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DEAF, Inc. (Developmental Evaluation and Adjustment Facilities Inc)

 215 Brighton Avenue
 Allston, MA 02134
[P] (617) 254-4041
[F] (617) 254-7091
www.deafinconline.org
[email protected]
Sharon Applegate
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1977
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2628350

LAST UPDATED: 04/24/2017
Organization DBA DEAF, Inc.
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

DEAF, Inc. inspires people to achieve personal and professional goals through accessible programs and services. We build bridges across communities by increasing communication access and awareness.

Access, Awareness, and Achievement for Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing and Late-Deafened People

Mission Statement

DEAF, Inc. inspires people to achieve personal and professional goals through accessible programs and services. We build bridges across communities by increasing communication access and awareness.

Access, Awareness, and Achievement for Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing and Late-Deafened People


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,936,340.00
Projected Expense $1,936,340.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • American Sign Language (ASL) Classes
  • DBCAN (DeafBlind Community Access Network)
  • Deaf Health
  • Independent Living Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

DEAF, Inc. inspires people to achieve personal and professional goals through accessible programs and services. We build bridges across communities by increasing communication access and awareness.

Access, Awareness, and Achievement for Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing and Late-Deafened People


Background Statement

Founded in 1977, DEAF, Inc. is a community–based, multi-service Massachusetts nonprofit run by and for people who are Deaf (Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened). Originally offering developmental evaluations and assessments for workforce readiness, DEAF, Inc. soon expanded in response to the needs of the Deaf community, and began offering independent living services, Adult Basic Education and GED preparation in American Sign Language (ASL). Our information and education are designed to meet the needs of Deaf adults for additional background information and time to clarify information and answer questions. Over time, we added a health outreach, prevention and education program, and DeafBlind community access services. Our health programming addresses disparities Deaf people experience in accessing health information and health care through culturally appropriate Medical Case Management for harm reduction and advocacy, and health education, including online ASL-based health-related videos. Our DeafBlind program trains sighted Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing adults to provide respectful guiding services to eligible DeafBlind adults who want to maintain and increase their independence and involvement in their communities.

All our programs are offered in ASL and use a variety of assistive technologies and communication access services, as needed, to meet the varied communication styles of our community.

Run by and for Deaf people, our staff reflects the community we serve – roughly 88% are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, or Late-Deafened, including our Executive Director, Finance Director, and program directors. Program Directors report to the Executive Director, who in turn reports to our Board of Directors. While welcoming and accommodating Hearing members, our Board maintains a Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened voting majority. Our strong volunteer pool includes members of the Deaf community as well as the Hearing community, particularly students from ASL interpreting and Deaf education programs at local universities.

DEAF, Inc. is guided by five core values in all that it does: Mutual Respect, between and among consumers, staff, and the community; Consumer-driven, enabling people to identify and achieve their goals and determine the focus of agency programs and services; Access, in communication accessibility and to services and opportunities in the larger community; Self-Determination, providing supported decision making so people can determine their appropriate personal and professional goals; Empowerment, creating an environment where people increasingly take charge of their lives and staff members are active participants in the leadership of the organization.

DEAF, Inc. is committed to bridging the gap between the Deaf community and the wider, Hearing community, and building bridges and networks among organizations to increase cultural awareness and improve communication. 


Impact Statement

Every year DEAF, Inc. has an impact on the lives of Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people.

Needs Statement

Communication access services, particularly American Sign Language (ASL) interpreting, are essential to our work, our staff, and our constituents. It is an ongoing challenge to educate the wider community about its importance, about the differences between the need for communication access in the Deaf community and interpreting services for Hearing non-English speakers, and about the unique need for ongoing funding to ensure communication access. Our staff reflects the community that we serve; 88% are Deaf. We seek $15,000 for day-to-day communication access for our staff, Board volunteers, and the people we serve to ensure communication with mainstream providers with whom we partner.

DEAF, Inc. seeks sustainable funding to maintain unique Deaf-accessible health access services that address disparities experienced by Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened adults and their families statewide. Our programs are designed to increase the numbers of Deaf adults adopting healthy behaviors and accessing quality care. We advance access to medical care, foster changes in lifestyle behaviors that affect health; and empower Deaf people to become active participants in their health and healthcare decisions through medical case management, Deaf-accessible health education, and partnerships that improve the abilities of mainstream healthcare providers to work effectively with this at risk population.

