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East Boston Ecumenical Community Council (EBECC)

 50 Meridian Street, B1
 East Boston, MA 02128
[P] (617) 567-2750
[F] (617) 569-5946
WWW.EBECC.ORG
[email protected]
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INCORPORATED: 1983
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2774242

LAST UPDATED: 07/10/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

East Boston Ecumenical Community Council, Inc. is a neighborhood-based organization that promotes the advancement of Latino immigrants of all ages through education, services, advocacy, community organizing, and leadership development.

Mission Statement

East Boston Ecumenical Community Council, Inc. is a neighborhood-based organization that promotes the advancement of Latino immigrants of all ages through education, services, advocacy, community organizing, and leadership development.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $754,000.00
Projected Expense $754,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Aspiring to Achieve
  • EB Parents Organizing
  • Immigration and Legal Assistace Program
  • Latina ESL

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

East Boston Ecumenical Community Council, Inc. is a neighborhood-based organization that promotes the advancement of Latino immigrants of all ages through education, services, advocacy, community organizing, and leadership development.

Background Statement

East Boston Ecumenical Community Council (EBECC) was founded in 1978 when a group of concerned religious leaders responded to racial antagonism and the resulting violence towards people of color. They worked at integrating them into the neighborhood public schools and public housing. Over the years these refugees changed to Cambodians and Vietnamese and then toward providing a safe haven to Salvadorans who had fled persecution and terror in their homeland.

Today, EBECC’s mission is to promote the advancement immigrants of all ages through education, services, advocacy, community organizing, and leadership development. By participating in EBECC programs, newcomers build support networks and acquire information and skills to achieve their own goals. By participating in EBECC organizing initiatives, they engage in collective action to improve the quality of life in East Boston and to advance immigrant rights at the local, state, and national levels.


Impact Statement

1.  EBECC served an unduplicated total of 5,300 individuals since July 2011. To deal with volatile funding, a week economy, and increasing service demand we conducted a strategic plan’s alignment this year.
2. The Immigration and Community Legal Assistance Program (CLAP) served an unduplicated total of 3,620 individuals from September 2011 through August 2012. Of these 1,200 individuals received general services such as case consulting, advanced parole, translation, letters to USCIS, and notary services.
3.  The Latina ESOL Program targets women ages 18-60 who have limited English proficiency. 180 Students attended at least 12 hours over the year, and 149 Students demonstrated learning gains over the year from level I to III.
4. 160 youth in ASPIRING participated in ESL classes, technology programs, Healthy Lifestyle workshops and counseling services. Out of 20 senior attending the program, 18 graduated from high school.
5.   EBECC will continue to work with the BUS coalition demanding that the Boston Public Schools and the Boston Teachers Union agreement on the Boston teacher’s contract seeking to improve the education of all Boston public school students is implemented. That contract must compel real reforms that drive systemic change in the Boston Public Schools.  
 

Needs Statement

Generate sufficient funds to support high quality programs, fiscal stability, and future growth through a comprehensive and diversified fundraising strategy. With this in mind we need to conduct a community needs assessment using primary and secondary sources including some information generated through direct dialog with potential and current clients to guide EBECC's future planning, fundraising, and programming that meets the unique needs of this population.
Hire a consultant to conduct a feasibility study for a capital campaign. The campaign will tests the case for support and the organization's standing in the community, identifies potential prospects and volunteer leaders, and engages key stakeholders as insiders. It provides validation and/or correction to the Case for Support based on what the philanthropic market will support. The campaign goal will be to reach $1M dollars to secure a new facility to increase service capacity.
 
 

CEO Statement

As EBECC's Executive Director, I am very proud to be at the helmet of an organization that provides the Latino community in East Boston with quality and invaluable services to help them realize their dreams. I am also grateful to all those who have contributed to helping my work at EBECC see positive results, from Board members, staff, volunteers, universities, community partners, and foundations. To lead a group of committed an dedicated staff is very rewarding. We all should be proud of EBECC’s achievements. I certainly am. There is a lot to do and the challenges are many. Yet we must celebrate our achievements and the elimination of many barriers facing the non-profit sector, but most important, immigrants in East Boston.

Board Chair Statement

As a member of EBECC's Board of Directors, I am proud to stand by an organization that provides the Latino community in East Boston the services and support necessary to achieve their hope for a better life.

Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- East Boston
EBECC is a neighborhood-based, multi-service agency located in East Boston Massachusetts. Although its main focus is East Boston, EBECC provides immigration services to Boston and its surrounding communities.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Ethnic/Immigrant Services
  2. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Intergroup/Race Relations
  3. Youth Development -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Aspiring to Achieve

ASPIREis a year-round, out-of-school-time program that promotes educational achievement by Latino immigrant students at East Boston High School (EBHS). The program offers: (1) ESL instruction; (2) study skills courses; (3) homework help; (4) open access to a computer lab; (5) health promotion and social issue workshops; (6) enrichment and recreational activities; and, (7) counseling and advocacy services that address school, personal, and family issues. Program staff is based at EBHS four mornings a week during the school year and at EBECC’sYouthCenterat other times.
Budget  $160,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Hispanic, Latino Heritage Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success   

Specific Outcomes to measure success are:

1. Students enrolled in ESL courses at EBECC will improve proficiency in English. 75% of students attending ESL I and ESL II instruction and 65% of students in Study Skills ESL will gain in English speaking and listening skills on the post-test at course completion. 

2. Students who participate in ASPIRING activities will improve school work and gain in social skills with 95% of students remaining enrolled in high school at the end of the school year and 90% of students who are seniors will graduate on time. In 2011 95% of seniors enrolled in the program graduated on time.

3. Students will have the skills and support to manage personal and family problems effectively with 52 students in need of counseling being successfully referred to services atASPIRINGor another community resource.

4. Students will have opportunities for developing skills in problem solving, independent thinking and life choices while developing their self-confidence and self- motivation. 175 students will participate in healthy choice/life skill workshops or activities with another 50 taking on leadership roles within the organization.

Program Long-Term Success   EBECC's longterm success is the elimination of barriers for Latino immigrant teenagers. They face many barriers to their academic achievement including: little or no proficiency in English; limited formal education for many of those who have emigrated from Central America; lack of exposure to computer technology prior to their arrival in the United States; lack of effective programming in middle and high schools in Boston that meets their needs, particularly the needs of those over-age and under-educated for their grade; difficulty in coping with issues related to past trauma and present cultural transition; lack of access to school and community services due to cultural and linguistic barriers. 

While all after-school programs in East Boston welcome youth from diverse cultural and racial backgrounds, onlyASPIRINGaddresses the specific needs of limited English-proficient Latino high school students. ASPIRINGis specifically designed to support the academic achievement and social functioning of immigrant youth and is one of the few neighborhood programs for teens focusing on academic achievement, leaderhsip and life skills development and civic engagement.

Program Success Monitored By   ASPIRING staff keep detailed records of student attendance and participation in the program and its activities in order to determine the number of unduplicated outputs for each activity. In addition, staff track drop-out rates, school attendance, and graduation rates.
In order to measure progress in the ESL courses, staff compares participants pre-test and post-test scores using Best Test. Staff also compares grades in the participant's ESL courses at EBHS throughout the year.

The Clinical Social Worker uses attendance records and participant charts (including treatment plans) to track individual progress and progress in group counseling.
Attendance rates and termination types are also tracked.

Examples of Program Success 

The overall outcome will be that Latino Immigrant East Boston High School students who are struggling in school will be identified in a timely manner and receive the prevention, counseling and confidence building help they need and thus acquire the skills, knowledge and ability to successfully move forward through school and graduate on time. 

Participants who take part in ASPIRING will:
Have a good attendance record

Improve their proficiency of the English language
 
Improve their mastery of the computer skills required for completion of school assignments.

Be able to complete homework assignments and develop strong study skills.

Further their acculturation process while affirming their cultural identity.

Gain control of school, personal and/or family problems that were hampering their academic achievement and/or jeopardizing their continued school enrollment


EB Parents Organizing

 The East Boston Parent Organizing Program promotes participation by Latino immigrant parents in East Bostonin in organizing to improve the Boston Public Schools (BPS). Activities include: (1) provision of classes through which parents acquire the knowledge and skills that result in increased involvement in their children’s education; (2) staffing of an education action committee comprised of parents whose children attend public schools in East Boston; (3) school-based support for parent organizing efforts at the Guild, Umana and O’Donnell Elementary Schools; and, (4) integration of Latino immigrant parents from East Boston into city-wide, school reform initiatives organized by the Boston Parent Organizing Network.
Budget  $60,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Children's Rights
Population Served Hispanic, Latino Heritage Children Only (5 - 14 years) Families
Program Short-Term Success   Increasing the power of parents, students and community members through education, mobilization, and leadership development. In addition,clearly define strategies to leverage the Coalition’s expertise and influencein pursuit of campaign goals and education reform work. Concretely:

We have been working withBostonParent Organizing Network’s (BPON) Youth Leadership program and thirty (30) of our youth participated in this activity.

