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Roxbury Youthworks Inc

 841 Parker Street, Suite 104-106
 Roxbury Crossing, MA 02120
[P] (617) 427-8095 x 222
[F] (617) 238-0466
www.roxburyyouthworks.org
[email protected]
Mia Alvarado
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INCORPORATED: 1987
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2733854

LAST UPDATED: 12/11/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Roxbury Youthworks Inc's (RYI) mission is to help youth caught in cycles of poverty, victimization, and violence to transition successfully into adulthood. 

Mission Statement

Roxbury Youthworks Inc's (RYI) mission is to help youth caught in cycles of poverty, victimization, and violence to transition successfully into adulthood. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $3,382,386.00
Projected Expense $3,359,329.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Being United In Leading our Destiny
  • Community Service Network
  • Dimock Lead Program
  • Gaining Independence for Tomorrow

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Roxbury Youthworks Inc's (RYI) mission is to help youth caught in cycles of poverty, victimization, and violence to transition successfully into adulthood. 

Background Statement

Julian Houston was appointed as the Judge of the Juvenile Session of the Roxbury District Court by Governor Michael Dukakis on January 2, 1979. At that time, the court had not heard juvenile cases for thirteen years, so a service infrastructure had to be created to meet the needs of the young people before the court. Judge Houston (ret.) appointed a small committee of professionals experienced with children's issues to advise him on how best to create a system of services for troubled children. The committee was chaired by Dean Hubie Jones of the Boston University School of Social Work. The committee met regularly for a year, and recommended that the Court create its own program to serve the needs of young people before the court. Roxbury Youthworks grew out of this recommendation.

 In the early days, Roxbury Youthworks sponsored restitution programs and diversion programs for juveniles before the Roxbury court. As it became apparent that gang activity and drugs, both distribution and use, were becoming widespread, we worked to identify juveniles at risk and to refer them to appropriate agencies. With support from the Department of Youth Services, we closely monitored at-risk young people before the court, until 1993 when the state's juvenile justice system was reorganized and the Roxbury District Court no longer heard juvenile cases.

By the year 2000, with support from DYS, Roxbury Youthworks began to open a series of Day Reporting Programs for youth supervised by the Department of Youth Services. Today, RYI operates all of these programs in the City of Boston.

Our youth live in Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan, Roslindale, Hyde Park & Chelsea where disparities in health, education, income, employment, & incarceration are prevalent and make the attainment of basic needs extremely difficult for residents. As a result, more often than not our youth have experienced; hunger, exploitation, incarceration, disrupted education, & violence. 56% of our youth are Black/African American, 31% Latino, 5% Caucasian, & 8% are Multi-racial speaking mainly, English, Spanish, Haitian Creole, Cape Verdean Creole. With regard to age, 1% of our youth were between the ages of 11-12; 49% were ages 13-17 and 50% were ages 18-24.

RYI has 4 programs across 6 sites in Metro Boston that include:

 The Community Service Network supports youth committed to the Department of Youth Services (DYS) as they transition from secure treatment facilities back to their home or an alternative placement. The RYI and DYS casework teams are co-located in 5 District Offices located in Dorchester, Hyde Park, Roxbury, Roslindale and Chelsea. We work with youths until they “age out” of DYS or end their voluntary services, assisting them to complete their education, gain employment, receive behavioral/mental health services. Our goal with this population is to "wrap around' them so they will not commit another crime and either be driven further into the juvenile justice system or enter the adult criminal system.

Gaining Independence For Tomorrow (GIFT) provides prevention, intervention, support, stabilization and therapeutic services to young girls who are victims of, or are at high risk of becoming victims of Commercial Sexual Exploitation (CSE). Through intensive individual mentoring, weekly psycho-social support groups, enrichment activities and leadership opportunities, our Life Coaches aid the girls in their recovery from exploitation or work to prevent them from entering an exploitive relationship.

 Being United In Leading our Destiny (BUILD) applies the successful model we developed at GIFT, but exclusively serves cisgender males and transgender youth who are victims of CSE and/or sexual assault or are at high risk of becoming victims. BUILD also has an outreach component in which the Outreach Life Coaches engage youth in areas and programs where runaway, throwaway and homeless youth gather.

What makes GIFT and BUILD different from other programs serving this population is that they are open seven (7) days a week. Life Coaches work a Sunday-Thursday or Tuesday-Saturday schedule.  Another unique quality of these two programs is that Life Coaches maintain their relationship with their youth even if they move out of the Metro Boston area.

Through RYI's Dimock Street Lead Agency in Roxbury we work with the Department of Children and Families (DCF) to facilitate and monitor all contracted youth and family support and stabilization services so that children are not removed from their family or are reunited in a safe and timely manner. We also identify programs for youth that need an alternative placement such as intensive foster care, group care, residential care or independent living.

All of our programs are designed to decrease the risk factors that exist in our youth’s lives & to increase protective factors. We combine a positive youth development model, trauma informed practices, & a high staff to youth ratio to provide intensive life coaching, psycho-educational groups, enrichment activities, & case management to over 200 youth & their families per year.  

RYI staff is comprised of 36 culturally diverse individuals who often grew up &/or live in the same neighborhoods as our program participants.  We are led by Executive Director Mia Alvarado & receive direction from our 9 member volunteer Board of Directors & pro-bono legal counsel from WilmerHale.  

