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GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders, Inc. (GLAD)

 30 Winter Street, Suite 800
 Boston, MA 02108
[P] (617) 4261350
[F] (617) 426-3594
http://www.glad.org
[email protected]
Brianna Boggs
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INCORPORATED: 1978
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2660498

LAST UPDATED: 11/12/2017
Organization DBA GLAD
GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders
Former Names Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders (2016)
Park Square Advocates Inc. (2014)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Through strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and education, GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders works in New England and nationally to create a just society free of discrimination based on gender identity and expression, HIV status, and sexual orientation.

Mission Statement

Through strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and education, GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders works in New England and nationally to create a just society free of discrimination based on gender identity and expression, HIV status, and sexual orientation.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Apr 01, 2017 to Mar 31, 2018
Projected Income $3,559,400.00
Projected Expense $3,559,400.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Civil Rights Project
  • Public Affairs and Education
  • The AIDS Law Project
  • The Transgender Rights Project
  • Youth Initiative

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Through strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and education, GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders works in New England and nationally to create a just society free of discrimination based on gender identity and expression, HIV status, and sexual orientation.


Background Statement

 

Founded in 1978, GLAD came into existence as a public interest law firm created to ensure that the LGBTQ community in New England could speak in its own voice in the courts about issues that concerned our community. We sought to educate judges, lawyers, and the public about our lives and our need for legal protections.

Today, we continue to employ strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and education to press for social change, both in New England and nationally. As we live in a nation committed to the rule of law as the means of guaranteeing that all citizens are treated equally and with dignity, our goal is the same as the words etched over the U.S. Supreme Court building: equal justice under law.

GLAD presses for change and expansion of rights under four main initiatives: the Civil Rights Project, the Transgender Rights Project, the AIDS Law Project, and the Youth Initiative. One of GLAD’s experienced attorneys directs each project. GLAD comprises four departments – Legal, Public Affairs and Education, Development, and Finance and Operations.

As impact litigators, our efforts and successes extend to all people burdened by the unfair policies, unconstitutional laws, and discriminatory practices that we challenge. While GLAD’s target populations are the LGBTQ communities of New England and those people affected by HIV, the institutional reform and social change achieved by our work benefit hundreds of thousands of people in New England and beyond.

We work specifically to expand and defend the rights of vulnerable segments of our community, including youth and students, elders, people of color and indigenous people, immigrants, those in prison, and those who are economically disadvantaged. Our GLAD Answers service is a free service that is open to callers from New England and around the nation. GLAD works closely with national partners to provide litigation support, strategize, and file amicus briefs in cases around the country.

 


Impact Statement

 Recent accomplishments include:

 

  • Twelve years after GLAD made Massachusetts the first state where same-sex couples could legally marry, GLAD’s Mary Bonauto won nationwide marriage equality at the Supreme Court.
  • GLAD won a historic a $7.5-million final settlement for class action plaintiffs, the largest settlement on behalf of LGBT workers ever, in the Cote v. Walmart employment discrimination suit.
  • In another first-of-its kind ruling, GLAD won a case at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court allowing AIDS Support Group of Cape Cod to continue providing a life-saving needle distribution and drug-overdose reversal program for injection drug users - a critical part of reducing transmission of HIV and Hepatitis C.
  • GLAD aided in passing a Massachusetts bill mandating insurance coverage of the treatment for lipodystrophy, a disfiguring side effect of some HIV medications.
  • GLAD won a precedent-setting suit on behalf of a man who was fired as Food Services Director at a Catholic high school when they found out he was gay. The court ruled that the school discriminated by firing him from a job that had nothing to do with religion – a victory that pushes back against attempts by religiously-affiliated institutions to violate nondiscrimination laws.

