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Organization DBA WAITT House
We're All In This Together
WAITT House, Inc.
waitt house
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

“We’re All In This Together” is more than the name of W.A.I.T.T. House, it is our vision. Our mission is to bring people from different cultures and races together harmoniously in a way that empowers them with the education, skills and support they need to improve the conditions in their lives and in their neighborhoods.

In keeping with our mission, WAITT House students and graduates are engaged at all organizational levels –our administrative assistant, one
counselor, three board members, and three out of our six teachers are WAITT House graduates,
and embody the multi-racial, multi-ethnic, and multi-lingual population of this community.

WAITT House provides education to more than 120 participants a year and  takes learners from basic literacy through career preparation and high school credentials to college transition, many whose first language is not English.

Mission Statement

“We’re All In This Together” is more than the name of W.A.I.T.T. House, it is our vision. Our mission is to bring people from different cultures and races together harmoniously in a way that empowers them with the education, skills and support they need to improve the conditions in their lives and in their neighborhoods.

In keeping with our mission, WAITT House students and graduates are engaged at all organizational levels –our administrative assistant, one
counselor, three board members, and three out of our six teachers are WAITT House graduates,
and embody the multi-racial, multi-ethnic, and multi-lingual population of this community.

WAITT House provides education to more than 120 participants a year and  takes learners from basic literacy through career preparation and high school credentials to college transition, many whose first language is not English.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $425,000.00
Projected Expense $375,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • ABE PROGRAM
  • Adult Diploma/College Transitions Program
  • Adult Literacy Program
  • CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

“We’re All In This Together” is more than the name of W.A.I.T.T. House, it is our vision. Our mission is to bring people from different cultures and races together harmoniously in a way that empowers them with the education, skills and support they need to improve the conditions in their lives and in their neighborhoods.

In keeping with our mission, WAITT House students and graduates are engaged at all organizational levels –our administrative assistant, one
counselor, three board members, and three out of our six teachers are WAITT House graduates,
and embody the multi-racial, multi-ethnic, and multi-lingual population of this community.

WAITT House provides education to more than 120 participants a year and  takes learners from basic literacy through career preparation and high school credentials to college transition, many whose first language is not English.


Background Statement

"We're All In This Together" or WAITTHouse was established in 1979-1980 by the Sisters of Charity, a group ofeducators who have been working in Roxbury for 110 years, along with communityresidents as a non-sectarian, non-profit community based organization. Since that time WAITT House has defined itsmission as one of community service, adult literacy, and educational andeconomic empowerment in an embattled but resourceful Roxbury - North Dorchesterneighborhood badly in need of adult educational opportunities. 

When the Sisters of Charity and community residentsbegan providing adult education through volunteer and part-time staffing, the
program became known. As participants reached their goals, expansion became obvious. WAITT House grew from a part-time understaffed program to a full-time,well-developed and very successful program.

           WAITT House's model programsbecame recognized publicly in 1983, whenBarbara Bushinaugurated the Boston Adult Literacy Initiative at WAITT House. Since that time we have been offering
hope and opportunity through the following programs: Adult Literacy, AdultBasic Education (ABE), Career Awareness, Computer Literacy, Outreach/Support Services, and an External High School Diploma (EDP.


WAITT House provides the basic education skills that adults need to become empowered, to break the intractable cycles that would keep them impoverished and without hope. WAITT House has fulfilled its mission on many fronts. 

Impact Statement

Accomplishments
 
1)  WAITT House's Open Campus Partneship Model was cited in a site visit from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education as a "Best Practice" among adult basic education programs. The evidence of this success is that over 50% of adult learners who are currently enrolled WAITT House's highest educational levels originally started at the beginning levels of Adult Basic Education (ABE).
 
2) WAITT House has produced more adult diploma graduates than any Boston ABE program.
 
3) WAITT House empowers students to identify and more fully use their substantial abilities, talents, resources, life experiences and interests to their full potential.  In fact, WAITT House has more ABE graduates working at WAITT House with college degrees than any other Boston ABE program.
 
4) WAITT House was recognized as being a leader among Boston adult literacy program in helping low-income adult learners and their families bridge the computer technology gap and obtain free and new computers.
 
