their problems with hoarding are not as severe as when they were first referred. Rather, they know what they have to do to keep their home within the parameters of housing’s requirements and they can prepare when an inspection is looming. When they get referred at this stage, the level of clutter is maintained in a much more manageable way.

Program Success Monitored By 

There are several before and after rating scales used to monitor success. These include the clutter image rating scale with photos of before and after that show the extent of clutter and clean out. The hoarding rating scale measures the client’s attitude about their possessions—difficulty or anxiety about discarding or acquiring stuff. The Activities of Daily Living (ADL) status measures before and after treatment. Apartment inspections are conducted for health and safety risks.

Examples of Program Success 

A client lived in a building that was being treated for bed bug problems. None were found in her apartment, but her home needed to be treated to prevent the problem from occurring. Because of her clutter, many things had to be removed and spread out to allow hot air treatment to reach everything in the apartment. The client received heavy chore services to help her reduce the large amount of clutter. After the treatment and assurances that she had no problem, her belongings were organized by heavy chore services and she began receiving home care services. Her homemaker helps to keep the apartment clean with clear pathways throughout. The client also participated in our 10-week psycho-education group and continues to meet twice a month in a peer support group. Her housing manager continues to monitor her home every few months. Occasionally when the client has brought in large amounts of stuff from a storage unit to sort through, she will get a visit from her housing manager. But she has never failed an inspection; and although her home is quite crowded, housing is satisfied and so is she. That is success.


Homeless Elders/Regional Housing Advocacy Program

The Homeless Elders/Regional Housing Advocacy Program helps seniors throughout Greater Lynn, the North Shore, and Cape Ann, and from all walks of life, to find good housing they can afford. While the program provides assistance and supports to homeless elders, it also aims to prevent senior citizens from becoming homeless in the first place. Housing advocates help relocate elders who have been displaced or are in jeopardy of losing their homes, as well as work to resolve landlord-tenant conflicts. Advocacy and assistance are provided free of charge to any senior regardless of income. A nurse visits every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to take blood pressure.

 
For nearly 20 years, and in conjunction with this program, GLSS has provided assistance to homeless seniors through its Homeless Elders Breakfast Support Program at the Lynn Senior Center located downtown within proximity to area shelters. This program ensures a nutritious daily meal to individuals over 60 who are homeless or unable to independently cook because of environmental, psychological, cognitive or social limitations.  GLSS serves breakfast to approximately 55 guests per day, for a total of 14,300 meals annually. To ensure that no senior ever sleeps on the street, GLSS “rents” beds each night from a local shelter. A free lunch is also available at the Senior Center to any senior in need. 
Budget  $119,583.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 
  1. Day-to-day outreach to consumers to assess current status, needs and wants;
  2. Completing housing applications, (including acquiring the needed documentation in the form of birth certificates, social security cards, medical forms assessing disability, and referrals for benefits);
  3. Attending hearings to advocate for the consumers when they are denied residency;
  4. Contacting landlords regarding availability as well as researching other options such as assisted living, rest homes or nursing homes;
  5. Arranging transportation, providing security deposits and acquiring furniture once a housing option has been found.
Program Long-Term Success 
In the last year, GLSS housing advocates helped 460 clients with a variety of housing issues, including disputes and evictions, and homelessness. Sixty have been placed in new housing situations to date.  
 

 

 
Program Success Monitored By 

The housing advocates prepare monthly reports that document the number of housing applications filed; the number of consumers receiving benefits; the number of people housed; the number of housing issues resolved; and the number of "near elders" (those in their 50's with disabilities) who have been helped in any way. These reports are reviewed on a regular basis to determine areas where adjustments can be made, and where new resources need to be found so that we can continue to help as many people as possible.

 

Examples of Program Success 
Robert is a 71 year old man and attends the Breakfast program daily. Robert walks with a cane and also has a history of substance abuse. When Robert first came to the Breakfast program he was living at the Emergency shelter. After his time was up at the shelter, he even spent a few nights on the street and at the police station. With help from the Breakfast program, Robert was moved into a single room occupancy. His case worker at the Breakfast program was able to obtain a safelink phone and completed a referral for the nearby furniture bank. Robert also started to receive homecare services to help with transportation and grocery shopping. Robert is now at the top of the list at a nearby elderly building and should be moving in shortly.

