Share |

Hull Lifesaving Museum, Inc.

 PO Box 221, Nantasket Avenue
 Hull, MA 02045
[P] (781) 925-5433
[F] (781) 925-0992
www.lifesavingmuseum.org
[email protected]
-- --
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1981
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2738797

LAST UPDATED: 09/20/2015
Organization DBA N/A
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

The Hull Lifesaving Museum, the museum of Boston Harbor Heritage,  preserves the region's lifesaving tradition and maritime culture through collections, exhibits, experiential and interpretive education, research and service to others.  The museum's open water rowing programs in Boston Harbor educate young people about themselves while developing a constituency that takes stewardship for its maritime history. The deeds, traditions, and ethics of nineteenth century coastal lifesavers - Skills, Courage, and Caring - are the foundation of the museum's exhibits and programs, and its underlying commitment to working to impact society, and individual lives, for the better.

Mission Statement

The Hull Lifesaving Museum, the museum of Boston Harbor Heritage,  preserves the region's lifesaving tradition and maritime culture through collections, exhibits, experiential and interpretive education, research and service to others.  The museum's open water rowing programs in Boston Harbor educate young people about themselves while developing a constituency that takes stewardship for its maritime history. The deeds, traditions, and ethics of nineteenth century coastal lifesavers - Skills, Courage, and Caring - are the foundation of the museum's exhibits and programs, and its underlying commitment to working to impact society, and individual lives, for the better.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $845,700.00
Projected Expense $794,384.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Home Waters
  • Maritime Apprentice Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Hull Lifesaving Museum, the museum of Boston Harbor Heritage,  preserves the region's lifesaving tradition and maritime culture through collections, exhibits, experiential and interpretive education, research and service to others.  The museum's open water rowing programs in Boston Harbor educate young people about themselves while developing a constituency that takes stewardship for its maritime history. The deeds, traditions, and ethics of nineteenth century coastal lifesavers - Skills, Courage, and Caring - are the foundation of the museum's exhibits and programs, and its underlying commitment to working to impact society, and individual lives, for the better.

Background Statement

The Hull Lifesaving Museum is so much more than a museum. Founded in 1978, we are an essential part of the community that for 30 years has provided not only crucial lessons from our maritime heritage, but also life-changing and sometimes life-saving experiences. Our mission celebrates the lifesaving spirit of Skills, Courage, and Caring, and the relevance of our history to our constituents’ daily lives. As one of our region’s leading cultural organizations and agents of social change, HLM draws people in and challenges them to draw the best from themselves by combining social service and experiential education with historical preservation and interpretation.  

HLM’s year-round education, recreation, and job-training programs, serving a diverse constituency 75% of whom are underserved youth from metropolitan Boston, are broadly recognized as best practice models, locally, nationally, and internationally. In December 2008, “demonstrating an innovative and highly effective solution to the youth drop-out and unemployment crisis,” through the MAP program, HLM was selected as a 2009 Social Innovator by Root Cause (Social Innovation Forum). The resulting training and support, has enabled HLM to develop the business frameworks and skills to allow us to even more effectively deepen and expand our organizational impact. 

HLM’s individualized program design respects the needs, expectations, and skill level of each participant. Our programs are ambitious, effective, diverse, and built on an understanding of HLM’s place in our stakeholders’ lives. In addition to MAP, HLM’s work includes Boston and South Shore-based, world-renowned open water rowing and experiential learning programs (“Home Waters”) that teach adults and children the values and skills of 19th century lifesavers, as well as an unparalleled collection of images, stories, and artifacts engagingly displayed and interpreted in the restored 19th century Point Allerton U.S. Life-Saving Station (National Register of Historic Places, 1981)  – the region’s premier resource for U.S. Coast Guard, Maritime, and Small Craft scholarship and the home of America’s most renowned lifesaver, Joshua James (1826-1902). Dramatically located at the mouth of Boston Harbor facing Boston Light, the Station is the site of the greatest number of rescues from shipwreck in the country. 


Impact Statement

HLM’s 5 greatest accomplishments of the past year are being invited to join the PACT partnership (through the Governor’s Safe and Successful Initiative), launching a Livery Boat Rental program in Fort Point Channel, with the support of the city, Installing a new Roof on our landmark historical property, the Point Allerton U.S. Life-Saving Station (HLM’s headquarters), developing the capacity of the Maritime Apprentice Program, and diversifying and expanding our fundraising. The highly competitive PACT, administered through the Boston Dept. of Public Health, is a remarkable network of 15 programs most effectively serving Boston’s most proven-risk youth through training, education, and counseling. Having operated open-water rowing programs in Boston Harbor for 35 years, HLM is excited to have been invited by the city to launch a small-boat rental program in the heart of downtown. Capital fundraising is a challenge, as is properly caring for a national, historical treasure. The new, cedar-shingle roof is Phase 1 of a multi-year, 3-Phase restoration plan. MAP both expanded and deepened this year, adding 3 new seats and testing implementation of a new career exploration curriculum. Our funding plan includes two-dozen private and corporate foundations, two federal grants, state funding, two annual fundraising events, and an annual giving campaign. Current Year Goals: Expand HLM staff by 2 positions (educator and case manager), increase our reserve fund to cover 3 months’ operating expenses, intensify succession and sustainability planning toward having a formalized set of goals by year-end, increase private and philanthropic support by 10%.