5) Through the Black Ministerial Alliance grant, WAITT House has built its capacity in providing an additional classroom with computer technology and video for all the students.  In addition, an entire computer network has been established to expand the technological capacity for the entire organization.
 
Goals
1) Further develop the Neighborhood Campus Model among the members of the Roxbury Adult Literacy Coalition. This effort will prevent the duplication of effort while providing additional resources and economic opportunities for the adult learner.
 
2) Teachers and WAITT House students will meet to brainstorm the most important health issues affecting their lives and families.  Students will prioritize the most pressing health problems. Then they will conduct research to learn about the history of these problems; identify resources and solutions to address these problems. 
 
3) To develop a program to show other adult basic education programs how to prepare adult learners to be actively involved in the decision-making process from the student council to the governing board and to attain college degrees so they can become professionals in adult basic education.
 
4) To expand the capacity of the volunteer program to fully access volunteers talents and assigns volunteers to the most appropriate positions to advance the educational and economic opportunities of the adult learner.

Needs Statement

WAITT House's participants reflect the multi-racial, multi-ethnic,
multi-lingual adult population that embodies the Roxbury andNorth
Dorchester communities. Currently, participants range from the age
of 21 to the age of 70; 44% of the participants are African-American, 29%
are CapeVerdean, and 11% are Latino, 8% are Haitian, 8% are African. Presently, 71% of the participants read below a 7thgrade reading level.

Single-parent Latina or African-American women make up about 30% of the student population. The male student population was about 5% in 1988, and 20% in 1999, and now men make up about 30% of the student population. 55% of these men are fathers. Originally the increase in the male student population was largely due to the development of the A-AMen project. By maintaining this project, WAITT House has been able
to continue recruiting men to the ABE programs. Our students’ income and employment situations have also statistically demonstrated that we are committed to serving those most in need: 16% are TAFDC recipients, 22% are unemployed, and 35% are underemployed.


The correlation between the lack of education skills/diploma and the inability to gain employment is staggering. The connection between education and income is indisputable. According to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2001median annual income for high school dropouts was $21,391 while workers with associate’s degrees earned $35,389, and those with bachelor’s degrees earned $46,276. The median salary for workers with master’s degrees was $55,302.


CEO Statement

WAITT House has been active in high poverty areas for thirty three years now. Thanks to the generosity of our donors, our talented staff, the dedicated volunteers, and our committed partipants these are some of the things that we have accomplished:

ON-GOING ACHIEVEMENTS
 
 85%- 90% Overall Retention Rate
 
Ranked number one full time adult education school in Boston by state funding sources
 
95% to 100% ADP graduation/placement
 
 
Maintenance of full-time staff despite reductions in public funding
 
Private grants have allowed WAITT House over the last (seven) years to maintain a full-time staff and full-time adult basic education services.

Board Chair Statement


Planning for any major project at WAITT House is always a collaborative effort among administration, staff, participants (through classroom discussion and the Student Advisory Council),and the WAITT House Board and agency partners. WAITT House prides itself on involving graduates in key policy-making positions. Graduates serve on the Board of Director,
which helps the administration make program decisions and shoulder fundraising tasks. Participants, graduates,
staff members, and board members along with our partners collaborated together in forming RALC.  Since RALC was founded in 2001, it has been committed to investigating the adult basic education needs and assets of Roxbury through the widest possible outreach to students, residents, and
community organizations. RALC’s community forums, focus groups, and surveys along with the secondary data from the US Census have been contributing factors in determining WAITT House’s priorities during the new millennium. This inclusive community planning process has provided an opportunity for students, residents, agencies and other entities to
work together systematically and rigorously over a eight-year period to conduct
a structured, rather than ad hoc method of researching community needs and
assets. These efforts have promoted a better referral system among RALC providers and have ensured a smoother transition for adult learners moving from one program to another in the Roxbury area. To date, RALC has
*conducted over 77 committee meetings and nineteen community wide planning forums ranging from 50 to 150 participants with a median attendance of 105;
students and graduates have approximately averaged 75% of
the attendees.



