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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Family-to-Family Project (FTFP) seeks to prevent and reverse family homelessness in Massachusetts by providing timely financial assistance. 

Mission Statement

The Family-to-Family Project (FTFP) seeks to prevent and reverse family homelessness in Massachusetts by providing timely financial assistance. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $330,000.00
Projected Expense $281,050.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Flexible Funding

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Family-to-Family Project (FTFP) seeks to prevent and reverse family homelessness in Massachusetts by providing timely financial assistance. 

Background Statement

In 1988, families from the Cambridge area joined together to discuss the stereotypes, complex causes, and societal impact of homelessness. The founders of the Family-to-Family Project (FTFP) learned that often families find themselves homeless or at risk of losing their housing because one disastrous event starts a chain reaction of hardships. These families often have nowhere to turn for assistance. FTFP and its Flexible Funding program was founded so that grants may assist families with back rent, moving costs, education expenses, and utility bills so they can maintain or achieve housing security. 

FTFP partners with over 20 direct service organizations, chosen carefully based on a strong track record in case management and demonstrated success serving homeless and high-risk families. Case managers from partner organizations are instrumental in identifying families that are eligible for FTFP’s support and submitting grant requests on behalf of these families. Partners ensure that grants are paired with case management, access to resources, and educational tools that help families attain and maintain self-sufficiency. Grants are aimed at ensuring stabilization and long-term sustainability of housing. 

FTFP provides grants primarily to families who have a history of employment, have maintained housing in the past, and only require one-time assistance to stabilize their housing situation and attain self-sufficiency. This includes families currently in shelter as well as families facing eviction. The flexible, innovative nature of FTFP grants allows families to successfully transition out of shelter or to overcome hardships early on and prevent them from spiraling into homelessness. By limiting grant making to this population, FTFP is able to use limited financial resources and make a meaningful impact on the lives of families and children who do not meet state and federal eligibility for funding, despite current or imminent homelessness.

FTFP intentionally keeps a lean staff so that resources may be directed towards assisting families. A part-time Program Assistant coordinates much of the communication with caseworkers at partner organizations, including funding decisions and follow-up collection. Executive Director Christina Donnelly is responsible for overseeing the daily operations of the organization, including program, staff, fundraising, and fiscal management. She works closely with the Board of Directors and reports directly to the Board Chair. 


Impact Statement

 

Major accomplishments in FY2014-2015 include:

·         Provided $160,000 in Flexible Funding in FY2014-2015 to keep over 130 families and over 265 children housed in stable and healthy environments. 

·         Provided $17,000 in Buttenwieser Family Enrichment Fund grants to provide 90 children with a safe, structured environment during the summer months so that parents can maintain consistent work schedules and income levels.

·         Improved systems for collection, management, and analysis of outcomes data. Successfully collected 6 and 12 month follow-up information for 90% of families funded in 2014. Of those, 95% remained stably housed 6 months after receiving funding, and 93% remain housed 12 months after receiving funding.

·         Increased program spending from 71% of total expenses in FY2013-2014 to 78% of total expenses in FY2014-2015.

·         Made strategic program improvements including a revision of the Flexible Funding application and the creation of a Memorandum of Understanding to be shared with partner organizations. The Memorandum of Understanding was created to formalize partnerships and create clear standards and expectations for all parties. Key responsibilities for partner organizations include:

o        Identifying families who will benefit the most from one-time financial assistance.

o        Ensuring that FTFP financial assistance is coupled with supporting services for families.

o        Providing outcomes data on families.

·         Held first annual Strategic Retreat for Board members and identified priorities for the upcoming fiscal year.

·         Expanded and diversified Board of Directors to include three new members, for a total of 10 highly engaged Board members from various sectors. 

Goals for FY2015-2016 include: 

1. Raise the efficiency and effectiveness of the Flexible Funding program and the Buttenwieser Family Enrichment Fund by:

- Providing at least $157,000 in FY2015-2016 to more than 130 families and 200 children who are at-risk, formerly homeless, or currently homeless in Eastern Massachusetts.