Impact Statement

Accomplishments during FY17:

Our GIFT program has continued to expand its alumni services, pre-employment and paid internship program. GIFT received funding through the Cummings Foundation 100k for 100 which now allows us to work with youth referred by probation or who have aged out or had their cases closed by the Department of Children and Families yet still need our services. In addition to providing training on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children, GIFT now offers sexual consent training to youth at community centers and local schools.

BUILD has implemented drop-in hours which allows for us to engage with clients as a team, provides clients a safe place to relax indoors and allows for clients to grow their community of support. In addition, the program has built new connections with some partnering agencies, which has allowed for the program to reach more clients and access new ancillary services for our youth.

RYI has adapted GIFT's successful pre-employment and internship in order to offer it to our youth that are committed to the Department of Youth Services. It is our goal to implement this program, called the University of Roxbury Youthworks (URY), in November 2017.

For the past 4 years, RYI has been using a client information database in GIFT and in the Community Service Network. We have recently created one for BUILD and redefined what information we want to capture as well as what outcomes we want to measure. We now have to ensure all direct service are trained and entering data in the system which should be completed in January 2018.

 

Needs Statement

Secure sufficient general operating funds to cover the overhead and operating costs that are not covered by our State contracts.

GIFT would benefit from additional funding for our internship program, special events, and alumni services so that we can continue to expand programming. In terms of concrete needs, GIFT is in need of a larger television, computer speakers, laptops to be used by our youth, for groups and training, pajamas and blankets for our youth, a color printer, a new gaming system, hygiene products, weighted blankets/stuffed animals to give to youth in crisis.

BUILD always can use continued community support through in kind donations. BUILD’s funding has specific limitations that community donations often are able to supplement. These donations can range from gifts cards that are directly given to youth, to actual items such as gloves, hats, blankets and hygiene products.

BUILD can also benefit from volunteers/interns to assist with drop-in hours and planning/implementing drop-in activities.

RYI, in general, is also seeking businesses that would be interested in being intern sites for our youth.

GIFT would benefit from additional funding for our internship program, special events, and alumni services so that we can continue to expand programming. In terms of concrete needs, GIFT is in need of a larger television, computer speakers, laptops to be used by our youth, for groups and in trainings, pajamas and blankets for our youth, a color printer, a new gaming system, hygiene products, portable tri-pod dry erase board, weighted blankets/stuffed animals to give to youth in crisis.


CEO Statement

Roxbury Youthworks Inc. is proud of its 15 years of advocacy on behalf of and direct services to youth that are at high risk or are known victims of commercial sexual exploitation. While initially focused on serving young women, over the past 3 years, we have developed an expertise in working with cisgender males and trans youth that fit this description. Our BUILD program opened in 2014 with a part-time Program Director who also served as a Life Coach. Today we have a full time Program Director and 4 full time Life Coaches.


Board Chair Statement


 

Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-Roxbury Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Dorchester Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Hyde Park Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Mattapan Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Roslindale Neighborhood
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Mission Hill

We also provide services in Chelsea, MA through our District Office Chelsea Satellite Site for youth involved with the Department of Youth Services.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Crime & Legal - Related - Sexual Abuse Prevention
  3. Crime & Legal - Related - Youth Violence Prevention

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Being United In Leading our Destiny

 

The BUILD Program (Being United In Leading our Destiny) employs an intensive Life Coach model to provide prevention, intervention, stabilization, advocacy, support, and therapeutic services to boys and trans-youth identified as victims of CSE or who are at high risk of becoming victims. BUILD launched in the summer of 2014 and began serving youth three months later in the fall. We currently have 4 clients in BUILD.

Budget  260,000
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Victims Males Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered
Program Short-Term Success 

80% of boys, young men, and trans-identified BUILD participants will increase their knowledge of healthy relationship, the cycle and impact of CSE, and safer sexual practices by 90% within a year. 

70% of boys, young men, and trans-identified BUILD participants will improve school and/or vocational/employment attendance by 60% in one year. 

Program Long-Term Success  65% of the boys, young men and trans-identified individuals who receive services from BUILD for up to one year will remain free from commercial sexual exploitation (CSE).
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored by BUILD Life Coaches who track school, vocational and employment attendance one time per week or daily.  Life Coaches  progress during individual meetings with participants, during weekly psycho-educational groups. The Healthy Relationships and Sexual Health Scale questionnaires measure youth's knowledge in these areas. The measurement scales are administered to participants quarterly.
Examples of Program Success  BUILD is a new program that began serving clients in the Fall of 2014. There has not been a sufficient amount of time to measure success.

Community Service Network

District Offices (DOs):In collaboration with the Department of Youth Services (DYS) the RYI DO staff guide youth who are transitioning from DYS secure treatment facilities and residential placements back to their homes and communities. RYI staff utilize a proven and positive youth development approach to helping youth set life goals and to connect them with the resources that they need to meet their goals. The six DO centers are located in Dorchester, Roxbury, Chelsea, and Hyde Park and serve approximately 150 youth per year. The success of this program depends upon five critical components: individualized service planning, consistent staff support, referrals to community resources, positive programming, and intensive supervision and monitoring. 

Budget  $1.3M
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

65% of Youth attend school or academic program regularly and stay all day    

75% of youth improve grades towards grade level performance in one or more subjects, as recorded through class attendance, homework completion, class participation or grades.

