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The Urbano Project

 29 Germania Street
 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
[P] (617) 9831007
[F] (617) 9831008
http://www.urbanoproject.org
[email protected]
Stella McGregor
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INCORPORATED: 2012
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 45-5436379

LAST UPDATED: 09/11/2017
Organization DBA Urbano Project
Former Names The Urbano Project (2013)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Urbano is a community art studio that fosters public and participatory art as a vehicle for personal transformation, community cohesion and social change.

Mission Statement

Urbano is a community art studio that fosters public and participatory art as a vehicle for personal transformation, community cohesion and social change.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $327,167.00
Projected Expense $369,971.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Artists' Projects
  • School Program
  • Urbano Fellows

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Urbano is a community art studio that fosters public and participatory art as a vehicle for personal transformation, community cohesion and social change.


Background Statement

 

The idea for the Urbano Project grew out of Stella McGregor’s previous work at The Space and the Cloud Foundation. Urbano is designed to give youth a key role in developing contemporary art projects in partnership with professional artists, while exploring the role of art as a catalyst for personal and social change. In 2009, Urbano opened a studio and exhibition space in Jamaica Plain where it has served 644 teens to date. Arts and performance events produced by teens in Urbano’s space regularly draw diverse audiences of community members, and partnerships with other arts and educational institutions have extended Urbano’s impact beyond the city, and in some cases beyond the United States.

The goals of the Urbano Project are to:

1) Offer teens high-quality arts education experiences, including opportunities to develop an awareness and appreciation of contemporary art and the role the arts can play to effect social change.

2) Challenge teens to express a strengthened identity as active, powerful, and engaged citizens of the city of Boston.

3) Support teens to explore and pursue their interests and develop as young people with the greatest chance for social and personal success.

4) Promote civic engagement through participatory and publicly sited works of art that address the major issues of our times, and develop a corps of positively-engaged teens who serve as youth leaders in their communities.

Urbano is unique among Boston-area youth-serving organizations because of its focus on conceptual and participatory contemporary art: art that calls on an eclectic use of media (including performance, the visual arts, and digital media), collaboration among artists with diverse skill sets, studio practice based in research and response to social justice themes, and an ongoing dialogue between artist and audience, all in service of creating civically-engaged and justice-oriented works of public art.

 


Impact Statement

From 2016 through 2017, Urbano Project has:

  • Supported 112 youth to become civically engaged artists and leaders, tackling current social issues that directly affect their lives and their community. Urbano has done this by providing:

  • High-quality contemporary arts and studio training through 3-hour classes and workshops twice-a-week, during the spring, summer and fall semesters, led by professional teaching artists.

  • 12 engaging and interactive Artists Projects and Events open to the public, inspired and run by Urbano students, fellows and teaching artists. (See below for a listing.)

  • Regular Friday workshops for students and fellows by Boston activists and community organizers.

  • Special lectures and workshops led by Boston and New England artists with experience in place-making and youth arts.

  • Open houses for families and neighbors at which students hone their presentational and public speaking skills.

  • Modest compensation and job preparation that carry over to workforce success.

  • Résumé writing, portfolio development and college prep workshops, for students who are typically the first in their family to attend college.

  • Launched a new artist exhibition series. In a new pilot program, Urbano held exhibitions that explored the work of three nationally and internationally known professional artists, complemented by 11 concurrent salon-style performances and workshops related to the exhibition themes. Urbano youth interacted with and learned from these artists, and they helped curate and run the exhibitions and events.

  • Engaged more than 3,000 community members and civic leaders through art and art-making around social justice issues

We estimate that through art exhibits, community events such as the Egleston Festival, and interactive arts events such as the Civic Nomadic Sculpture, Urbano youth and artists reached more than 3,000 youth, community residents and civic leaders this year, creating dialog around issues such as the use of public spaces and youth violence.

  • Fostered catalyzing Interactions between youth and adult artists and organizers

Urbano students have had lively two-way exchanges with Radcliffe Fellow Tania Bruguera (a prominent Cuban artist-activist), Carlos Espinoza-Toro (an MIT-trained urban planner and community organizer), and Dr. Cara Berg Powers (a media artist and community advocate). Students gained confidence in their ability to participate at the table with adult professionals, often making positive and substantial contributions to the dialog about issues that directly affect their community.