Mobile Mental Health Program (MMH)

MMHP is a compassionate, pioneering effort that delivers a range of critical mental health services to the most vulnerable of our elders, and integrates them into the home environment. As the first of its kind in Massachusetts, the program concentrates on elders who “fly below the radar” relative to more mainstream mental health providers, and addresses issues like anxiety, depression, and adjustment to loss, that often ravage elder life quality. Five GLSS geriatric social workers/clinicians provide ongoing clinical assessment, counseling and support to consumers as needed. Initiated as a 2-year pilot program in 2007, the Elder Mobile Mental Health Project exceeded expectations and has been instituted as a permanent program for our consumers. Now in its eleventh year of operation, it has recently received over 1000 referrals to MMH/Substance Abuse program and over 100 hoarding referrals.

 
According to our most recent assessment, fully 59% of those receiving services have managed symptoms or experienced a reduction in negative symptoms. Additionally, the program has become recognized more broadly in the community as a resource for clinical services to elders; and, our referral sources have expanded to local hospitals, VNAs, doctors’ offices, and housing authorities.
Budget  $432,479.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

(* sample taken from reporting period 9/1/2012 – 8/31/2013)

·    Of the 82 referrals received during this time period, we had some contact with 73 or 89%. Reasons for no contact included lack of response to outreach efforts, refusal of program or admission to a hospital, hospice or long-term care facility, or screened out due to lack of eligibility for the program because of age, location, or already having another provider for counseling services.

·    Of the 73 people we contacted, 27 or 37% agreed to the program and have an active treatment plan.

·    Of those with an active treatment plan, 100% remained housed in the community, none were homeless or evicted.

·    Of those with an active treatment plan, 16 or 59% reported a decrease in negative symptoms.

·    Of those with an active treatment plan, only 1 or 3% was hospitalized for psychiatric problems.

·    Of those with an active treatment plan, 16 or 59% reported an improvement in meaningful daily activities and a positive sense of well being.

Program Long-Term Success 

(* since beginning of program 11/1/2007)

1.       Over 1000 referrals to MMH/SA program and over 100 hoarding referrals since inception in 2007.

2.      Improved community awareness of the program as evidenced by an increase in referrals from community providers, including local Councils on Aging, Visiting Nurse Associations, hospitals and doctors' offices.
3. Outreach and education provided to local community providers, such as Catholic Charities, and local elderly housing sites.

4.      We currently have a LDAC clinician working with SA clients.

Program Success Monitored By 

1.      Overall, most clients will complete an initial Geriatric Depression Scale and clinical assessment with follow-ups as appropriate.

2.      Initial and biannual reviews of client-centered treatment plans.

3.      Development of a clinical forum for review of client progress.

4.      Development of a client database for tracking demographic and client specific information.

5.      Implementation of Quarterly Outcomes tracking spreadsheet.

Examples of Program Success 

Rose, an 87 year old woman was living alone in her own home with few supports and declining vision. She had only an elderly relative to call on for assistance. When the relative became ill, Rose was frightened about making decisions for her care, and was grieving the many losses over the years. While eligible for home care services, she was apprehensive about allowing strangers, including the EMMH counselor, into her home. However, with regular telephone contact a home visit was scheduled. Rose spoke of her grief and her fears for her future as her vision declined. Slowly, Rose began to consider the services offered and allowed workers into her home. Rose now has weekly visits from a companion who helps with errands or just visits. She has a volunteer money manager to help with bills, and has connected with the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind. She is learning to make decisions for herself and to cope with some of the changes she is experiencing as a normal part of aging.