 


Needs Statement

 

Our key areas of need for 2017 include:

  • Increased resources to carry out cutting-edge legal work, such as advocacy on behalf of LGBTQ elders and employment nondiscrimination litigation.
  • Capacity building support for improving GLAD’s information technology, including hardware, improved programmatic and donor databases, other software, and personnel.
  • Support for Board Development work to help GLAD’s Board of Directors deepen their engagement and strengthen their skills to expand resources for GLAD.
  • Increased resources to better meet the HR needs of the organization and staff, including technology, training, professional development, and succession planning.

 


CEO Statement

When all is said and done, GLAD is nothing more and nothing less than the handiwork of a community of dedicated individuals – board, donors, staff, volunteers, and allies – with a shared vision of equality and justice.

GLAD is all about daring to dream big and then making those dreams a reality. From employment protections to marriage equality and more, GLAD has achieved what so many at the time considered to be pipe dreams.

GLAD continues to imagine and work toward an even more just world:

A world where LGBTQ youth can grow up fully loved by their families, guardians, teachers and peers, and LGBTQ elders need not go back into the closet to age with dignity;

A world where same-sex parents no longer have to adopt their own children but are considered legal parents from the moment of birth;

A world where transgender individuals can be who they are without fear of discrimination or violence; and

A world where people living with HIV are thriving, and new infections are a relic of the past.

In other words, a world where we are not just tolerated, but celebrated, safe, and affirmed.


Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
BERKSHIRE REGION, MA
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

GLAD works mainly within the six New England states to win precedent-setting legal and policy victories that serve as blueprints for the rest of the nation. We also work on select national cases that have far-reaching impact and effects for individuals and communities across the country.

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Lesbian/Gay Rights
  2. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Alliances & Advocacy
  3. Education - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Civil Rights Project

Civil Rights Project (CRP): The CRP focuses on ending discrimination against LGBTQ people and families. The CRP’s most significant victories include bringing marriage to all six New England states, filing the first cases to challenge the discriminatory Defense of Marriage Act, and securing marriage equality for the country after arguing at the Supreme Court. The CRP advocates for full parental rights for non-biological LGBTQ parents and does legislative and policy work and education on the many ways LGBTQ couples form families, including in-vitro fertilization and surrogacy. The CRP is researching the specific needs of LGBTQ elders. The CRP is also combating employment discrimination against same-sex married couples and is deeply engaged in work around religious exemptions.
Budget  $1,878,215.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered Families Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Examples: The lives of LGBTQ youth and elders will be improved under the legal and policy umbrella. LGBTQ families will have the same protections as other families. And LGBTQ individuals will feel safe and secure in all areas of their lives including employment, housing, and education.   
Program Long-Term Success  LGBTQ people will have the same rights and responsibilities as the rest of the population.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 

As noted earlier, twelve years after GLAD made Massachusetts the first state where same-sex couples could legally marry, Mary Bonauto, GLAD's Civil Rights Project Director, won nationwide marriage equality at the Supreme Court.


Public Affairs and Education

 

GLAD’s website, GLAD Answers – our free legal information and referral service, publications, and workshops ensure that individuals know their legal rights and how to assert them. Using print and online media, we tell the stories of LGBTQ people and how the law affects them. The department oversees GLAD’s speaking opportunities and webinars. It recruits and trains approximately 40 volunteers each year to staff GLAD’s information and referral service, GLAD Answers. It maintains a Lawyer Referral Service of more than 250 New England attorneys who understand the service needs of the LGBTQ and HIV-positive communities. Working with GLAD’s legal team, it updates and distributes over 20 unique publications on the legal rights of LGBTQ and HIV-positive people in New England.

 

Budget  $1,178,405.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Lesbian & Gay Rights
Population Served Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered K-12 (5-19 years) People/Families of People with HIV/AIDS
Program Short-Term Success      
Program Long-Term Success      
Program Success Monitored By      
Examples of Program Success 



The AIDS Law Project

AIDS Law Project (ALP): The ALP fights discrimination based on HIV status, and for the privacy, health, and other rights of those living with HIV/AIDS. The ALP’s largest current case challenges a large national long term care insurance company’s refusal to cover an applicant taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication to prevent contracting HIV. Disability antidiscrimination laws protect those who are treated adversely based on false beliefs about a health condition. We also argue that the insurance company’s discriminatory action was based on the unfounded and biased assumption that gay male sexuality is inherently risky and unhealthy.

