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Organization DBA PEM
Former Names Essex Institute (1992)
Peabody Museum of Salem (1992)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the Peabody Essex Museum is to celebrate outstanding artistic and cultural creativity by collecting, stewarding and interpreting objects of art and culture in ways that increase knowledge, enrich the spirit, engage the mind and stimulate the senses Through its exhibitions, programs, publications, media and related activities, PEM strives to create experiences that transform people's lives by broadening their perspectives, attitudes, and knowledge of themselves and the wider world

Mission Statement

The mission of the Peabody Essex Museum is to celebrate outstanding artistic and cultural creativity by collecting, stewarding and interpreting objects of art and culture in ways that increase knowledge, enrich the spirit, engage the mind and stimulate the senses Through its exhibitions, programs, publications, media and related activities, PEM strives to create experiences that transform people's lives by broadening their perspectives, attitudes, and knowledge of themselves and the wider world

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $24,094,000.00
Projected Expense $24,086,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Outreach
  • Curatorial and Collections
  • Education
  • Exhibitions and Publications

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the Peabody Essex Museum is to celebrate outstanding artistic and cultural creativity by collecting, stewarding and interpreting objects of art and culture in ways that increase knowledge, enrich the spirit, engage the mind and stimulate the senses Through its exhibitions, programs, publications, media and related activities, PEM strives to create experiences that transform people's lives by broadening their perspectives, attitudes, and knowledge of themselves and the wider world

Background Statement

The Peabody Essex Museum is America’s oldest continuously operating museum. It was founded in 1799 by some of the country’s earliest, most successful entrepreneurs. During the past twenty years, PEM has been among the fastest growing art museums in North America and the museum is internationally recognized for creativity, innovation, outstanding exhibitions, education programs, publications, and financial management. The Museum’s collections rank among the finest of their kind in several areas and encompass American, Asian, African, Native American, Oceanic, contemporary and maritime art, plus photography and 23 historic properties and numerous parks and gardens. In addition to a collection of approximately 1.8 million objects, PEM offers a vibrant schedule of changing exhibitions and public programming, a hands-on education center, and one of New England's major independent research libraries.

In November 2011, the Museum announced a $650 million advancement campaign and we have now raised $572 million. Along with an increase to the museum's endowment and an expansion that will include 175,000 sq. feet of additional space, this campaign will support the creation of new interpretive paradigms and experiences.

PEM’s mission is to celebrate art, culture, and creativity in ways that transform people’s lives. To fulfill this mission, the museum is dedicated to creating new kinds of art and art museum experiences through innovative interpretive ideas and methods based on multiple disciplines including neuroscience, museum visitor research, new technologies, and a variety of other knowledge bases. PEM defines art interpretation as the sum total of factors that influence the nature of the relationship between people and works of art. Between now and 2017, the museum will create more than 100,000 square feet of new installations of its collections. Thus the development of new interpretive ideas, strategies, and methods will have immediate potential application.

Impact Statement

2012 Accomplishments:
- PEM presented 19 exhibitions that attracted nearly 250,000 visitors and included an exploration of Ansel Adam's career-long fascination with water as a subject; a groundbreaking look at contemporary and historic works of Native American art; installations by international contemporary artists; a rare opportunity to view newly restored Gothic tapestries; and a whimsical look at the art of millinery in an exhibition organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum and the iconic British milliner Steven Jones.
- Four critically-acclaimed exhibitions organized by PEM toured nationally and internationally, showing at the National Maritime Museum in the UK, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and the James A. Michener Museum.
- To reinforce the themes of changing exhibitions and the collection, PEM offered hundreds of engaging programs aimed at audiences of all ages. Among the many offerings were public tours of galleries and historic houses, artist-led workshops, concerts, films, panels, lectures and interactive events, as well as 10 weekend festivals.
- PEM continued to offer education programs designed to link students' experiences at the museum to their classroom lessons and reinforce curriculum frameworks and 21 st century skills. Last year these programs served over 22,000 students and educators from over 300 schools and after-school programs.

Current Goals:
Over the next several years, PEM will work to further its ambitious $650 million advancement campaign.
This campaign includes:
- $350 million increase to an already robust endowment
- $200 million for a 175,000-square-foot-expansion
- $100 million to support creative new installations of the collection, several infrastructure improvements to existing facilities and other advancement initiatives

Needs Statement

Exhibitions and Publications Support
Every year PEM presents a broad range of original exhibitions, many of which are accompanied by publications that further expound the themes, ideas and objects presented in a given show.
Annual Cost: $6,388,800

Curatorial and Collections Support
PEM’s curatorial staff is responsible for conceiving and organizing exhibitions for the museum and for travel to other venues, as well as preparing and publishing scholarly catalogues and educational texts. The museum maintains and exhibits many unique and widely respected collections, including: African, American, Asian Export, Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Korean, maritime, Native American, and Oceanic art.
Annual Cost: $4,929,864

Education Programs Support
The museum’s Department of Education and Interpretation develops and implements a wide array of educational programs and contributes to the interpretive development of exhibitions.
Annual Cost: $2,249,463