- Maintaining program spending to represent a minimum of 78% of total Operating Budget.

- Implementing a Memorandum of Understanding with partner organizations to formalize partnerships and create clear standards and expectations for all parties.

- Continuing to employ strategies for data collection to improve outcomes data.

 

2. Increase revenue through fundraising efforts by:

- Strengthening relationships with current donors through targeted donor stewardship and recruiting new donors with the assistance of the Board of Directors.

- Developing strategic relationships with foundations.

- Creating a marketing plan to attract a new segment of donors.

 

3. Engage with partner organizations’ advocacy efforts to share data on the effectiveness of FTFP’s model and to gain a voice in advocating for effective interventions for preventing and reversing family homelessness.

 

4. Continue to engage the Board of Directors and utilize their skills so that they develop a shared strategic vision for FTFP and serve as effective ambassadors of the organization and its mission.


Needs Statement

Flexible Funding: FTFP has an ongoing need for funding that will provide direct support to families. Funds are used to meet the various needs of families that are referred from partner organizations. Grants are aimed at ensuring stabilization and long-term sustainability of housing by providing assistance that can be used for a range of needs.
 
Strategic Planning: FTFP needs support through a strategic planning process. The organization is poised to create a strategic plan based on the vision and added capacity brought by new staff and Board members. 
 
Website Development: FTFP has a very basic, low-functioning website. We would like to make improvements to the website so that it accurately portrays our mission, vision, and model, and so that it provides succinct and poignant information to potential donors. 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Greater Boston and Eastern Massachusetts

Organization Categories

  1. Housing, Shelter - Housing Support
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Flexible Funding

FTFP’s core program is its Flexible Funding Program, through which families are able to access small grants that assist them to secure or retain housing. FTFP partners with 28 direct service organizations that are chosen carefully based on a strong track record in case management and demonstrated success serving homeless and high-risk families. Case managers from partner organizations are instrumental in identifying families that are eligible for FTFP’s support and submitting grant requests on behalf of these families. Partner organizations ensure that grants are paired with case management, access to resources, and educational tools that help families attain and maintain self-sufficiency. Grants are aimed at ensuring stabilization and long-term sustainability of housing by providing assistance that can be used for a range of needs. 
Budget  $160,000.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Housing Expense Assistance
Population Served At-Risk Populations Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 

FTFP hopes that between 90 and 100 percent of families who receive FTFP Flexible Funding remain housed at the time that both 6 and 12 month data is collected. 

Program Long-Term Success 

The staff and Board of FTFP envision a community that works together to employ the best, research-based strategies to address and prevent family homelessness in Massachusetts. While this is a large and complicated issue, FTFP hopes to improve the lives of one family at a time by providing them with a small and effective amount of assistance. By doing so, FTFP contributes to slowing the rise of family homelessness and giving families a chance to recover from emergency and crisis situations. Through collaboration with direct service partner organizations that serve homeless and at-risk populations, FTFP ensures that an investment in a family extends beyond one-time monetary assistance. Partner organizations guarantee that assistance is paired with case management, and access to resources and educational tools that help families establish housing stability and maintain self-sufficiency.

Program Success Monitored By 

FTFP measures the effectiveness of the Flexible Funding program by tracking how many of the families assisted remain housed after an initial grant. FTFP works with its partner organizations to provide accurate follow-up information regarding families’ housing status at 6 month and 12 month intervals after a grant is awarded. Data collected from the families is recorded, analyzed, and used to continuously shape the flexible funding program and inform policy. This system also allows FTFP to evaluate partner organizations' effectiveness in working with families based on partners' continued engagement and ability to facilitate and track positive outcomes.