Budget  $306,065.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Lesbian & Gay Rights
Population Served People/Families of People with HIV/AIDS Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered
Program Short-Term Success      
Program Long-Term Success 

The ALP’s largest current case challenges a large national long term care insurance company’s refusal to cover an applicant taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication to prevent contracting HIV.

Program Success Monitored By     
Examples of Program Success   A publication about the effects of lipodystrophy on Boston residents was made available on GLAD's website. See more at https://www.glad.org/issues/hivaids/

The Transgender Rights Project

The Transgender Rights Project (the TRP) focuses on ending discrimination based on gender identity and expression. The TRP uses impact litigation to ensure that protection from discrimination based on gender identity and expression is respected and enforced. The TRP also: 1) works on the local, state and national levels to challenge and eliminate the wide variety of insurance exclusions that inhibit health care access for transgender people; 2) works closely with administrative and regulatory offices to promote administrative regulations and/or guidance that assist transgender people in areas such as obtaining documents consistent with their gender and ensuring appropriate implementation of existing law; 3) works in coalition to pass transgender inclusive legislation on the state level; and 4) works on the federal level to pass federal legislation that will provide employment protections to LGBT people, as well as working on national policy issues that affect transgender people.

 

Budget  $757,289.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Lesbian & Gay Rights
Population Served Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Other Named Groups
Program Short-Term Success    

Transgender Rights Project (TRP): The TRP was founded in 2008 to end harassment and discrimination based on gender identity and expression, and heighten public awareness and understanding. Led by nationally recognized attorney Jennifer Levi, this initiative drafts and promotes legislation, and pursues litigation never before heard by the courts, that offer the broad promise of establishing protections for trans individuals. It also effects policy change through advocacy with public and private entities and provides education on trans issues through the media. Lastly, the TRP plays a central role in developing and refining legal models to most effectively advance transgender legal equality and provides key consultation to other organizations and private legal firms in New England and nationally.

Program Long-Term Success 

Transgender Rights Project (TRP): The TRP was founded in 2008 to end harassment and discrimination based on gender identity and expression, and heighten public awareness and understanding. Led by nationally recognized attorney Jennifer Levi, this initiative drafts and promotes legislation, and pursues litigation never before heard by the courts, that offer the broad promise of establishing protections for trans individuals. It also effects policy change through advocacy with public and private entities and provides education on trans issues through the media. Lastly, the TRP plays a central role in developing and refining legal models to most effectively advance transgender legal equality and provides key consultation to other organizations and private legal firms in New England and nationally.

Program Success Monitored By    
Examples of Program Success 

Gender transition-related medical care is necessary medical care for many transgender people, but getting that care paid for can be a huge barrier. Private and public insurers have traditionally simply excluded gender transition-related procedures from their coverage based on the unfounded assumption that treatment is experimental, elective, or cosmetic. However, since April 2013, GLAD has successfully challenged Medicare’s exclusion of gender transition-related surgeries, has ensured that all transgender taxpayers can deduct their medically necessary transition-related expenses, and has secured MassHealth coverage of transition-related care. Each victory lays the groundwork for the next, because each time we establish the reality and legitimacy of transgender people’s medical needs, we make it easier for others to make the case. Read more at https://www.glad.org/issues/transgender-rights/


Youth Initiative

GLAD’s Youth Initiative works to advance equal treatment for, and the safety of, LGBTQ youth in New England through litigation, education, outreach, advocacy, and intervention. We focus on settings in which youth are likely to encounter discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, or HIV status: schools, child welfare, juvenile justice system and community-based/family. In 2017 and beyond, GLAD's Youth Initiative is focused on bullying, harassment, disproportionate discipline and policing in schools as well as expanding rights and resources for out-of-home LGBTQ youth.

