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Mary M B Wakefield Trust 000444 01

 1465 Brush Hill Road
 Milton, MA 02186
[P] (617) 333-0924
[F] (617) 333-0924
www.wakefieldtrust.org
mark@dogwoodlanefarm.org
Mark Smith
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 2005
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-6076048

LAST UPDATED: 11/18/2015
Organization DBA The Wakefield Estate
Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust is to promote life-long participatory learning using the land and resources of the Wakefield Estate.   Through collaborative partnerships with schools and community organizations, the Trust provides educational opportunities, tours, presentations, workshops, hands-on training, internships and other programs covering a variety of subjects, including local history, ecology, horticulture, agriculture, archival work and historic preservation.

By fostering the connections between people, land and history, the Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust aims to create a living and accessible landscape that carries on the legacy of Mary ("Polly") Wakefield and her vision for an engaged and knowledgeable citizenry.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust is to promote life-long participatory learning using the land and resources of the Wakefield Estate.   Through collaborative partnerships with schools and community organizations, the Trust provides educational opportunities, tours, presentations, workshops, hands-on training, internships and other programs covering a variety of subjects, including local history, ecology, horticulture, agriculture, archival work and historic preservation.

By fostering the connections between people, land and history, the Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust aims to create a living and accessible landscape that carries on the legacy of Mary ("Polly") Wakefield and her vision for an engaged and knowledgeable citizenry.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2011 to Dec 31, 2012
Projected Income $595,000.00
Projected Expense $600,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Environmental Science Field Experience Program
  • Grew After-school Environmental Partnership
  • Summer Archaeology Institute
  • Summer Landscape Intern Program
  • Wakefield Fellows Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust is to promote life-long participatory learning using the land and resources of the Wakefield Estate.   Through collaborative partnerships with schools and community organizations, the Trust provides educational opportunities, tours, presentations, workshops, hands-on training, internships and other programs covering a variety of subjects, including local history, ecology, horticulture, agriculture, archival work and historic preservation.

By fostering the connections between people, land and history, the Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust aims to create a living and accessible landscape that carries on the legacy of Mary ("Polly") Wakefield and her vision for an engaged and knowledgeable citizenry.


Background Statement

The Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust was created by Mary ("Polly") Wakefield to preserve and protect the 22-acre historic Wakefield Estate located in Milton, MA.  The Wakefield Estate has been owned and occupied since 1707 by the same family and has a rich assortment of historic buildings, rare collections and a prized plant collection.  Upon her death in 2004, the Trustees of the Estate set out to put into action Polly's wishes that the estate be a place for public learning and enjoyment, with an emphasis on re-establishing and cultivating the connection between people and nature.  In 2007, the organization hired its first executive director to develop and manage the organization's vision and programs.  Since 2007, a diverse set of programs have been implemented that use the assets and resources of the estate to promote hands-on experiential learning opportunities for students of all ages.  These include:
  • Day-long outdoor and environmental learning experiences for K-5 children
  • Innovative programming for high-school and middle school age students, including the Wakefield Estate's Summer Archaeology Institute and Summer Landscape Intern positions, animal husbandry and local food production
  • Providing paid and unpaid fellowships to undergraduate and graduate students from area universities in subjects ranging from archival studies and management, archaeology, historic preservation, collections management, horticulture and landscape design, mineralogy, fine arts, and historical research
  • Day-long and week-long seminars for adult learners, ranging from landscape design and preservation to backyard homesteading, offering workshops in backyard chickens, bees, orchards, canning and preserving.
The Wakefield Estate is staffed by four dedicated people - an executive director, a program director, and landscape director and a groundskeeper - who work closely together to carry out the mission of the organization.  The staff has built solid partnerships with dozens of school and community organizations in the metro-Boston area, particularly Boston Public Schools, the Arnold Arboretum and area colleges.  The organization has also formed a dedicated group of advisors infused with invaluable knowledge to assist with promoting Polly's vision.
 
Looking forward, the trustees, staff and advisors will continue to create new and innovative programming that captures the imagination of the people and inspires them to become involved with the Estate's goals.

