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Organization DBA MACDC
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Community Development Corporations (CDCs) are community-controlled, nonprofit organizations that work throughout the Commonwealth to build more inclusive, vibrant, and productive communities. The Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC) is an association of CDCs and other community-based development organizations that are dedicated to working together and with others to create places of opportunity where people of diverse incomes and backgrounds access housing that is affordable, benefit from economic opportunities and fully participate in the civic life of their community. We achieve this by building and sustaining a high performing and adaptive community development sector that is supported by private and public investment and sound public policies.

Mission Statement

Community Development Corporations (CDCs) are community-controlled, nonprofit organizations that work throughout the Commonwealth to build more inclusive, vibrant, and productive communities. The Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC) is an association of CDCs and other community-based development organizations that are dedicated to working together and with others to create places of opportunity where people of diverse incomes and backgrounds access housing that is affordable, benefit from economic opportunities and fully participate in the civic life of their community. We achieve this by building and sustaining a high performing and adaptive community development sector that is supported by private and public investment and sound public policies.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,315,400.00
Projected Expense $1,310,410.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Development Advocacy & Organizing
  • Mel King Institute for Community Building
  • Member Initiatives Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Community Development Corporations (CDCs) are community-controlled, nonprofit organizations that work throughout the Commonwealth to build more inclusive, vibrant, and productive communities. The Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC) is an association of CDCs and other community-based development organizations that are dedicated to working together and with others to create places of opportunity where people of diverse incomes and backgrounds access housing that is affordable, benefit from economic opportunities and fully participate in the civic life of their community. We achieve this by building and sustaining a high performing and adaptive community development sector that is supported by private and public investment and sound public policies.


Background Statement

The Massachusetts community development field started in the late 1960s when residents of low- and moderate-income communities organized themselves into effective and powerful community-based organizations. The vision from the start was that these organizations would provide a voice for the disenfranchised, foster equitable community development and transform communities in ways that respect, include and empower local residents. First in Boston and then spreading across the state, the CDC model has achieved sustained success over the past 40 years, making Massachusetts a key leader in community development for the country. In 1982, CDC leaders formed MACDC to unite community development practitioners across the Commonwealth and to lead advocacy and capacity building efforts that would strengthen community-based development.

 
MACDC is recognized nationally for our large and active membership base, our successful advocacy campaigns, our effective capacity building programs, and our commitment to community-leadership and organizing. One additional factor in our success is our ability to work with and through coalitions in order to more effectively address a broad array of issues that impact our communities.

 


Impact Statement

Since their inception more than 45 years ago, Massachusetts CDCs have developed over 20,000 homes and attracted several billion dollars of investment to low- and moderate-income communities. The MACDC GOALs Initiative - Growing Opportunities, Assets, and Leaders across the Commonwealth - measures the field’s annual progress in the following categories, helping to capture the broad impact our field has collectively across Massachusetts: community leaders engaged; homes produced and preserved; job opportunities created or preserved; local entrepreneurs assisted; families supported; and investments in local communities. Each year, MACDC conducts a detailed online survey of our members to learn precisely what they have accomplished.
 
In 2015, MACDC's members leveraged $859.9 million of investment into our communities to support these outcomes:
- 2,055 affordable homes built or preserved;
- 6,680 jobs created or preserved;
- 2,397 community leaders were engaged;
- 2,218 entrepreneurs assisted; and
- 72,896 families supported with housing and jobs, foreclosure prevention counseling, homebuyer, education and other services
 
MACDC’s current work is framed by these four objectives:
1. Support our members so they can achieve tangible and meaningful results for our communities;
2. Ensure that the Community Investment Tax Credit is successfully implemented, so that it achieves its full potential for improving communities and expanding opportunity;
3. Advocate for state, local and federal public policies that better support community-led efforts to create places of opportunity for everyone; and
4. Build and sustain the Massachusetts community development “eco-system,” so that it enables diverse stakeholders to work collaboratively and efficiently to achieve comprehensive community building outcomes.