To attract and retain Deaf professionals for our staff is important for addressing the growth in need. Staff providing direct services to the Deaf community must be fluent in ASL. As part of our mission, we strive to provide appropriate and fulfilling employment to Deaf professionals. To expand capacity, we seek funding to expand our staff.

Office space to meet the demand for our services and the access needs of our community, including those with mobility and vision issues, is more of a challenge as demand for our services grows.


CEO Statement

How many Deaf people do you know? Few Hearing people have ever met or interacted with a Deaf person, or been aware of Deaf people around them. Deafness is not visible, unless people are signing in public. An estimated 546,000 Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Massachusetts, the greatest concentration in the Greater Boston area and the eastern part of the state.

Barriers to communication isolate Deaf people from Hearing (and Hearing people from the Deaf people around them) -- family members neighbors, and the wider, Hearing community at large. The isolation begins as early as childhood: 93% of children born Deaf are born to Hearing parents who have likely never met another Deaf person before and who do not know sign language or how best to communicate with their Deaf child. The majority of Deaf children experience delayed language development, an obstacle for success at school. Deaf high school students are 3 times as likely as their Hearing counterparts to drop out of high school. Those who complete high school read, on average, at a 2.8 to 4.5 grade level. Sign language is the language of Deaf people, but American Sign Language (ASL) is not English conveyed by hand gestures, nor is it a universal language. ASL is a manual, spatial language with a syntax structure completely different from English; it is not a phonetic language. It is infinitely easier for a Hearing non-English speaker to learn English because of a familiarity with sounds and their relationship to written language than for a Deaf person, for whom the written symbols relate to a spoken phoneme unrelated to any manual sign.

Language barriers limit Deaf people’s access to information that for Hearing people is readily available. As a result, what seems like simple information to someone Hearing often requires additional context and background information for a Deaf person to understand it fully. Simply providing an interpreter does not level the playing field or address the real issue of access to information required to deal with health, finances, housing, and the many other issues that disadvantaged people of all races, ethnicities, and abilities face.

The mission of DEAF, Inc. is to inspire people to achieve their goals. We provide information that is accessible, including the kind of background information that is needed for Deaf people to make informed decisions that affect their lives and the lives of their families. We are uniquely able to do this because DEAF, Inc. is run by Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people for Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people. At the same time, we strive to avoid duplication of services by collaborating with Hearing service providers, linking Deaf people to services and helping them understand the information they receive from mainstream providers. We also work with collaborating partners to help them develop culturally competent

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
While DEAF, Inc. serves people in communities throughout the Commonwealth, we haves offices in Greater Boston, the North Shore and Merrimack Valley, and the Southeast area and Cape Cod (serving the Islands).

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Deaf/Hearing Impaired Centers, Services
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

American Sign Language (ASL) Classes

DEAF, Inc.’s American Sign Language (ASL) Classes build bridges across communities and increase awareness about Deaf people in the wider community. DEAF, Inc. offers Adult Education ASL classes for Hard of Hearing, Late-Deafened, and Hearing adults who want to learn ASL and learn about Deaf culture. These tuition-based ASL classes are available for beginners (Level 1) through intermediate (Level 5). We have plans to develop the program to offer tailored classes for businesses and professionals, labs, and filed trips to increase opportunities for students to meet and interact with Deaf members of the community. Our ASL classes also generate unrestricted revenue that can be used to support DEAF, Inc.’s mission.

Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
Short term goals include:
  • Develop a new curriculum that can be tailored to meet the needs of different learners, including community members, businesses, nonprofit services providers, medical professionals, first responders and the like.
  • Increase outreach to the wider community  
Program Long-Term Success 
The long term goals of this program include:
  • Increase awareness about Deaf people, our language, and our culture,
  • Increase the numbers of people (Hard of Hearing, Late-Deafened, and Hearing) who can communicate in ASL
  • Generate revenue to support Deaf-accessible direct services
Program Success Monitored By 
Measures for success include:
  • Registrations
  • Feedback from students
  • Feedback from instructors
Examples of Program Success  TBS

DBCAN (DeafBlind Community Access Network)

The DeafBlind Community Access Network (DBCAN) is a consumer-led program that offers DeafBlind adults across Massachusetts the support of trained, sighted Providers whose assistance maintains their independence in the community. DBCAN recruits and trains sighted Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing people to provide respectful guiding and 1:1 communication with visual information supports for shopping, exercising, dealing with mail, keeping appointments, attending civic, social, religious, recreational and educational events – whatever errands and activities a DeafBlind consumer chooses. DBCAN matches eligible DeafBlind adults with DBCAN Providers, supervises the Providers, and provides support and suggestions to ensure that DeafBlind adults and Providers maintain good working relationships.