Impact Statement

In 2011, the impact of the Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust was measured by the following accomplishments:
  • Provided day-long environmental and outdoor learning experiences for over 2000 Boston Public School K-5 students 
  • Provided five college level research internships to undergraduate and graduate students from local universities, including Boston University, University of Massachusetts/Boston, Simmons College, Tufts, and The Landscape Institute.  Research areas included archaeology, mineralogy, historic preservation, collections management, landscape design and archival documentation
  • Provided summer enrichment program in archaeology to youth from Boston and surrounding neighborhoods
  • Provided paid summer internships to ten high school students from surrounding communities in landscape design and maintenance
  • Provided weekly after school program for children of the Henry Grew School in Hyde Park
In 2012, in addition to expanding the existing programs and services listed above to involve even more students, we are launching several new initiatives:
  • Transforming the grounds and gardens into a "working arboretum," where learners of all ages can apply new knowledge and skills with hands-on activities at the Wakefield Estate
  • Designing and implementing a new student teaching component to our environmental and outdoor learning program, giving local education students hands-on opportunities to gain valuable "outdoor classroom" experiences with school children
  • Researching and creating a master landscape management and site plan to better manage the horticultural resources of the estate and plan for the addition of new buildings and programs.
 

Needs Statement

The top five most pressing needs of the organization are:
 1.  Identify and secure new sources of revenue in order to fund our program expenses, thereby ensuring the long-term financial sustainability of the organization;
2.   Develop additional programs to reach a broader audience for all ages;
3.  Address strategic and legal questions around organizational structure,  board development, and long-term vision;
 4.  Determine long-term staffing needs and how to fund two new positions:  a development staff position and a collections management position;
5.   Create a capital campaign to fund the construction and renovation of new and existing buildings.  

CEO Statement

As a father of two teens who have grown up in the tech-savvy age of personal electronic devices, Youtube, texting, video games and a daily barrage of overt and subliminal messages that compel them to stay connected to their "devices," I have witnessed them become increasingly disconnected from and disinterested in the natural world around them.  The growing disconnect from and disinterest in the natural world I see in today's youth troubles me; we - humanity - have a long history of destroying that which we fear or do not value.  
 
Much of the work we do at the Wakefield Estate is informed by Richard Louv's book "The Last Child in the Woods."  In his book, Louv describes the phenomenon of what he calls "nature deficit disorder," the growing chasm between the natural world and children.   It is a rare thing today when a 5th grader can distinguish a maple leaf from an oak leaf, or when a class of 4th graders is not afraid to sit on the grass.  Because of the lack of access and opportunity, safety concerns, and the emphasis on electronic gadgetry, children today are growing up largely indoors;  most children are more apt to see a close up of a spider on a computer screen than in their back yard under a twig.
 
Our mission here at the Wakefield Estate is really about creating a new generation of learners who are passionate about participating in learning, and who love to touch, smell, taste and handle that which they are learning about. 
 
I am inspired -- and indeed, more hopeful about our future -- when I see school-aged children become curious about the world that surounds them and begin to comprehend the complexity of the natural world.  It's a wonderful thing to watch a 3rd grader who, after being terrified to sit on the grass here on his or her first visit to the  Wakefield Estate, falls in love with being outdoors, of running in the freshly cut grass without their shoes, of staring down a bull frog in the pond.  These simple but so important experiences for young children today provide the basis for a life-long appetite, curiosity and respect for the environment.  This is the generation that will be tasked with coming to terms with and finding solutions to the greatest challenge humanity has had to face: global climate change.  Re-connecting kids to nature is the vitally important first step.
 
 

Board Chair Statement

Take this
The people are too long
Far was the prize
Gifted by a King
Without a future
 
Take this
The past has long come
Near is the reward
Bequeathed for All
With a future - ours
 

The trustees have been delivered a jewel by a woman, Mary May (Polly) Binney Wakefield, with a vision born from wealth, but grown from the earth. The People are the beneficiaries. Ensuring that this will always be is our primary responsibility and burden.

 As with the Dogwoods developed and patented by our benefactor, the Trustees were handed a seed to cultivate and nurture for the beauty and enjoyment of the People. Unlike Mother Nature’s millennia of development, our seed only began with the fundamental building blocks for life as a charitable organization.