  • Brought its students’ research and documentation skills to a new level

At Urbano, the creative process has always been research-driven. In 2016-2017 students took it a step further, using their strengthened skills to record and tell their community’s authentic stories. For example, Artivism in Egleston is participatory research project in which youth artists were trained to use rigorous social research techniques to learn about the history, attitudes and challenges that shape the Egleston Square Neighborhood. In partnership with the Design Studio for Social Intervention (ds4si), Artivism in Egleston created multimedia art works presenting their findings to spark dialogue among residents and civic leaders

  • Contributed to academic scholarship on the role of the arts in positive youth development

Urbano continued to build on its fruitful collaborations with researchers from Harvard University, deepening our understanding of the importance of arts programming for youth. This collaborative research has been funded by the Barr Foundation and published in the Harvard Educational Review.

  • Gained recognition as a key player in the cultural life of Boston

Urbano staff were on the Steering Committee and Leadership Council of Boston Creates, the cultural planning process led by Mayor Martin J. Walsh. Four Urbano teaching artists were chosen as Boston’s Artists in Residence in 2016. Last fall Urbano students were invited to serve on a panel at the 2016 Youth Arts for Social Change Conference. In November the Boston Foundation awarded the prestigious Collaborate Boston Award with an associated $25,000 grant to the Urbano Fellows’ Nomadic Civic Sculpture project. Just this month (June, 2017), Urbano Fellows presented their work at the Conference Boston Civic Media: Design, Technology and Social Impact, hosted by Emerson College.




  • Rebranded print and web materials & social media to strengthen institutional & programmatic marketing

Urbano updated its organizational branding, created a new website and collateral materials to elevate awareness of Urbano as a socially-engaged, contemporary arts organization. It also strengthened its social media strategy, sending electronic newsletters at more regular intervals, and live-streaming many of its events as they happen, which has drawn new, young audience members.




Needs Statement

 

  • New board members who bring expertise in finance, fundraising, PR/marketing, facilities, human resources, public art, youth development, social change, or working with the Boston Public School system, as well as connections to industries including finance, high tech, legal, museums, fine art, commercial art, and universities.
  • General operating support for Artists’ Projects and the Young Curators Program, in order to help us reach our goal to increase the number of students these programs serve, as well as the depth of the teens' engagement.
  • Funding for a Development Coordinator who will enhance fundraising capacity focus on foundation relationships, and cultivating individual donor support.
  • Support for technology and media resources, including upgrading our current equipment (i.e. printers, cameras) and maintaining our website.

 


CEO Statement

Urbano is an integral part of my 25 years of artistic practice, exploring how contemporary art can provides us with the tools to better ourselves, create a more egalitarian and just society, and address the pressing issues of our time. We hope to nurture a new generation of artists, leaders, and human beings. We are distinct from other organizations because we are really looking at the forefront of artistic practice and educational practice. We are also looking at what it means to be a creative individual living in this day and age. We're not interested just in technique or craft in art education, with our teens and practicing artists, we are exploring and working together to see how we can change our social and physical environment, for the betterment of humanity and the world;  to be engaged in our lives in a passionate way, doing things that we care about in ways that are meaningful to us, to our communities and the world. I have been researching and thinking about pedagogy as art. Felix Guattari posed a provocative question: "How can you bring a classroom to life as though it were an artwork?" That is our goal here at Urbano.

All of Urbano’s projects are designed in response to an annual theme developed with input from teen artists, instructors, and collaborating organizational partners. Project themes are intended to spark conversation, invite multiple points of view, take advantage of contemporary scholarship and academic discourse, and make direct reference both to current artistic movements and students’ lived experience. The theme for 2013-2014 is “The Emancipated City: Reimagining Boston,” inspired by Jacques Rancière’s book, The Emancipated Spectator.

Artistic experimentation and open-ended exploration of ideas on the part of both students and instructors are key to Urbano’s approach to contemporary arts education. This model, in which collaboration and mutual learning replace traditional, hierarchical instruction, encourages students to rethink and dismantle familiar power dynamics in the classroom. Through Artists’ Projects that require Teaching Artists and students to work collaboratively to create a complex, large-scale final works, Urbano develops intergenerational relationships based in mutual understanding that strengthen teens’ ability to be self-directed, collaborative learners, co-workers and citizens.