Examples of Program Success  Best efforts for follow-up from FY2014-2015 indicate that overall 95% remain housed six months after receiving a FTFP grant, and 93% remain housed twelve months after a grant.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Christina Donnelly
CEO Term Start Nov 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Christina Donnelly, a graduate of Georgetown University, is the Executive Director of the Family-to-Family Project. She has six years of non-profit experience and experience in the human services field in Massachusetts. Christina is responsible for overseeing the daily operations of the organization, including program, staff, fundraising, and fiscal management. She works closely with the Board of Directors and reports directly to the Board Chair. She recently completed the Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership Core Certificate Program at Boston University's School of Management. 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

FTFP partners with 28 direct service organizations that are chosen carefully based on a strong track record in case management and demonstrated success serving homeless and high-risk families. Case managers from partner organizations are instrumental in identifying families that are eligible for FTFP’s support and submitting grant requests on behalf of these families. Partner organizations ensure that grants are paired with case management, access to resources, and educational tools that help families attain and maintain self-sufficiency. Partner organizations include ABCD, Community Teamwork Inc, Crittenton Women's Union, FamilyAid Boston, Greater Boston Legal Services, HomeStart, Housing Families, Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless, Metropolitan Boston Housing Authority, Project Hope, The Second Step, and Urban Edge, among others. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Ellen H. Cross
Board Chair Company Affiliation None
Board Chair Term May 2012 - May 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Eleanor Andrews American Tower Corporation Voting
Jordan Evans Boston Public Schools Voting
Kathryn Hawkes MIT Sloan School of Management Voting
Elizabeth Malloy Victory Programs Inc Voting
Janice Rudenauer Main & Mystic Marketing Engineering Voting
Gabe Sheets-Poling Cargill Risk Management Voting
Matthew Singh Hyperbina Design Group Voting
Abby Sosland ICF Consulting Voting
Tracy Heather Strain The Film Posse Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

   

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $330,000.00
Projected Expense $281,050.00
Form 990s

2015 IRS Form 990

2014 IRS Form 990

2013 IRS Form 990

2012 IRS Form 990

2011 IRS Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Financial Statements

2014 Financial Statements

2013 Financial Statements

2012 Financial Statements

2011 Financial Statements

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $301,497 $234,732 $333,697
Total Expenses $289,959 $189,752 $381,176

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- $0
Individual Contributions $301,456 $233,713 $273,299
Indirect Public Support -- -- $0
Earned Revenue -- -- $0
Investment Income, Net of Losses $16 $1,019 $196
Membership Dues -- -- $0
Special Events -- -- $60,500
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $25 -- $0

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $224,890 $134,320 $233,808
Administration Expense $29,725 $25,062 $43,449
Fundraising Expense $35,344 $30,370 $103,919
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 1.24 0.88
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 71% 61%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 13% 31%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $95,177 $87,889 $45,409
Current Assets $93,526 $85,247 $45,243
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- $0
Current Liabilities $3,250 $7,500 $10,000
Total Net Assets $91,927 $80,389 $35,409

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 28.78 11.37 4.52

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

The ultimate goal of the Family-to-Family Project (FTFP) is to prevent and reverse family homelessness in Massachusetts. The staff, Board, and funders of FTFP envision a community that works together to employ the best, research-based strategies to address and prevent family homelessness in Massachusetts. FTFP bases its success on how many families remain housed after receiving a Flexible Funding grant. FTFP works closely with caseworkers at its partner organizations to ensure that families are being supported and that outcomes are reported in a reasonable time frame.  



2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

The core of FTFP’s work is to coordinate with partner organizations to efficiently distribute Flexible Funding grants and Buttenwieser Enrichment funds to families in need. Flexible Funding applications are submitted by caseworkers at one of the direct service partner organizations and reviewed by FTFP staff on a weekly basis. In FY2014-2015, FTFP provided $160,000 in funding to assist 130 families and 265 children move out of shelter or maintain safe, proper homes. In addition, Buttenwieser Enrichment funds enabled 90 children to attend summer camp.