Needs Statement

1. MACDC looks to develop relationships with new prospective donors and investors in our work.  We are currently looking for support for our general operations, advocacy, capacity building and communications work.
2. MACDC seeks professionals to serve as Community Development Mentors to promote and support a culture of learning and mentoring within the community development field and to enhance the preparation of mid- to senior-level professionals of color for advancement.
3. MACDC is also looking to develop relationships with new prospective donors and investors to support the Mel King Institute for Community Building, which we co-founded and operate. The Mel King Institute provides community development leaders with comprehensive trainings and courses to build the skills they need to be effective in their positions in the community. Contributions to the Institute provide student scholarships and underwrite training programs.
4. MACDC will be undertaking a new strategic planning process in late 2016 and/or early 2017 and will be looking for funding to support a consultant to assist with this process. 
 

CEO Statement

MACDC's membership includes every certified CDC in Massachusetts, giving us a unique understanding of the challenges facing these important organizations.  Our membership structure also enables us to unite and organize the CDC sector around important policy campaigns - bringing power and influence to a diverse network of grassroots organizations. As a practitioner-led organization, we have a unique ability to speak on behalf of these community-based groups and to build bridges between our members and other stakeholders in government, the nonprofit sector and the private sector.  Indeed, this bridging role has emerged in recent years as a critical "value-add" that we bring to the community development eco-system as all of us pursue more comprehensive and cross-sector approaches to community improvement.  We have effectively bridged practitioners and policy makers across multiple sectors, including housing, business development, workforce development, community organization, public health, environmental justice, energy efficiency, and public safety.
 
Finally, I think one of MACDC's core strengths is our willingness to challenge old thinking and pursue new innovations.  This trait is evident in our leadership of the Community Development  Innovation Forum since 2006, the creation of the Mel King Institute in 2009, the passage of CDC certification legislation in 2010 (to increase accountability within the sector) and the creation of the Community Investment Tax Credit in 2012. 

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Massachusetts-All Regions

The direct beneficiaries of our programming are the Community Development Corporations (CDCs) and other community development organizations across Massachusetts. The population served by MACDC's members experience lower household median income, higher percentage of poverty and unemployment rates, and have higher representation of African Americans, Latinos and Asians than statewide averages. 

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  2. Housing, Shelter - Alliances & Advocacy
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Community Development Advocacy & Organizing

MACDC is a prominent leader within Massachusetts in shaping public policy related to community and neighborhood development. MACDC focuses its advocacy and organizing activities on matters related to affordable housing (including mixed- use development and transit oriented development), small and micro business development, family asset building, community reinvestment, and community building.
MACDC deploys both an "inside" and "outside" approach to advocacy in which we maintain strong and active relationships with legislators and policymakers, while also organizing, training and mobilizing grassroots leaders to be active participants in the policy making process.
MACDC is also a strong believer in the power of coalitions to influence policy and we participate in numerous coalitions related to both our core issues as well as other important issues such as public transit, workforce development, public health, energy efficiency and clean energy, safety, and youth development.
Budget  $241,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Community Economic Development
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
MACDC is currently developing a new legislative agenda for the new legislative session, which begins in January 2017. Short-term success of our work will be largely based upon policy and budgetary outcomes for the legislative issues for which we are advocating.
Program Long-Term Success 

An overall goal of our advocacy and organizing work is to achieve greater economic opportunity for all residents of the Commonwealth. We believe that everyone deserves a fair and genuine opportunity to participate in the economic mainstream and achieve economic security. This means that we must provide the access and the tools that enable people to succeed and address structural obstacles that prevent many of us from fully benefiting from the economic opportunities available in our communities.

