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Organization DBA --
Former Names Magic Me Boston (1991)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Generations Incorporated strives to improve the literacy skills of young children through Grade 3. We also provide meaningful opportunities for older adults who serve as literacy volunteers in our partner schools and after-school programs in low-income communities.

Mission Statement

Generations Incorporated strives to improve the literacy skills of young children through Grade 3. We also provide meaningful opportunities for older adults who serve as literacy volunteers in our partner schools and after-school programs in low-income communities.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $2,310,515.00
Projected Expense $2,278,409.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Classroom Literacy
  • Reading Coaches

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Generations Incorporated strives to improve the literacy skills of young children through Grade 3. We also provide meaningful opportunities for older adults who serve as literacy volunteers in our partner schools and after-school programs in low-income communities.


Background Statement

We began our intergenerational work in 1991 by bringing children to local nursing homes to develop meaningful relationships with residents. In the late ‘90s, we shifted our focus to children's literacy and the engagement of retirees as mentors. Today, we are one of the leading intergenerational literacy programs in the nation, providing critical support to over 3,400 kindergarten through third grade students annually at Boston and Revere Public Schools and community-based after-school programs.  We are the only organization partnered with Boston and Revere Public Schools that provides intentional, structured, high-dosage literacy interventions targeting early readers (grades K-3), and our volunteers’ dedication and training yields strong results each year.

Impact Statement

 

Accomplishments:

*2014 – Began Year 1 of implementing 3-year Read to Succeed plan

*2013 – 250 tutors provide 55,922 hours of literacy support to 3,300+ students

*2013 – Program of Distinction Designation from Generations United

*2010 –Social Innovator Award for Healthy Aging

*2009 –Washington University study found that students demonstrate 60% greater improvement over their non-participating peers

Goals: Focus on Program Enhancement before Expansion

Classroom Literacy Program

2014 School Year: Serve 3,116 students in 131 K-3rd grade classrooms in Greater Boston.

2015 School Year: Serve 3,226 students in 137 K-3rd grade classrooms – 82% of all students will be in K-1st grade (112 classrooms).

Enhancements: We have shifted our focus to reach more K-1st grade classrooms - 90% of our work will be in K-1st grade classrooms by 2016. We are developing an improved program model, volunteer training, and evaluation tool. We will also expand our program to participate in four summer programs by 2016.

Reading Coaches Program

2014 School Year: Serve 370 1st-3rd grade students.

2015 School Year: Serve 290 1st-3rd grade students.

Enhancements: The program is being adapted to more effectively serve 1st grade students – was designed for 2nd-3rd graders.

We are shifting the program to after-school and out-of-school time sessions to cause less disruption to students’ time in the classroom – this will cause a decrease in the number of students.

Active Aging Program

Each year, we will provide 150 health and wellness activities for our 250+ older volunteers.

Enhancements: Train volunteers to lead activities. Expand program offerings - Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance evidenced-based program, and Zumba Gold Classes.

Financial

Over the next three years we will see expenses increase, on average, 3% per year as we implement our strategic plan. We will decrease our dependence on government grants by growing our individual donor base. By 2016, we hope to have a 3-month operating reserve fund.


 


Needs Statement

 

In January 2013, we began implementing our 3-year strategic plan, Read to Succeed. We are investing in core literacy program enhancements and infrastructure so that by 2016 we will be ready to grow to new communities. Our focus is to get better before we get bigger.

Strategic Priorities:

1. Make key investments and changes to our literacy programs to meet the growing demand for classroom-based and early literacy support. We will hire a Literacy Expert to work with district administrators and teachers to develop a more prescribed literacy model, new standards, evaluations tools, and improved volunteer trainings.