In FY2015-16, FTFP anticipates providing over $157,000 in financial assistance for at least 130 families. With more resources directly aimed at helping families overcome or prevent homelessness, FTFP will distribute a majority of its funding to families for security deposits and back rent. In addition, FTFP continues to provide assistance for utility arrearages, childcare, education expenses, and expenses associated with moving directly from shelter to permanent housing.

FTFP grants are to be considered when all other sources of funding have been explored. FTFP collects information from all families seeking assistance by requiring partner organizations to submit an application on behalf of families. The application is an opportunity for FTFP to learn more about the family, including their ability to maintain housing long-term. Maintaining housing for low-income families can be complicated by the cost of transportation, childcare, education, disabilities, and other issues. FTFP requires caseworkers to complete a monthly budget with families that includes all income and expenses for the family. When making a decision to provide funding, FTFP staff members are able to discern whether a better match for funding can be made.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

FTFP intentionally keeps a lean staff in order to direct as many funds as possible towards preventing and reversing family homelessness. FTFP's full-time Executive Director and part-time Program Assistant work closely to reply to funding requests on a weekly basis. The FTFP Board of Directors supports the Executive Director in specific strategic areas.
 
FTFP partners with over 20 direct service organizations that are chosen carefully based on a strong track record in case management and demonstrated success serving homeless and high-risk families. Case managers from partner organizations are instrumental in identifying families that are eligible for FTFP’s support and submitting grant requests on behalf of these families. Partner organizations ensure that grants are paired with case management, access to resources, and educational tools that help families attain and maintain self-sufficiency. Grants are aimed at ensuring stabilization and long-term sustainability of housing by providing assistance that can be used for a range of needs, including rent, utilities, childcare and education expenses. 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

FTFP measures the effectiveness of the Flexible Funding program by tracking how many of the families assisted remain housed after an initial grant. FTFP works with its partner organizations to provide accurate follow-up information regarding families’ housing status at 6 month and 12 month intervals after a grant is awarded. Data collected from the families is recorded, analyzed, and used to continuously shape the flexible funding program and inform policy. Best efforts for follow-up from FY2014-2015 indicate that overall 95% remain housed six months after receiving a FTFP grant, and 93% remain housed twelve months after a grant. This system also allows FTFP to evaluate partner organizations' effectiveness in working with families based on partners' continued engagement and ability to facilitate and track positive outcomes.
 
FTFP's success in tracking outcomes has improved significantly since the Family Homelessness Prevention Project, an outcomes-based research study conducted between 2010 and 2013. This project highlighted the importance of effectively engaging partners in tracking families' outcomes. FTFP has adjusted many of its partnerships over the last year, with a new emphasis on partners' ability and commitment to reporting outcomes to FTFP so that we may measure success. 
 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

FTFP seeks to prevent and reverse family homelessness by providing small, flexible, and effective grants to families so that they may remain housed or move out of shelter into stable housing. The Family Homelessness Prevention Project (FHPP) tracked families who received FTFP grants over the course of three years, and at the end of that time the research team found that 95% of families remained housed. FHPP was the first significant attempt that FTFP made to track families after receiving grants, and the results were very positive. This has drawn FTFP's focus to tracking outcomes as proof that the funds provided to family are effective in preventing family homelessness. 
 
As mentioned above, FTFP has shifted its relationship with partner organizations to reflect this new emphasis on tracking outcomes. Partner are chosen based on their ability to serve at-risk and homeless families, connect them to resources, and provide support for families' endeavors to attain self-sufficiency. If an organization is unable to provide follow-up information on families at 6 and 12 month intervals after a grant has been made, however, then they are not eligible to partner with FTFP. This emphasis on tracking outcomes comes in conjunction with a renewed focus on the original mission of FTFP, which is to provide flexible funding assistance to families. In the past year, FTFP has increased the amount of families funded and has been able to report outcomes on these families. All of these factors show a positive trend in FTFP's work towards the mission of preventing and reversing family homelessness.