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Reach Beyond Domestic Violence, Inc.

 PO Box 540024
 Waltham, MA 02454
[P] (781) 8910724
[F] (781) 8913861
www.reachma.org
[email protected]
Laura Van Zandt
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INCORPORATED: 1981
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2735449

LAST UPDATED: 05/31/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names Waltham Battered Women's Support Committee (2004)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

REACH is committed to advancing the safety, healing, and empowerment of those who experience domestic or relationship violence, through direct services and education while promoting social justice for individuals and families of all backgrounds.

Mission Statement

REACH is committed to advancing the safety, healing, and empowerment of those who experience domestic or relationship violence, through direct services and education while promoting social justice for individuals and families of all backgrounds.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $2,393,349.00
Projected Expense $2,393,349.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Based Advocacy
  • Education and Prevention
  • Emergency Shelter and Hotline

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

REACH is committed to advancing the safety, healing, and empowerment of those who experience domestic or relationship violence, through direct services and education while promoting social justice for individuals and families of all backgrounds.

Background Statement

REACH is a nonprofit agency providing safety and support to survivors of abuse while engaging community members to promote healthy relationships and prevent domestic violence. REACH believes that we can build communities in which survivors of domestic violence have support without having to flee to shelter, perpetrators of violence are held accountable, and community members are active bystanders and proponents for healthy relationships. To this end, while our direct services provide care to domestic violence survivors, we also work to change systems and attitudes in our community that affect them. This prevention work, as well as our highly personalized, inclusive approach to services is what distinguishes REACH from others in the field.

REACH began in 1981 as the Waltham Battered Women’s Support Committee, when a group of dedicated women in the Metro West suburbs of Boston saw a need for more services addressing the needs of women in abusive relationships. What started as an all-volunteer shelter and hotline has grown into a multiservice agency helping more than 6,000 people a year. We became one of the first shelters in Massachusetts to accept male survivors, parents with teenage sons, and LGBTQ survivors. The name of the agency was changed in 2004 to better reflect this evolution. In 2005, we founded the PAVE program, one of the first teen dating violence prevention initiatives in the state. Over the past 10 years, the agency has tripled in size – in budget, staff size, and the number of people we serve. In 2010, we completed a $2.5 million capital campaign and construction project which doubled our shelter capacity. Our new shelter features a first-floor, handicapped accessible suite so that we are better able to serve survivors with physical disabilities. That same year, a significant capacity building grant from the Richard and Susan Smith Family Foundation allowed us to upgrade our technology to ensure that we have the infrastructure to accommodate continued growth. In 2011 we completed a strategic planning process with a consultant from the Technical Development Corporation. We are currently exploring additional capacity building opportunities that would strengthen our operational capabilities, as well as our individual donor base, volunteer management and board recruitment, to better serve survivors in accordance with our Strategic Plan.

Impact Statement

Among our many accomplishments:

-We served 7,000 people through our various programs, providing safety and support for survivors of domestic violence, answering hotline calls, and educating the public through our innovative Prevention programs.

-We continued to be seen as a leader in the field of inclusive domestic violence service provision, and as leaders in the area of prevention.

-We surpassed our fundraising goal for the year.

-We successfully engaging hundreds of people in the movement to stop domestic violence, through one-on-one conversations, community events, volunteerism, and fundraising.

-We developed tools to evaluate and improve our work. We worked in collaboration with several other domestic violence agencies to develop a tool that measures the empowerment of survivors while taking into account the many factors affecting their lives that we can’t influence (availability of affordable housing, how a judge will rule on a restraining order, whether or not an abuser will abide by court mandates). This tool  measures things like a survivor’s knowledge (access to information about how to keep safe), goal setting (ability to see a path to keeping safe), and self-efficacy (belief in their own capacity to keep safe).

Looking ahead, our goals include:

-Successfully complete construction and the transition into new office space, which will allow us to server more survivors and serve them better, and to expand our prevention programs into even more communities.

-Continue to develop evaluation tools in collaboration with other agencies and with leading researchers in the field.

-Expand our donor base through efforts to engage individual donors and corporate and foundation funders.


Needs Statement

-We need to secure the remaining funding which will allow us to move into new office space, because our current space no longer fits the needs of the organization and the ever-growing demand for our services. We have secured space in Waltham and are looking to renovate it and move in during late summer 2017.

-Continue to provide exceptional services by maintaining fully staffed programs and eventually expanding our staff, enabling us to work with even more survivors and with community members around prevention.