It is clear from our findings that need for adult basic education far outweighs available services. Here is an extract from RALC’s report of what the community needs: expand classes at convenient locations and keep programs open for longer hours. Further, adults in our area are in critical need of support throughout the continuum of study: recruitment, enrollment, retention, persistence, and completion. Mentoring, tutoring, improved case management services, counseling and day care would all help adults in a successful pursuit of education.   

It is clear from the findings of RALC community wide forums, focus
groups, wait lists, student surveys, and the US Census Data of 2010 that there is a critical need for adult education and literacy services. More specifically, the findings indicate that
adult basic education programs need to provide additional class hours for those who enter the beginning levels of adult literacy and ABE as well as providing these adult learners with career and support services. That way, they can successfully transition from adult literacy to the upper levels of ABE, ADP, skills training or college.

The DOE Monitoring Team noted participants routinely comment on the importance of the “care, concern and direction” shown them by the staff, and indicate that this support is critical to their ability to achieve their goals. This care and concern are seen throughout
WAITT House, and are a primary reason for the high retention rate the program enjoys.

3. WAITT House Project’s Response To This Need

3a. Goals



WAITT House participants know the importance of
education. They know the social, economic and career opportunities that have not been available to them, and they have taken an important step to improve their futures and the futures of their families. Although our participants have a strong commitment to making positive changes in their lives; issues involving domestic violence, substance abuse, housing, immigration, personal illness or illness of a family member are very common, and having access to a full-time educational couns

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Identifying the Roxbury area must be done very carefully. Geographic boundaries are hard to discern in Dorchester, Grove Hall, and Upham’s Corner. The area cannot be defined by drawn lines, but by the people who enter our door for services. They are from Roxbury and North Dorchester, or perhaps are people who work in the area.

Community planning areas, if defined by the people we serve, are more realistic and responsive to the needs and assessments of the community. Approximately 80% of our students are from Roxbury or North Dorchester. As we are very close to them, almost contingent, they would not think twice about entering our doors. Thus, by definition of action and proximity, we do service them, though by definition of strict boundary lines, we do not. The crux of community planning networking involves ABE, natural partners, and support services. The students find us because what we offer, they need.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Adult Education
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

ABE PROGRAM

ABE PROGRAM IS DIVIDED INTO TWO COMPONENTS:

Intermediate Level is for those who read and write between grade levels 4, and 6. Participants remain in this level for approximately fourteen (14) or twenty-eight (28) weeks depending upon ability and progress. Upon successful completion of the Intermediate Level, the participant is able to enter the Advanced Level. 

The Advanced Level is for readers and writers at grade 7 level and above, and is the highest level of the ABE program. Participants study in this level for fourteen (14) weeks. Upon successful completion of the
Advanced Level, participants enter the Pre-Diploma program for about seven weeks.  


At the end of each level participants will be well qualified to enter the next level of study. Those who successfully complete the

Intermediate level and Pre-Diploma program will be qualified to enter our Adultl Diploma program, a job training program, employment, GED program at a community college or higher education. 

Budget  500,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Literacy
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

develop curriculum, and make requests for specific field trips, workshops, and
guest speakers through the student advisory council and RALC. This allows for
WAITT House’s classroom environment to be elastic and responsive to the current needs of adult learners. WAITT House recognizes that the cultural and civic institutions should be available to all participants, and to that end, staff and participants plan field trip activities to such places as the Museum of Fine
Arts, Symphony Hall, Huntington Theatre, City Hall, State House, Black Heritage Trail, National Historical Parks of Concord andLexingtonand
African American Museum of History. Participants take notes, write reports and
discuss what they have discovered and gained. In addition, our collaboration withVine Street Community Centerand the Dudley Branch Library and Dudley Literacy Center has provided additional classroom space, computer lab, reading clubs, and an expansion of our reading library for WAITT House participants. 

Program Long-Term Success 

Our retention rate is
quite high among adult literacy programs. 



 



·        
During
2004, the Federal Department of Education reported that WAITT House



adult learners had
achieved significant learning gains and outcomes. This is directly



related to the
additional class hours and services we have been able to offer through



First Literacy (formerly
BALF) and our collaboratives.