 

The challenges are many; how to place a level of importance? In 7 years, we have taken an Estate in total disarray into an true operating foundation providing a wide range of opportunity and enjoyment for the Public. We have provided educational research grants for dozens of college students to research history, archeology, architecture, collections, paper, landscape design, and automobile restoration among many topics.We have provided summer educational employment to dozens of our young, local residents. We have expended close to a million dollars on infrastructure with several million to go, all of which are necessary to ensure long term accessibility and enjoyment of the estate. We have provided workshops in such diverse areas as beekeeping, archeology, tree growth, and back-yard farming. And to top it all off, we have been able to have 1000’s of local school children visit the property and learn of its history, beauty and opportunity. We have reached society from all walks of life.

 
We currently have four full time employees: Executive Director, Program Director, Landscape Director and Groundskeeper.   We have also been most fortunate to have assembled a diverse group of interested and knowledgeable individuals to provide guidance with our charitable endeavors as we progress from a fledgling entity into an energetic contributor to the Public Good.

The trustees have grasped the concept of EDUCATION as fundamental to Polly’s goals for the property. The flexibility of education has been interwoven with almost every aspect of our progress to date and is fundamental to the future of the organization and the People. As we have begun Polly’s Vision we have been able to provide most programming with Polly’s support. We need to continue Polly’s opportunity. We will reach more. The time has come to reach out to the public to help us continue to support them.


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
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Organization Categories

  1. Public & Societal Benefit - Citizen Participation
  2. Education - Education N.E.C.
  3. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts,Culture & Humanities NEC

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Environmental Science Field Experience Program

The Environmental Science Field Experience Program provides school age children, grades K-5, a full day outdoor educational experience on the grounds of the Wakefield Estate.  The program consists of hands-on participatory learning activities that focus on life cycles of plants, animals and insects, both land and aquatic species.  
Budget  $20,000
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Short term, over 90 % of children participating will be able to understand and describe the cycles of plant and animal life, native, non-native and invasive species, identify six to ten tree species, and be comfortable in a natural (foreign) surrounding. 
Program Long-Term Success  One long-term change as a result of the Environmental Science Field Experience Program is the participants' acquired knowledge of and interest in the natural ecosystems.  Too few urban children today have the opportunity to experience being in the woods,  rolling on a freshly cut lawn, blowing dandelion seeds, catching crayfish, holding a newly hatched chick, feeding grass to sheep; enjoying the simple things that previous generations did every day.  This generation of children will have to develop a deep curiosity in and love for the natural world if it is to solve the environmental challenges of the 21st century.
Program Success Monitored By  We know the program is working by the excitement we observe when the children get off the bus for their second visit.  On their first visit, children are often anxious of what they will experience during their field experience; for too many, this is the only outdoor educational experience they will have all year.  But the anxiety is soon replaced with a sense of wonder and excitement as they discover the varied aspects of the estate's landscape:  the woods, ponds, animals, gardens, orchards and fields.  The change in children's behavior between the time of their arrival and departure tells us the program meets their needs and desire to be closer to the natural world around them.
Examples of Program Success  One of the best examples of the program's success is the teachers in the various school in and around Boston who sign up each year to bring their students here.  One school in particular -- the Charles Taylor School in Mattapan - commits to bring all grades (K-5) to the estate every year.

Grew After-school Environmental Partnership

The Grew After-school Environmental Partnership is a collaborative project between the Wakefield Estate, the Grew School and the Hyde Park Presbyterian Church.  The project is designed as an educational enrichment program for at-risk youth in grades K-5 from the Henry Grew elementary school in Hyde Park, MA.  Students from the Grew school, identified by the school as needing extra support for successful academic outcomes, spend one afternoon per week at the Wakefield Estate for a variety of outdoor and environmental education activities over a 10-week period.  For these children, the day at the estate is often the one opportunity they have each week to experience the beauty of and fascination with nature up close and hands-on.  Students get to search for crayfish, feed the lambs and llama, and learn about the life cycles of plants and animals.  Tutoring support is also provided during the afternoon session for homework help. 
Budget  $5,000
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of the 10-week program, children exhibit a new-found sense of pride and self-confidence for having mastered becoming comfortable with new faces and new surroundings.  All of the children can identify plants and animals they previously could not, and all have an expanded vocabulary and understanding of the natural world around them.
Program Long-Term Success 
The ultimate change we hope to see in  the lives of the children involved in our afterschool partnership is improved social and academic outcomes. All of the children involved in the program have behavioral and learning challenges.  The after school program focuses on providing the children a supportive and nurturing environment in which to build learning skills and peer relationships. All  of the children who participate leave our program with new friendships and  a new awareness and fascination with the natural world around them.  The program provides one more tool to these kids to assemble the tool box of skills they will need to be engaged, successful citizens in the years ahead.
Program Success Monitored By  The on-site program at the estate is directed by the estate's Program Director with the support of four tutors from the Hyde Park Presbyterian Church.  The teaching staff meet at the outset of the 10-week program to create a program schedule and a matching curriculum.  Through the 10 weeks, the teaching staff meet to assess and evaluate the progress of the children, challenges and problems that arise, and trouble shoot as needed to keep the progress on track.
Examples of Program Success  The best evidence of the program's success is the improved individual behavior of the children involved and the improved peer dynamics within the group.  Children who might display anger and/or violence  vis-a-vis their peers at the outset of the program learn to modify their impulses through adult companionship and guidance, resulting in new friendships and news skills that will serve them for their entire lives.