-Secure one or more large-scale ($100,000+) capacity building grants to enhance our operational capabilities and grow the agency to meet the increasing demand from the community.

-Our strategic plan calls for strengthened efforts to bring about systemic change for survivors, reducing the systemic barriers they face. Specifically, increasing access to appropriate mental health services for our clients is a priority.

-Our strategic plan also calls for increased access to legal representation for our clients.

CEO Statement

In 1981, a handful of committed volunteers from the community took a chance and took responsibility for creating safer and healthier communities. In 2011, we celebrated the 30thAnniversary of their efforts, recognizing three decades of refuge, education, advocacy and change – and the many survivors who reach beyond domestic violence every day. Our founders recognized that it could happen here, and it could happen to anyone, but that it didn’t have to. It was a community problem, and the community could do something about it.

Our programs are life-saving AND life-changing: our advocates stand with survivors who are facing tremendous risk in reaching beyond domestic violence – doing safety planning, going to court, working on housing, finding jobs and schools and daycare, as well as physical and mental health services. Our child and adolescent therapist works with kids and parents who have lived with abuse– sometimes for years. Our prevention team reaches into the community in a variety of ways, helping neighbors, clergy, schools, and businesses join in the work to end domestic violence.

At REACH, we are working to end domestic violence by not only providing a safe place for survivors but by working to change the conversation, change the expectations, and change the norms. Our staff and volunteers work with systems and communities in ways that support survivors in finding safety while preserving dignity and autonomy.

Domestic violence thrives in silence – isolation, stigma, shame. Each and every one of us, our voice is a primary tool. On the hotline, in support group, in the classroom, at board meetings, at the library or the hair salon, we speak to comfort, to educate, to advocate, to create change. Talking about domestic violence or talking about healthy relationships can be tough. And we want it to get easier. We offer training, we visit homes, places of worship, businesses, we talk with teachers, parents and coaches… we help our communities find a voice – whether as survivors or as neighbors, friends, and family. Domestic violence affects all of us and all of us can work to end it.

Board Chair Statement

Being Board President of REACH Beyond Domestic Violence is both challenging and immensely rewarding. The challenges are daunting at times; we will never completely eradicate domestic violence. It often seems that rather than decreasing, disclosure of incidences of violence are on the rise, and there is still so much to accomplish in terms of educating individuals and communities about causes and prevention. Funding is a constant challenge.

But we, as an organization, have had many successes as well. Our teen dating violence prevention program is being introduced in a growing number of high schools in the 27 cities and towns we serve.  We began a community organizing pilot program in one city, to help people meet their neighbors, reach out to others in the community, and use their voices to talk about domestic violence and its prevention.   Last year, as part of our five year strategic planning process, we got feedback from numerous other agencies, elected officials, and members of communities we serve that showed we both have a positive impact on those groups, and that the word about domestic violence prevention is beginning to be heard.

We have had many children born in our shelter because mothers are abused during pregnancy. We have seen abuse between same sex couples, and between family members. We see children who are traumatized by the violence they have witnessed. We have been able to make a difference in many of these lives.  We have watched members of our agency’s or just say Survivor Speakers Bureau  come through terribly abusive relationships, and with REACH’s help, overcome countless obstacles and choose to share their stories to help others.

I personally feel rewarded by my interaction with both our professional staff and dedicated Board members, and knowing that our work is having a positive effect on so many survivors and their families. I am proud of our successful capital campaign that allowed us to double the number of families we serve in our shelter.

 At one time, I served on the board of a homeless shelter in New Hampshire. Many of the women and children staying in that shelter had been victims of domestic violence. They left home and came to look for safety; however the shelter was not confidential, and abusers would at times stand outside, begging for another chance. You could see the tears of the little ones calling to their father, the hope on the women's faces, but also the fear that the cycle of abuse would begin again. It was heartbreaking.

I have witnessed friends of my children in abusive high school relationships. I saw a young girl who was living with us at the time, threatened by a boyfriend who told her that if he couldn’t have her, no one would, and recklessly speeding with her in the car until she was able to escape and come home shaken and terrified. I have seen neighbors from other countries accept bullying and abuse because it is accepted in their country of origin.

 Each of these incidents had me wondering how I might make a difference.  REACH has given me that opportunity. I am passionate about the work REACH does, my role in the organization, and my choice to become an Ambassador for REACH Beyond Domestic Violence.


