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Organization DBA --
Former Names Mobilization for Survival (1977)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Boston Mobilization develops and empowers teen leaders for social justice. Through popular education, community organizing and connecting across difference, our teen leaders move local communities toward justice.
 

Mission Statement

Boston Mobilization develops and empowers teen leaders for social justice. Through popular education, community organizing and connecting across difference, our teen leaders move local communities toward justice.
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Feb 01, 2016 to Jan 31, 2017
Projected Income $284,845.00
Projected Expense $284,845.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Speak Up!
  • Sub/Urban Justice
  • Youth of Massachusetts Organizing for a Reformed Economy (YMORE)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Boston Mobilization develops and empowers teen leaders for social justice. Through popular education, community organizing and connecting across difference, our teen leaders move local communities toward justice.
 

Background Statement

Boston Mobilization has been an active part of the Greater-Boston peace and justice movement since its inception in 1977 as a local chapter of the nation-wide anti-nuclear organization Mobilization for Survival. Originally formed to promote peace and stop nuclear build-up during the cold war, Boston Mobilization has been a Boston area leader in the fight for social justice for the past 30+ years.

Mobe is a largely youth-run grassroots organization that educates, empowers, and organizes young people to engage in their communities and find their voice as agents for constructive change through grassroots campaigns for peace, racial equality, economic justice, and genuine democracy. We utilize non-violent actions, education, and local legislative efforts to help improve our local community and our world. Our goal is to produce a systemic change in social values that brings true peace and equality. 

We develop young leaders through their active roles in grassroots campaigns promoting fundamental social change. We encourage youth to critically examine their relationships to their community, their country, and the world in which they live. We work against apathy and the systemic disempowerment of youth.


Impact Statement

Sub/Urban Justice School Year Program: Our social justice education was particularly effective this year, as we have completed more than 50 workshops since the beginning of the year, and are on par to deliver 75 this year in its entirety. While the bulk of our trainings continue to be for teens, we have also reached a number of other populations to great effect. Some particularly notable trainings include a series with Tufts undergrads in four different pre-orientation programs. These ranged from basic facilitation skills-building for the program leaders to advanced anti-oppression and social justice topics.

Another training that stood out was our work with younger students (elementary and middle-school age) who are part of the Jack and Jill organization, a statewide network of Black parents aimed at supporting their children. Yet another meaningful training outside our traditional population was with pediatric residents at Boston Medical Center. We were approached by one of the residents who stated quite bluntly that they were about to become doctors working with children, but they had never had a meaningful conversation about race and racism. Our teens led a workshop with this group of residents that was absolutely transformative. They described it as the best professional development session they had during their residency.

Our teen facilitators were not only amazing at their work, but also did a great job in growing their own skills with support from our experienced staff. They demonstrated increased confidence and efficacy as the year went on. And the frequency with which our training partners request continued trainings suggest that we are hitting our marks!

In addition to our external education, our teen leaders have done significant work on the organizing front, acting on behalf of an increased minimum wage, and more recently fighting for progressive revenue via the Fair Share Amendment. In the fall of 2015 they worked to get enough signatures to move forward a 2018 Ballot initiative to change the state’s constitution. After this successful groundwork, we look forward to this campaign coming to a vote in 2018!

Summer 2016: Our Sub/Urban Justice summer program used the energy of voting to accomplish its mission of training the next generation of social justice leaders. Our 20 leaders met with elected officials, City officials, and Senator Elizabeth Warren’s office in an effort to raise the profile of the new teens pre-registration to vote law. They produced three short videos about voter pre-registration and are already figuring out how to accomplish effective teen voter education and pre-registration in their schools, which will become a major Boston Mobilization program in the coming year!

Mobe Will Expand Programming through Teens Vote! We are thrilled to announce that this past year Boston Mobilization won funding to launch an exciting new voting rights project: Teens Vote! A recent MA law change allows for 16 and 17 year olds to ‘pre-register’ to vote. Once they turn 18, these preregistered voters automatically enter the voting rolls. This past year Boston Mobilization raised the funds and conducted preliminary planning and organizing for this new project, which will expand our teen education and organizing to a larger geographic area.