Older Battered Womens’ Program

GLSS’ Older Battered Women’s Program (OBWP) is the only program in Massachusetts, and one of only a few in the country, tailored to helping older women who experience partner abuse. Our mission is to empower these women by respecting, listening, empathizing, advocating, counseling, offering support groups of other women in similar circumstances, and creating a safe place to heal and grow.. OBWP provides a seamless web of core supports complemented by an array of positive social choices that promote independence, well-being, community integration, and meaningful dignity. Core services include comprehensive needs assessment, individual service plans, ongoing counseling/advocacy, case management, and a variety of peer support options. Critical to achieving success, services are often delivered in the client’s homes. Typical client service needs are medical care, emergency legal intervention, personal advocacy, interagency service coordination, individual and group counseling, group support, legal consultations, in home visits, personal care services (for disabled clients), housing, transportation, and emergency shelter.

Since 1997, OBWP has served women age 50 and older in 50 communities north of Boston who are coping with, or fleeing from abusive relationships with a partner or spouse. OBWP has expanded its outreach area and is now collaborating with three other Elder Services agencies, Councils on Aging and area Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault agencies North of Boston in three counties Essex, Middlesex and Suffolk. Currently, three support groups are offered in Lynn, Beverly and Amesbury and a fourth group in North Andover will be added. Two new pilot programs will be initiated in 2015 to address the needs of all elders over 50 who are physically and emotionally abused by their adult children and grandchildren.
Budget  $246,229.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Population Served Females Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 

The short-term success of the program is evidenced by intake, participation, observation, and evaluation. During the intake process, the client is allowed to share as much (or as little) as she feels comfortable with about her history of abuse. After the first meeting the Social Worker completes a Staff Assessment on Intake with questions to assess the status of the client such as: their insight of the abuse, willingness to talk, awareness of resources, services and options, current coping skills, self-esteem, confidence, and whether they have a safety plan.

The Social Worker understands that it takes time for the client to trust the worker and share what she has kept secret for many years. It may take many sessions before that trusting relationship can be built and the work of healing and change can begin. The Social Worker looks for the level of participation of the client in group sessions and observes any signs of improvement. An evaluation is done after the first six months to determine effectiveness. The outcomes reflect significant change for those women who stay with the program for 6 months and more. Those clients also offer great support and hope for the newer members of the program.
Program Long-Term Success 

An 2014 evaluation of both individual and support group participants produced positive results. Of those contacted, 79% responded:

· More than 90% feel safer at home because of changes they made since they joined the program.

· More than 90% of participants who have been part of the program for more than 3 years feel hopeful that positive change is not only possible, but long-lasting.

· 44% of individual program participants and 76% of group members feel less alone than when they first joined the program. They attribute that to working with the staff and / or the group.

· 57% felt they had people they could trust to support them when they joined the program; 96% feel they have people they can trust now. That’s a 68% improvement.

· More than 90% feel more confident.

· 59% felt they had been in a physically or sexually unsafe relationship. After participating in the program and making changes, only 5% felt unsafe at the time of the survey.

· 23% felt they were in an emotionally unstable or financially risky relationship now, down from 95%. This may be attributable to program participants making changes in their life.[1]

· 91% felt their expectations had been met (or exceeded!).

· 92% would strongly recommend the program to others – and some already had.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Direct Services Outcome Measures process includes a Staff Assessment on Intake and a Client Satisfaction Survey. Throughout the first six months the Social Workers measure the client’s progress by observing if the client attends group regularly; if she has bonded with the group; has increased self-esteem/confidence; is motivated to change; has become assertive in a positive way; if there has been any change in her relationship to the abuser; and does she have hope. Between 6-9 months the Social Worker will meet with the client to complete a Client Satisfaction Survey together asking them the same questions that were on the Staff Assessment during the initial intake but adding the following: Has the program helped you: 1) understand your experience as abuse; 2) become willing to talk to someone about your experience; 3)become more aware of the resources and services available to you; 4) exercise options; 5) develop coping skills; 6) develop social connections; 6) develop a safety plan; and 7) has your self-esteem, confidence, hope, and empowerment increased because of the program.