Budget  $450,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Short-term goals:

  • Eligible DeafBlind adult have access to a minimum of 25 hours of Provider time each month
  • At least one group Provider training is scheduled and individual trainings are reviews are scheduled as needed to meet demand in specific areas across the state
Program Long-Term Success 

Our long-term goals include:

  • DeafBlind adults should have access to as many Provider hours as they need to accomplish the errands and engage in a vibrant life in the community
  • Programs designed to maintain the independence of DeafBlind adults to maintain their independence are available and well attended, such as self-advocacy skills development, specialized Braille classes designed for DeafBlind adults, other skills development.
  • DeafBlind adults have access to community-based opportunities to engage socially and productively in the wider Deaf and DeafBlind community.
Program Success Monitored By 

We measure our success with the following tools:

  • Certificates of completion of Provider training
  • Reports from DeafBlind adults about their successful scheduling and use of Providers
  • Reports of hours used in 3 categories: Community/Culture/Recreation; Maintaining Independence; Social Supports
  • Reports from DeafBlind adults that they were satisfied with the Provider time available to them each month
  • Reports from Providers of successful appointments each month
  • Attendance reports with demographic information showing increased attendance among DeafBlind adults at DEAF, Inc. events
  • Size of waiting list (DeafBlind adults waiting for Provider services)
Examples of Program Success  “Joan,” a fiercely independent DeafBlind woman, had been told by her doctor that she was borderline diabetic. Joan came to DEAF, Inc. for help understanding what she needed to do to avoid developing diabetes. She worked with our staff to develop a plan for diet and exercise, and come frequently to check on her progress. Joan enjoyed walking and going to a gym for exercise, and DBCAN was able to find a Provider who would go with her to the gym and as part of a Deaf walking group. Joan went to the supermarket with her Provider, who helped her find the foods she was looking for to improve her diet and lower her fat intake. After 6 months, Joan had lost more than 20 lbs. and lowered her sugar levels to normal levels.

Deaf Health

Deaf Health promotes behavioral changes to improve health outcomes for Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people affected by health disparities. We provide health literacy and advocacy for harm reduction through Deaf-accessible Medical Case Management, evidence-based health education, health videos (in ASL with voice-overs and captioning for Hard of Hearing viewers, and large-print transcripts for DeafBlind viewers), and events, like our Deaf Community Health Fair. All the health information we provide - from workshops to 1:1 meetings to videos - include vital background information that fills in gaps in general health information and enables Deaf adults to understand as much health information as possible, including about their own health profiles. Our prevention services focus on critical public health issues, including infection and chronic disease prevention for obesity, diabetes, heart diseases, cancer, and other health issues. Through strong collaborations with hospitals, health centers, and other health care providers, we advocate to improve access to quality care for our community.

Budget  $275,579.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Adults At-Risk Populations General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

 Our short-term goals include:

  • Community members have the supports (information and services) to become more independent in managing health conditions
  • Deaf adults benefit from Deaf-accessible evidence-based programs (EBP) -- clinically proven approaches to behavioral changes – as their Hearing counterparts. Specifically:
--75% successful completion of EBPs90-99% apply long-term behavioral changes independently
--90% would recommend the program to others
--90-99% demonstrate increased understanding of their health and what affects their health, develop skills for self-management and advocacy, are confident taking active roles in their health care and in maintaining their chronic conditions and increased physical strength and stability, increased safety at home and perceived safety
--Community interest in taking ASL-based EBPs increases
 
  • Deaf community accesses culturally appropriate general health information online
  • Deaf adults benefit from Deaf-accessible Medical Case Management
Program Long-Term Success 

 Our long-term goals include:

  • Health outcomes for Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people in Massachusetts are on par with the general population
  • Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened adults are able to advocate successfully for access to health care and health information, and for appropriate access services so they understand their health profiles and can make informed decisions about their behaviors, options care, medications and interventions.
  • Awareness among health professionals increases understanding of the need for Deaf-accessible health-related services and how to provide appropriate services to Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people.
  • Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened adults with chronic health conditions have the skills and access to resources they need to manage and maintain their health
Program Success Monitored By 
Our measures for success include:
  •  Number of Medical Case Management cases closed; reports of individual service plan goals achieved; reports on follow through with care plans.
  •  Increased health literacy among Deaf adults and older adults who attend health-related workshops, retention rate of participants for EBPs offered, certifications of completion, and specific measures defined by EBPs.
  •  Viewing statistics and new subscribers at Project HOPE’s YouTube channel.
Examples of Program Success 

Attending our series of nutrition workshops, “Matilda” learned the difference between Coca Cola and Diet Coke. Matilda drank Coca Cola regularly, thinking that it was not any different than Diet Coke, except that the Diet Coke had “weight loss properties” similar to that of a diet pill. At a Healthy Eating workshop, our Health Specialist showed her a picture with a stack of 10 sugar cubes and explained that was how much sugar was in a 12 oz. can of Coca Cola. Matilda was so surprised that she promptly went to the restroom and poured out the Coke she was drinking at the time. Matilda asserted that in the 10 months that passed since that workshop, she has stopped drinking Coca Cola. She is also aware that diet sodas do not hold any “magic” ingredient that helps a person lose weight.


Independent Living Services

Our Independent Living Services program offers support services in ASL for Deaf, and Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people in a variety of areas, including financial stability and skills for managing personal finances; communication skills (ASL and “survival” English); instruction for how to use and request appropriate communication access; advocacy for finding and applying for safe and affordable housing, applying for and maintain health insurance and other benefits; and assistance for communicating with Hearing service providers – medical professionals, social security, state agencies, and others. We provide information and support to enable people to make informed decisions, and assist with accessing housing, healthcare, and other benefits; assess needs for various assistive technologies; and provide information on being prepared for emergencies. Targeted IL services include Senior IL Services, to help Deaf seniors and seniors with age-related hearing loss remain independent; Youth Leadership and Transition Planning for Youth; the Assistive Equipment Program, which helps with applying for financial supports to acquire and use appropriate assistive technologies; and the Deaf Parent's Support Group. 

Budget  $1,047,245.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Information & Referral
Population Served Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Our short-term goals are to:
  • Increase the financial stability of Deaf people through increasing financial literacy, skills for managing personal finances, and understanding the impact and responsibilities of receiving the benefits.
  • Increase the number of Deaf people who live in permanent, affordable, safe and accessible housing.
  • Increase health and wellness of Deaf people by improving their understanding of health benefits and insurance options.
  • Improve parenting skills among Deaf and Hard of Hearing parents with Deaf and Hearing infants and children.
  • Improve the preparedness of Deaf and Hard of Hearing people in the event of emergencies.
  • Improve understanding in the Deaf community about the issues of substance abuse and access to services for those with substance abuse issues.
Program Long-Term Success 

Our long-term goals are to:

  • Data is available to document the Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened community’s need for and utilization of services robust, and to track and report on the progress of individual service plans, demographics for program development and sustainability
  • Financial independence and financial stability outcomes Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people living in eastern Massachusetts are on par with the general population.
  • Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people live in safe, accessible, affordable and permanent homes and communities.
  • Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people have the assistive technology they need to ensure their independence and safety, and have access to additional technologies as their needs change and as technologies improve.
  • Sustainable collaborations among Deaf and Hearing service providers ensure access for Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened individuals to benefits and services that increase and sustain their independence and self-determination.
Program Success Monitored By 

We use the following tools to measure success in independent living:

  • I/R datasheets; event attendance records.
  • Individual Service Plans
  • Reports, application forms, referral forms, benefits and other acceptance letters and similar documentation
  • Self-reports
  • Assistive Technology Plans
  • Class and workshop certificates of completion
Examples of Program Success 

 “Mary,” a proud, Deaf senior, enjoys her friends and her independence. Recently, cost of living increases made it hard for her to pay her bills; she’d missed friends who came by to visit; phone conversations were difficult, especially hearing her grandchildren’s voices; and doctor’s appointments were frustrating.

Together, Mary and our IL staff reviewed her income and found she qualified for food stamps and fuel assistance. With help, she filled out benefits applications, and in a few weeks was approved. Now she can afford her necessities without giving up food and heat.