Needs Statement

HLM’s 5 most pressing needs are: Board development, Funding, Staff development, Sustainability and Succession Planning, and Space. Our dedicated Board is limited in its capacity and ability to help HLM embrace opportunities for overall growth and, particularly, expansion of our Boston-based identity and programs. The Board knows this, and eager for help. While HLM is adept at surviving on shoestring funding, we have meager reserves and no endowment. Our vision for growth far outreaches our current capacity, and financial constraints increasingly interfere with organizational and personal creativity. Most HLM staff still wear many hats. This exhausts personnel, and hinders succession and sustainability planning. We must grow our staff numbers, invest in their expertise, and promote specialization. HLM’s valued programs still rest too heavily on their founders’ visions and the personal sacrifices of staff who accept egregiously low wages to invest in program development. We are eager to strengthen our infrastructure, provide competitive salaries and benefits, and reward dedication and excellence. Our spaces are cramped, and innovative program ideas are hampered by crowding and sharing of facilities. HLM hopes to relocate it headquarters from the South Shore to Boston.


CEO Statement

--

Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
--

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - History Museums
  3. Education - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Home Waters

Home Waters (HW) inspires excitement about learning. A Harbor-based experiential learning program, HW builds self-confidence, respect for others, academic and communications skills, engagement with community, and consciousness of social responsibility through on-the-water adventure, strong and consistent adult and peer leadership, and delightful intellectual content. HW is an effective program for dropout prevention/stay in school, early intervention/diversion, and a support for sobriety. For all youth, it offers a happy and safe oasis in the city.Home Waters’ parallel core activities are year-round, fixed-seat/open-water rowing in Boston Harbor, academic support, and cultural enrichment. The program operates year-round, Monday through Friday, out of the Hull Lifesaving Museum’s facilities in downtown Boston’s Marine Industrial Park – our Seaport Boatshop and Boston Rowing Center (pier-side activities and rowing fleet) in Fort Point Channel.
Budget  $187,530.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

The year-round Home Waters program has three short-term goals:

Goal 1.To provide recreational programming for 200 urban young people annually.

Goal 2.To stimulate intellectual excitement and growth through the study of Boston Harbor and related areas of local history, heritage, and ecology.

Goal 3.To sustain a safe, open, trusting urban learning refuge that encourages discoveries about oneself, one’s peers, and one’s environment.

Program Long-Term Success 
The long-term measures of success in Home Waters is demonstrated by:
  • Students staying in school and advancing a grade throughout the school year.
  • A cadre of young people who feel a sense of stewardship for Boston Harbor, and are able to demonstrate their prowess by providing information about the resource, leading (mentoring) others into the resource, and modeling sensitivity to the ecology and history of the marine environment.
  • Establishing friendships and crews that cross neighborhood and ethnic lines.
  • Linking, through discussion and activities, on the water and land-based social and personal discoveries and issues, creating meaningful, enduring learning.
Program Success Monitored By  We measure Home Waters and its outcomes through:
  • Monthly evaluation of participants’ comportment and development
  • Monthly documentation of enrollment figures, including detailed demographics
  • Monthly documentation of individual and crews accomplishments.
  • Annual student and parent questionnaires, assessing program content and climate.
  • Verification of students’ school status via school counselors, advisors, and teachers.
  • At least 25% participants volunteering time to the site and program.
Examples of Program Success 
Home Waters serves young Bostonians who have long been recognized as “disengaged” and “disconnected.” Increasingly, a large part of our target constituency is being identified as “proven risk.” Given the crucial linkage between education, employability, and stability, we are proud and pleased that 100% of Home Waters participants, for the 12 years that we have collected the data, have remained in school and advanced a grade level.
 During the past year, we served 200 young Bostonians, 75% recruited through public schools, and the balance through community-based organizations throughout the city. They travel to Home Waters from all over the city, including neighborhoods in Allston/Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, Downtown, East Boston, Fenway/Kenmore, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, Roslindale, Roxbury, South End, and South Boston. 75% are middle- and high-school students in Boston Public Schools, the remaining 25% participating in one of Boston’s alternative education programs.
 

