Share |
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

Transition House's mission is to break the cycle of domestic violence in our community. To achieve our goals we offer long and short-term housing, holistic support services, violence prevention resources, community education and training to address the social impact of domestic violence throughout the lifecycle. We provide these services in diverse and culturally appropriate settings to support and empower families and individuals to live safely and access community resources, education, training and sustainable employment that will set the stage for a future free from domestic violence.

Mission Statement

Transition House's mission is to break the cycle of domestic violence in our community. To achieve our goals we offer long and short-term housing, holistic support services, violence prevention resources, community education and training to address the social impact of domestic violence throughout the lifecycle. We provide these services in diverse and culturally appropriate settings to support and empower families and individuals to live safely and access community resources, education, training and sustainable employment that will set the stage for a future free from domestic violence.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $1,933,000.00
Projected Expense $1,860,800.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Support
  • Housing

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Transition House's mission is to break the cycle of domestic violence in our community. To achieve our goals we offer long and short-term housing, holistic support services, violence prevention resources, community education and training to address the social impact of domestic violence throughout the lifecycle. We provide these services in diverse and culturally appropriate settings to support and empower families and individuals to live safely and access community resources, education, training and sustainable employment that will set the stage for a future free from domestic violence.

Background Statement

Transition House was created in 1976 as the first emergency shelter on the East Coast for women and children escaping domestic violence. While never wavering from our mission or our commitment to survivors of violence, our organization has expanded its core services over time and is regarded as an indispensable community resource. For over 40 years, Transition House has been Cambridge’s ONLY domestic violence agency providing emergency shelter, transitional and permanent supported housing, youth violence prevention education, and holistic intervention resources to our diverse community.

 

Throughout our history, Transition House has been an innovator of dynamic programs that have helped thousands of families and educated tens of thousands of youth. We’ve been at the forefront of developing policies and practices that support victim rights; protect the safety and privacy of those in danger; and expand the network of vital services for survivors recovering from the trauma of abuse.

 

Transition House programs form a one-of- a-kind continuum of holistic violence prevention and intervention services designed to achieve positive outcomes and long-term safety for the community we serve. Our work engages responsive, trauma-informed strategies to achieve our mission. Our programs are successful because they connect with participants’ whole lives over a period of time that often spans three years or more. This adds unique depth to our highly integrated services as we work with people to align their personal goals and leverage available resources in the context of achieving safety for their families. In addition to our programmatic strengths in violence intervention, housing and trauma support, we nurture our participants’ efforts to rebuild their lives, increase English language proficiency, and pursue education and meaningful employment.

 
Because our case management practices adopt a family wellness perspective, we are highly attuned to the needs of the children in our programs and offer opportunities to connect families with early intervention programs, early education and child care as well as on-site and community-based medical and mental health services.
 
Our work reaches throughout the lifecycle. As our population ages, we are developing nuanced tools to address DV among elders. Our Focus on Elders project is filling a void in community services, uniting practitioners from various disciplines to create resources that can be replicated in other communities.
 

Impact Statement

Top Accomplishments:
  • Expanded Community Support Partnership to include 3 full time social workers and reached over 550 people in 2016.
  • Provided comprehensive domestic violence training to the entire Cambridge Police Department and Cambridge Housing Authority staff.
  • Launched the Focus on Elders project, formed the Elder Abuse Advisory Committee and trained service providers to recognize and address abuse among elder community members.
  • Completed $1,035,000 renovation of Shelter property.
Goals for Current Year:
  • Expand Community Support Partnership to serve more elder victims of violence.
  • Develop organizational capacity in fundraising and external communication.
  • Strengthen partnerships with local law enforcement and social service agencies, and Cambridge Domestic and Gender Based Violence Prevention Initiative to create strategies that prevent violence before it happens.
  • Engage educators and youth workers in community organizing and outreach.
  • Complete Transition House's 40 Stories Project (www.transitionhouse.org/40stories) and enhance its use as a tool for amplifying our message and mission.

Needs Statement

Transition House needs support to advance its mission and sustain its innovative programs. Over the next two years, our most pressing needs are:

  • Develop organizational capacity in fundraising and external communication in order to increase donor support and stewardship and diversity agency revenue. $200,000
  • Expand Focus on Elders project by hiring a clinical social worker with geriatric specialty to serve more elder victims of violence. $162,000
  • Create Housing Assistance Fund to support DV survivors in our residential programs who need additional subsidy to use their Section 8 vouchers in the local/regional rental market. $100,000
  • Sustain Survivor Assistance Fund to support DV survivors with short term material needs including: medical expenses, legal documents, transportation, food and clothing. $20,000

CEO Statement


Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

Local
The majority of people we serve are from Cambridge and the Greater Boston Area.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Victims' Services
  2. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention -
  3. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Counseling

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Community Support

The Community Support Partnership program provides intervention, support and resource coordination to address domestic violence in diverse our community.  
Budget  $560,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Victims Females
Program Short-Term Success 

In 2009, we co-founded the Cambridge, Arlington, Belmont High Risk Assessment & Response Team and advanced domestic violence homicide prevention by bringing together a unique collaboration of state, municipal and community stakeholders to share information and develop new practices to triage the urgent and complex safety needs of those most vulnerable to lethal abuse. This approach has changed law enforcement protocol in three cities, increased community engagement strategies among State agencies that serve children and low income families, and heightened trust, collaboration, and communication among multidisciplinary partners.