Needs Statement

Boston Mobilization depends on support from individuals, foundations and corporations to continue its work. Contributions of all sizes are welcome and encouraged!!

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
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Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development-Citizenship
  2. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy -
  3. Education -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Speak Up!

In 2008, high school students in Boston identified racism and privilege as major problems in their schools. They decided to address these problems by collecting personal stories and creating a resource for facilitating conversations about race and racism. These teens worked for two years gathering stories, artwork, discussion questions, activities, and resources.

Speak Up!was published in September of 2010 and is being used by schools from Boston to San Francisco to address racism and improve school climate. The book includes stories from white students and students of color and supports peer education and community organizing as avenues to student-led social change

Budget  --
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success   
Program Long-Term Success   
Program Success Monitored By   
Examples of Program Success   

Sub/Urban Justice

Sub/Urban Justice represents a group of individuals and organizations committed to transforming our suburban and urban communities by supporting youth to develop a social justice perspective, and empowering them with the leadership skills to make positive changes in their schools and communities. We currently work with many different organizations across the Boston Metropolitan area to build a broad and effective network implementing social justice policies and practices across the region. We invite you to participate, collaborate, and help create the change we so desperately need.
Budget  --
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  -Youth become confident in their ability to facilitate workshops, small group meetings, and tell relevant stories with their peers.
Program Long-Term Success  -Youth effectively organize campaigns on issues of social justice
Program Success Monitored By  -Surveys of youth and outcomes of campaigns
Examples of Program Success  -Youth were interested in working on a campaign regarding incarceration in Massachusetts, and over the summer of 2015, trained dozens of their peers on the issue, who then met with their local legislators as well as Sen. Warren's office, marched on a local courthouse and partnered with the Jobs Not Jails Coalition to bring racial justice into the conversation.

Youth of Massachusetts Organizing for a Reformed Economy (YMORE)

The YMORE Coalition (Youth of Massachusetts Organizing for a Reformed Economy) is a metropolitan area community organizing coalition comprised of 7 core member institutions and an additional 7 organizations who participate on a semi-regular basis. We define youth as High School aged (13-19). We define metropolitan area as the regional aggregation of infrastructure, including industry, transportation, housing and education – in the Boston area, it is often described as being “inside the 128/95 loop”. We define community organizing most simply as the process of building relationships to leverage power to make change. This form of relational organizing is not unique, even amongst youth organizing groups. What distinguishes us from more traditional youth organizing, however, and leaves us positioned to be pioneers in this particular field is our strong pre-existing networks, our scope of vision, and our ability to bridge geographic and cultural differences.
Budget  --
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Civil Liberties
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success   
Program Long-Term Success   
Program Success Monitored By   
Examples of Program Success   

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Erin Rodriguez
CEO Term Start Sept 2015
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
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Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Tri-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Erin Rodriguez
Board Chair Company Affiliation Youthbuild
Board Chair Term Sept 2015 - 2017
Board Co-Chair Nina Mukherji
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Real Food Challenge
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Tamar Brandes-Krug Student --
Nina Mukherji Real Food Challenge --
Mary Neguse Student --
Will Poff-Webster Commonwealth of Massachusetts --
Erin Rodriguez Youthbuild --
Evan Seitz Unitarian Univeralist College of Social Justice --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Feb 01, 2016 to Jan 31, 2017
Projected Income $284,845.00
Projected Expense $284,845.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $128,795 $112,044 $69,030
Total Expenses $131,889 $92,957 $72,218

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $105,833 $55,867 $69,028
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $22,962 $56,174 --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- $3 $2
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $105,686 $78,900 $58,181
Administration Expense $22,289 $10,535 $10,882
Fundraising Expense $3,914 $3,522 $3,155
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 1.21 0.96
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 85% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% 6% 5%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $41,486 $46,911 $27,824
Current Assets $41,486 $46,911 $27,824
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $41,486 $46,911 $27,824

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. The breakout of administrative and fundraising expenses for all three years above is per the organization's Form PCs on file with the state of MA.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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