Program Success Monitored By 
In the short-term, we know if our advocacy work is successful by tracking policy and budgetary outcomes: the number of bills that move forward in the legislative process; the number of bills that pass into law; and the value of approved budgetary line items relative to previous expenditure and perceived need.
Over time, we know if our programs are successful by measuring the aggregate outcomes of our members at the community level. Every year we conduct the GOALs survey of our members to enumerate the number of housing units preserved or created, the number of small businesses assisted, the number of leaders engaged, for example.
Examples of Program Success:
Our GOALs outcomes tallies the impact of this state-level advocacy work at the community level. In 2015, MACDC's members leveraged $859.3 million of investment into our communities to support these outcomes:
- 2,397 community leaders were engaged;
- 2,055 affordable homes built or preserved;
- 6,680 jobs created or preserved;
- 2,218 entrepreneurs assisted; and
- 72,896 families supported with housing and jobs, foreclosure prevention counseling, homebuyer, education and other services
Examples of Program Success 
Our GOALs outcomes tallies the impact of this state-level advocacy work at the community level. In 2014, MACDC's members leveraged $615 million of investment into our communities to support these outcomes:
- 1,459 affordable homes built or preserved;
- 6,161 jobs created or preserved;
- 2,569 community leaders were engaged;
- 1,304 entrepreneurs assisted; and
- 72,046 families supported with housing and jobs, foreclosure prevention counseling, homebuyer, education and other services

Mel King Institute for Community Building

The Mel King Institute for Community Building’s mission is to foster vibrant and thriving Massachusetts communities by advancing the skills, knowledge and leadership ability of professional practitioners and volunteer leaders in the community development field. The Institute does this through four key activities:
- Providing high-quality professional development courses, workshops and seminars to community development professionals, board members, AmeriCorps service members and volunteers;
- Sponsoring the Innovation Forum to provide a structured process for engaging practitioners, academics, and researchers in discussions about new ideas and approaches;
- Serving as a professional development resource and network through our website, newsletter, and our growing network of partners;
- Addressing issues of inequity, racism and inclusion in community development and our organizations, through the multi-sector coalition The Alliance - Advancing Community Development by Confronting Racism.
   
Budget  $273,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Organizational Development & Training
Population Served Other Named Groups
Program Short-Term Success  The Mel King Institute has firmly established itself as a center for learning within the Massachusetts community development field. Our programmatic short-term success will be measured by the overall breadth of courses and learning sessions we provide. Our goal is to offer 30 days of training with at least 500 students participating each year. We also will host three innovation forums and continue to operate The Alliance’s mentoring program through FY 2017.
Program Long-Term Success  The long-term objective of the Mel King Institute for Community Building is that more community development organizations have qualified professionals and leaders, and in turn, will have a greater capacity to deliver on their mission of community development and community building. The Mel King Institute is dedicated to providing high-quality training programs to a broad spectrum of individuals and organizations across the state.
Program Success Monitored By 
The Mel King Institute is committed to evaluation and continual learning. An outside evaluator was hired in 2010 to develop a logic model, participant survey questions and instruments, and an overall evaluation plan.
At the conclusion of the first year of operations, the external evaluator prepared a report evaluating the courses offered from December 2009 through June 2010 utilizing participant survey responses. The report was issued in August 2010. For the second year of operations, the Mel King Institute expanded the scope of the evaluation to include interviews of prior participants to capture individual experiences and to better understand the longitudinal impact of the Institute’s work and again, a report was prepared in August of 2011. The King Institute continues its annual third party evaluations, which can be found at https://melkinginstitute.org/evaluation.
Examples of Program Success 

Even though the Mel King Institute for Community Building was established only seven years ago, we are beginning to see the long-term impact of the program. For example, a North Shore CDC staff person was awarded a MKI Scholarship to attend the National YouthBuild Conference several years ago. She went back to her organization with new knowledge of the program’s structure, applied for funding and in 2013, YouthBuild North Shore was born. The first of its kind in Essex County, they serve 32 Salem and Lynn youth annually. Another early participant in our trainings was a young AmeriCorps member who went on to a senior staff position at a CDC, became a member of our Steering Committee, and even taught classes for the Institute! These are but two examples of how our program contributes to the long-term success of the people and organizations with whom we work.