Examples of Program Success  Mary, a 72-year old woman, was looking for support and 1:1 counseling after suffering physical, emotional, sexual, and financial abuse for 52 years by her husband. She knew she needed to leave her husband but didn’t know to do so without him severely hurting her. Upon referral, an OBWP advocate met with her and discussed options and the resources available for her particular situation. They met weekly for a year to help give her the confidence to leave. Mary joined the OBWP support group to gain strength from her peers as well. During that year, Mary rented a storage shed without her husband knowing and carefully began storing her belongings and money. She hired a lawyer and started the divorce process. She used retirement funds to purchase a home in another state without her husband knowing. Once safe in her new location, her husband was served with divorce papers. The divorce is now final and Mary received 50% of all assets. She no longer lives in fear and a state of apprehension.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Paul T. Crowley
CEO Term Start July 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Mr. Crowley has 25 years of experience in executive and financial management and oversight of both for- and not-for-profit organizations.  Currently, he is responsible for total agency operations, overseeing a staff of more than 600, and a budget of more than $60,000,000.  This role includes overseeing GLSS’ Transportation Department, which serves as the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s (MBTA’s) contractor for the North Territory of “The RIDE,” currently providing more than 600,000 door-to-door rides per year for people with disabilities throughout 23 cities and towns north of, and including, Boston. 
 
Since taking on his leadership role at GLSS, Mr. Crowley has played a major role in developing new and expanding existing transportation options, with a focus on understanding the gaps that currently exist in the transportation network in our communities and working with others to bridge them.  As a lead agency in both the North Shore Link and Greater North Shore On the Move, GLSS has been pivotal in broadening transportation options to the under-served and the disabled in communities throughout the North Shore and bringing forward unique programs, such as MobilityLinks (being funded by a grant from the Federal Transit Administration), which encompass the ideas of consumer choice and consumer-directed care. 
 
Prior to serving as Executive Director, Mr. Crowley served on the Agency’s Board of Directors, as President and a member of the Finance Committee.  In those roles, he helped to guide the unprecedented growth of GLSS’ Transportation Department into the largest non-profit transportation provider in the state.

Educational Background:
Bachelors of Science and Administration in Accounting Northeastern University. 
 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Steven Epps Director of Transportation

Steven Epps, GLSS Director of Transportation, joined the organization in 2014. He has worked in public and private not for profit agencies involving transit for over 25 years in Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, and Virginia. In his current role at GLSS, he directs all operations for the contract with the MBTA for the North Service Area for its paratransit program, THE RIDE. Steven directs operations for Medicaid, and many private pay contracts as well. He is keenly interested in coordinated transportation between multiple agencies on the North Shore, and sets the tone for a safety culture and consumer-centered operations.

 

 

Ken Halkin Director of Finance
Ken has come to GLSS with 20 years of  CFO level experience in  a non-profit health and human services organization. He has overseen finance, budget, grants management, risk management, IT, telecommunications real estate/facilities, purchasing and other administrative departments such as HR & labor relations in the nonprofit field.  Organizations and positions held include  Assoc. Executive Director, Administration & Finance, Tri-City Mental Health, Executive Director/CFO – Haverhill/Newburyport Human Services, Business Manager – MA Department of Mental Health,  Haverhill/Newburyport.  Ken has also provided professional services to the following: Beverly YMCA, Turning Point, Inc., Northern Essex Mental Health Center, Baldpate Psychiatric Hospital, Greater Lynn Mental Health & Retardation Center, Little Missionary Sisters of Charity. He also serves on many boards in many capacities including the Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center, Institute for Independent Business, Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce, Amesbury Chamber of Commerce,·and he was the founder of the  Non-Profit Executive Forum (Haverhill, Amesbury, Newburyport).

Educational Background:

Ken has an M.B.A from Cornell University  and a  B.A. from  S.U.N.Y. at Stony Brook.

Marilyn Long Director of Community Programs
Marilyn Long has been employed with GLSS since 1984 and has ably served the Agency in a variety of roles during that time. Most recently, she joined GLSS’ senior management team in the position of Director of Community Programs, having served as the department’s Assistant Director for more than 8 years.
 