Summer Archaeology Institute

The Summer Archaeology Institute is a hands-on archaeological program for high school-age youth at the historic Wakefield Estate in Milton, MA.   The institute is designed for high school students interested in learning about local history and archaeology.

 

In each two-week session, participants work side by side with graduate students from Boston University’s Department of Archaeology. Students gain excavation experience and acquire basic laboratory skills, as well as learn the methods and techniques involved in conducting archaeology. Participants also gain experience in identifying artifacts and the behind-the-scenes activities that occur after the fieldwork has been conducted. 

Budget  $10,000
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Archaeology
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of a two-week session of the Summer Archaeology Institute, 100% of the youth participating will understand the theory and practice of conducting an archaeological excavation and the field's relevance to understanding society today.
Program Long-Term Success  The Summer Archaeology Institute is designed as an enrichment program that introduces high school-age youth to the field and discipline of archaeology; an experience few high school youth get to have.  Youth who participate in the program gain valuable life and learning experiences and are exposed to the exciting world of archaeology.  We do not track youth who participate in the program, but we do know that one youth went on to study archaeology in college as a result of participating in the Summer Archaeology Institute.  Long term, the program's intent is to awaken in the youth a sense of curiosity and wonder about learning, introduce them to the field of archaeology, and build basic life skills that will serve them throughout their lives: team work, rigorous physical challenges, and academic enrichment.
Program Success Monitored By  Throughout the two-week session, the program's co-leaders observe, interview and work side by side with the participants, noting enthusiasm, interest or disinterest, and any behavioral challenges that need to be addressed.  At the end of each day, all participants and leaders take 20 minutes to journal about the day.  These journals are reviewed by the leaders to assess progress and success.
Examples of Program Success  Last summer, one of our participants announced at the end of the summer that he, as a result of participating in the Summer Archaeology Institute, would be attending college to study archaeology.  The institute was his first exposure to the field of archaeology.  What he learned and experienced motivated him to go deeper into the field, a wonderful example of the impact this program has on youth. 

Summer Landscape Intern Program

The Summer Landscape Intern Program provides 10 high school-age youth from Boston and surrounding communities a six- to eight-week paid internship to learn the basics of landscape maintenance.  The youth work side by side with the estate's landscaping staff to learn horticulture, arboriculture as well as other skills such as basic carpentry, fence building, and animal husbandry.
Budget  $15,000
Category  Employment, General/Other Internships
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  In the short-term, 90% participants will for the first time in their lives receive a paycheck; understand the expectations of the organization in order to continue to receive a paycheck; and begin to set expectations for themselves around their personal work ethic.
Program Long-Term Success 
For many urban youth, having a paid summer job provides not only a needed paycheck, but a chance to build a foundation of a work history that will be a critical cornerstone for future endeavors.  
 
For most youth who become our sumer landscape interns, this is their first "real world" work experience.  They learn the importance of expectations of others -- like showing up to work on time, of working hard to accomplish the task at and - and how to set expectations for themselves; of taking pride in one's work.  The ultimate change that will result from this program is the altered trajectory of the lives of the participants based on the new self confidence, the new sense of self and the new knowledge that they can achieve what they set their sights on.
Program Success Monitored By  The program is co-led by two certified arborists with experience working with youth.  The leaders monitor individual and group productivity on a weekly basis, evaluate work plans and goals, and motivate the youth to take on leadership roles each week related to different tasks.  
Examples of Program Success 
One of the key measures of the program's success is its overwhelming popularity with the youth;  about one-third of the participants re-apply for a second year internship.  We see the confidence the program builds in the youth and the leadership qualities many develop from the first year to the second.  
 