75% of program youth attend medical and/or behavioral health appointments and adhere to physician/mental health provider recommendations 85% of the time.  
 

75% of our youth decrease risky behavior in one or more of the following areas during a consecutive 12 month period as measured and observed during 1 to 1weekly, bi-weekly or monthly meetings or contact with RYI Staff, group sessions, program recreational activities, feedback from other providers and parents/guardians, youth self-report, team meetings,  information regarding re-commitments or new charges for our DYS youth, monitoring of social media to ascertain if BUILD or GIFT Program youth are involved in exploitative relationships, assessing all of our youth’s risk and/or victimization through commercial sexual exploitation and providing pro-active interventions and supports:

Youth refrain from running away

Youth adhere to curfew as applicable

Youth commit no new crimes

Youth reduce gang involvement and affiliation

Youth decrease substance use and/or abuse

Youth refrain from acting out through violence

Youth are not arrested or incarcerated

Youth remain free from commercial sexual exploitation  
Program Long-Term Success 

70% of our program youth develop and maintain a positive, non-exploitative or abusive, nurturing relationship with at least one adult for at least one year.

70% of our program youth develop and maintain one or more positive, supportive, non-exploitative or abusive relationships with a peer for at least one year.   

65% of our high school graduates or those that receive their GED’s enter college, a vocational program or attain and maintain full time or part time employment.

Program Success Monitored By 

Outcomes are measured, tracked and documented by our Direct Care DO Program staff for our long standing. Direct Care staff measure logic model generated and defined outcomes and enter information into our Salesforce database. The data is then analyzed and reviewed by our Senior Management Team, who identify outcome informed needed improvements or changes to service provision and programming. The Program Directors and Direct Care Staff then work together to implement and tweak our service delivery. Our Direct Care staff check each youth's school attendance daily and also check to make sure that each youth is abiding by their curfew. During 1 to 1 meetings with youth, team meetings, through feedback from service providers and parents/guardians, teachers, employers, pay stubs and client self report, DO Direct Care staff track outcomes.

Examples of Program Success 
1. 73% of our District Office (DO) Program participants were employed between 3 to 12 months.
2. Of the 136 youth served in 2014:
   a. 16 graduated from high school or received their GED
   b. 2 graduated from junior high and successfully entered high school
   c. 83 were actively engaged in school
   d. 6 were enrolled in college or a vocational program
   e. 24 completed high school or their GED during 2013 and were            working full or part time.
3. 93 out of 136 DO Program youth participated in community based enrichment activities that included: creative arts programs, sports leagues, teen empowerment programs, and community service projects.
4. The Massachusetts Department of Youth Services' most recent statewide report compared youth detention rates between 2011 and 2013 and found that in the Boston Metro region, the number of newly incarcerated youth decreased dramatically from 88 in 2011 to 70 in 2013. DYS attributed this decrease in youth detention rates in large part to community organizations such as RYI. 
5. Our work within the Mass Coalition for Fair Sentencing prompted the passage in September of 2013 of a law requiring that 17-year-olds be treated as juveniles in Massachusetts and that they be placed in the custody of DYS. 

Dimock Lead Program

 

In partnership with DCF, RYI Service Coordinators ensure that clients of the Dimock Street Area Office have the opportunity to grow up safely in loving and supportive homes that enable them to thrive. Guided by family strength based and positive youth development practices, the RYI Dimock Lead Team convene family team meetings, match clients with the service providers that will best meet their needs, conduct focused home visits and utilization reviews, and modify treatment plans. The staff works closely with clients to help them navigate the DCF system, maximize the utilization of and connection to the service providers and supports available to them, and to maintain fluid progress towards their goals.

Budget  $238,207.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children's Protective Services
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families
Program Short-Term Success   90% of clients will participate in team evaluation meetings and assessments  as designated by DCF protocol to ensure that they are moving fluidly through the DCF system.
Program Long-Term Success 

80% of the Dimock Lead Agency families involved with DCF utilize contracted services 70% of the time.


 

Program Success Monitored By  The RYI Dimock Lead Agency Staff track client progress, referrals, and contracted provider agencies and programs, via calls to clients and providers, site visits to providers, team meetings, and billing, to make sure that services are being provided and utilized as intended.  
Examples of Program Success 



Gaining Independence for Tomorrow

Gaining Independence for Tomorrow (GIFT) Program:Since 2008, GIFT has served over 300 girls and young women who have been victimized by or who were deemed at high risk of becoming victims of commercial sexual exploitation. GIFT Program youth are between the ages of twelve to twenty-two. Each youth is assigned a Life Coach who combines their professional skills with their often times first-hand knowledge of the neighborhoods, to provide the compassionate and intensive supports and referrals that the youth need throughout their recovery from commercial sexual exploitation. GIFT is funded by the Department of Children and Families (DCF), is located in Dorchester, MA and serves 42 girls and young women at any given time.
Budget  $676,766.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Females Minorities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

80% of GIFT Program girls will increase understanding of healthy relationships over a 6 to 9 month period

50% of GIFT Program girls leave an unhealthy relationship within one year of participation in the GIFT Program

80% of GIFT Program girls will increase understanding and practice of physical and sexual health

 
70% will make healthy and safe decisions in the community within a 6 to 9 month period
 
70% Make healthy and safe decisions in regards to their bodies

70%  of GIFT Program girls will sustain employment and demonstrate professional behavior at work for at least six weeks (for clients 16 and up)

65% of school enrolled GIFT Program girls increase: attendance in academic placement, stay in school until the end of day and engage in academic activities    




Program Long-Term Success  65% of GIFT participants remain free from commercial sexual exploitation for 1 or more years.