Maritime Apprentice Program

MAP is an intensive, multi-year program that prepares Boston’s proven-risk, DYS-committed youth for adult responsibilities and careers in technical trades. Based in our downtown Boston Seaport Boatshop, MAP provides hands-on, skills-based training, combined with counseling and work readiness prep. MAP works with each youth for a minimum of 2 years, through direct service, extensive referrals, and co-enrollment with program partners. As apprentices’ personal, social, and technical skills develop, activities become progressively more complex and rewarding. Apprentices are paid a weekly wage and are required to co-enroll in GED or diploma-granting programs. Those with high school certificates continue onto college, training, industry certifications, internships, or work. MAP offers an extraordinarily personalized approach to addressing pervasive unemployment, under-education, and recidivism. Our staff trades-people, teachers, and social workers embrace the ethic of never giving up.

Budget  $470,116.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Offenders/Ex-Offenders Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Short term, and core MAP goals for apprentices are stability and first-steps toward successful citizenship, such as a high school credential, advanced training or college credentials, employment and career-orientation, and variety of measures indicating departure from the street: Staying out of jail, detaching from gangs, and engaging with family, mentors, wholesome friends, and counseling.
Program Long-Term Success 
  • All MAP apprentices attaining GEDs and diplomas, attending college or in advanced training.
  • Apprentices in paid and unpaid internships, developing relationships and cultivating mentors among MAP industry partners.

Program Success Monitored By      Apprentices gain significant emotional-, intellectual-, and skills-based competencies in MAP. MAP’s core, hard-skill evaluation tool is our Individual Skill Assessment (ISA) that measures the hard skills in MAP’s two-year curriculum on a three-point scale. The tasks currently measured by the Qual Card are broken down by area, including Basic Carpentry Skills, Planning and Survey, Hull Systems, Powertrain Systems, Electrical Systems and Mechanical Systems, and closely mirror the MAP Shop Curriculum. This tool will be modified during the current program year to include new Green Technologies-related skills. Individual soft skills assessments also are carried forth on a monthly basis.
Examples of Program Success 

   Youth in DYS custody are often unable to meet the acceptance and retention standards of programs in Boston that offer vocational training, leaving them with few if any options for pursuing further education or employment. MAP and our partners embrace this population with a proven model that fosters its success.MAP collects data on Apprentices’ re-offense rates, progress in receiving a high school credential, post-secondary degrees, or advanced training, and their success in attaining employment.

·  Eighty-one percent of apprentices have not re-offended since entering MAP.

·  Sixty-eight percent of MAP’s former dropouts have attained a high school credential or remain in school.

·  Eighty-seven percent of MAP apprentices have pursued advanced training and education, gotten employment, and/or have been accepted into trade unions.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Lory Newmyer
CEO Term Start July 1997
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Corinne Berry Leung Director of Advancement & Communication --
Mr. Edward P. McCabe MS Director of Maritime Programs --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
American Association of Museums - Member 2012
Associated Grant Makers 2012
Chamber of Commerce 2012
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Boston Youth Services Network (BYSN)
Backroads of the South Shore
Northeast Region Coaches Confederation
Council of American Maritime Museums (CAMM)
New England Museum Association (NEMA)
U.S. Life-Saving Service Heritage Association (USLSSHA)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 10
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 120
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): Brazilian
Gender Female: 4
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Robert MacIntyre
Board Chair Company Affiliation Facilities Management Consulltant/Self Employed
Board Chair Term July 2002 - June
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Stacey Best Board of Bar Overseers, SJC Voting
Ms. Dolly Snow Bicknell Kingston Tennis Club, Tennis Pro Voting
Mr. Nowell Bloomenthal Bloomenthal & deBastos, LLC Voting
Ms. Diana Burns Gray, Gray & Gray, CPA's, Partner Voting
Mr. Paul Carlson Cohasset Selectman Voting
Mr. Steven Clancy Mutual Telecom Services, Owner & CEO Voting
Ms. Maureen Gillis Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Dental Network Mgr Voting
Mr. Paul Lualdi Engineer, Retired Voting
Mr. Robert MacIntyre Facilities Management Consultant/Self Employed Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Response
  • Trusteeship

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $883,363 $726,843 $664,306
Total Expenses $799,373 $734,076 $632,582

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $273,958 $173,365 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $273,958 $173,365 --
Individual Contributions $493,184 $430,601 --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $71,808 $40,440 $600,796
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- $1 $1
Membership Dues $5,480 $5,403 $1,967
Special Events $38,933 $77,033 $61,542
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $718,895 $675,308 $577,146
Administration Expense $23,321 $43,456 $40,763
Fundraising Expense $57,157 $15,312 $14,673
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.11 0.99 1.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses 90% 92% 91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 2% 24%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $280,038 $164,830 $171,506
Current Assets $156,574 $55,461 $68,338
Long-Term Liabilities $74,100 $83,195 $62,468
Current Liabilities $53,505 $13,193 $33,362
Total Net Assets $152,433 $68,442 $75,676

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.93 4.20 2.05

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 26% 50% 36%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--