Member Initiatives Program

Through our Member Initiatives Program, MACDC works to ensure that community development organizations throughout the Commonwealth have the tools and resources they need. Over the next year, MACDC will:
(1) Support peer learning and networking by hosting 30 peer learning sessions focusing on content areas such as affordable housing development, small business development, Community Investment Tax Credit implementation, community organizing and communications;
(2) Provide specialized technical assistance to at least 35 CDCs;
(2) Continue our partnership with the Massachusetts Minority Contractors Association (MMCA) to increase CDC utilization of W/MBEs on our construction projects;
(3) Work with Boston LISC, the Multifamily LEAN Program, and New Ecology to help CDCs and other nonprofit owners of affordable housing retrofit their properties to make them more energy efficient;
(4) Release the annual GOALs report highlighting Massachusetts CDC's housing and community development activities.
Budget  $419,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Organizational Development & Training
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
Between 7/1/2016 and 6/30/2017, MACDC expects to achieve the following outcomes:
1) Peer Learning and Networking: 150 people will participate in at least 30 peer group meetings, developing new skills and broadening their professional network;
2) Economic development through increased MBE/WBE Hiring: Expand the Boston Pilot Program from 12 projects to 20, while continuing to meet our ambitious goals of procuring 30% of the contracts with MBEs and 10% of the contracts with WBE's;
3) Affordable Housing Energy Retrofits: Funding continues to be allocated toward the retrofitting of low- and moderate-income households to help CDCs complete more than 1,000 energy retrofits annually;
4) Annual GOALs Report: Release our annual State of the Sector report in early May of 2017.
Program Long-Term Success 

MACDC's Member Initiatives Program will be successful in the long-term as determined by the impact of our member's work across the Commonwealth. Our members, CDCs, directly address the disparities and inequalities in our communities by focusing on creating places of opportunity where all people can live with dignity while participating in and benefiting from our economy. To start, CDCs help create opportunities for people to come together to plan for the future of their community. From the overall direction put forth by the community, CDCs then focus on developing and revitalizing the built environment of each neighborhood in which they work. Through the ongoing process of transforming the places in which people live and work, individuals and families are better positioned to focus on their future with access to quality housing, services, schools, and transportation options. As people have more options to thrive, new energy contributes to the ongoing revitalization of the community.

Program Success Monitored By 
MACDC primarily will use our GOALs Report to evaluate the success of our work. As our members increase their internal capacity and apply new skills and best practices to their work, MACDC will track the increase in our member's overall output in their community.
The MACDC GOALs Initiative is our annual research, documentation and accountability tool. Each year, MACDC collects production data from each of our members using a sophisticated online survey tool. Out of this data collection process, we produce two key reports based on our findings. One report is a short, eight-page document highlighting results from the year; it is distributed to the public, government officials, funders, and others. The second report is a detailed appendix with data on every project and program offered by our member organizations.
With respect to the Boston Pilot Program, we are collecting data quarterly from the 12 projects to monitor progress toward our goals.
Examples of Program Success 
Our GOALs outcomes tallies the impact of our Member Initiatives work at the community level. In 2015, MACDC's members leveraged $859.3 million of investment into our communities to support these outcomes:
- 2,397 community leaders were engaged;
- 2,055 affordable homes built or preserved;
- 6,680 jobs created or preserved;
- 2,218 entrepreneurs assisted; and
- 72,896 families supported with housing and jobs, foreclosure prevention counseling, homebuyer, education and other services