60% of GIFT participants complete high school, GED or academic program (for students 19 and older)   

 


 

 


 

The staff also identified the inputs for the logic model as being:

 

The Program Director, 6 life coaches, 1 office manager, 1 Clinician, Staff trainings, DCF funding, Building/vans, partnerships with: courts, law enforcement, schools, therapists, Human Trafficking Advocacy Groups.

 

The method for achieving the three positive outcomes include:

 

Meet with Life Coach 2 times per week for 1 hour each time, 1 to 1's address; physical and sexual health, exploitative and healthy relationships, boundaries, community relationships, independent living skills, Create a goal focused individualized service plan, Call and text daily to check on goals, Life coaches teach and model advocacy skills, Create and implement a personalized safety plan, Participation in GIFT groups (psycho-educational and or instructional) for 1.5 hours weekly, Participation in GIFT recreational activities, Referrals for therapy with GIFT Clinician or outside clinician as needed.

 

A database system has been developed specifically for the GIFT Program so that staff can input and track the three defined outcomes in real time. This allows the GIFT staff to evaluate each girl’s progress and to cater and tweak services and supports accordingly. 
Program Success Monitored By 

A. Educational/Vocational/Employment  

1. Life Coach requests attendance records from school guidance office /vocational program/employer by phone call at least weekly. Life Coach also requests pay stubs from employed participants as needed. 
2. Life coach calls caregiver weekly to check status
B. Physical and Sexual Health and Healthy Relationships 
1.  Life Coach administers the following surveys to girls in caseload and record scores and responses in Salesforce Database.
a. Healthy relationships questionnaire, girls are respondent administered to girls by Life Coach quarterly
b. Physical/sexual health survey, girls are respondent; pre-/post-test on sexual health understanding. Life Coach administers test before and after group sessions on sexual health
2. Life Coach observation, based on girl’s comments in one-to-one's, contact through text and calls with participants, group sessions and facebook monitoring
2. Life coach records status of girl’s romantic relationships
3. Life coach calls caregiver weekly to check status


Examples of Program Success 

During FY 2014:

67% of our GIFT Program girls remained free from commercial sexual  exploitation.
2. Of the 49 GIFT girls served during FY 2014
   a. 9 graduated from high school or received their GED
   b. 6 graduated from junior high and successfully entered high school
   c. 30 were actively engaged in school
   d. 3 were enrolled in college
   e. 8 completed high school or their GED during 2013 and were            working full or part time.
3. 36 out of 49 GIFT Program girls, participated in community based enrichment activities that included: creative arts programs, sports leagues, teen empowerment programs, and community service projects.
4. As a result of the work of the Support to End Exploitation Now Coalition (of which we are a founding member) and the testimony of our GIFT girls at the State House, Governor Patrick signed Massachusetts' new human trafficking legislation in 2011. Since this victory, we participated in the Minor Victims of Sex Trafficking Implementation Committee and submitted our recommendations to the AG's Office in September 2014.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 As Executive Director of Roxbury Youthworks I am proud of the positive goals our youth are attaining and of the direct service staff that is helping them achieve these results.  All of the young people we serve have been exposed to or have experienced violence, exploitation and poverty.  The staff build strong and unconditional relationships with our youth who generally do not trust adults.  Each day new opportunities are being given to our youth through the multitude of community partnerships RYI has formed in the past 33 years.   

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Mia Alvarado LICSW
CEO Term Start Sept 2008
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Since 2008 Mia Alvarado has been the Executive Director of Roxbury Youthworks. She is responsible for a $2.9M annual budget, a 38 member staff and manages all of the agency’s contracts with the Department of Children and Families, the Department of Youth Services, the Massachusetts Office of Victim Assistance and the Department of Public Health ensuring that adequate funds are available to permit the agency to carry out its work.

 

A Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker, Mia has worked extensively in the field of child welfare and juvenile justice. Prior to her current position, Mia was a Special Assistant to the DCF Commissioner’s Office and Chief of Staff to former DSS Commissioner Harry Spence. 

 

During her career, Mia has implemented many new programs and practices. She developed the first specialized foster homes in Boston in the late 1980s and brought Family Group Conferencing to DSS in 2001. Mia has been a leader and champion for commercially sexually exploited youth since 2000. Mia was selected to represent the child welfare field as a member of Technical Working Group for the Salvation Army’s Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) Community Intervention Project funded by OJJDP in 2007. Mia is one of the founding members of the Support to End Exploitation Now (SEEN) Coalition.  She actively assisted in the drafting of the Safe Harbor legislation which has been incorporated into the recently signed Human Trafficking Bill. Mia also served on the Minor Victims of Sex Trafficking Committee which wrote recommendations for the implementation of the Safe Harbor provisions of Human Trafficking Bill.  Most recently she was selected as a Core Member of the CEASE (Cities Empowered Against Sexual Exploitation) Network.