Program Success Monitored By 

At the end of each cycle, participants evaluate teachers, staff (including the Director), and classes. Evaluations are also conducted by our various funders and government agencies who determine if we meet or exceed our contractual obligations. We also participate in the bi-annual forums of the Roxbury Adult Literacy Coalition. These forums evaluate partnerships, distribution of resources, programs cost-effectiveness, learner participation, assessment, and recruitment. 


WAITT House uses various instruments to measure cognitive-based outcomes: 1) Participant’s Life and Literacy Skills Inventory from the Voyager Series 2) The Diagnostic Assessments of  Reading(DAR) 3) ABE writing teachers’ analysis of a participant's writing skills and 4) The Massachusetts Adult
Proficiency Test (MAPT) and 5) MCAS Math and ELA.


           

           

Examples of Program Success  Ailene Scott's role has grown substantially
since joining the WAITT House staff twelve years ago. Hired as a tutor, she eventually became the
educational counselor/ADA Coordinator. 
Ailene's dedication to her work and her staff development skills has
proven to be indispensable to WAITT House. 
She is eager and willing to take on new challenges-- such as completing
three courses on teaching new readers and becoming a diagnostic assessment
administrator.  It is also worth
mentioning that Ailene is the staff liaison to the Student Advisory Council and
is a Mass ALL board member. Ailene along
with Ditmar coordinate Women of WAITT (WOW) activities and participate in We
Learn.

Adult Diploma/College Transitions Program

          WAITT House offers an Adult Diploma/College Transitions Program.

           When a participant successfully completes the Intermediate level of the ABE program; scores at a grade level equivalent of 9th grade on Massachusetts Assessments Proficiency Tests in Math and Reading as well as successfully writing a five (5) paragraph essay and successfully completes the preparatory exercises of the Career Awareness/Next Steps program, they then qualify for participating in Adult Secondary Education - Adult Diploma Program, GED program or College Transitions program. Each participants is also required to prove competency in additional skills he or she developed through life or work experience. 


          The Curriculum consists of five subjects: :Community Resources, Consumer Awareness, Career Awareness, Health, and Government and Society. In addition, the participants are required to take the following courses: College Experience, College Reading, Art and Culture, History, Physical Education, Health/Nutrition, Math and Englsish Language Arts. This program recognizes adult experiences and concerns, and they reflect the cultural variety of WAITT House participants.

Budget  105,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Literacy
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

Teachers use consumer reports, current magazines, local newspapers, “News for You.” Upon recommendations from participants at the literacy and ABE levels, they can read News for You on-line, which allows participants to highlight the reading and orally read to improve pronunciation, reading fluency and comprehension. These services help keep participants abreast of current events. The Endeavor and Voyager Reading and Writing Series of New Readers Press has become a powerful tool to develop thematic sessions as well as develop literacy skills. 
Participants chose the Endeavor Series last year and chose Voyager Series eight years ago.  Samira Fernandes educational seat was funded by First Literacy three years and a student recently graduated from the Adult Diploma program wrote: “the Voyager book helps us to be informed about community and society as well as helping us improve our writing and reading.” As Mario Joseph, ADP graduate stated, “this book deals with our real lives.”



 

Program Long-Term Success 

The greatest moment of recognition and
accomplishment is when a participant is
awarded his or her diploma at the EDP graduation ceremony; a long awaited dream fulfilled!

Program Success Monitored By  This EDP component, called
the Individual Skill, can be demonstrated by an above average evaluation of job performance, a consistent record of volunteer work, successful completion of two college courses or job training program, or reporting on one's experience as a parent.
Examples of Program Success 

Michael Taylordid not have a steady job when he came to WAITT House. “When I
firstcame to this school I wasn’t ready. I missed a lot of days and that cost me a lot. I’m here to tell youthat if you want to make it at WAITT House, they are here to help you do just that.” Michaelgraduated in May of 2005. He had held down two jobs since coming to WAITT House. One jobcame through our collaboration with theRoxburyResourceCenter.