During the Year we included youth from our ASPIRING program in advocacy efforts ensuring increased student leadership in the coalition. In total 70 students have participated in advocacy efforts.

Through meetings and workshops parents and community members have shared knowledge, experience and challenges with the coalition and BPS. An average of 67 attendees participated per event.

In addition they took the goals and message of BUS and incorporated it into the following activities: 1) testified about what needs to be addressed to provide good public education at public hearings; 2) attended parents committee meetings at O’Donnell and Guild Schools; 3) made presentations at the Guild ESL classes, 4) planned agendas and attended parents council meeting at O’Donnell; 5) made testimony presentations to the media and 6) met with city Councilors, BTU, and Superintendent of School.

Program Long-Term Success   EB-POP’s goal is to promote participation by Latino immigrant parents in East Bostonin organizing to improve the BPS. Its objectives are to:

·        Promote the acquisition by 70% of Latino immigrant parents in East Boston of knowledge and skills that will increase their involvement in their children’s education in the BPS;

·        Strengthen vehicles to promote participation by Latino immigrant parents in organizing to improve public schools in East Boston;

·        Develop leadership among 50% of Latino immigrant parents in East Bostonin organizing to improve the BPS; and,

·        Promote participation by Latino immigrant parents in citywide campaigns to improve the BPS.

·        Raise awareness of problems and solutions

To meet its goals EB-POP developed its activities based upon: (1) input from the Parents’ Committee; (2) evaluation y revision of goals and objectives; (3) feedback sessions held with the principals of the schools, (4) feedback from participants in parent education training; and, (4) staff support and learning from their work.
Program Success Monitored By   Measuring the number of Engage families of BPS students as partners to increase student achievement:

A. Increase the number of schools with active and effective parent councils specifically schools with an FCOC and improving system wide processes.

  • Actual increase the number of parents attending parent/teacher conference by 30% and parent attendance by 15% in Open Houses
  • Actual increase % active and well informed parents on School Site Council in all schools

B. Advocate for the superintendent to demonstrated commitment to family engagement.

 C. Advocate for evaluations of every principal on family engagement by the school district.

Examples of Program Success   10 parent leaders from each group lead, all organizers, and EB-POP staff, and MAC as co-chair participated in Conference.
 
30 parents requested deputies to hold Principal accountable sending timely communication (mailings, calls) to homes in the appropriate language (open house, site council, parent teacher, and student discipline, report cards.)
50 parents reported changes on how schools note school attendance beyond home to notify parents of absences.
 
Change student suspension from out of school to in school suspension. Advocate for required notification to parents on warning notice- student discipline, attendance.

Immigration and Legal Assistace Program

Immigration Program assists eligible immigrants in taking advantage of opportunities to work legally, reunify with family members  left behind in their homeland, and progress towards legal permanent residency and eventually naturalization. 
Budget  $240,000.00
Category  None of the above
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Hispanic, Latino Heritage Families
Program Short-Term Success 
Both programs have denostrated a very succesful impact in the life of immigrant families and individuals. The Immigration and Legal Assitance program served an undiplicated total of 5,636 individuals. 964 individuals obtained theri temporary protected status (TPS) while 2,300 received general services such as advanced parole, letter to USCIS, and notary services. In terms of family petiotions, 168 individuals completed i-130 petitions so that they could reunite with their family here in the U.S. 
The Latina ESL services served 200 Latinas. 95% made education progress, and 88% made exceptional gains on the Best-Plus Test.
Program Long-Term Success 
Latina ESL Program promotes effective functioning by pregnant and parenting Latino immigrant women in their role as parents, homemakers, consumers, and neighbors through the acquisition of English language proficiency, the mastery of life skills, and the development of support network. 
Program Success Monitored By 
Immigration services are measure by the number of individuals that have succesfully obtained legal status or have reunited with family memebers or obtained work permits. In the ESL Program, it is required that at least 85% of students will advance to an ISPL level on the BEST-PLUS test.
Examples of Program Success 
200 individuals have improved English Language proficiency by participating in the Latina ESL program.
 
The immigration and legal Assistance program provided services to 5,636 unduplicated clients.
 