 


Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)

Urbano programs are open to any public high school student from the Boston area. Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, Roxbury, Hyde Park, and Mattapan are the most commonly-represented communities in our programs.

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts Education
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Artists' Projects

 

Artists’ Projects are offered in a variety of media, including music, installation, literary arts, performance, and other disciplines. New projects are planned and executed each semester (summer, fall and spring), with up to 15 teens participate in each Artists’ Project. A professional, practicing artist leads each course, and at the end of each semester, teens and their adult partners produce an exhibition for the public. Artists’ Project curricula are modeled on college-level arts seminars, emphasizing development of technical skill and conceptual exploration, experimentation, and development of personal style. Participating students learn arts administration and curatorial skills as they conceptualize, design, research, and produce large-scale projects. They receive a stipend of $300/semester.

Budget  $162,745.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Youth will improve skills and understanding related to Contemporary Arts Practice such as:

•           Improved communication skills

•           Improved observation skills

•           Improved presentation skills

•           Increased self-confidence

•           Ability to collaborate with different types of people

•           Inviting participation

•           Proposing innovative ideas

•           Taking appropriate risks through their art

•           Looking at relationships (with art, community, work, self)

•           Being idea driven versus discipline-driven

 

Youth will also:

•           Have increased comfort with understanding issues from multiple perspectives and across barriers.

•           Gain comfort in cross-disciplinary endeavors.

•           Increase comfort forming working partnerships with peers and adults.

•           Gain knowledge about connections between contemporary art and social change.

•           See themselves as creative individuals who are part of the larger contemporary art community.

Program Long-Term Success 

The Urbano Project is contributing to a new generation of leaders in the community who are compassionate, inquisitive, creative thinkers, actively committed to breaking down social barriers (such as language, race, gender and religion) between communities.

The Urbano Project creates high quality, cross-disciplinary, collaborative, publicly-sited and participatory art projects that challenge assumptions about contemporary art and education and artists’ role in creating social change

 The Urbano Project contributes to the arts in Boston by building a bridge between urban communities and the contemporary art scene.

Program Success Monitored By  Student pre- and post-program surveys provide self-reported information on development in the arts, social skills, plans for the future, and community involvement. Classroom observations conducted by the Program Manager at least twice a semester ensure pedagogical consistency and record data on arts learning. Instructors complete written evaluations of each student’s personal and artistic development at the end of each project using rubrics developed by Urbano.
Examples of Program Success 

98% of teen artists told us that they learned new techniques and worked with new artistic media in developing an Artists’ Project.

 “My artwork was displayed in the middle of Boston and got mostly positive reactions. I found the negative reac­tions to be the most interesting because they enabled me to see both views of my artwork face to face.”

100% of participants told us that Urbano’s pro­grams helped them to meet and work effectively with people from different backgrounds, and be­come open to ideas different from their own.

90% of teen artists felt that Urbano’s programs helped them learn to express ideas and talk about issues of per­sonal importance.

“Every time there was a single moment with one person on stage, I wanted the audience to … remember a time when they were in a situation where they saw someone doing something wrong or made someone feel uncomfortable and they sat there and did nothing…”

100% of Urbano’s 2012 high school seniors gradu­ated & will attend college in the fall.


School Program

Urbano serves approximately 100 students through its partnerships with Boston International High School Newcomers Academy (BINcA) and the Margarita Muñiz Academy, a BPS Innovation School. By working with a BINcA, a school designed specially to meet the needs of students who have just recently arrived in the United States, and Margarita Muñiz, which is Boston’s first dual-language high school, Urbano is able to extend its commitment to creating work that transcends borders.

Budget  $52,647.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Youth will improve skills and understanding related to Contemporary Arts Practice such as:

•           Improved communication skills

•           Improved observation skills

•           Improved presentation skills

•           Increased self-confidence

•           Ability to collaborate with different types of people

•           Inviting participation

•           Proposing innovative ideas

•           Taking appropriate risks through their art

•           Looking at relationships (with art, community, work, self)

•           Being idea driven versus discipline-driven

 

Youth will also:

•           Have increased comfort with understanding issues from multiple perspectives and across barriers.

•           Gain comfort in cross-disciplinary endeavors.

•           Increase comfort forming working partnerships with peers and adults.

•           Gain knowledge about connections between contemporary art and social change.