Adult Literacy Program

The Adult Literacy Program (0-5) is divided into three components:
Beginning I GLE (0-2) for those who read and write below the second grade level equivalent. Beginning II GLE (3-4) and Beginning III GLE (4-5).  Participants who enter these levels are taught in small classes of approximately ten students.The small group instruction and full-time educational services allow people to confidently develop their literacy skills and reach their academic goals in a shorter span of time.

At the end of each level, participants will be  qualified to enter the next level of study in the Adult Literacy Program. Depending upon a person’s skill level, learning difference, disability and/or attendance, an adult learner may stay in the Adult Literacy Program from two cycles to four years. Upon successful completion of the highest (GLE) level of the Adult Literacy Program, participants enter the Adult Basic Education (ABE) Program. cycles to one year. 



 

Budget  700,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Literacy
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated International
Program Short-Term Success 
        
know how to manage personal/ family finances and apply sound consumer practices

· understand how to use community resources to meet the demands of daily living

·        develop knowledge about occupations and career planning techniques

·   understand the principles and practices necessary to maintain good health

·        understand the American governmental and social systems and how each system affects the lives of citizens

·        know how to utilize pre-algebra, algebra, and geometry in practical life situations

develop writing skills which includes the writing process as it relates to writing a cover letter, letters to the editor, elected officials

·        develop reading skills to infer and expand meaning beyond the text

become computer literate


·        develop sound study habits as well as academic and Equipped for the Future (EFF) life skills



·        qualify and receive scholarships in the  College Connection Program.


Program Long-Term Success 
·        know how to manage personal/ family finances and apply sound consumer practices
 
·   understand
how to use community resources to meet the demands of daily living

·        develop knowledge about occupations and career planning techniques

·        understand
the principles and practices necessary to maintain good health

·        become certified in First Aid and CPR
·        
understand the American governmental and social systems

·        know how to utilize pre-algebra, algebra, and geometry in practical life situations develop writing skills which includes the writing process as it relates to writing a cover letter, letters to the editor, elected officials

·   develop reading skills to infer and expand meaning beyond the text as well as increase reading for the simple joy of reading



·        become computer literate

·        develop sound study habits



receive scholarships in  College Connection Program.


Program Success Monitored By 
  
85%- 90% Overall Retention Ratefor the last five years       
Ranked number one full time adult
education school in Boston

By state funding sources·       
95% to 100% EDP
graduation/placement rate



·       
Maintenance of full-time
staff
despite
reductions in public funding



·       
351 High School Diploma
graduates since 1984,
the highest number



of graduates among adult literacy programs in
Boston.   


Examples of Program Success 


Maria Barbosa enrolled in W.A.I.T.T. House’s adult literacy program (GLE 3) on September 12, 2005. After a year of studies, she entered W.A.I.T.T. House’s Pre-Diploma and Career Awareness programs; there she met representatives from the Career Collaborative. After participating in the Career Collaborative program, she was able to find full-time employment and continue with her education. She recently passed
the English and Math MCAS exams and completed the Adult Diploma Program and received her high school diploma in June of 2009. She entered college and enrolled in a nursing assistance program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Training Institute. After that,
she switched from working as a food service employee to a nursing assistant position. The increased wages helped her save for college. She is currently a student of Bunker HillCommunity   College and plans to become a Nurse. Maria also was awarded a First Literacy Scholarship at Boston City Hall in June of 2009.



CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

 Participants who enter the Intermediate Level of the ABE program are required to enter the Career Awareness Class. This class includes realistic assessment and development of participants interests, writing, research and life skills as related to community involvement, entering employment, skills training or higher education. This class consists of a seventeen (17)-week program. It combines personal development, coping skills, stress management, with career development skills, including interest inventories, interview techniques, computer literacy, and assistance with job applications.

 At the end of the program participants are prepared to enter job training, higher education or employment. For those already employed, it means advancement in their present position or transfer to employment for which they have more skill. 