Geographic Area Served

METROWEST REGION, MA
REACH's service area includes the following cities and towns:

Acton, Arlington, Bedford, Belmont, Billerica, Boxborough, Burlington, Brookline, Carlisle, Concord, Dedham, Lexington, Lincoln, Littleton, Maynard, Needham, Newton, Reading, Sudbury, Waltham, Watertown, Wayland, Wellesley, Weston, Wilmington, Winchester, and Woburn. This is where we provide Community Based Advocacy and Education and Prevention efforts. Our shelter/hotline serve survivors from across the state and occasionally beyond.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Violence Shelters and Services
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Community Based Advocacy

Given that there are fewer than 200 shelter beds in the state to accommodate the demand, it is imperative that domestic violence victims have access to support within their communities without having to flee to shelter. While we are committed to maintaining our shelter for the safety and security of individuals in immediate danger, our range of services extends to Community Based Advocacy, allowing survivors to receive many of the same services but without having to relocate and leave community ties behind. This allows us to work with survivors wherever they are on their journey, and to assist a far greater number than can be helped through shelter alone. Shelter programs, for security reasons, can only help a survivor after they’ve left an abusive partner. But we are able to help survivors who might be struggling with the decision to leave. We work with each survivor to identify areas of need, and encourage them make the best decisions for their families.
Budget  $415,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success 

Over the course of our interactions with survivors, we aim to increase skill building around coping mechanisms, self care and harm reduction, with the following overall goals in mind:

 

1. Residents feel and are safe.

2. Decreased feelings of isolation among victims of domestic violence.

3. Decreased use of negative coping skills

4. Increased use of positive coping skills.

5. Increase in survivors’ perceived mental wellbeing and ability to make decisions.

6. Increased access to outside resources.
Program Long-Term Success  While our Community Program provides direct care to domestic violence survivors, we also work to change systems in our community that affect outcomes for survivors. REACH works to engage law enforcement, court and probation personnel, legal services, mental health and housing service providers to raise awareness of issues pertaining to domestic violence and to ensure that survivors are less likely to fall through the cracks of an overworked system. Through this approach to service delivery, we are addressing the issue of domestic violence by changing the way information is shared and resources are allocated. This improves relationships between service providers and law enforcement, improves the competence of police officers and sensitivity to domestic violence, and increases the number of individuals who are referred for services. Using this collaborative model, we assess for homicide risk and make sure that other parties understand when a survivor is at particularly high risk.
Program Success Monitored By  Survivors in our Community program work out a personalized plan with their REACH Advocate defining their desired goals and objectives. With this approach, success is not defined by any one set of criteria but rather with the belief that the survivor should be empowered to decide what their own best course of action is. REACH is in the process of developing an evaluation tool in collaboration with several other domestic violence agencies that measures the empowerment of survivors while taking into account the many factors affecting their lives that we can’t influence (availability of affordable housing, how a judge will rule on a restraining order, whether or not an abuser will abide by court mandates). This tool will measure things like a survivor’s knowledge (access to information about how to keep safe), goal setting (ability to see a path to keeping safe), and self-efficacy (belief in their own capacity to keep safe). We will use these results to improve our service delivery.
Examples of Program Success  One of the things our Advocates do frequently is accompany survivors to court, and also to prepare them for the experience of court and help them debrief afterwards. One time an abuser’s brother chased the Advocate and the survivor out of court and the court officer had to walk them to their cars and detain the brother. Because REACH had previously facilitated meetings between this survivor and the local police department, she had a relationship with them, knew that they believed her, and felt comfortable calling them after this incident. When they got home there was already a police escort in front of the house. REACH helped her change the locks on her doors so the abuser gain access. She attends a REACH support group, and has continued access to an Advocate who understands that leaving an abuser is a process and walks side by side with her, helping decide what’s a violation of the restraining order, going to probate court to deal with issues of child support and visitation.

Education and Prevention

REACH’s Prevention and Education Program challenges the dangerous perception that domestic violence is a private, family issue, or one that happens elsewhere. We use a 3-pronged approach Youth Work: We reach 2,000 teens a year using evidence-based curriculum and interactive discussions to encourage teens to think about healthy relationships. We offer support groups for girls at risk, and host a statewide summit bringing teens together to discuss healthy relationships and peer leadership. Community Education: Working with faith groups, police departments, hospitals, and neighborhood organizations, we lead conversations with people around domestic violence, what it looks like and how to support those experiencing it. Network Mobilization: We bring together cross-sections of the community to determine the best strategy for getting the message out regarding domestic violence, in order to create community-driven, culturally-appropriate prevention strategies.