In her current role, Marilyn is responsible for overseeing all aspects of GLSS’ community-based programs and outreach efforts in the Agency’s five-town service area of Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant, Saugus, and Swampscott. These elements include Reception; Information and Referral; the Family Caregiver Support Program; the Consumer Advisor; the Ombudsman Program; Volunteers; and Nutrition programs, including Meals on Wheels and weekday lunches served at a number of community café sites. Through special arrangement with the Lynn Council on Aging, Marilyn is also responsible for the oversight of the Lynn Senior Center, currently the only council on aging in Massachusetts co-located with an Area Agency on Aging (GLSS’ federal designation) and Aging Services Access Point (GLSS’ state designation).  She is also responsible for providing support and outreach to the other four councils on aging in GLSS’ service area. In addition, Marilyn acts as the GLSS liaison and provides support to staff in the AARP Money Management Program, a collaborative effort of GLSS and North Shore Elder Services. 
 
In her role as Assistant Director, Marilyn assisted in the oversight and management of all elements of Community Programs, in particular managing Reception, Information and Referral, and community outreach efforts. Over her 30-year tenure with GLSS, she also served as the Information and Referral Supervisor and in several positions in the Nutrition Department.
 

Significant accomplishments over the past several years include developing a robust Latino outreach program through the Lynn Senior Center; overseeing the comprehensive certification of a team of three GLSS Information and Referral Specialists by the Alliance of Information and Referral Systems (AIRS); and managing the process of and the eventual award of a new multi-million-dollar nutrition contract. Under Marilyn’s leadership, Community Programs continues to grow, develop, and innovate in the provision of consumer-driven services that promote choice and well-being. Programs under her direction consistently score very high on audits and are commended for meeting the needs of the most vulnerable.

Holly Marcinelli Director of Home Care Programs

Holly joined Greater Lynn Senior Services in 2007, and has served as the Director of Consumer Services since 2014. In her current capacity she oversees the daily operations of the Home Care department, and supervises the Directors of Senior Care Options (SCO) and Clinical Programs. The programs under Holly’s direct oversight include Home Care, Nursing, Supportive and Congregate Housing, High Risk Case Management, Intensive Case Management, Consumer Directed Care, Care Transitions Intervention, Home Care QA, Wellness Programs, Khmer Outreach, Hospital Liaison, and Consumer Engagement. Since taking on the Director role, Holly has led departmental change and improvement efforts including expanding intake and outreach, strengthening programming serving high risk populations, enhancing consumer wellness initiatives, and increasing focus on consumer centered care and self-management models. She is committed to supporting professional development and ensuring a highly skilled staff, driven by a shared commitment to the GLSS Mission, Vision, and values. Accomplishments in her previous Program Management role at GLSS included supervising case managers, QA staff, and interns, developing and training on program policy and procedure, and supporting the clinical capacity of the department through consultation, training, and crisis intervention.

Holly has over 20 years of experience in social services and non-profits. Prior to joining the GLSS team, Holly gained valuable direct service experience as a case manager and social worker in New York City, Georgia, and North Carolina. In past roles, she provided supportive services to people living with HIV/AIDS, refugees, individuals with Mental Illness and Addictions, homeless individuals and families, and older adults. Holly received a BA in Religion and Music from Wake Forest University in North Carolina, and a Masters in Social Work from Fordham University in New York. She has held professional Social Work licenses in both New York and Massachusetts.

Valerie Parker Callahan Director of Planning & Development
Employed with Greater Lynn Senior Services, Inc. since May of 2005, Valerie brings twenty years of experience and an extensive background in research and evaluation to the Agency. Prior to working with GLSS, she served as a lead consultant on a number of elder housing and service research projects supported by the Executive Office of Elder Affairs. She has the proven ability to accurately organize, interpret, prioritize, and translate disparate sources of data into meaningful and critical decision-making information. Similarly, she has strong familiarity with the process of policy formulation (especially through consensus- building); of turning policy guidelines into effective program activities; and also of evaluating how well those activities actually do – or do not – carry out the policy’s intent. In addition to her numerous contributions associated with planning and development, Valerie is currently leading a significant strategic planning initiative for Greater Lynn Senior Services, Inc., conducting program impact evaluations, assisting in the design of new programs, and helping to generate and integrate critical resources in order to support the mission and vision of the Agency at large.
   