In 2013, we launched a unique collaboration with the Cambridge Housing Authority (CHA) to provide four housing units each year for individuals and families transitioning from our shelter to independent living. At the end of a year of successful tenancy, clients are able to secure a permanent housing unit or mobile housing voucher from the Housing Authority.

Program Long-Term Success 

Our Community Support Program served over 200 victims last year in Cambridge (95% of whom are very low income, 25% are new immigrants who are not English proficient, 10% have a disability, and 8% are elderly).

To maximize our impact, we work with many community partners providing services that support and empower families to live safely, access community resources and sustainable employment that will set the stage for a future free from domestic violence.

Transition House works in close partnership with Cambridge’s city leaders to enhance broad scale community collaboration on violence prevention and intervention. Because of our advocacy, the City funded and launched the Cambridge Domestic and Gender Based Violence Prevention Initiative in 2014. The Initiative has improved community’s capacity to respond to and prevent domestic violence and dramatically extends the reach of Transition House’s work and aligns municipal resources in our common effort to eradicate domestic violence.

 
Program Success Monitored By 

Measuring the impact of traditional domestic violence interventions like shelter stays is a challenge. Clients live in shelters for a brief period and most move on with limited contact in the future. However, in Cambridge, because our programming will reach a wide spectrum of residents beyond those who are in immediate need of shelter, we have an important opportunity to gauge the short and long term impact of our work. Because we are partners with the Cambridge Domestic and Gender Based Violence Prevention Initiative, the Police Department, the Housing Authority, Public Health officials, the School Department, the local courts and our municipal leaders, we will have access to a wide range of data that we will coalesce into a meaningful measurement of our efforts to reduce domestic violence in our community. With the ability to measure the work of our innovative partnership, our goal is to become replicable in other cities and towns in the Commonwealth and across the nation.

Examples of Program Success 

Mia is a young mother with a very low income who lives in an apartment subsidized by the city of Cambridge. She was referred to our Community Support Program by the Cambridge Police Department after a domestic violence incident. Because of the domestic violence, Mia had to miss shifts at work and fell behind on her rent. Our advocacy team helped Mia set up a payment plan to avoid eviction and obtained financial assistance for Mia to cover most of her back rent. We also assisted her through the process of applying for an emergency housing voucher from the Cambridge Housing Authority under federal Violence Against Women Act guidelines. Her application was accepted and Mia was able to use her newly obtained voucher to stay in her current apartment permanently, preventing her and her children from becoming homeless. This is an example of how early intervention helps survivors remain safely housed in their community.


Housing

Transition House offers a unique continuum of housing resources: emergency shelter (3-6 months), transitional housing (18-24 months), and permanent supported housing (for victims of violence who also have a disability). We provide holistic support services for all residential clients to help address the many impacts of domestic violence. We provide residential services in diverse and culturally sensitive settings that support and empower families and individuals to live safely and access community resources, education, training and sustainable employment that will set the stage for a future free from domestic violence.
Budget  $1,090,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Victims Homeless Families
Program Short-Term Success  Our Housing Program supports individuals and families who are homeless as a result of domestic violence. Short term success varies depending upon the need of the survivor. For some, success is obtaining affordable, permanent housing after being denied opportunities for independence in an abusive relationship. Over 80% of families serviced will obtain permanent housing within 3 years of their affiliation with Transition House. For others, success is the capacity to return to school or earn an income after years of abuse and isolation. 62% of our clients are enrolled in career training or higher education programs. In other cases, success is securing permanent resident status. In many situations, immigrant women have been doubly vulnerable to abuse because they are not aware of legal interventions or support services available. Over the past 3 years, we have supported clients as they become US citizens and have partnered with legal services to accompany survivor through the long  process of obtaining U-Visas and Green Cards that allow victims of violence to engage in school, work and community endeavors and have a pathway to residency.  
Program Long-Term Success 
Our housing program is comprised of short, medium, and long term interventions to domestic violence, a pervasive violation of fundamental human rights. Our housing program provides an opportunity for individuals and families to escape violence and re-establish their lives.
 
 
Program Success Monitored By 
We monitor success in a variety of ways. Quantitatively over 50 % of all program participants are able to increase their income, gain skills or employment during their stay. Among our Transitional Living clients, who area able to secure scattered site housing in safe residential neighborhoods, these numbers soar to over 75%. 
 