•           See themselves as creative individuals who are part of the larger contemporary art community.

Program Long-Term Success 

The Urbano Project is contributing to a new generation of leaders in the community who are compassionate, inquisitive, creative thinkers, actively committed to breaking down  social barriers (such as language, race, gender and religion) between communities.

The Urbano Project creates high quality, cross-disciplinary, collaborative, publicly-sited and participatory art projects that challenge assumptions about contemporary art and education and its role in creating social change

The Urbano Project contributes to the arts in Boston by building a bridge between urban communities and the contemporary art scene.
Program Success Monitored By  Student pre- and post-program surveys provide self-reported information on development in the arts, social skills, plans for the future, and community involvement. Classroom observations conducted by the Program Manager at least twice a semester ensure pedagogical consistency and record data on arts learning. Instructors complete written evaluations of each student’s personal and artistic development at the end of each project using rubrics developed by Urbano.
Examples of Program Success 

 

Not yet available; this is the first year of the program.


 


Urbano Fellows

The Urbano Fellows program is made up of experienced Urbano alumni and current teen artists who have participated in Urbano’s programs for at least two semesters.  Fellows meet twice weekly during the summer and once weekly during the school year.  Working with a lead artist and Urbano’s senior leadership, this group of peer leaders is responsible for researching, conceptualizing, and producing exhibitions in Urbano’s gallery. They also explore Boston’s contemporary art scene, researching current and past exhibitions and artists, conducting studio and gallery visits, and meeting with professional artists and curators.  They lead monthly whole-group critiques that bring together youth from across all Artists' Projects to share work in progress and provide feedback, and also engage in special projects with external partners. In 2013, the Fellows worked with the MIT Civic Media Collaborative Design Studio to create a traveling installation, and in 2014 they are partnering with artists from Harvard's Project Zero to create a printmaking installation. Urbano Fellows receive a stipend of $10/hour.

Budget  $57,165.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Youth will improve skills and understanding related to Contemporary Arts Practice such as:

•           Improved communication skills

•           Improved observation skills

•           Improved presentation skills

•           Increased self-confidence

•           Ability to collaborate with different types of people

•           Inviting participation

•           Proposing innovative ideas

•           Taking appropriate risks through their art

•           Looking at relationships (with art, community, work, self)

•           Being idea driven versus discipline-driven

 

Youth will also:

•           Have increased comfort with understanding issues from multiple perspectives and across barriers.

•           Gain comfort in cross-disciplinary endeavors.

•           Increase comfort forming working partnerships with peers and adults.

•           Gain knowledge about connections between contemporary art and social change.

•           See themselves as creative individuals who are part of the larger contemporary art community.

Program Long-Term Success 

The Urbano Project is contributing to a new generation of leaders in the community who are compassionate, inquisitive, creative thinkers, actively committed to breaking down  social barriers (such as language, race, gender and religion) between communities.

The Urbano Project creates high quality, cross-disciplinary, collaborative, publicly-sited and participatory art projects that challenge assumptions about contemporary art and education and its role in creating social change.

The Urbano Project contributes to the arts in Boston by building a bridge between urban communities and the contemporary art scene.
Program Success Monitored By  Student pre- and post-program surveys provide self-reported information on development in the arts, social skills, plans for the future, and community involvement. Classroom observations conducted by the Program Manager at least twice a semester ensure pedagogical consistency and record data on arts learning. Instructors complete written evaluations of each student’s personal and artistic development at the end of each project using rubrics developed by Urbano.
Examples of Program Success 

Students are self motivated and challenge themselves (+2 points on a 6-point scale)

Students give critical feedback that will help others to improve, articulating opinions in ways that help others’ work to move forward (+2 points)

Students use vocabulary to express comparisons (references to other works, comparisons to other works, etc.) (+4 points)

 “This project is about the issues that lurk in the shadows of our lives, the things swept under the rug, the elephant in the room. It’s about awareness on a personal and global scale of things we seemed determined to ignore, or unintentionally blind ourselves to. They need not make us uneasy. They might be a source of solace, and help us know we share in a bigger, more complex and ambiguous human experience. They may inspire us to want to change a world dominated by these frightening realities. What skeletons are in your closet?”