 

Mia was appointed to the Governor’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee in 2006 and served until 2008. She is an active Steering Committee member of the Suffolk County Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative and a member of the Special Populations Committee.  Mia serves on the Executive Committee of The Children’s League of Massachusetts and Co-chairs the Public Policy Committee.  She is also on the Board of the Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers and is Board Chair for Mothers for Justice and Equality.

 

A Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker Mia has a Master’s of Social Work from Salem State College and a Bachelor’s of Science in Education from Wheelock College.

 

 
Co-CEO Ms. Diana Thompson
Co-CEO Term Start July 2008
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience

Diana Thompson is the current Deputy Director for Roxbury Youthworks, Inc., focusing her attention on Finance and Human Resources.

Diana began her professional career working in the banking industry and after 11 years she transitioned into the non-profit sector.

In February, 1998 Diana became the Deputy Director for Roxbury Multi-Service Center in Dorchester, MA. At RMSC, Diana managed 4 programs and a 30 member staff; she also was responsible for ensuring that the agency had up to date Information Technology and Telephony systems. Diana also assisted with creating the Agency budget, and with budget spending and monitoring for several programs. Diana assisted the Executive Director and Board of Directors in creating a financially strong organization, even becoming Interim Executive Director upon the departure of the Executive Director.

After leaving RMSC, Diana worked as a small Christian non-profit organization, TechMission Inc., which provided technology and other services to Faith-Based organizations and the Faith-Based community as a whole. There, Diana directed the AmeriCorps program, helping to place more than 60 Corps members in Faith-Based programs in 5 cities across the US, and was responsible for fundraising helping to raise more than $190,000 in foundation support.

In July of 2008, Diana joined Roxbury Youthworks, Inc. and had oversight of the programs under the Department of Youth Services and Department of Children and Families contracts; she also handled some of the Human Resources and Finance functions. With the departure of the Business Manager, Diana assumed all of the Human Resources functions and more of the Finance functions; the oversight of the DYS and DCF programs has transitioned to another manager so that Diana can focus fully on HR and Finance. In her spare time, Diana works part time as a Certified Travel Agent, and enjoys traveling to different parts of the world.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Sandra McCroom Sept 2000 Aug 2007

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Renee Jones Clinical Director  

Katie Carlson is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker who has had 13 years of significant experience with directing case management, accessing services for youth and families, providing counseling services, and developing young leaders. Her career has been spent working with high risk/at risk youth and families. She has extensive clinical expertise and experience in CSEC, PTSD, ADHD as well as other forms of trauma. She has been a manager and supervisor for more than 8 years.

 

Katie became the Clinical Director of Roxbury Youthworks in October 2014.  Prior to this, Katie served as the Director of RYI’s GIFT (Gaining Independence for Tomorrow) Program, a position she held since the Program’s inception in July 2008. She was a six-year member of the SEEN (Support to End Exploitation Now) Coalition’s Steering Committee through the Children’s Advocacy Center of Suffolk County and the Suffolk County DA’s Office where she assisted in the drafting of the Safe Harbor legislation which was incorporated and signed into law as MA Human Trafficking Bill. 

 

Katie holds a Master of Social Work degree from Boston College and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology and Social and Rehabilitation Services from Assumption College.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association The Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

 

Roxbury Youthworks has built relationships with a variety of organizations that assist us in meeting the needs of our young people and their family members.  Example of these include Lovin' Spoonfuls which provides free food for our youth and their families; ABCD that assists our families with fuel assistance, gives us gift cards and employs our youth over the summer, Youth Options Unlimited for GED classes and employment assistance and Home Start for housing and shelter services. Below is an additional list of our community partners. YouthBuild Boston -- Provide building trades training and GED classes

 Strive for the Future - Provide job readiness and GED classes

More Than Words - Provide jobs for youth

 GIRLZ Radio - Provide jobs for youth and conducts groups with us

Healthy Families Massachusetts -- Provides in home parenting skill building support for teen parents.

 The Home for Little Wanderers - Provide Counseling

 Girl's LEAP - Provide self defense classes

Community Servings - Provide volunteer opportunities

RYI's staff attend the monthly High Risk Youth Network meetings held by The Black Ministirial Alliance of Boston.  Our Executive Director serves on the Executive Committee of the Children's League of Massachusetts, the Board of the Massachusetts Human Service Providers, the Suffolk County Juvenile Detention Initiative and Support to End Exploitation Now Steering committees.  She is the Board Chair and active member of Mother's for Justice and Equality.


 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 36
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 1
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 79%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 21
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 33
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Tri-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair The Honorable (ret.) Julian T. Houston (ret.)
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired - Presided over Roxbury District Court
Board Chair Term July 2017 - June 2018
Board Co-Chair Mr. Rafael Ruiz
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Retired - Boston Police Department
Board Co-Chair Term July 2015 - June 2016

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
The Honorable Angel Kelley Brown Brockton District Court Voting
Mr. Stephen G. Crawford Crawford Stretegies Voting
Mr. Donald M. Deng VP and Litigation Counsel State Street Bank Voting
Mr. David Ennis Affirmative Investments Inc. Voting
The Honorable Julian T. Houston (ret.) Retired Voting
Ms. Marie (Sandy A. Matava Suffolk University Voting
Mr. Eric Mitchell ED - Dorchester ABCD Voting
Mr. Rafael Ruiz Retired from Boston Police Department Voting
Ms. Susan Wayne Doc Wayne Athletic League Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 0
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 60%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


On January 2, 1979, I was appointed an Associate Justice of the Roxbury District Court. Among my duties was to preside over the Juvenile Session of the Court, which had been returned, coterminous with my appointment, after a thirteen year sojourn in the Boston Juvenile Court. The return of juvenile cases to Roxbury had been a condition of the black members of the House supporting Governor Dukakis’ Court Reorganization Bill which passed the House by a narrow margin.