Cost: $405,908 over 3 years

2. Create a new, more sustainable operational model that reduces our reliance on government funding, creates greater consistency in program implementation across sites, and is more responsive to volunteer needs. We will ask volunteers to take on more leadership roles at each partner programs. We will raise funds for 70 “private” stipends. Cost: $524,517 over 3 years

3. Invest in our capacity to raise more unrestricted dollars so that we may diversity our funding base and establish an operating reserve. We will grow our Board of Directors and we will hire a short term consultant to help us create a plan for individuals.

Cost: $268,000 over 3 years


 


CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement



Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- North Dorchester
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- West Roxbury
Greater Boston

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Remedial Reading & Encouragement
  2. Youth Development - Adult, Child Matching Programs
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C.

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Classroom Literacy

The Classroom Literacy Program provides small group and individual learning opportunities to children in K-3rd grade classrooms. Our literacy tutors (50+ older adults) provide highly structured literacy assistance to the whole class during the literacy block. In addition to full classroom assistance, at least half of the tutor’s time is spent working in small group tutoring sessions with 8-10 children who have been specially referred for ongoing, long-term tutoring. Our highly trained Classroom Literacy tutors support the same classrooms all school year, for an average of 10 hours each week. We served 2,954 students through the Classroom Literacy Program in 2016.
Budget  $1,143,880.00
Category  Education, General/Other Literacy
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
Generations Incorporated places highly trained older adult literacy tutors within K-3rd grade classrooms to provide structured literacy support to struggling students through sustained small group tutoring sessions and full classroom literacy support.  At the end of the school year, we will achieve the following results:
  • 65% of all students served will have improved academic performance in English Language Arts.

  • 80% of teachers will report that student participation and concentration within the classroom improved.

  • 85% of teachers will report that hosting a GI tutor provided them with extra time to assist students needing significant, specialized support.
 
Program Long-Term Success  We envision a day when all children are proficient readers when they enter 4th Grade.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  According to 2014-15 assessments, our Classroom Literacy program had a measureable impact on the students we served. 84% of teachers reported their Classroom Literacy tutor had a moderate or strong influence on improving students’ participation, motivation, and concentration and 86% of teachers reported that volunteers had an influence on students’ reading and literacy performance. According to DIBELS scores, 64% of the students served by GI improved their academic performance. In response to a survey question, a K-2 Kindergarten Teacher at O'Donnell Elementary underscored the important social-emotional support that GI volunteers provide while in the classroom, stating, “Our tutor is wonderful at encouraging students to do their best, keep trying, and to 'never give up'. They remember this and quote here when we are doing other activities that may pose a challenge. 'It's like [the tutor] says... Never Give Up!’"

Reading Coaches

The Reading Coaches Program is a one-to-one structured literacy program, which pairs a student in grades K-3 with a trained older adult Reading Coach. Each pair meets twice per week for 30 or more minutes per session during the school year using American Reading Company curriculum to guide them through each session. Students are referred to this program by either the classroom teacher for school-based programs or a family member for after-school programs. We served 459 students in the Reading Coaches Program in 2016.
Budget  $696,083.00
Category  Education, General/Other Literacy
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 
The Reading Coaches engages students who are reading below grade level in twice-weekly one-to-one literacy tutoring sessions.  We aim to reach the following goals each program year: 
 - Each student participates in at least 35 tutoring sessions/year
 - At least 50% of students end the year at or above grade-level literacy benchmark
 -  At least 65% of teachers report that students with previous attendance issues showed improved attendance during the school year
Program Long-Term Success  We envision a day when all children are proficient readers when they enter 4th Grade.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  The Reading Coaches program is evidence-based. Generations Incorporated participated in a rigorous, two-year study of the AARP Experience Corps one-to-one mentoring model conducted by Washington University. In 2009, researchers found that participating students who attended at least 35 tutoring sessions over the course of a school year demonstrated 60% greater improvement in key literacy skills than their non-participating peers.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Mary Gunn
CEO Term Start June 2002
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience In June of 2002, Mary Gunn became the Executive Director of Generations Incorporated. After serving in the Peace Corps in the early 70s, Mary came to Boston from her native New Hampshire and taught for several years in Cambridge. She then moved into the non-profit sector, overseeing after school and teen programs in Dorchester. From 1989 through 2001, Mary served as the Executive Director of Bird Street Community Center in Dorchester, where she successfully led a major effort to expand services for youth. Mary is very enthused about reinventing retirement and the aging opportunities that exist in our communities for adults over the age of 55. She has extensive fundraising, strategic planning, program development, and community development experience. Mary holds a M.S. in Management, lives in Lynn, and continues to spend any spare time hiking in the New Hampshire mountains.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Katie Klister Brown Director of Volunteer Management