Budget  $244,217.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Lesbian & Gay Rights
Population Served Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Homeless
Program Short-Term Success   GLAD worked closely with the Massachusetts Department of Youth Services to develop guidelines for working with LGBTQI youth in the juvenile justice system. These guidelines were adopted on July 1, 2014 and go beyond nondiscrimination to create a safe & affirming environment for all youth. This includes respecting gender identity in preferred names and pronouns, placement, and clothing, and allowing attire that is consistent with gender identity, including shapewear (Massachusetts is the first state that acknowledges shapewear as a vital part of gender identity). Not only does this policy cover all employees, interns, and volunteers at DYS, but companies that DYS contracts with for youth services are expected to have their own policy consistent with these principles. DYS has trained nearly 2,000 people on this policy to ensure that contracting services are able to provide this standard of care to youth in DYS care. Read more at https://www.glad.org/issues/youth/
Program Long-Term Success 

Youth Initiative: GLAD works to ensure that LGBTQ youth are safe, welcomed, and treated equally and with respect in every facet of life. GLAD deploys litigation, legislative, and educational resources to create long-term, systemic change and advance a more just and affirming world for LGBTQ young people. The Youth Initiative recently won a first-in-the-nation victory in Maine, where the state’s supreme court determined that a transgender student has the right to use the bathroom that corresponds with her gender identity rather than her assigned birth sex.

Program Success Monitored By     
Examples of Program Success 

 

GLAD’s “Got Rights?” workshop, which informs LGBTQ and HIV-positive youth of their legal rights in Massachusetts, has been wildly successful. The workshop is interactive and includes role-playing segments and clips from popular television shows depicting school responses to bullying and other scenarios. We have adapted the workshop to speak to the needs of transgender audiences, addressing participation in gender-separated extracurricular activities and strategies youth can employ to get their schools to acknowledge their appropriate gender and chosen name. We have also adapted the Got Rights? workshop to address employment issues and dealings with the police. The Got Rights? workshops enable GLAD attorneys to meet youth face-to-face in environments where they feel comfortable, and GLAD has learned the on-the-ground needs of youth in Massachusetts through these workshops. Read more at https://www.glad.org/issues/youth/ 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Janson Wu
CEO Term Start Dec 2014
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Janson Wu has served as GLAD’s executive director since December 2014, following eight years as a staff attorney and a seven-month tenure as deputy director.
During his time at GLAD, Janson has been deeply involved in the breadth of GLAD’s work, including the rights of LGBT elders, family law and parentage, employment benefits, transgender rights, DOMA, and marriage equality. He served on the legal teams of many of GLAD’s significant cases, including the DOMA challenges Gill v. OPM and Pedersen v. OPM, and the successful asylum case of Ugandan activist John Abdallah Wambere. In 2012, in the case In re Madelyn B, Janson successfully argued before New Hampshire’s highest court that a non-biological lesbian mother should be recognized as a parent.
In addition to his litigation, Janson has been extensively involved in GLAD’s legislative and policy work throughout New England. In New Hampshire and Rhode Island, he led GLAD’s coalition work with local advocacy organizations, legislators, and individuals to pass marriage equality in those states.
In 2012, Janson received the David Carliner Award from the American Constitution Society, and in 2011 he was named one of the Best LGBT Lawyers under 40 by the National LGBT Bar Association. He was also a 21st Century Fellow with the Pipeline Project, which is dedicated to cultivating leadership among LGBT people of color.
Before coming to GLAD, Janson worked as an attorney with Tri-City Community Action Program, a multi-service anti-poverty organization where he provided legal services to low-income people. He also worked as an associate at the litigation law firm of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan in San Francisco. Janson has served on the ABA’s Commission on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and on the Legal Committee of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health.
Janson Wu is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Brianna Boggs Director of Development --
Eva Boyce Chief Financial Officer --
Gary Buseck Legal Director --
Amanda Johnston Director of Public Affairs and Education --
Janson Wu Deputy Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 21
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 95
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 19
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 18
Male: 6
Not Specified 2