Mary’s doctor prescribed hearing aids, but they cost too much for her. Our staff helped Mary apply for funding for hearing aids, which were provided free.

Together, Mary and our IL staff contacted Mary’s landlord and requested reasonable accommodations, like a visual doorbell. Now Mary never misses friends when they drop by. She received an amplified telephone, so she can hear her family and friends when they call.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

How many Deaf people do you know? Few Hearing people have ever met or interacted with a Deaf person, or been aware of Deaf people around them. Deafness is not visible, unless people are signing in public. An estimated 546,000 Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Massachusetts, the greatest concentration in the Greater Boston area and the eastern part of the state.

Barriers to communication isolate Deaf people from Hearing (and Hearing people from the Deaf people around them) -- family members neighbors, and the wider, Hearing community at large. The isolation begins as early as childhood: 93% of children born Deaf are born to Hearing parents who have likely never met another Deaf person before and who do not know sign language or how best to communicate with their Deaf child. The majority of Deaf children experience delayed language development, an obstacle for success at school. Deaf high school students are 3 times as likely as their Hearing counterparts to drop out of high school. Those who complete high school read, on average, at a 2.8 to 4.5 grade level. Sign language is the language of Deaf people, but American Sign Language (ASL) is not English conveyed by hand gestures, nor is it a universal language. ASL is a manual, spatial language with a syntax structure completely different from English; it is not a phonetic language. It is infinitely easier for a Hearing non-English speaker to learn English because of a familiarity with sounds and their relationship to written language than for a Deaf person, for whom the written symbols relate to a spoken phoneme unrelated to any manual sign.

Language barriers limit Deaf people’s access to information that for Hearing people is readily available. As a result, what seems like simple information to someone Hearing often requires additional context and background information for a Deaf person to understand it fully. Simply providing an interpreter does not level the playing field or address the real issue of access to information required to deal with health, finances, housing, and the many other issues that disadvantaged people of all races, ethnicities, and abilities face.

The mission of DEAF, Inc. is to inspire people to achieve their goals. We provide information that is accessible, including the kind of background information that is needed for Deaf people to make informed decisions that affect their lives and the lives of their families. We are uniquely able to do this because DEAF, Inc. is run by Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people for Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, and Late-Deafened people. At the same time, we strive to avoid duplication of services by collaborating with Hearing service providers, linking Deaf people to services and helping them understand the information they receive from mainstream providers. We also work with collaborating partners to help them develop culturally competent programs and work more effectively with the Deaf community.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Sharon L. Applegate MPH, MSW
CEO Term Start July 2003
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Sharon L. Applegate
Employment History

1. Executive Director
Developmental Evaluation and Adjustment Facilities, Inc. (DEAF, Inc.), July 2003 – present

Broad leadership, executive, administrative, HRD, development and financial management responsibilities for DEAF, Inc., a 501 (c) not-for-profit corporation with 30 staff, 1500 consumers and annual operating budget of $2 million. Management of state-wide services: Greater Boston, Northeast, and Southeast Independent Living Services; Project HOPE – Health Support Services including Medical Case Management, Outreach, Prevention & Education, and Peer Support programs; Adult Education and Shared Reading Program; and DeafBlind Community Access Network.

2. Assistant Executive Director
New York Society for the Deaf, June 1997 – May 2003

Broad leadership, executive, administrative, HRD and financial management responsibilities for NYSD, a 501 (c) not-for-profit corporation with 80 staff, 3000 consumers and annual operating budget of $10 million. Management of New York City-wide comprehensive behavioral health, social and rehabilitative services: OMH-licensed mental health clinic; OASAS-licensed Substance Abuse Treatment Program; Ryan White HIV-AIDS Case Management Program; NYSD Service Coordination Department; OMH-licensed Psychiatric Treatment Apartment Program; OMRDD-licensed Individual Residential Alternative; Communication Skills Program and Supported Employment Services.

3. Director, Behavioral Health and Clinical Services
New York Society for the Deaf, February 1996 – June 1997

Directed OMH-licensed Mental Health Clinic and Ryan White HIV-AIDS Case Management Program. Supervision of OASAS-licensed Substance Abuse Treatment Program. Directed individual and group therapy and treatment planning.