Budget  $200,000.00
Category  Public, Society Benefit, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

We anticipate reaching 2,000 youths and an additional 1,000 adults with our Education and Prevention Program in the coming year. We expect to see the following results:

 

1. Participants will demonstrate increased knowledge of what constitutes healthy and abusive relationships.

2. Participants will demonstrate increased knowledge of relationship violence, its causes, and consequences.

3. Participants will express having the skills and resources to help themselves or friends if they are in an abusive relationship.

4. REACH will improve the social climate in communities where we work by lessening acceptance of domestic violence, building stronger communication and anger management skills, lessening gender stereotyping, and creating a greater awareness of community services for abuse.

5. REACH will reduce the impact of abuse and enhance the safety of survivors of domestic violence by providing direct services.pasting
Program Long-Term Success  REACH believes that we can create a sustainable model, in which survivors of domestic violence have access to support without having to flee to shelter, perpetrators of violence are held accountable for their behavior, and community members become active bystanders and proponents for healthy relationships. Many incidents of domestic violence are never reported, so conversations that take place around the kitchen table or in the local coffee shop have tremendous potential to influence community perceptions around healthy relationships. By encouraging conversation about domestic violence, REACH counters the perception that domestic violence is a private, family issue, or one that happens only in certain circles. This stigma can isolate and endanger victims of abuse, and isolation is often perpetuated by abusers as a means of maintaining control. By raising awareness and developing locally based solutions we reduce the isolation felt by victims and prevent future violence from occurring.
Program Success Monitored By  To measure our outcomes, we currently evaluate the program using surveys that measure changes in participants’ knowledge around the causes and appearance of relationship violence, what resources are available to them, and how to help a friend in need. We are in the process of developing a more sophisticated tool that will allow us to capture not only change in knowledge, but also attitudes and behavioral intentions. With funding from a local community foundation, we have engaged a consultant to help us design new tests, as well as run and analyze the data, conduct a multi-year analysis, and help us develop evaluation measures for the peer leadership component of the program. We will use these results to make continuous improvements to the program.
Examples of Program Success  During the fall semester, our youth educator encountered a freshman girl who had been in an abusive relationship in the 8th grade. The girl disclosed the relationship to her health teacher, and the REACH staffer was able to do some advocacy work with her to help her understand the emotional after effects of the abuse that she was still experiencing. The health teacher later remarked to the REACH staffer that while he had always been in favor of this program, he had always thought of it as preventive, it hadn’t occurred to him that students would be coming into their freshman year having already experienced dating abuse. This story also illustrates the value of being able to provide wrap-around services. Talking about the issue of dating and domestic violence in a public and educational way inevitably leads to disclosures. REACH has the expertise to address these disclosures in a trauma-informed way.

Emergency Shelter and Hotline

 

REACH’s Emergency Shelter Program serves people who are fleeing from abusive situations in their homes or relationships, and often have no place else to turn. We offer a comprehensive range of services designed to provide immediate safety, meet the needs of victims, and to help them gain independence. Those services include counseling, assistance securing longer-term housing, support with legal issues, a children’s therapy program, and access to other resources beyond those of a typical shelter program to help families heal physically and emotionally. REACH’s shelter serves as a first line of defense for victims who are facing physical injury, economic uncertainty, and the lasting effects of trauma that influence their emotional and mental health, their coping skills, and their ability to make decisions for their families. We help families articulate their own goals and outcomes for the duration of their time with us, and measure progress against those stated goals.
Budget  $475,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success 

Over the course of our interactions with survivors, we aim to increase skill building around coping mechanisms, self care and harm reduction, with the following overall goals in mind:

 

1. Residents feel and are safe.

2. Decreased feelings of isolation among victims of domestic violence.

3. Decreased use of negative coping skills

4. Increased use of positive coping skills.

5. Increase in survivors’ perceived mental wellbeing and ability to make decisions.

6. Increased access to outside resources.
Program Long-Term Success  As an organization, REACH is working to foster communities where survivors have support without having to flee to shelter, and where perpetrators are held accountable.  Ultimately we hope that shelters like ours will no longer be needed, but we remain a place of safety and security until such a time.
Program Success Monitored By 

For the shelter we measure numbers of: survivors and children sheltered, bed nights provided, and survivors who accessed benefits or counseling services. We conduct exit interviews with residents where they self-report outcomes, including decreased feelings of isolation, mastery of positive coping skills, and a greater perceived ability to make decisions. We monitor the growth of the overall program, as well as the progress of individual survivors toward their own personal goals. For some this may mean accessing transitional or permanent housing, finding a job with adequate benefits, or learning to cope with the effects of their trauma in a healthy way.