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr Richard Yurko
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yurko, Salvesen & Remz, P.C.
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Beck Bailey Human Rights Campaign Foundation Voting
Ms Leila Bailey-Stewart CityYear Voting
Mr. Mark Brown John Hancock/ManuLife Voting
Ms. Darian Butcher Heifitz Rose, LLP Voting
Mr. Ed Byrne Project 10 East, Inc. Voting
Mr. Francisco Cabas Alere Voting
Mr. Andre L Campagna Beacon Hill Staffing Group Voting
Mr. Fred Csibi Novartis Voting
Ms. Jo Davis MSW Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission Voting
Mr. Shane Dunn Excel Academy Charter Schools Voting
Ms. Kyle Faget Ropes & Gray LLP Voting
Mr. Ben Franklin McDermott Will & Emery LLP Voting
Ms. Meghan Freed Freed Marcroft LLC Voting
Mr. Joe Garland Rhode Island Hospital Voting
Mr. George Hastie Hastie Consulting Voting
Mr. David Hayter John Hancock Voting
Ms. Deborah Heller Heller Cunningham Voting
Mrs. Terry Holzman Communications Consultant Voting
Ms. Joyce Kauffman Kauffman Crozier LLP Voting
Mr. Charles J. Latovich Independent Consultant Voting
Ms. Dianne R. Phillips Partner, Holland & Knight Voting
Ms. Marlene Seltzer Retired Voting
Mr. David Wilson Retired Voting
Mr. Richard Yurko Yurko, Salvesen & Remz, P.C. Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 17
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 10
Male: 14
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $7,506,800 $3,530,732 $3,969,303
Total Expenses $7,139,274 $3,633,482 $4,063,827

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$713,900 $574,000 $716,062
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,686,081 $1,509,790 $1,763,891
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $280,501 $369,497 $136,540
Investment Income, Net of Losses $35,010 $-28,835 $44,262
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $783,005 $713,981 $606,216
Revenue In-Kind $4,008,303 $392,299 $702,332
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $6,384,808 $2,827,241 $3,196,074
Administration Expense $330,492 $352,724 $394,169
Fundraising Expense $423,974 $453,517 $473,584
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.05 0.97 0.98
Program Expense/Total Expenses 89% 78% 79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 13% 16% 15%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $2,644,789 $2,216,112 $2,566,620
Current Assets $1,524,945 $1,308,014 $1,521,057
Long-Term Liabilities $46,007 $84,741 $114,381
Current Liabilities $292,411 $192,526 $410,644
Total Net Assets $2,306,371 $1,938,845 $2,041,595

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.22 6.79 3.70

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 2% 4% 4%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.  
 
Please note, the nonprofit had a change in fiscal year from calendar year (Jan. 1 - Dec. 31) to fiscal year (Apr. 1 - Mar. 31) and as such, the 2011 audit posted above covers Jan. 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. As well, the 2011 990 posted above covers a three month period (Jan. 1, 2011 - March, 31, 2011).
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

 

Founded in 1978, GLAD came into existence as a public interest law firm created to ensure that the LGBTQ community in New England could speak in its own voice in the courts about issues that concerned our community. We sought to educate judges, lawyers, and the public about our lives and our need for legal protections.

Today, we continue to employ strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and education to press for social change, both in New England and nationally. As we live in a nation committed to the rule of law as the means of guaranteeing that all citizens are treated equally and with dignity, our goal is the same as the words etched over the U.S. Supreme Court building: equal justice under law.

GLAD presses for change and expansion of rights under four main initiatives: the Civil Rights Project, the Transgender Rights Project, the AIDS Law Project, and the Youth Initiative. One of GLAD’s experienced attorneys directs each project. GLAD comprises four departments – Legal, Public Affairs and Education, Development, and Finance and Operations.