When I arrived in the Roxbury Court, the Juvenile Session was virtually nonexistent. There were 4 probation officers who had been transferred from the Adult Session, none of whom had been trained to handle juvenile cases. There were no services within the Court for juveniles. Moreover, there were few community-based services that were interested in working with our court-involved young people. One of my first actions was to appoint a committee of social service professionals to take a hard look at the needs of the Juvenile Session & report back to me. The committee, chaired by then-Dean of the School of Social Work at BU, Hubie Jones, met for a year, interviewing community leaders & representative of community institutions. Their report confirmed that many social service institutions in Roxbury were not enthusiastic about providing services to court-involved youngsters, & it recommended that the Juvenile Session take immediate steps to create a non-profit corporation that could sponsor needed services for juveniles before the Court. As a result, RYI was incorporated as a 501(c) 3 tax exempt corporation in 1981.

Since its founding, RYI Inc. (RYI) has undergone a number of significant changes, but its core commitment has never wavered. It has been consistently committed to providing needed services to court-involved young people. The Juvenile Session in Roxbury has been moved to the Dorchester District Court, however, for the last ten years, RYI has been the sole agency entrusted by the Department of Youth Services to provide daily supervision & support to youngsters throughout the City of Boston who are committed to the Department but do not require a secure setting. It has grown from one office & a staff of one & a half people, to seven locations & a staff of 36. It has pioneered in the development of programs to address the needs of young women who are being sexually exploited for commercial purposes, & its Director, Mia Alvarado, played a leadership role in recently persuading the legislature to pass a bill that protects the rights of children that are commercially sexually exploitation. These & other accomplishments would not have been possible without a strong staff with strong leadership, a committed & supportive Board of Directors, & the consistent generosity of the various local charitable institutions, for which we are everlastingly grateful.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $3,382,386.00
Projected Expense $3,359,329.00
Form 990s

2017 990

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2017 Audit

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $2,985,998 $2,942,993 $2,648,075
Total Expenses $2,802,052 $2,794,885 $2,637,228

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $2,767,311 $2,775,018 $2,464,059
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $2,767,311 $2,775,018 $2,464,059
Individual Contributions $128,050 $72,952 $70,028
Indirect Public Support $83,826 $86,817 $91,920
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $5,537 $1,660 $1,383
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- $5,626 $4,035
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $1,274 $920 $16,650

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $2,180,369 $2,255,297 $2,048,865
Administration Expense $621,683 $509,792 $510,938
Fundraising Expense -- $29,796 $77,425
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.07 1.05 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 81% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 1% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $960,347 $821,668 $653,229
Current Assets $728,735 $698,656 $556,298
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities $140,587 $185,204 $162,284
Total Net Assets $819,760 $636,464 $490,945

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.18 3.77 3.43

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 As the Chief Financial Officer of Roxbury Youthworks, I consider us fortunate to have the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as a consistent and primary funding source. In addition to fiscal support, DYS, DCF, and DPH provide us with the opportunity to establish direct and collateral partnerships with a variety of organizations in MA. Similar to many other states, the Commonwealth faces budget difficulties so current contracts do not increase in order to meet the cost of living needs of the program, including salary increases for staff, increased rents and utilities and increases in the cost of travel for staff. In order to meet these increases, Roxbury Youthworks looks for creative ways to manage expenses, increase revenues through fundraising and create new innovative programs.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakout was not available.

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Our ultimate goal is to help the highest risk, system involved Boston youth who are caught in cycles of poverty, victimization, and violence to transition successfully into adulthood. Through individual long term mentoring, psycho-educational groups, supported and guided referrals to community resources, case management, recreational activities, and individual goal setting we help youth increase the protective factors and supports in their lives and decrease existing risk factors. We combine our services with a positive youth development approach, trauma informed practices, and a client centered framework. Youth are able to build their self esteem, heal from traumatic events, increase their confidence with setting and achieving short and long term goals, and engaging in positive pro-social connections to their communities and in individual relationships.

Part of what puts the youth that we serve at their highest risk are the disparities that exist along racial lines in Boston and particularly in the neighborhoods in which our youth live. The Mayor’s Office and the Boston Public Health Commission report consistent disparities in Boston for people of color in health, income, education, violence, arrests, and incarceration. By providing intensive services and supports to help improve outcomes for our youth in these critical areas, we help our youth to compete from a much more level playing field.
 
Specifically in combination our five programs: 
  1. Help stabilize and reintegrate youth who are coming out of court-ordered detention and treatment facilities back into their families and communities.

  2. Assist youth in achieving their goals through intensive educational advocacy and support, enhancing their job readiness skills and connecting them to employment opportunities.