Latina ESL

Latina ESL Program promotes effective functioning by pregnant and parenting Latino immigrant women in their roles as parents, homemakers, consumers, and neighbors through the acquisition of English language proficiency, the mastery of life skills, and the development of support networks. The program provides: (1) beginning and high beginning-level ESL instruction; (2) Spanish-language courses on women’s health and parenting; and, (3) on-site babysitting for children one week to five years of age concurrent to the ESL classes.
Budget  $230,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Females Hispanic, Latino Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success 

 In 2011, 218 women enrolled and participated in three levels of ESL over the course of the year and an average of 40 children (toddlers and infants) received creative care per cycle. Of the learners completing Level I and II, 82% exhibited an increase in their SPL level in the oral section of the BEST Plus test and of the learners completing Level III, 94% achieved post scores of at least SPL 1-2 in English reading and writing skills. An important fact is that 100% of  learners in Level II, upon finishing the course, registered for further education, 74 learners enrolled in Level III classes and 2 students became volunteers after completing Level III.

 

 

Program Long-Term Success  EBECC has offered ESL instruction since 1987. The Latina ESL Program targets women ages 18 to 60 years of age who have limited English proficiency. The goal is to provide services to 275 women during the year. Priority is given to women who: (1) have entered the United States within the past five years; (2) have little or no literacy in their native language; (3) are pregnant and/or parenting; and, (4) are heads of household. EBECC’s Latina ESL program is unique because it uses a case management approach to address the needs of the women for not only ESL classes but also other services to meet the social and personal needs of the participants. This wrap around program of services insures that the participants achieve a successful integration into their new community upon completion of the classes
Program Success Monitored By   Methods used to gauge progress include:
  • Completion of Student Intake and Termination Forms;
  • Maintenance of Program Attendance Records;
  • Pre/Post-ESL Testing, utilizing the oral section of the short form of the BEST test and program-developed tests of reading and writing skills; and,
  • Completion of a Course Evaluation Questionnaire by learners in Spanish to solicit feedback on what they liked and did not like as well as suggestions for improving the program.
Data on student residency, enrollment, attendance, completions, and number and reason for terminations, is collected on an ongoing basis, primarily by the Education Coordinator.
Examples of Program Success   

A structured plan with measured outcomes is in place to evaluate the proposed program. Participant successes are listed below:

  • 80% of learners in Levels II and III will achieve a learning gain of 33 points on the BEST-Plus test and/or advance to the next level
  • 75% will achieve a learning gain of some points in English and reading and writing skills
  • 90% of learners will register for further education upon completing Level II or Level III
  • 100% of learners will complete a course evaluation questionnaire in Spanish soliciting feedback on program as well as suggestions for program improvement
  • Teachers will participate in at least one in-service training and/or observation of another program’s ESL classes

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Key strategic directions to be pursue over the next 3 years are necessary. There is a significant number of Latino residents seeking citizenship naturalization and US Civic Education. We started a Citizenship class with fee for service contributions but would like to obtain more finacial support for this program and expand it to include ESOL To Work classess. EBECC Board and management believe that the current mix of programs, as they are currently operating, address many vital individials and community needs. However, more resources are needed to cover a broad expectrum of clients and ensure financial sustainability for the organization. We also belive that these existing programs should be expanded to meet the demand of the growing Latino immigrant population in East Boston.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Frank M. Ramirez BSBA, MBA
CEO Term Start Aug 2007
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Frank Ramirez career history includes government, health care, and human services. With an MBA from the University of Southern New Hampshire and two Bachelors of Science degrees, he began his career in the US in Human Resources after leaving his native Nicaragua. Working for the Nicaraguan Government,  Frank obtained an advanced certificate in Development Projects Administration from the Central American Institute of Business Administration (INCAE) sponsored by the Inter-American Bank of Development. His skill in administration led him to be the Associate Director of the Greater Lawrence Family Health Center in Lawrence, and then CEO at two Federally Qualified health centers, one in Tulsa, OK and the second in Rochester NH. In Tulsa, at the Morton Comprehensive Health Services, he successfully turned around and eliminated a $700,000 deficit. He has been on the Board of Directors of several non-profit institutions in Massachusetts, Florida,New Hampshire, and Oklahoma. Currently he serves in the Board of the EBNHC.
Frank has a well-rounded experience in public policy and advocacy at the national, state, and local level. He has been affiliated with important institutions such as the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Massachusetts Department of Social Services, Wang Laboratories, and HDC Diagnostics, a radiology, and clinical laboratory company in south Florida. In primary care, Frank was the Associate Director and COO for the Greater Lawrence Family Health Center, a $20 million FQHC in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where he played a significant role in the implementation of the Family Residency Program to train Medical Doctors in family and community medicine.