As impact litigators, our efforts and successes extend to all people burdened by the unfair policies, unconstitutional laws, and discriminatory practices that we challenge. While GLAD’s target populations are the LGBTQ communities of New England and those people affected by HIV, the institutional reform and social change achieved by our work benefit hundreds of thousands of people in New England and beyond.

We work specifically to expand and defend the rights of vulnerable segments of our community, including youth and students, elders, people of color and indigenous people, immigrants, those in prison, and those who are economically disadvantaged. Our GLAD Answers service is a free service that is open to callers from New England and around the nation. GLAD works closely with national partners to provide litigation support, strategize, and file amicus briefs in cases around the country.

 


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

GLAD employs strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and education in making our world more just, inclusive, and affirming. We work toward a society in which our identities are simultaneously irrelevant to our opportunities in life and celebrated as part of the broader diversity of American society. What we are able to achieve first here in New England through impact litigation and first-of-their kind cases, such as second parent adoptions in the 1990s and marriage equality in the 2000s, sets the standard and creates the template for progress across the country. Our legal info line and connections to private law firms nationwide allows us to stay up-to-date on, and respond immediately to, the real legal issues LGBTQ people face every day. As such, GLAD is nationally recognized as being a leader in the LGBTQ movement. We are not only uniquely positioned to change law and policy, we are changing hearts and minds through a proven education strategy of one-to-one contact with key decision-makers and influencers, far-reaching media coordination, and community outreach efforts.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

GLAD’s legal team consists of nationally renowned experts on LGBTQ law.

Civil Rights Project Director Mary Bonauto is nationally acknowledged as the chief strategist of the marriage movement. She is also recognized as a movement leader around issues of parentage and family law. Jennifer Levi, the director of the Transgender Rights Project, is a nationally distinguished expert on transgender legal issues and has served as counsel in a number of precedent-setting cases establishing basic rights for transgender people, including groundbreaking work on healthcare access issues and gender markers in identification documents. Bennett Klein, director of GLAD’s AIDS Law Project, has litigated cases in state and federal trial and appellate courts establishing legal protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and people living with HIV, including the successful argument before the Supreme Court in GLAD’s 1998 Bragdon v. Abbott case that stated people with HIV can be protected from discrimination via the Americans with Disabilities Act. Janson Wu has served as GLAD’s Executive Director since December 2014, following eight years as a staff attorney. During his time at GLAD, Janson has been deeply involved in the breadth of GLAD’s work, including the rights of LGBT elders, family law and parentage, employment benefits, transgender rights, DOMA, and marriage equality. He served on the legal teams of many of GLAD’s significant cases, including the DOMA challenges Gill v. OPM and Pedersen v. OPM, and the successful asylum case of Ugandan activist John Abdallah Wambere. In 2012, in the case In re Madelyn B, Janson successfully argued before New Hampshire’s highest court that a non-biological lesbian mother should be recognized as a parent.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

GLAD measures our success by the success of our cases, the shifts in policies we influence, and the public awareness and support we are able to generate.

Because our strategic impact litigation is dependent on finding plaintiffs who are willing to participate in high-profile cases, it is sometimes difficult to state objectives with strictly quantitative outcomes. But it also allows GLAD to be an exceptionally nimble organization, quickly responding to community needs as they arise. This flexibility also allows us to change course as needed, ensuring that our time, and resources are directed to the most impactful work at all times.

Much of GLAD’s policy-related work is related to the legislative process and collaborative partnerships. Election outcomes, new state, local and organizational leaders, and political climate affect what policies can advance in a given year. Therefore our success will be seen over the long-term – in the incremental support we gain through community organizing efforts and legislator education, and in the passage of new bills and revisions to previously set guidelines.