Community Outreach Programs Support
Community Outreach includes a suite of in- and out-of-school programs that provide students from low resourced communities the opportunity to engage with art and explore their own and other cultures and creativity and are 100% subsidized.
Annual Cost: $293,852

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

NORTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
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Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Art Museums
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Community Outreach

Community Outreach includes a suite of in- and out-of-school programs. While each program has specific goals, the common thread is the use of sequenced visits that provide students from low resourced communities the opportunity to engage with art and explore their own and other cultures and creativity. Among the programs included in this suite are Creative Collaborations, formerly known as the Multiple Visit Partnership Program, which serves grades 3-5 students during school hours; ArtLink, formerly known as the Youth & Community Partnership Program, which was developed to reach youth outside of regular school hours, runs throughout the year, and has expanded programming during vacation periods; and a week of Arts Adventures Club summer camp. All of these programs are 100% subsidized. Under the Community Outreach umbrella, PEM also works with partners such as Boys & Girls Club, North Shore Community Development Coalition and Salem State University on teen and college student programs.

Budget  $293,852
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

The programs develop creative and critical thinking skills; communication and literacy capabilities; and build self-confidence.

Program Long-Term Success 

Community Outreach programs encourage participants to see the museum as a welcoming and enriching destination in their community and builds valuable relationships with area educators, families and organizations.

Program Success Monitored By 

As with education programs, multiple methods are used to measure the success of PEM’s Community Outreach programs. These range from evaluations conducted in-house to those done in partnership with outside evaluators such as Lesley University’s Program Evaluation and Research Group.

Examples of Program Success 

Since 2011, PEM has partnered with Salem State University (SSU) on the Summer Bridge Program. Targeting students with strong academic potential from low-income backgrounds and underperforming schools, the program helps students prepare for post-secondary learning. As part of the curriculum, students visit PEM and take part in a number of arts-based learning experiences. At the end of the first year, SSU faculty was unanimous in saying that PEM’s contribution helped create critical improvements in student outcomes. According to SSU, students who complete the program accumulate more credit hours during their first year and have a retention rate 6% higher than those who did not. One student noted: “One of the most interesting things I learned… was probably that you can compare two different artifacts from different cultures, and still be able to connect them in some way. What is fascinating about that, is societies and cultures can be so different, but at the same time be so similar.”


Curatorial and Collections

PEM’s curatorial staff is responsible for conceiving and organizing exhibitions for the museum and for travel to other venues. The curatorial staff also prepares and publishes scholarly catalogues and educational texts related to the exhibitions and the collection at large. The museum maintains and exhibits unique and widely respected collections, including African, American, Asian Export, Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Korean, maritime, Native American and Oceanic art. PEM’s photography collection comprises 800,000+ rare and vintage images representing nearly every kind of format and process, and the architecture collection includes 22 historic structures, 4 of which are designated National Historic Landmarks; 6 others are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. PEM’s Phillips Library is one of New England’s most important and oldest research libraries, housing 400,000 printed volumes, over a mile in linear feet of manuscripts and an extensive collection of other materials.

Budget  $4,929,864
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

PEM will create opportunities for greater access to its collection for numerous audiences.

 

Program Long-Term Success 

The museum will continue to be outstanding stewards of its collection.

Program Success Monitored By 

This will be measured through various activities undertaken by PEM staff, as well as tracking activities such as visitors on-site and online.

Examples of Program Success 

In recent years, the museum has begun to develop ways of making enhanced information about its collection available online.


Education

The museum’s Department of Education and Interpretation develops and implements a wide array of educational programs and contributes to the interpretive development of exhibitions. Each year, the museum offers hundreds of programs to advance arts learning and appreciation and to stimulate critical thinking, cross-cultural dialogue, intellectual inquiry, creativity and connection making between the past and present. These programs are presented to a broad spectrum of audiences from toddlers, to student groups, families and adults. PEM serves the varied interests and learning levels of these audience groups through a range of programs that take place in the museum galleries, art studios and beyond.   

Budget  $2,249,463
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

To provide a variety of highly engaging programming that engages audiences of all ages and interests.

Program Long-Term Success 

To foster a greater understanding and appreciation for art, culture and the creative process and the way in which these connect to one’s life.

Program Success Monitored By 

Multiple methods are used to measure the success of PEM’s education programs. These range from evaluations conducted in-house to those done in partnership with outside evaluators such as Lesley University’s Program Evaluation and Research Group.

Examples of Program Success 

The museum annually serves approximately 25,000 students and teachers, and reaches thousands more through its adult and family programs.