As the executive Director of EBECC he directs EBECC’s operations to achieve its mission to advanced opportunities and advocacy on behalf of Hispanics and other immigrants of East Boston with a commitment to reduce racial and ethnic disparities, develop self-sufficiency and self determination.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Luisa Chew Coordinator Immigrantion & Legal Assistance Program  Luisa is bilingual in Spanish/English. Originally fromGuatemala. Bachelor’s degree in Psychology. Eleven (11) years experience in her current position at EBECC.Specific duties  include: (1) counseling about options and resources; (2) referrals to attorneys or legal assistance agencies; (3) N-400 naturalization application assistance; (4) preparation and filing of NACARA cases; (5) preparation of advance parole forms; (6) preparation of I-130 family petitions, I-485 adjustment of status forms, and DS-230 consular process forms; and, (7) renewal of work permits. In addition to the above services, she provides information about changes in U.S. immigration policies and procedures and rights under the law for immigrants of varying immigration status.
Ms. Chau Truong Accountant Chau Truong has a Bachelor of Business management from theUniversityofMassachusetts. An immigrant fromVietnamprovides financial and administrative support to the Executive Director. Other responsibilities include but are not limited to bookkeeping and other financial management tasks such as maintaining general ledger, recording deposits, accounts payable, and accounts receivable transactions. As required she submits payroll information to ADP and maintains payroll records. She also maintains adequate internal control, and prepares monthly financial reports for Executive Director and Board, and assists in developing program and agency budgets. She has been with EBECC for 5 years.
Ms. Paula Virtue Latina ESL Coordinator  Paula Virtue has a bachelor’s degree in education and 11 years of experience in human service and teaching inChile.  Paula has over 40 years of teaching experience, including 10 years inChileand over 20 years with the Latina ESOL Program. She is fluent in Spanish and English.  In addition, Accredited the Board of Immigration Appeals. Paula’s experience and work inLatin Americamade her realize that Latino newcomers, particularly women, once in this country, need help to be able to function effectively so that they can maintain the well being of their families, achieve self-sufficiency, and participate in the mainstream community. Paula has come to know the concerns and individual stories of struggle and suffering of some of her students at the Latina ESL program. To foster better understanding of Latino Women’s struggles and barriers, Paula pioneered the establishment of the Latina ESL project in 1989.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Utilization Review Accreditation Commission (URAC) - Core Accreditation 2011

Collaborations

 EBECC has working relationships with many Organizations, including the Attorney General’s Office, the District Attorney’s Office, the East Boston District Court as well as most organizations in the Boston area that work with immigrants/refugees and/or provide legal assistance, including IIB, GBLS, and Centro Presente. EBECC is active in networks such as the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition, and the Boston United for Students Coalition. EBECC is a member of health care For All’s Children Health Access Coalition. Through participation in monthly meetings, the agency maintains communication with organizations that do related work in order to develop cooperative agreements that support resource sharing, avoid duplication of efforts, and engage in collaborative problem solving. The organization is affiliated with The National Council of La Raza.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Funding is the major challenge for EBECC as it is for most non-profits at this time. EBECC has a strategic plan in place to increase its funding base with a focus on government grants, an annual campaign to involve and gain the support of more local businesses and residents in its work as well as continuing to seek out new foundations and to nurture its positive relationships with its current funders. In addition immigration issues including the new immigration Deferred Action Program for young people is putting added stress on EBECC staff and resources as they try to help them through this process many of whom are current or past ASPIRING students and members of their families.
 EBECC is seen as a leader in the community and is often asked to participate in other community events, political forums or to provide training to staff or clients at other agencies. As such EBECC has developed multi-faceted partnerships and collaborations with a variety of community, state and national agencies that bring in resources, information, assistance and support which contribute to the success of EBECC’s programs. EBECC has outcome measurement systems that have been in place for several years that allow staff to set realistic targets and track progress toward their achievement.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 12
Number of Volunteers 20
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 80%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 14
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 13
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Tri-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. William Horne Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Private Attorney, retired
Board Chair Term Sept 2010 - Aug 2012
Board Co-Chair Dr. Francisco J. Navarro
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation International private Attorney
Board Co-Chair Term Sept 2011 - Aug 2012