Qualitatively, we see success daily in the lives of the individuals and families we serve.  We support their journey away from violence, fear and trauma a they build safer, healthier, more connected lives.
 
 
  
Examples of Program Success  A long term commitment: As an immigrant from South Asia, Lydia never imagined her life in the US would be so challenging. But, she says, it’s much less stressful now. With help from a neighbor, Lydia and her 2 small daughters left an abusive and controlling husband and came to Transition House. After months in the shelter, she moved to our Transitional Living program. 2 years later, she moved into our Supported Housing program, where her family lived until they were able to gain permanent, affordable housing in Cambridge. Lydia works part time and has completed a GED and associate's degree. With help from Transition House, she has a scholarship for survivors of domestic violence and is now on track to finish a BA in 2018. She’ll graduate just before her older daughter starts college. Lydia looks forward to a human services career and her children are thriving. For more than 7 years, she says, Transition House has been a constant source of support and encouragement for my family.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Risa Mednick
CEO Term Start July 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Risa Mednick has over 25 years of experience working for social justice in the nonprofit sector. Throughout the course of her career, she has had roles that encompass direct client service and counseling as well as organizational development, capacity building and strategic planning, An advocate for human rights and social change, Risa is a noted leader in the Cambridge community where she serves on a variety of cross-sector commissions and co-founded the Cambridge Initiative on Domestic and Gender Based Violence as well as the Cambridge Nonprofit Coalition. She was named an Outstanding Woman of Cambridge by the YWCA in 2012, a Massachusetts Unsung Heroine by the Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women in 2014, and Cambridge Community Advocacy in 2016 by Eastern Bank. 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ronit Barkai Assistant Director --
Jenny Herrera Operations Director --
Julie Kahn-Schaye Director of Youth and Family Services --
Jasmine Khalfani Director of Housing --
Ester Serra Community Support Partnership Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
-- --
Associated Grant Makers --
Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers --
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Jane Doe, Inc.

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Transition House enjoys critically important collaborations throughout our community.
1. We are a founding partner with the City of Cambridge of the cross-sector Cambridge Initiative on Domestic and Gender Based Violence Prevention. 
2. We are partners in an innovative collaboration with the Cambridge Housing Authority (CHA) that creates pathways for survivors to obtain permanent housing and avert homelessness. 
3. We have an historic partnership with the Cambridge Police Department which offers complementary support and protection for those in need.  
4. Our work depends on intensive collaboration with over 25 NGO and municipal community partners to assure a broad base of referrals and client support resources, including: Community Legal Services And Counseling Center, Greater Boston Legal Services, Emerge, the City of Cambridge , the Cambridge Multi Service Center, the Cambridge Council on Aging. Somerville-Cambridge Elder Services, a range of settlement houses, schools, and immigrant aid organizations, Boston Area Rape Crisis Center, the Network La Red, Asian Task Force and Massachusetts Association of Portuguese Speakers, and the Cambridge Nonprofit Coalition. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 15
Number of Part Time Staff 15
Number of Volunteers 30
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 92%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 4
Other (if specified): Haitian, Middle Eastern
Gender Female: 30
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Hollis Young Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term July 2015 - June 2018
Board Co-Chair Mr. William Stanton
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Co-Chair Term Feb 2015 - Jan 2018

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Denise Dilanni WGBH Voting
Joy Fisher-Williams Macmillan Voting
Teug Margaret Fu Pricewaterhousecoopers Voting
Allyson Kurker Kurker Padgett Voting
Jennifer Mathews Commonwealth of Massachusetts Voting
Risa Mednick Transition House Exofficio
Javier Mejia Highland Technology Voting
Eliza Minsch Petrucelly Nadler Norris Voting
Lauren Perry K2C Associates LLC Voting
William Stanton Retired Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 8
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Governance and Policy

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $1,933,000.00
Projected Expense $1,860,800.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

Audit Documents

2016 Annual Audit

2015 Annual Audit

2014 Annual Audit

2013 Annual Audit

2012 Annual Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,550,042 $1,276,317 $1,091,738
Total Expenses $1,414,034 $1,135,828 $1,076,940

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $293,955 $220,798 $229,850
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $1,194,060 $1,039,356 $861,888
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- $1 --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $54,700 -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $7,327 $16,162 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,126,591 $939,738 $907,304
Administration Expense $221,122 $190,357 $167,381
Fundraising Expense $66,321 $5,733 $2,255
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.10 1.12 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 83% 84%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 19% 3% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $1,758,366 $1,388,474 $735,527
Current Assets $266,666 $229,472 $103,994
Long-Term Liabilities $1,357,037 $989,461 $613,180
Current Liabilities $57,721 $191,413 $55,236
Total Net Assets $343,608 $207,600 $67,111

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates Jan - Dec
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.62 1.20 1.88

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 77% 71% 83%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--