Katie Klister maintains manages, and executes strategies for volunteer recruitment, retention, and recognition.  Previously, Katie served at Generations Incorporated as an Americorps Lead.  Before joining Generations Incorporated, she served as a volunteer teacher at the Martin County Child and Family Development Center for the Christian Appalachian Project in Kentucky.  She received her B.A. degree in Family Studies from St. Olaf College, where she studied in Community Development and Sustainability in Guatemala and Cuba.

Kendra Mrozek Director of Programs --
Kathleen Thompson Director of Finance & Administration --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Social Innovation Fund Sub-grant Social Innovation Fund through AARP Foundation 2016
Program of Distinction Generations United 2013
Executive Director, Mary Gunn speaks at TEDxBoston TEDxBoston 2010
Greater Boston Social Innovator in Healthy Aging Social Innovation Forum 2010
Highlighted our Experience Corps program on the Making a Difference series NBC News 2009
Social Innovation Partner Award John Hancock Financial Services 2008
MetLife Award of Achievement in Older Volunteer Program Management MetLife 2007
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2007

Collaborations


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 8
Number of Volunteers 275
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 91%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 14
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Commercial General Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Employee Benefits Liability
Professional Liability
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Harvey Salgo
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Board Chair Term July 2015 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. George Blount John Hancock USA/Manulife Financial Voting
Mr. Stephen Bryant Columbia Gas of Massachusetts Voting
Ms. Kristy Coviello Deloitte Voting
Ms. Melody Forbes Harvard Medical School Voting
Mrs. Carol Kamin Carol Kamin Consulting Voting
Mr. Jonathan Kappel Clark University Voting
Mrs. Susie S. Lee-Snell M.Ed. in Early Childhood Education, CHC Voting
Ms. Wai-Chi Mok Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Dr. Peter Muyanda-Mutebi Roxbury Community College Voting
Ms. Amanda Reeves Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. Voting
Ms. Michelle Roman AARP Experience Corps Volunteer Voting
Mr. Harvey Salgo La Capra Associates Voting
Mr. William Wolff AARP Experience Corps Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 60%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • --
  • Audit
  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Ethics
  • Executive
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $2,310,515.00
Projected Expense $2,278,409.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited financials

2009 Audited financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $2,139,133 $2,441,544 $2,786,955
Total Expenses $2,166,504 $2,345,567 $2,641,374

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$493,424 $568,913 $526,691
Government Contributions $628,040 $782,350 $1,000,845
    Federal $628,040 $782,350 $1,000,845
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $70,331 $68,043 $60,500
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $246,667 $338,019 $317,583
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $61,989 $62,483 $77,187
Revenue In-Kind $637,821 $618,979 $804,054
Other $861 $2,757 $95

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,825,896 $2,011,151 $2,366,873
Administration Expense $166,493 $176,075 $133,017
Fundraising Expense $174,115 $158,341 $141,484
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.99 1.04 1.06
Program Expense/Total Expenses 84% 86% 90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 14% 11% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $557,715 $540,106 $451,188
Current Assets $514,667 $449,000 $353,417
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
Current Liabilities $87,982 $43,002 $50,061
Total Net Assets $469,733 $497,104 $401,127

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.85 10.44 7.06

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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