           

Budget  25,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Literacy
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
We are respected as a solid educational and vocational preparation program. We have developed an excellent network with the following programs for placements and referrals:

ABCD Skills Training
Program, American Red Cross Nursing Assistant Program, Blaine Beauty School, Boston Business School, Computer Processing Institute, Dimock Health Careers, La Alianza Hispana Computer Technology, MBCC-LPN, Oficina Hispana, Training
Inc.,


Linkages with employment and employment preparation:Be Our Guest, Citizens Bank, UPS, United States Post Office, Federal
Reserve, Morgan Memorial/Goodwill Industries, Strive, and Urban League;
 

Participants are also referred toThe Work Placeto seek employment,
resume preparation, interviewing techniques and video taping, computer
literacy, job research, personal assessment, and placement in-house services,
which are the practical follow-up of all the task participants learn in class.


Program Long-Term Success  linkages
for higher education:AquinasCollege, Bunker Hill Community College,
Franklin Institute, Laboure, Roxbury Community College, UMASS at Boston,
and
theHigher Education Information
Center-BPL at Copley.

Program Success Monitored By 

Participants are also referred toThe Work Placeto seek employment,
resume preparation, interviewing techniques and video taping, computer
literacy, job research, personal assessment, and placement in-house services,
which are the practical follow-up of all the task participants learn in class.


Examples of Program Success 

WAITT House's track record exemplifies success with our target populations who in turn reinvest in themselves, their communities, families and this organization. As a result new dreams and
productivity are recycled rather than cycles of poverty.



 



 



 



WAITT House has persevered in adult basic education
for twenty years and it is



the
intent of "We're All In This Together" to continue diversifying our
funding base through community planning, collaboratives and private
grants. Through these improvements in
our service capacity, the residents of Roxbury and North Dorchester receive the
exceptional educational and career services they need to improve the conditions
in their lives and in their neighborhoods.



CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Stephen Patrick Hanley
CEO Term Start Sept 1988
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

WAITT House (WH) has fulfilled its mission on many fronts; highlighted in the following achievements:

·         Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) recognizes WH in 2011for Best Practices among Adult Basic Education Programs in preparing adult learners for their “Next Steps” in Higher Education through WH’s Open Campus Partnership Model.

 

·         WAITT House was recognized in 2010 as being a leader among Boston adult literacy programs in helping low-income adult learners and their families bridge the computer technology gap and obtain free and new computers.

 

·         WAITT House graduate and Administrative Assistant, Ana Cardoso, graduates with

B.A. degree from Cambridge College 2010.

*           Teha Woodrow, WAITT House graduate, receives the 2010 Massachusetts Adult Alliance for Literacy Student Leadership Award and receives a scholarship from

through First Literacy. Teha is on the Dean’s List at Roxbury Community College.

 

·         On March 29, 2009, the Executive Director of WAITT, Stephen P. Hanley was awarded the Elizabeth Ann Seton Award. This award is presented annually to individuals who embody the qualities of the Sisters of Charity Congregation’s founder.

 

·         A national organization, the Society for the Study of Social Problems awarded WAITT House the 2008 Social Action Award. Founded in 1951, the SSSP promotes research on and serious examination of problems of social life. The organization selected for this award has a history of challenging social inequalities, promoting social change and/or working toward the empowerment of people marginalized by social inequalities.

 

·         Sixteen ADP participants received certification in First Aid/CPR and successfully completed a 2 month Health Course at Dimock. 

 

·         WAITT House graduate, Math Teacher Intern, original member of the AAMen Project,

           Nelson Miranda graduated from Roxbury Community College (RCC) in June of 2007.

 

·         The Massachusetts Coalition for Adult Education honored, Stephen Hanley, Executive

            Director of WAITT House, the Adult Education Administrator of the Year 2006.

 

·          In June of 2006, two WAITT House graduates and WAITT professionals, Luis DePina Computer Literacy Teacher and Ana Cardoso, Administrative Assistant, graduated

            from Roxbury Community College with their associate degrees along with certificates.

 

·         During FY 2006, WAITT House developed a successful Fine Arts curriculum which

            incorporates art along with life skills, critical thinking skills, math, and computers.

 

·         During FY 2006, WAITT House was one of a handful of ABE/ESOL programs chosen

            by the Mass DESE  to be viewed by Federal DOE to help Federal monitors

            capture how ABE programs truly respond to student needs and goals. 