A brief anecdote:  Two years ago, a very quiet and retiring 16 year old girl from Dorchester, who had absolutely no prior experience working with trees, plants and the landscape, worked here as an intern.  She quietly did her work and appeared to enjoy being outdoors.  But we had no idea what she really thought of the experience.  To our surprise, she re-applied for a second year, and demonstrated confidence, leadership and knowledge to the newer youth.  

Wakefield Fellows Program

The Wakefield Fellows program at the Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust puts the resources and assets of the Wakefield Estate to the service of learning for college-age students.
 
The Wakefield Estate is home to a rare and prized set of collections - both material and plant - that offer unique, hands-on learning opportunities for college students in a number of fields of study, including: museum studies & collections management, archaeology, art history, archival studies, horticulture, historic building and landscape preservation, landscape design, decorative arts, library studies and management, and local history.  
To date, the Wakefield Fellows program has hosted graduate and undergraduate fellows from a number of colleges and universities to conduct independent research projects within the above fields that satisfy their degree requirements.  Colleges involved include Boston University, Tufts, UMass/Boston, Simmons, Harvard, the Winterthur Museum School, Univ of Pennsylvania, and the Landscape Institute
Budget  $20,000
Category  Education, General/Other Postsecondary Education
Population Served Other Named Groups Other Named Groups Other Named Groups
Program Short-Term Success  Short term, Wakefield Fellows develop skills and knowledge that will propel them on their career and vocational paths.  Each Fellow is supervised and advised by a expert in the field, who offer professional guidance and direction and oversee their Fellow's work.
Program Long-Term Success  The long term change and impact for the participants in the Wakefield Fellows program is professional and career development.  The program provides undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to conduct primary research and thus satisfy a requirement for college graduation. Fellows gain first-hand experience working with and on a rare and valuable set of collections that very few students have the opportunity to experience.
Program Success Monitored By  Each Fellow is supervised by a professional in the field of their research.  At the outset of the fellowship, the Fellow and the supervisor create a set of objectives for the research project and develop a work plan to meet their goals.  Throughout the fellowship, the Fellow and the supervisor meet regularly to assess progress and challenges and make any necessary changes to the project plan.
Examples of Program Success  The Wakefield Fellows produce scholarly papers based on their research, copies of which are provided to the Wakefield Charitable trust.  In some instances, the research is the subject matter for graduate theses of students, evidence that the program plays a vital role in shaping the next generation of professionals in these fields of study.  Some of the research has been published in industry journals, further evidence that the Wakefield Fellows program is successful.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We offer programs for children, youth and young adults that few, if any, metro-Boston organizations offer.  With an emphasis on engagement and participation, the programs we offer empower children and youth to learn knowledge and skills far beyond the subject matter of a given program.  By providing hands-on learning opportunities with peers -- whether participating on an archaeological excavation or learning about invasive species -- those involved learn the vital lesson of becoming engaged and informed citizens. 
 
We began our outreach in 2008, slowly building our menu of learning opportunities since then, by creating unique and innovative programs for youth and young adults.  Until now, we have relied on our endowment to fund the costs associated with each program - salaries, supplies, transportation, etc.   Looking ahead, we want to continue to expand our program offerings to reach more youth.  To do so, however, we will need to expand our source of revenue to maintain a long-term sustainable funding base without depleting Polly's endowment which is needed to maintain the site, its buildings and its material and plant collections.
 
So, the largest challenge we face is a financial challenge -- how to support existing programs and the expansion of our programs to reach more youth and young adults.  We raise a small percentage of program cost through fees; however, we never let one's inability to afford the program fee prevent their participation.  We believe cost should never be a barrier for learning.  Therefore, we are reaching out to individual donors and the philanthropic community of metro-Boston to engage and inspire and to consider supporting the unique and innovative programming happening at the Wakefied Estate.  
 