4. Social Worker
Rockland Psychiatric Center, Inpatient and Outpatient Deaf Unit
June 1987 – February 1996

5. Instructor
Private tutoring, American Sign Language, 1980, 1984, 1986
New York Society for the Deaf, Communication Skills Program, Summers 1984, 1985, 1986

Education
  • Master of Science in Social Work, Practice, Programming and Supervision, Columbia University 1987
  • Master of Public Health, Population and Family Health, Columbia University, 1987
  • Bachelor of Art, Sociology, Columbia University 1983
 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Elaine Ducharme DBCAN Program Director --
Ms. Jill Hatcher Project HOPE Program Director --
Ms. Carol Hilbinger Independent Living Services Program Director --
Ms. Elvira Livchits Finance and Human Resources Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

In addition to collaborations with direct service providers across Massachusetts, DEAF, Inc. has partnerships with Massachusetts State Association of the Deaf (MSAD), Association of Late-Deafened Adults (ALDA), Massachusetts Nonprofit Network (MNN), and the Associated Grant Makers (AGM)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 18
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 80
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 34
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 17
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 19
Other (if specified): Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, Late-Deafened
Gender Female: 20
Male: 65
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Kelly Kim
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Learning Center for the Deaf
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 - Dec 2016
Board Co-Chair Mr. Wesley Ireland
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Novocure, Inc.
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Kathleen Anderson KMA Properties, LLC Voting
Ms. Sharon Applegate MPH, MSW DEAF, Inc. Exofficio
Ms. Crystal Eusebio Boston University Voting
Mr. Michael Gardener Esq. Mintz, Levin, Cohen, Ferris, Glovsky, and Popeo, P.C. Voting
Ms. Elaine Gifford Harvard School of Public Health Voting
Ms. Diana Goldfarb Nonprofit Development Consultant Voting
Mr. Wesley Ireland Novocure, inc. Voting
Mr. Kelly Kim The Learning Center for the Deaf Voting
Ms. Katie J. Lewis Peabody Public Schools Voting
Mr. Nigel Long Esq. Lynch & Lynch Attorneys Voting
Mr. Parinay Malik Fidelity investments Voting
Mr. John Sullivan CPA FTI Consulting Voting
Ms. Kerry Thompson Disability Rights Fund, Inc. Voting
Ms. Lu Traina Mental Health Consultant and ASL Interpreter Voting
Mr. Sunit Upadhyaya US Dept. of Transportation Voting
Ms. Alicia Wooten Boston University Voting
Dr. Shehzaad Zaman MD CareWell Urgent Care Physician Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 5
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 9 Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing, Late-Deafened
Gender Female: 9
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

DEAF, Inc. strives for diversity in our leadership and governing body. First and foremost, we strive for diversity in terms of hearing loss and hearing; next we seek racial, ethnic, sex/gender, and economic diversity, as well as a variety of skills. We seek to include women, members of communities of color, and members of the Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing and Late-Deafened community on our Board and to increase visibility in Massachusetts’s professional fields with Board members who have strong business connections and can assist in reaching out to the corporate/private sector.

Because of the diversity of communication styles and skills among our Board members, all our Board meetings and committee meetings are interpreted (including Communication Access Realtime Translation – CART) to enable inclusion and ensure full and effective communication among members. The cost of communication access services is not covered by any grants and securing funding for communication is an ongoing challenge.

While DEAF, Inc.’s Board is relatively small, our membership has traditionally be highly effective and involved. All our Board members take their roles seriously and we achieve generally high numbers of participation in our scheduled, face-to-face meetings as well as ad hoc online meetings conducted as needed through email. We regularly benefit from 100% Board participation in contributions. Additionally, we always have Board presence at special agency events. 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,760,874 $1,691,966 $1,758,191
    Federal -- -- --
    State $1,760,874 $1,691,966 $1,758,191
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $209,907 $95,121 $200,428
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $39,893 $67,993 $39,128
Investment Income, Net of Losses $236 $15 $20
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $8,180 $9,986 $10,046

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,517,390 $1,484,809 $1,555,939
Administration Expense $386,649 $396,161 $414,746
Fundraising Expense $48,862 $55,156 $56,005
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.03 0.96 0.99
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 77% 77%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 2% 3% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $408,662 $367,460 $457,170
Current Assets $408,662 $367,460 $457,170
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $129,853 $154,840 $173,505
Total Net Assets $278,809 $212,620 $283,665

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 3.15 2.37 2.63

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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