 

·         FY 2006, WH formed a more formal partnership with RCC, adults who qualify for WH’s College Connection program receive a 3 credited college experience course at RCC.

 

·         From 2002-2006, awarded grants from the Nellie Mae Education Foundation to

Increase the level of preparedness for adults to successfully reach their post secondary

educational goals. 75 graduates successfully completed the Transition to College Course.

·         Massachusetts Alliance for Adult Literacy, the statewide student leadership organization,

named Stephen Hanley the Director of the Year.

 

The Federal Department of Education (DOE) reviewed, visited and wrote up WAITT House in a national report for providing educational services to help adult literacy learners achieve significant learning gains

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 12
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 89%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 3
Other (if specified): Cape Verdean
Gender Female: 4
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 2
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Ruth Brown Grant
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term Sept 2010 - Nov 2012
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jake Coakley Retired Voting
Mr. Roberto Flores Community Volunteer Voting
Marie Gill S.C. Sisters of Charity Voting
Alice Kenneally S.C. Sisters of Charity Voting
Ms. Eudese Lindo Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Jose Pina Self-Employed Voting
Mr. James Small Attorney Voting
Exia Swilley Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Jennifer Swilley Clerk Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Cape Verdean
Gender Female: 6
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 6
Board Meeting Attendance % 85%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 75%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Education

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $425,000.00
Projected Expense $375,000.00
Form 990s

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $365,399 $464,007 $408,144
Total Expenses $428,146 $452,907 $430,635

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$39,400 $99,233 $81,233
Government Contributions $294,229 $335,112 $313,197
    Federal -- -- --
    State $279,229 $335,112 $309,696
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $15,000 -- $3,501
Individual Contributions $31,770 $29,662 $13,714
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $296,076 $307,327 $298,365
Administration Expense $132,070 $145,580 $132,270
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.85 1.02 0.95
Program Expense/Total Expenses 69% 68% 69%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets $14,400 $46,427 $43,260
Current Assets $2,675 $34,120 $30,226
Long-Term Liabilities $87,226 $87,238 $86,266
Current Liabilities $89,270 $58,538 $67,443
Total Net Assets $-162,096 $-99,349 $-110,449

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.03 0.58 0.45

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 606% 188% 199%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

WAITT House is one of those focused non-profits and grass root organizations that survived the horrific economic crisis of 1988, the major economic downturn in Massachusetts during 1992; the destructive blows to the economy during 2001 and 2002 and the abandonment of major foundations in ABE during 2008 and 2009. And we cannot forget the effects of financial meltdown of 2008 which took hold of ABE in FY 2009 and FY 2010. Do you think that is by chance? We have endured because our dedicated and die hard professionals have learned to survive and thrive during that type of economic crisis-es. 

We are experts in reducing costs, maximizing resources and preventing the duplication of effort in adult education by forming veritable collaboratives through our “Open Campus Partnership” and leadership in the Roxbury Adult Literacy Coalition.
We aim to continue diversifying our funding base through private grants and private/public funding collaboratives as we currently do with La Alianza Hispana, Dimock, Vine Street Community Center, DSNI, Dudley Branch Library/Literacy Center, RCC, Roxbury Resource Center, and World Education. These types of funding efforts will help ensure the programmatic stability and quality of our exemplary programs; however, this can only happen with your help!

WAITT House has persevered in adult basic education for over thirty years and it is the intent of "We're All In This Together" to continue diversifying our funding base through community planning, collaboratives and private grants. Through a grant this from the BMA, WAITT House is receiving technical assistance in building the capacity of its technology for adult learners. Through these improvements in our technology capacity, WAITT House has been able to further diversify its funding and effect a successful fundraising year and ensure that residents of Roxbury receive the exceptional educational and career services they need to improve the conditions in their lives and in their neighborhoods.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s.  The 2009 government contributions line item was adjusted in conjunction with the audit and the schedule B's of the 990 to list the corporate and foundation grant totals.  Sisters of Charity contributions are listed in corporate/ foundation for delineation from individual contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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