Young Curators’ artists’ statement forGiants of Urbanoexhibited at the Boston Center for the Arts

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Stella Aguirre McGregor
CEO Term Start July 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Stella Aguirre McGregor has been an artist and cultural worker for over 25 years, working on projects in Boston, Macedonia, New Orleans, and Taiwan. As an artist, curator, and arts administrator she is interested in exploring the role of art in society, as an integral part of life, and as a catalyst for social change.

 Stella served as Executive Director of the Cloud Foundation from 2003-2009 where she conceived and developed the acclaimed Teen Curatorial Program and Artists’ Workshops. Previously she served as Program Manager for Individual Artists at the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and was Senior Arts Administrator for the Boston Central Artery/Tunnel project’s public art program. In 1986 Stella founded The Space, an award-winning non-profit artist-run gallery in Boston’s South End where she produced over 200 projects encompassing visual, performing, and public arts, with the participation of youth and community members.

McGregor has served in the board of the National Association of Artist’s Organizations (NAAO), the Cambridge Public Art Committee, and of the UrbanArts Institute at Mass College of Art and Design. Stella was named one of Boston’s Top 10 Women in the Arts in 2008 and in 2011 she received the Jorge Hernandez Arts Leadership Award. In 2012 Stella was named a Massachusetts College of Art and Design Commencement Honoree and award recipient for Excellence in Art Education. Also in 2012 Stella was selected as one of the 100 Most Influential People for the Hispanic Community of Massachusetts by El Planeta newspaper.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr. Ricardo Barreto Jan 2000 June 2012
Ms. Pamela Worden Nov 1980 Dec 1999

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Excellence in Art Education Massachusetts College of Art and Design 2012
Finalist, National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities 2012
Finalist, National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities 2011
Certificate of Appreciation Culture for Change 2010

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Americans for the Arts 2010
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Project-based partnerships result in public exhibitions, installations, and performances of work developed by Urbano’s teens. These collaborations enable teens and partnering organizations to learn from each other and engage with new sectors of the community. In 2013-2014, Urbano partnered with the MIT Civic Co-Design Lab to create an interactive, multimedia interface for Urbano Fellows to gather opinions and feedback from members of the public while also sharing completed Urbano works in public spaces. This tool, dubbed the "PARTI" (Participatory, ARtistic, Travelling Installation), is a fun and practical way for Urbano to accomplish its mission of creating publicly engaged art. Urbano also collaborated with a team of artists from Harvard University's Project Zero research center. Working in partnership with the Urbano Fellows, these artists created a fully-customized curriculum incorporating museum visits, printmaking, and conceptual conversation. For the artists' project Crossing Urban Boundaries, Urbano students partnered with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) to discuss the issue of transportation equity in Boston. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 5
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Mixed Race
Gender Female: 7
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Employment Practices Liability
Internet Liability Insurance
Workplace Violence
Fiduciary Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Todd M. Gershkowitz
Board Chair Company Affiliation State Street Financial
Board Chair Term July 2014 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Betty Fulton Board member --
Mr. Todd M. Gershkowitz Senior Vice President Head of Global Total Rewards, State Street Voting
Ms. Etty Padmodipoetro Urbano Planner/Architect, Rosales and Partners Voting
Ms. Andrea Satchdeva Clerk --
Mr. Alexandre V. Swayne Senior Associate Intermediary Business Group, State Street Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Daniel D'Oca -- --
Doris Sommer -- --
Kristen Struebing-Beazley -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 79%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 70%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $327,167.00
Projected Expense $369,971.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 990EZ - Urbano Project - Covering May 3, 2012 - June 30, 2012

Audit Documents

2016 Review

2015 Review

2014 Review

2013 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $382,616 $492,399 $374,260
Total Expenses $423,342 $374,876 $359,350

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $41,244 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $41,244 -- --
Individual Contributions $298,579 $437,726 $309,765
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $42,665 $54,673 $64,495
Investment Income, Net of Losses $128 -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $322,806 $329,742 $311,139
Administration Expense $62,499 $31,795 $26,843
Fundraising Expense $38,037 $13,339 $21,368
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.90 1.31 1.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses 76% 88% 87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 3% 7%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $165,475 $206,793 $106,093
Current Assets $135,452 $165,512 $59,763
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $22,874 $10,035 $26,858
Total Net Assets $142,601 $196,758 $79,235