  3. Address the multiple needs of young people that have been commercially sexually exploited.

  4. Work with law enforcement, child-serving public agencies and other non-profits to end the commercial sexual exploitation of children through public awareness campaigns and passing of legislation.

  5. Prevent youth and their families from becoming further system involved i.e.: keeping youth with their own families and reuniting them whenever possible.

  6. Provide basic needs assistance such as food, clothing, hygienic products and a safe place to gather.

  7. Teach clients how to be active and engaged community members while finding opportunities for them to apply these skills. 

In the next three years we will:

Complete the RYI Life Skills and Leadership Development curriculums that are geared specifically to positively impact the populations of youth we serve - DCF aging out youth, minor victims of commercial sexual exploitation including; boys, girls, young men, young women, and trans-identified individuals, and at high risk youth. We will offer both curriculums to youth in all of our 3 programs and these curriculums will be formally added to the core services that we currently offer.

Complete the first year of our BUILD Program with a full caseload of 7 boys, young men or trans-identified youth who have been victims of commercial sexual exploitation or who are at risk of becoming victims. In years two and three, we will increase our capacity to serve boys, young male and trans-identified individuals who have been victims of CSE or who are at high risk of becoming victims and who do not have open cases with the Department of Children and Families.

During FY 2015 and during part of FY 2016 we will create and implement logic models for our BUILD and YOLO Programs and begin to document youth outcomes in our Salesforce database.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

The following services & supports are provided to youth in some or all of our programs & are designed to impact outcomes & help meet client goals & needs. Programs that provide the listed service are noted after each entry:

-Youth meet with RYI Staff  for approximately 4 hours a week for mentoring/life coaching ( GIFT, BUILD)

- Resource Development Specialists visit youth in custody at least once a month 90–60–30 days before discharge to develop a relationship & begin a community plan (DO)

 - Before discharge to the community youth completes questionnaire to determine individual interests, strengths & begins short-term life goal planning, focusing on education, employment, & life skills, with support from RYI staff & DYS clinicians (DO)

-Youth are visited in school (high school, GED, college) by a Site Support Specialist(SSS) in person at least 1x/week (DO)

-SSS receives attendance records from school daily (DO)

-SSS tracks youth curfews daily (DO)

-RYI Staff accompany, transport & support youth to one or all of the following: Individual Education Plan meetings & meetings with teachers, DCF or DYS client review meetings, job interviews, college tours & interviews, recreational activities, RYI activities, & court appearances. (All)

-Through individual & group sessions, youth are provided with information about physical & sexual health, exploitive & healthy relationships, boundaries, & identifying & developing goals, & developing independent living skills. (GIFT, BUILD, DO, YOLO)

Life Coaches & youth call & text one another almost daily to check up on relationships & goals. (GIFT, BUILD)

- Life Coaches & youth create & implement personalized safety plans that: Identify triggers, identify what they can do, or what others can do to help them calm down in crisis, identify a “run plan” Life Coaches can know their potential whereabouts in a crisis (GIFT, BUILD)

- Youth participate in weekly 2.5 hour groups (psycho-educational & instructional) (GIFT, YOLO)

- Youth develop leadership skills through participation in the YELL curriculum & initiate & organize community leadership projects(YOLO)

- Youth participate in recreational &/or enrichment activities & events 2x per month (YOLO) or once every two months (GIFT) or as opportunities become available through in kind donations or DYS sponsored activities. (DO)

- Guided & supported referrals to therapy, substance abuse treatment, job readiness programs, vocational programs, life skills development programs, sporting & recreational programs, basic needs services, & housing programs (All)

To further decrease the risk factors of our youth & to impact long term outcomes, we engage our youth in advocacy & community leadership work that focuses on issues that are critical to their livelihood.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

-RYI Direct Care, Management and Administrative Staff = 36

- Staff trainings (CSEC, motivational interviewing, trauma-informed practice, gangs, positive youth development, and other relevant trainings and workshops)

 -DYS Funding

- DCF Funding

-DPH Funding 

- Private funding

- Donations

- Buildings/cars/van

- Collaterals in partnership with DCF and DYS: courts, law enforcement, BPD, probation, school, therapists, Human Trafficking Unit, placement providers, DYS Secure Treatment Facilities,

-11 member Board of Directors
 
- In-kind donations and pro-bono services 
 
-Expertise in providing recovery services to minor victims of Commercial Sexual Exploitation as well as providing informational workshops and trainings to community organizations about this issue
- As the sole  holder of the DYS Metro Boston youth community re-entry contract, we have amassed expertise in helping DYS committed youth successfully transition from DYS secure treatment facilities and placements back to their homes and communities.
 - Our staff reflect the cultural, linguistic and ethnic backgrounds of the youth that we serve and many have grown up in and/or currently live in the same neighborhoods as our youth. These commonalties allow our staff to engage our program youth in long term, impactful relationships and support services.
 - As one of the oldest minority nonprofit business enterprises in the City of Boston with a solid track record, we have been able to amass a substantive network of community partners that include funders, direct service providers, youth advocacy initiatives. Through these connections, we are also able to help leverage resources to meet the basic and emergency needs of the youth and families that we serve.
 