GLAD’s a multi-pronged strategy includes community engagement so that our successes can thrive. GLAD’s Public Affairs & Education department works closely with our legal team to ensure the most legally accurate and compelling information is available to the general public and used to make convincing arguments for justice in the public sphere. Our media strategy reaches across the country, changing hearts and minds through the strategic dissemination of information and education to the general public, decision-makers, the news media, and individual consumers about the legal rights of LGBTQ people and people living with HIV. We achieve this through a variety of media, events, publications, one-on-one conversations, podcasts, and videos disseminated on the Internet. GLAD’s Public Affairs & Education department focuses on the people behind GLAD’s legal work, putting names and faces on issues that otherwise go unnoticed.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

2017 was a tremendous year for GLAD and the LGBTQ community.

  1. We filed a first-of-its-kind lawsuit challenging the president’s directive to reinstate a ban on military service by transgender people.
  2. We won a preliminary injunction that prohibits the banning of transgender people from serving in the military.
  3. We achieved significant success with expanding family protections for LGBTQ parents.
  4. We worked towards challenging the transgender exclusion in the ADA.
  5. We leveraged state-specific legislative and lobbying resources, by convening roundtables of LGBTQ public policy advocates.
  6. We ensured that a life-saving needle distribution program could continue its work.
  7. We educated LGBTQ youth on their rights around bullying, harassment, and policing.
  8. We fought to ensure LGBTQ youth in state care are treated with respect.
  9. We assisted over 400 people through our Transgender ID Pop-Up Project.
  10. We piloted a Prison Legal Partnership Project, a collaborative initiative pairing pro bono attorneys with LGBTQ prisoners.
  11. We gave help to over 2,500 callers through our GLAD Answers program.

The election of Donald Trump threatens to roll back LGBTQ rights after years of progress. Soon after the inauguration, the Department of Education rescinded guidance protecting transgender students. Rumors of an executive order that would weaken nondiscrimination protections in the name of religious liberty. And in July, the President tweeted his intention to ban transgender service members from the military and followed with an order to the military. Deportations and travel bans are separating families and demonizing immigrants. The health needs of our loved ones are under assault and federal agencies are stripping away metrics to track the needs and wellbeing of LGBTQ communities.

GLAD has adapted quickly to these extraordinary circumstances and are fighting hard to protect our community members in New England and across the nation.

We have the opportunity to transform New England into an equality zone and a model. By 2020, we will achieve in all 6 New England states:

  • Comprehensive non-discrimination laws
  • Legal recognition of all LGBTQ families, regardless of what they look like or how they are formed
  • Public and private insurance coverage for transgender healthcare
  • LGBTQ-inclusive anti-bullying laws

Even as we dismantle discriminatory laws and pass new, affirming policies, we recognize that not all members of our community are equally lifted by our victories. GLAD is thinking expansively about LGBTQ people’s experiences across a lifetime from our earliest years, through school, at work, in the healthcare system, forming families, aging with dignity, facing death. We are paying particular attention to the needs of LGBTQ people of color, low-income individuals, immigrants, prisoners, youth and elders.

Half of black gay and bisexual men will contract HIV in their lifetime. LGBTQ youth of color are disproportionately targeted by police. LGBTQ undocumented immigrants seeking asylum in the U.S. are re-traumatized in detention facilities. We can and must do better as one LGBTQ community. Through intentional, sustained partnerships with LGBTQ communities of color, strategic interventions that challenge discriminatory policies and practices, and coalition engagement with allied social justice movements, GLAD will do this work. We will pay equal attention to our organizational culture, practices, and staff and board composition to ensure that they reflect these values.

Laws are simply words on paper until they are given might and meaning in people’s daily lives. We must increase enforcement of existing LGBTQ legal rights by expanding our community’s access to the justice system. GLAD will use new models to make our GLAD Answers legal information service more mobile and more accessible. We will expand our outreach to marginalized people in our community, and help build LGBTQ-competent legal services and representation throughout New England.