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Joseph Kriesberg
CEO Term Start July 2002
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Joe Kriesberg is the President and CEO of MACDC.  He first joined MACDC in 1993 as Vice President and served in that capacity until he became President in July 2002.  He oversees the agency's advocacy work with public and private sector entities, its capacity building work with members, its long-term strategic planning, its collaborations and partnerships and internal operations. He has launched several innovative new programs at MACDC, including the Mel King Institute for Community Building, the GOALs Initiative, the biennial MACDC conventions and the Community Development Innovation Forum – a collaborative process to identify and implement strategies to help the field adapt to the changing context for its work. During his tenure, Joe has led the association's legislative advocacy work. He has helped to pass many important bills through the Massachusetts Legislature, including the groundbreaking Insurance Industry Community Investment Act (1998), the Affordable Housing Trust Fund (2000), the Small Business Technical Assistance Program (2006), a comprehensive anti-foreclosure law (2007), a new law to help preserve so-called “expiring-use” affordable rental communities (2009) and the Community Investment Tax Credit (2012). Joe serves on the board of several state and national organizations, is frequently asked to speak on community development issues and trends here and around the country, and writes about these issues for MACDC’s website (www.macdc.org)

 
Prior to working for MACDC, Mr. Kriesberg worked for eight years on energy and environmental issues for nonprofit organizations in Washington, DC and Boston, MA. Mr. Kriesberg has a B.A. from Binghamton University (New York State) and a J.D. Degree from Northeastern University in Boston. He is a member of the Massachusetts Bar.
 
He lives in Boston, MA, with his wife, Dina Brownstein, and their two children, Joshua and Michael.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Shirronda Almeida Director of Mel King Institute for Community Building

Shirronda Almeida, assists CDCs in improving their capacity as community resources and serves on MACDC’s management team.  She manages the Alliance – Advancing Community Development by Confronting Racism, the Community Development Mentoring Program and spearheaded the launch of The Mel King Institute for Community Building in May, 2009.

Before working at MACDC, Shirronda worked on various local and statewide youth development, organizing, prevention and public art programs.  She holds a Master's degree in Education from Harvard Graduate School of Education where she focused on adolescent Risk and Prevention and social change.  She received her B.A. from Simmons College in International Relations and minored in Spanish.  Shirronda also enjoys traveling, dancing, practicing yoga and reading.

Mr. John Fitterer Director of Communications

John Fitterer, Director of Communications, oversees MACDC's fundraising, marketing and communications programs and serves on MACDC's management team. Central to these core responsibilities is working with leaders in the philanthropic and business community to significantly raise the awareness of community development as a critical component to thriving communities. Currently, John is focusing on promoting and raising funds for the Community Investment Tax Credit, a $66 million / 6 year tax credit for CDCs in Massachusetts.

Before working at MACDC, John was the Director of Resource Development and Marketing at Nuestra CDC in Roxbury, MA. Prior to switching to the nonprofit sector, John helped launch a successful web-application and software company across North America. John is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of Binghamton University with a BA in English.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Community Service Award to Joseph Kriesberg CHAPA 2015
Diane Sterner Award for Leadership to Joseph Kriesberg Nat'l Assoc. of CED Associations 2014
Nonprofit Advocacy of the Year Award Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2013

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

MACDC engages in formal and significant collaborations with local service providers through our membership structure. We have 88 member organizations, all of whom are involved in providing housing, economic opportunity and other services to low- and moderate-income people in the Commonwealth at the local level. MACDC’s organizational structure and programs provide substantial opportunity for us to work with our members and for our members to advance our shared goals.  

MACDC also engages in several formal collaborations with other organizations when doing so can advance our goals and mission. Two years ago, we established a relationship with the Massachusetts Minority Contractors Association (MMCA) to ensure local contractors are getting more opportunities to participate in CDC-led real estate development projects. We also play a leadership role in advocacy coalitions, including Building Blocks, the Smart Growth Alliance and Transportation for Massachusetts. We also serve on several boards for sister organizations including the Mass. Community Banking Council, the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, the Smart Growth Alliance, and the National Alliance for Community Economic Development Associations (NACEDA).