With an endowment that supports our facility and overhead, 100 per cent of funds raised from donors will go to support our programs.  We believe that once donors meet our staff, tour the estate and buildings, and learn about our programs, they will be inspired to support our our work and mission.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Mark L Smith
CEO Term Start Nov 2007
CEO Email mark@dogwoodlanefarm.org
CEO Experience Co-Founder and President, Brookwood Community Farm
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Erica Max Program Director Managing Director of Coolidge Corner Theatre Foundation
Ms. Deborah Merriam -- Founder and Owner, Panini's Bakery

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Community Partnership Award Boston Youth Environmental Network (BYEN) 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Boston Public Schools
Hyde Park Presbyterian Church 
Blue Hill Collaborative
Boston University
UMass Boston 
Simmons College 
Brookwood Community Farm
 Curry College (under development)
Tufts University
Fogg Museum
Harvard University 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We are a relatively new organization that has focused on program development these first few years as we have organized ourselves to provide services to nearby schools, universities and residents of local communities. Looking to the future, the board of trustees is deliberating the organizational make-up and structure to best serve our constituency.  

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 15
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr/Ms Shared Role
Board Chair Company Affiliation n/a
Board Chair Term Jan 2004 - Dec
Board Co-Chair Mr/Ms Shared Role
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation n/a
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2004 - Dec

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Gordon Barrett Sippican Capital Advisors Voting
Ms. Nathalie Binney Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Stephen Raich Russell, Brier & Co. LLP Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr John Cronin Community Volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Claire Dempsey Boston University NonVoting
Ms. Meredith Hall Community volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Valarie Kinkade Museum and Collectors Resource NonVoting
Mr. Branch Lane Community volunteer NonVoting
Ms Vivien Morris Community Volunteer NonVoting
Mr. Robert Mussey Community Volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Barbara Plonski Community Volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Nigel Shaw National Park Service NonVoting
Ms. Lynne Spencer menders, torrey & spencer, inc. NonVoting
Ms. Pam Thompson Arnold Arboretum NonVoting
Mr. Ken Turino Historic New England NonVoting
Ms. Elizabeth Vizza Friends of the Public Garden NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 1
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 33%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Mary M. B. Wakefield Charitable Trust is a relatively new organization, begun in 2005 shortly after the death of Polly Wakefield who left the estate and its assets as a Trust.  The current board of three directors, or Trustees, have served on the board since its founding.  The board has steered the creation and development of a new organization that now serves the public through a number of programs.
 
The Trustees recognize that for the organization to exist ten, one hundred, even a thousand years from now, it will need to attract new board members, donors, members and volunteers that continue to infuse vitality and innovation to the organization.  
 
One of the biggest challenges facing the organization from a governance perspective is how to attract and recruit new board members that share the vision and values of Polly Wakefeld and the mission of the organization. To address this and other challenges,  the Trustees have recently sought the counsel of two organizational development professionals to help navigate the evolution of the organization's governing structure and strategic vision.  This is an ongoing process with many unanswered questions -- such as whether to change from a private operating foundation to a public charity.  These are complicated structural and legal questions that will work themselves out over time as the Trustees find creative solutions and a clear path forward.
 
 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2011 to Dec 31, 2012
Projected Income $595,000.00
Projected Expense $600,000.00
Form 990s

2014 990 PF

2013 990 PF

2012 990 PF

2011 990 PF

2010 990 PF

2009 990 PF

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $-22,746 $2,623,790 $889,233
Total Expenses $712,033 $687,532 $585,855

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $26,596 $34,260 $9,608
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $3,124 $4,265 --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-62,962 $2,582,983 $876,339
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $10,496 $2,282 $3,286

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $591,436 $597,676 $470,268
Administration Expense $120,597 $89,856 $115,587
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses -0.03 3.82 1.52
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 87% 80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $24,072,242 $22,136,090 $21,831,412
Current Assets $132,993 $59,411 $81,820
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $1,194 $1,300 $0
Total Net Assets $24,071,048 $22,134,790 $21,831,412

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $16,000,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 4.5%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose Major renovations of historic buildings and construction of greenhouse, restrooms and classroom
Campaign Goal $500,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates June 2013 - June 2015
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $0.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 111.38 45.70 --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Mary M B Wakefield Charitable Trust is a IRC Sec 501(c)(3) Charitable Organization which is classified as Private Operating Foundation  (IRC Sec 509).  We are required to file US form 990-PF and pay a tax on our net investment income.  Massachusetts specifically exempts Private Foundations (of which we are a sub-class) that file and attach form 990-PF to form PC from the audit requirement.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's 990 PF, as this organization does not have audited financials.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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