 

REACH is in the process of developing an evaluation tool in collaboration with several other domestic violence agencies that measures the empowerment of survivors while taking into account the many factors affecting their lives that we can’t influence. This tool will measure survivors’ knowledge, goal setting, and self-efficacy.
Examples of Program Success  Finding a safe, affordable place to live away from their abuser can be especially difficult forsurvivors of domestic violence, who face numerous obstacles. In some cases, the survivors we work with have no paper trail to prove their residence in the past (necessary for accessing public housing), in other cases their name is associated with an abuser whose destructive history puts them in a negative light. Some have bad credit due to a history of financial abuse. Calls to prior landlords may alert the abuser to their whereabouts and compromise their safety. One survivor who stayed with us was initially denied housing because of her ex-husband’s history of destructive behavior. REACH walked her through the appeal process, vouched for her status as a victim, demonstrated her separation from her abuser, and helped her win the appeal and get her own apartment, which she has successfully maintained for over a year now.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Laura Van Zandt
CEO Term Start Oct 2004
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Executive Director since 2004 (and board member prior to this role), Laura Van Zandt has extensive experience in project management, fiscal management, and organizational development. Under her leadership, REACH is enhancing its community outreach programs to better address the constantly changing needs of victims of domestic violence. With support from the Board of Directors, Van Zandt has led a successful capital campaign, enhanced the agency’s community presence, and expanded REACH’s teen violence prevention outreach program. Formerly a Vice President at Scudder Investments, Van Zandt worked to develop new mutual fund products and provided sales support for offices around the world. Immediately prior to coming to REACH, she was Vice President of Relationship Management for the Mutual Fund Group at Wellington Management Company, where she worked with clients to manage the investment, administrative, legal, and marketing aspects of sub-advisory relationships. She holds a B.A. from Cornell University and and M.B.A. in finance from Boston College’s Carroll Graduate School of Management.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Deborah Heimel Director of Operations --
Heather Hernandez Director of Residential Programs --
Brianna Nadelberg Director of Development --
Maria Pizzimenti Director of Advocacy --
Jessica Teperow Director of Prevention Programs --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 18
Number of Part Time Staff 9
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 73%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 16
Hispanic/Latino: 7
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 27
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Heather Campbell
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Board Chair Term July 2014 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Claire Bean Northeast Bank Voting
Brooke Brown Chair, Dana Hall School Store; Former kindergarten teacher Voting
Heather Campbell Community Volunteer Voting
Kevin Dunckel Program Presenter, Boston Museum of Science; Former Customer Service Engineer with EMC Corporation Voting
Jane Edmonds Vice President for Governance at Babson College --
Barry Guryan Esq Epstein, Becker & Green Voting
A. Miriam Jaffe Esq Kushner Sanders Ravinal LLP Voting
Stephen R. Langlois Fidelity Investments Voting
Kathie Lyons Partner, CIO Sensei Voting
MaryAnn Mattoon Community Volunteer Voting
MBaye NDiaye MFS Financial Services Voting
Stephen Reed Esq. Partner, Beck Reed Riden LLP Voting
Diane Suda DMD Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates Voting
David Weaver The Survey Group Voting
Sylvia Whitman Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 11
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $2,087,112 $1,863,750 $1,571,145
Total Expenses $2,007,984 $1,796,460 $1,619,275

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $943,663 $697,087 $562,174
    Federal $88,290 $36,098 --
    State $839,695 $606,054 $503,069
    Local $15,678 $27,935 $34,105
    Unspecified -- $27,000 $25,000
Individual Contributions $1,008,626 $1,025,013 $891,055
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $295 $305 $368
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $50,784 $51,840 $28,785
Revenue In-Kind $83,744 $89,505 $88,763
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,503,643 $1,310,040 $1,179,490
Administration Expense $139,771 $140,260 $122,082
Fundraising Expense $364,570 $346,160 $317,703
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 1.04 0.97
Program Expense/Total Expenses 75% 73% 73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 18% 20% 21%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $2,745,866 $2,709,271 $2,621,070
Current Assets $584,191 $496,959 $352,318
Long-Term Liabilities $1,678,392 $1,691,521 $1,704,432
Current Liabilities $51,379 $80,783 $46,961
Total Net Assets $1,016,095 $936,967 $869,677

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 11.37 6.15 7.50

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 61% 62% 65%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note this organization changed its fiscal year dates from Jan.-Dec. to July-June in 2013. As such, the 2013 990 and audit documents posted above reflect a 6 month period and that data is not shown in the charts and graphs.  
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

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1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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