Exhibitions and Publications

Every year the museum presents a broad range of original exhibitions, many of which are accompanied by publications that further expound the themes, ideas and objects presented in a given show. Due in large part to its many popular exhibitions, PEM presented excellent and dynamic examples of art and culture to over 405,000 people in 2011: 248,000 on-site visitors in Salem, and more than 157,000 people who attended PEM-organized exhibitions at other venues. The museum’s 2011 exhibition calendar included many styles and sources of art and culture and featured such shows as Golden: Dutch and Flemish Masterworks from the Rose-Marie and Eijk van Otterloo Collection, Man Ray | Lee Miller: Partners in Surrealism, Ripple Effect, The Art of H2O, and Painting the American Vision. The current and upcoming exhibition schedule can be found at http://www.pem.org/exhibitions/.
Budget  $6,388,800
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Each year, PEM strives to reach a broad regional, national and international audience.

Program Long-Term Success 

With its exhibitions and publications, PEM aims to broaden individual perspectives through presentations that encompass a range of ideas, cultures, art forms, and timeframes.

Program Success Monitored By 

Multiple indicators are used including visitor feedback generated through surveys and exhibition comment books, attendance figures and publication sales.

Examples of Program Success 

In recent years, PEM’s exhibitions have traveled to such venues as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Kimbell Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, England. The topics of these exhibitions have ranged from ancient Mayan art and the imperial garden of China’s Qianlong emperor to the photography of Ansel Adams and surrealists Man Ray and Lee Miller.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Dan L. Monroe
CEO Term Start Jan 1993
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Joshua Basseches Deputy Director and Chief Operating Officer --
Sidney E. Berger The Ann C. Pingree Director of the Phillips Library --
Jay Finney Chief Marketing Officer --
Juliette Fritsch Chief of Education and Interpretation --
Lynda Hartigan The James B. and Mary Lou Hawkes Chief Curator --
Monica Mackey Chief Philanthropy Officer --
Anne Munsch Chief Financial Officer --
Will Phippen Director of Museum Collection Services --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 156
Number of Part Time Staff 100
Number of Volunteers 150
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 4
Caucasian: 238
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 2
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 157
Male: 99
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 9
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Samuel T. Byrne
Board Chair Company Affiliation CrossHarbor Capital Partners LLC
Board Chair Term June 2010 - June 2013
Board Co-Chair Mr. Sean M. Healey
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Affiliated Managers Group, Inc.
Board Co-Chair Term June 2010 - June 2013

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Tina Ambani Harmony Art Foundation, India Voting
Samuel T. Byrne CrossHarbor Capital Partners LLC Voting
C. Richard Carlson UBS Financial Services Voting
Alfred D. Chandler Community Volunteer Voting
Martha Chayet Community Volunteer Voting
Samir Desai ADITI, Inc. Voting
Kimberly Smith Guerster Community Volunteer Voting
Carter H. Harrison Shawmut National Corp. Voting
James B. Hawkes Eaton Vance Corp. Voting
D. Thomas Healey Jr. Merrill Lynch Voting
Sean M. Healey Affiliated Managers Groups, Inc Voting
Carla B. Herwitz Choate, Hall & Stewart Voting
Patricia Fae Ho American Association of University Women Voting
Timothy A. Ingraham Community Volunteer Voting
John O. Parker Parker Capital Management, Inc. Voting
Stuart W. Pratt NAI Hunneman Corp. Voting
George Putnam Putnam Investments Voting
Jeffrey Rayport Castenea Partners Voting
C. Franklin Sayre NextEra Energy Resources LLC Voting
Robert N. Shapiro Ropes & Gray Voting
Nancy Tieken Community Volunteer Voting
Rose-Marie van Otterloo Community Volunteer Voting
Gail von Metzsch Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 2
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 15
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 4
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $24,094,000.00
Projected Expense $24,086,000.00
Form 990s

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $53,044,354 $93,181,006 $25,129,463
Total Expenses $33,021,331 $28,018,745 $27,105,767

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,364,567 $2,546,817 $1,588,115
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,364,567 $2,546,817 $1,588,115
Individual Contributions $40,791,268 $83,934,036 $22,151,902
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $3,950,755 $4,030,527 $2,272,311
Investment Income, Net of Losses $5,454,726 $1,273,490 $-2,068,551
Membership Dues $778,000 $706,764 $645,298
Special Events $84,079 $119,888 $134,158
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $620,959 $569,484 $406,230

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $25,586,765 $20,753,980 $20,272,769
Administration Expense $4,733,288 $4,720,394 $4,580,899
Fundraising Expense $2,701,278 $2,544,371 $2,252,099
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.61 3.33 0.93
Program Expense/Total Expenses 77% 74% 75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 3% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets $380,976,385 $372,283,355 $287,900,717
Current Assets $15,245,128 $47,151,709 $13,448,986
Long-Term Liabilities $35,273,342 $34,674,952 $35,146,000
Current Liabilities $2,399,105 $2,078,176 $2,013,903
Total Net Assets $343,303,938 $335,530,227 $250,740,814

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $282,276,924.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose $650 million advancement campaign that includes: -$350 million increase to an already robust endowment -$200 million for a 175,000-square-foot-expansion -$100 million to support creative new installations of the collection, several infrastructure improvements to existing facilities and other advancement initiatives.
Campaign Goal $650,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates 2006 - 2017
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $572,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 6.35 22.69 6.68

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 9% 9% 12%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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