- Volunteers 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Outcomes are measured, tracked and documented by our direct care staff for our long standing DO and GIFT Programs. Direct Care staff measure logic model generated and defined outcomes and enter information into our Salesforce database. The data is then analyzed and reviewed by our Senior Management Team, who identify outcome informed needed improvements or changes to service provision and programming. The Program Directors and Direct Care Staff then work together to implement and tweak our service delivery. For our more recently launched YOLO and BUILD Programs, our Direct Care staff track and document the same critical elements to gauge youth success and outcomes that include improvements in: Educational, vocational, and employment performance, physical and behavioral health, safety, and building and maintaining pro-social, positive relationships with their peers, adults, and with their communities.

During FY’s 2015, 2016 and 2017, we will consistently achieve or surpass the following outcomes and benchmarks:

70% of our program youth develop and maintain a positive, non-exploitative or abusive, nurturing relationship with at least one adult for at least one year.

70% of our program youth develop and maintain one or more positive, supportive, non-exploitative or abusive relationships with a peer for at least one year.   

 65% of Youth attend school or academic program regularly and stay all day    

This outcome is measured by youth attendance and is tracked by program staff daily, weekly, or bi-weekly, and also through meetings and conferences with teachers, and parent/guardian information.

75% of youth improve grades towards grade level performance in one or more subjects, as recorded through class attendance, homework completion, class participation or grades.

65% of our high school graduates or those that receive their GED’s enter college, a vocational program or attain and maintain full time or part time employment. This outcome is measured and tracked by direct care program staff through client self-report, pay stubs, grades, and vocational program certification, during one to one meetings, feedback from employers and parents/guardians.

80% of program youth increase knowledge of and practice of sexual health and healthy relationships as indicated during 1 to 1 meetings with RYI Staff, group sessions feedback from other providers and parents/guardians, youth self-report, team meetings, or quarterly improvement in their scoring on the Healthy Relationships and Sexual Health Surveys scale.

75% of program youth attend medical and/or behavioral health appointments and adhere to physician/mental health provider recommendations 85% of the time.

75% of our youth decrease risky behavior in one or more of the following areas during a consecutive 12 month period as measured and observed during 1 to 1weekly, bi-weekly or monthly meetings or contact with RYI Staff, group sessions, program recreational activities, feedback from other providers and parents/guardians, youth self-report, team meetings,  information regarding re-commitments or new charges for our DYS youth, monitoring of social media to ascertain if BUILD or GIFT Program youth are involved in exploitative relationships, assessing all of our youth’s risk and/or victimization through commercial sexual exploitation and providing pro-active interventions and supports:

Youth refrain from running away

Youth adhere to curfew as applicable

Youth commit no new crimes

Youth reduce gang involvement and affiliation

Youth decrease substance use and/or abuse

Youth refrain from acting out through violence

Youth are not arrested or incarcerated

Youth remain free from commercial sexual exploitation 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

What We Have Accomplished: 

1. 73% of our District Office (DO) Program participants were employed between 3 to 12 months.
2. 67% of our GIFT Program girls remained free from commercial sexual  exploitation.
3. 100% of our YOLO Program youth did not become involved with the Department of Youth Services.
4. Of the 206 youth served in 2014:
   a. 25 graduated from high school or received their GED
   b. 8 graduated from junior high and successfully entered high school
   c. 113 were actively engaged in school
   d. 9 were enrolled in college
   e. 32 completed high school or their GED during 2013 and were            working full or part time.
5. 93 out of 136 DO Program youth, 36 out of 49 GIFT Program girls, and 10 of our YOLO Program youth  participated in community based enrichment activities that included: creative arts programs, sports leagues, teen empowerment programs, and community service projects.

6. As a result of the work of the Support to End Exploitation Now Coalition (of which we are a founding member) and the testimony of our GIFT girls at the State House, Governor Patrick signed Massachusetts' new human trafficking legislation in 2011. Since this victory, we participated in the Minor Victims of Sex Trafficking Implementation Committee and submitted recommendations to the AG's Office in September 2014. 

7. Our YOLO Program youth wrote, acted in, & filmed a PSA &created a social media campaign that encouraged their peers to drink water instead of sugar sweetened beverages & outlined the negative health effects of sugar sweetened beverages. YOLO youth also promoted the campaign through in person presentations at various youth organizations & programs.

8. The Massachusetts Department of Youth Services' most recent statewide report compared youth detention rates between 2011 and 2013 and found that in the Boston Metro region, the number of newly incarcerated youth decreased dramatically from 88 in 2011 to 70 in 2013. DYS attributed this decrease in youth detention rates in large part to community organizations such as RYI. 

What We Have Yet to Accomplish: 

Complete the RYI Life Skills and Leadership Development curriculums that are geared specifically to address the needs of the populations of youth that we serve - DCF aging out youth, minor victims of commercial sexual exploitation including; boys, girls, young men, young women, and trans-identified individuals, and at high risk youth. We will offer both curriculums to youth in all of our five programs and these curriculums will be formally added to the core services that we currently offer

Complete the first year of our BUILD Program with a full caseload of 7 boys, young men or trans-identified youth who have been victims of commercial sexual exploitation or who are at risk of becoming victims. In years two and three, we will increase our capacity to serve boys, young male and trans-identified individuals who have been victims of CSE or who are at high risk of becoming victims and who do not have open cases with the Department of Children and Families.

During FY 2015 and during part of FY 2016 we will create and implement logic models for our BUILD and YOLO Programs and begin to document outcomes in our Salesforce database.