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.92 16.49 2.23

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
This nonprofit was previously fiscally sponsored by the Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston Inc.  The 2012 Form 990 posted above, for Urbano Project, covers May 3, 2012 - June 30, 2012, as this corresponds to the transition from fiscal sponsorship by the Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston Inc., to Urbano Project's own 501(c)(3) status. Urbano Project was formerly fiscally sponsored until Fall 2012 by Urban Arts.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

The Urbano Project aims to improve Boston’s landscape of civic and cultural life by inspiring a new generation of urban leaders who are compassionate, civically engaged, creative thinkers, actively committed to breaking down social barriers through art. Our goal is to see our youth develop skills and understanding related to contemporary arts practice and issues of social change. We strive to see our youth

  • participate in a process to develop the narrative of an idea 
  • become proficient in creating and thinking critically about contemporary art
  • develop public speaking and presentation skills 
  • engage in critical reflection about their own work and the work of others - demonstrate a willingness to interact and collaborate with those who are different from themselves 
  • learn the visual, social, and political language of contemporary art
  • develop an understanding of issues across racial, social, and cultural barriers
In the next three to five years, our specific goals include:
  • increasing our Board to 9 members, contributing to our organization’s effectiveness over the long term 
  • diversify our income sources to ensure our sustainability 
  • form an alumni advisory board to offer assistance and guidance about how to improve our programs and provide maximum educational benefit to our youth

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Urbano’s strategies for success rely on the synthesis of art, education, community, and social justice. To accomplish our program goals, Urbano invites professional artists and youth artists to collaborate on semester-long projects that call on them to learn collaboratively through studio exploration and experimentation. They work in partnership, making decisions together regarding the conception, production, and exhibition of their ideas. Youth who have been involved with the program for two semesters or more are invited to join the Urbano Fellows, a team of peer leaders who assist with the research, events, and partnerships. All Urbano programs are united by an annual theme that ensures conceptual continuity, and regularly revised and improved through a youth-led critique process. By striving for artistic excellence alongside youth development, Urbano’s key strategies lay the groundwork for encouraging deep civic and creative engagement.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Urbano is uniquely situated at the hub of Boston’s artistic and educational communities, and maintains an active network of communications with peers and partners in both the contemporary arts world and the youth development world. This allows us to create initiatives that combine established best practices with new and innovative ideas at the vanguard of arts education. Our staff is composed entirely of practicing artists who also bring a deep bank of professional expertise in the field; our Founder and Artistic Director, Stella McGregor, is a well-known leader in the Boston arts world who was a pioneer in creating participatory public art programs involving youth. We have strong collaborative relationships with peer organizations both within and beyond the arts education field. We are a young, flexible organization, committed to continual reflection and improvement.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Evaluation and assessment are integral to Urbano’s work culture. Urbano’s assessment of student learning in the arts is based on the Massachusetts Arts Curriculum Frameworks and implemented through a combination of student pre- and post-program surveys, a portfolio review rubric, class observations, and student and instructor interviews. These tools track indicators including use of materials, techniques, and terminology appropriate for the artistic discipline studied; incorporation of references to contemporary artworks; understanding of the role of artists in the community; evidence of consideration of the social implications of artwork; incorporation of multiple disciplines in a single work; use of technology; ability to express meaning and emotion through the arts; the development of a personal style; the representation of abstract concepts; critical response to student’s own work and the work of his/her peers; and the ability to revise one’s work based on critique from self and others. Video documentation is also used to enable performing arts students and instructors to assess student work. Classroom observations conducted by the Arts Education Manager at least twice a semester ensure pedagogical consistency and record data on arts learning. Teaching artists also complete written evaluations of each student’s personal and artistic development at the end of each project.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

In the last two years, Urbano’s Board has grown from 5 members to 8, and two of our new members have had a particularly strong impact both on our financial footprint and our reflective practices. We are still hoping to build and sustain crucial internal Board structures, including committees and a Board manual. We have begun to diversify our income sources by building relationships with individual donors and by renting our venue as a source of earned income. We have not yet begun to pursue other potential sources for earned income that we have identified, including fee-based workshops and professional development opportunities for youth and adults. While we have not yet assembled an alumni advisory board, we have worked to incorporate our alumni into our organizational culture in other ways, notably by maintaining the Urbano Fellows program as an active pathway for alumni engagement, and by employing alumni as teaching assistants, contracted employees, and administrative staff.