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Robert Corley
Board Chair Company Affiliation NeighborWorks Southern Mass
Board Chair Term Nov 2015 - Oct 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Jess Andors Lawrence CommunityWorks Voting
Ms. Vanessa Calderon-Rosado IBA-Inquilinos Boricuas en Accion Voting
Ms. Janelle Chan Asian CDC Voting
Ms. Yun-Ju Choi Coalition for a Better Acre Voting
Mr. Dave Christopolis Hilltown CDC Voting
Mr. Robert Corley NHS of the South Shore Voting
Mr. Marc Dohan Twin Cities CDC Voting
Mr. Philip Giffee NOAH Voting
Ms. Ann Houston The Neighborhood Developers Voting
Mr. Joseph Kriesberg MACDC Voting
Ms. Gail Latimore Codman Square NDC Voting
Mr. Danny LeBlanc Somerville Community Corporation Voting
Mr. Mickey Northcutt North Shore CDC Voting
Mr. Frank Shea Urban Edge Voting
Mr. Stephen Teasdale Main South CDC Voting
Mr. Richard Thal Jamaica Plain NDC Voting
Ms. Marcia Thornhill Nuestra Comunidad Development Corporation Voting
Ms. Corinn Williams CEDC-SM Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Sara Barcan CEDAC --
Ms. Marizabel Benoit Boston LISC --
Ms. Janelle Chan Asian CDC --
Ms. Susan Connelly MHP --
Ms. Amy Cotter Metropolitan Area Planning Council --
Mr. John Fitzgerald Volunteer --
Mr. Ezra Glenn MIT --
Ms. Machiko Hewitt The Lawyers Clearinghouse --
Ms. Tamar Kotelchuck Federal Reserve Bank of Boston --
Mr. Joseph Kriesberg MACDC --
Ms. Sarah Lamitie Boston Private Bank & Trust --
Ms. Meredith Levy Somerville Community Corporation --
Ms. Maria Mulkeen Hyams Foundation --
Ms. Madeline Nash Boston LISC --
Mr. Mat Thall South West Boston CDC --
Mr. Antonio Torres Mass Housing --
Mr. Bob Van Meter Boston LISC --
Ms. Carol Wolfe DHCD --
Ms. Aspasia Xypolia Viet-AID --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 8
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 64%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Membership
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Public Policy/Advocacy

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,315,400.00
Projected Expense $1,310,410.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2016 MACDC Audit

2015 MACDC Audit

2014 MACDC Audit

2013 MACDC Audit

2012 MACDC Audit

2011 MACDC Audit

2010 MACDC Audit

2009 MACDC Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,303,154 $1,010,187 $1,043,123
Total Expenses $1,180,677 $1,072,707 $1,044,806

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$830,800 $519,250 $666,723
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $73,435 -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $204,253 $238,889 $199,889
Investment Income, Net of Losses $154 $532 $245
Membership Dues $141,672 $136,922 $121,510
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $29,051 $19,807 $49,726
Other $23,789 $94,787 $5,030

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,004,484 $932,321 $938,022
Administration Expense $132,579 $83,291 $57,708
Fundraising Expense $43,614 $57,095 $49,076
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.10 0.94 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 85% 87% 90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 5% 11% 7%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $709,847 $573,594 $640,177
Current Assets $666,239 $548,140 $616,433
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $144,242 $130,466 $134,529
Total Net Assets $565,605 $443,128 $505,648

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 5.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.62 4.20 4.58

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

MACDC has increased its unrestricted net assets every year since Joe Kriesberg became President in 2002.  We have a stable and diverse array of revenue sources including membership dues, tuition, contract income, government contracts, sponsorships, corporate donations, foundation grants, and individual donations. In recent years, we have significantly increased our earned revenue through the Mel King Institute, grown our member dues by over 20% and increased our individual donations from about $5,000 to about $35,000 annually.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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