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Ann Ayala-Macey Youth Worker Voting
Ms. Nancy Juliana Bastidas College Student Voting
Mr. Luis Bravo Perfiles Publishing group Voting
Professor Jorge Capetillo-Ponce University of Mass. Boston Voting
Mr. Thomas R. Kelleher MA, LMFT EB Neighborhood Health Center Voting
Ms. Ana Martinez Parent Organizer Volunteer Voting
Mr. Michael Nicastro EB Neighborhood Health Center Voting
Ms. Jean Starapoli Retired Teacher Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Keilyn Chicas College Student Voting

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Jonathan Hernandez Aspiring Program NonVoting
Angel Merlos Aspiring NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 7
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 30%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Youth

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Funding is the major challenge for EBECC as it is for most non-profits at this time. EBECC has a strategic plan in place to increase its funding base with a focus on government grants, an annual campaign to involve and gain the support of more local businesses and residents. The workplan is continuing to seek out new foundations and to nurture positive relationships with its current funders. In addition immigration issues including the new immigration Deferred Action Program for young people is putting added stress on EBECC staff and resources as they try to help them through this process. Many of yhese "Dreamers" are current or past ASPIRING students and/or members of their families.
One of the greatest EBECC's strengths is that staff members are representative of their clients as 67% of the staff are Latino and 90% speak Spanish. In addition 60% staff live within the area and are familiar with the problems and resources of the neighborhood which helps them bond with their clients. EBECC’s longevity in the area – 34 years- has led to a high level of trust within the community by both its constituency and other agencies. EBECC is seen as a leader in the community and is often asked to participate in other community events, political forums or to provide training to staff or clients at other agencies. As such EBECC has developedmulti-faceted partnerships and collaborations with a variety of community, state and federal agencies that bring in resources, information, assistance and support which contribute to the success of EBECC’s programs. EBECC has outcome measurement systems that have been in place for several years that allow staff to set realistic targets and track progress toward their achievement and it has favorable relationships with funders including United Way, private foundations and corporations.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $754,000.00
Projected Expense $754,000.00
Form 990s

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2012 Audited Financial Statement

2011 Audited Finacial Statements

2010 Audited Financial Statement

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $573,721 $609,703 $575,603
Total Expenses $553,476 $609,510 $567,101

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$187,000 $202,500 $228,400
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $29,816 $27,746 $43,839
Indirect Public Support $90,250 $107,820 $93,009
Earned Revenue $265,769 $269,700 $196,779
Investment Income, Net of Losses $886 $1,937 $2,417
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- $11,159
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $482,692 $541,939 $497,828
Administration Expense $56,590 $55,678 $54,654
Fundraising Expense $14,194 $11,893 $14,619
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 1.00 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 87% 89% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 5% 4% 4%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $184,192 $148,962 $160,392
Current Assets $114,343 $76,819 $64,535
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $48,393 $33,451 $44,446
Total Net Assets $135,799 $115,511 $115,946

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
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2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
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3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.36 2.30 1.45

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 Secure Financial Sustainability. The current economic climate has brought serious challenges to EBECC to obtaining new sources of funding or expand existing ones. EBECC has wanted to continue to grow to respond to community demands, but recognizes that it would need to develop new fundraising and revenue generation strategies to make this growth possible in an overall funding environment that have included state budget cuts and declining foundation and corporate funding.
           EBECC’s current array of funding sources reflects the development of the agency over time from a small grass-roots organization to what it is today, a small, but significantly more sophisticated, multi-service organization. Additionally, funding for EBECC has been shaped in part by the changing target populations the agency has served at different points in its history reflecting demographic changes in East Boston. For the last three years we have made sure private and corporate foundations continue strong in support of EBECC’s work. 
EBECC has evolved from a somewhat informal organization to a more formal and less centralized structure characterized by formalized procedures, emphasis in efficiency, and delegated decision making by empowering program coordinators. At the programmatic level, I realized that EBECC cannot move forward in the fight against poverty and inequity without continuing supporting equality before the law and the legal empowerment of the poor.
We have gradually worked to eliminate and prevent any substantial deficit and to improve our financial position. To that effect we increased fee revenues, and we implemented modest price increases for immigration services and adult education to ensure that fees are competitive with those charged by similar non-profit organizations, to fully cover the costs of service provision, and generate a surplus that may be used to support other agency services. Despite the economic decline and thanks to the strong and trusting relationship with funders, several foundations remained consistent donors providing both operating and programmatic support including Hyams Foundation, Boston Foundation, Anna B. Stearns Foundation, Clippership, Boston Bar Foundation, First Literacy Fund, East Boston Foundation and others. Building and reconciling the philosophies of these diverse funders have kept a somewhat steady income flow.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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