Educational Background:
Valerie has a M.A., Political Science/Public Policy, from Boston University. She completed her Ph.D., qualifying exams with high honors. She also holds a BA, in Political Science, from Fordham University, New York.
Lisa Wharff Director of Human Resources

Lisa has recently come to GLSS and brings over 30 years of experience in the human resources field. Prior to GLSS, Lisa has worked at such diverse companies as Digital Equipment Corporation, New England Power Company, Brady People ID, and more with employees up to 2500. Her various skills include management coaching, talent acquisition and retention, development and management of performance and evaluation plans, compensation programs, benefit programs and labor relations negotiations skills. Lisa has also served on the board of Girls, Inc.

 

Educational Background:
Lisa has a B.A. from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana in Organization Psychology.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Aging Innovations Award/The Kiosk for Living Well (TM) National Association Area Agencies on Aging (n4a) 2017
Achievement Award for Older Battered Women’s Program National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a) 2008
Homeless Elders/Regional Housing Advocacy Program National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a) 2008

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Over the years, GLSS has demonstrated a profound capacity for successful collaboration and partnering with a wide variety of local area organizations to best meet the needs of program services. Collaborators include: the Lynn Community Health Center; Greater North Shore Aging and Disabilities Resource Consortium (North Shore Link); Elder Service Plan of the North Shore; Lynn Housing Authority; Lynn Shelter Association; Union Hospital; North Shore Medical Center; Lynn Housing Authority; and the Councils on Aging in five towns we serve.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 525
Number of Part Time Staff 122
Number of Volunteers 125
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 77%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 89
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 10
Caucasian: 415
Hispanic/Latino: 100
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 22
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 264
Male: 373
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. John Baker
Board Chair Company Affiliation Printing Company Representative
Board Chair Term Oct 2007 - Oct 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. John Baker Printing Company Voting
Ms. Bethany Beauregard Administrator at Abbott House, Lynn Voting
Mr. E. Carlton Brown WalMart Public Relations Officer/Community Liaison Voting
Ms. Pearl Brown Lynn Museum & Historical Society Voting
Mr. Nelson Chang Attorney Voting
Ms. Mary Curtis Registered Nurse, Retired Voting
Reverend Christopher Foustoukos Greek Orthodox Priest Voting
Mr. Robert Long Accountant, Ret. Voting
Ms. Mary Magner Nonprofit Executive Nahant COA Voting
Mr. Al Malagrifa Retired Voting
Mr. Robert Mazzone Executive Director of Housing Authority Voting
Ms. Laurie Roberto Executive Director of Nursing Facility Voting
Mr. Peter Rossetti Insurance Agent, Attorney, Tax Accountant Voting
Mr. Joseph Sano Attorney Voting
Ms. Ruth Suber Community Ombudsman Oversight Panel Voting
Ms. Kathleen Vadala Retired Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 5
Board Meeting Attendance % 67%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $65,106,006 $59,680,406 $55,933,705
Total Expenses $64,138,425 $61,114,635 $54,932,967

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $50,797,791 $48,043,336 $46,025,690
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $50,797,791 $48,043,336 $46,025,690
Individual Contributions $1,856,938 $855,590 $1,225,698
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $11,253,013 $9,619,749 $8,145,361
Investment Income, Net of Losses $25,805 $108,739 $23,938
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $1,172,459 $1,052,992 $513,018

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $59,645,704 $57,140,444 $50,770,366
Administration Expense $4,429,068 $3,905,145 $4,092,580
Fundraising Expense $63,653 $69,046 $70,021
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.02 0.98 1.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses 93% 93% 92%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $18,224,842 $17,403,035 $17,694,068
Current Assets $10,631,219 $10,330,345 $10,452,854
Long-Term Liabilities $3,372,686 $3,398,120 $3,387,744
Current Liabilities $6,361,576 $6,481,916 $5,349,096
Total Net Assets $8,490,580 $7,522,999 $8,957,228

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.67 1.59 1.95

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 19% 20% 19%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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