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The American City Coalition Inc. (TACC)

 2136 Washington Street
 Roxbury, MA 02119
[P] (857) 308-3015
[F] --
www.tamcc.org
charlotte_rice@tamcc.org
Charlotte Rice
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INCORPORATED: 1995
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3243095

LAST UPDATED: 08/05/2015
Organization DBA The American City Coalition
TACC
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The American City Coalition is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit public charity working to revitalize neighborhoods so that urban families flourish in safe environments and benefit from the full economic opportunity of American cities.

TACC advances integrated approaches to complex problems that respond to both place-based and people-based need. TACC’s programs focus on community planning, supportive service strategy, and economic development in neighborhoods with high concentrations of poverty. 
 
TACC supports cross-sector partnerships by bringing together new partners with ingrained incentives to promote positive physical and social change, as well opening up dialogue between organizations that have been working side by side in the same neighborhood, but often within silos. By bringing together stakeholder to form a common vision, TACC seeks to identify lasting solutions to complex problems and drive public and private resources to work on behalf of low-income residents in underserved neighborhoods. The result is accelerated community transformation and increased economic opportunity that improves the quality of life for low-income residents.
 
 

Mission Statement

The American City Coalition is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit public charity working to revitalize neighborhoods so that urban families flourish in safe environments and benefit from the full economic opportunity of American cities.

TACC advances integrated approaches to complex problems that respond to both place-based and people-based need. TACC’s programs focus on community planning, supportive service strategy, and economic development in neighborhoods with high concentrations of poverty. 
 
TACC supports cross-sector partnerships by bringing together new partners with ingrained incentives to promote positive physical and social change, as well opening up dialogue between organizations that have been working side by side in the same neighborhood, but often within silos. By bringing together stakeholder to form a common vision, TACC seeks to identify lasting solutions to complex problems and drive public and private resources to work on behalf of low-income residents in underserved neighborhoods. The result is accelerated community transformation and increased economic opportunity that improves the quality of life for low-income residents.
 
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $1,121,074.00
Projected Expense $1,121,074.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Planning
  • Economic Development Program: Local
  • Economic Development Program: Systemic
  • Supportive Services Advisory

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The American City Coalition is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit public charity working to revitalize neighborhoods so that urban families flourish in safe environments and benefit from the full economic opportunity of American cities.

TACC advances integrated approaches to complex problems that respond to both place-based and people-based need. TACC’s programs focus on community planning, supportive service strategy, and economic development in neighborhoods with high concentrations of poverty. 
 
TACC supports cross-sector partnerships by bringing together new partners with ingrained incentives to promote positive physical and social change, as well opening up dialogue between organizations that have been working side by side in the same neighborhood, but often within silos. By bringing together stakeholder to form a common vision, TACC seeks to identify lasting solutions to complex problems and drive public and private resources to work on behalf of low-income residents in underserved neighborhoods. The result is accelerated community transformation and increased economic opportunity that improves the quality of life for low-income residents.
 
 

Background Statement

Founded in 1994, The American City Coalition grew out of lessons learned from the development of the earliest mixed-income communities in the United States. The inspiration for our work is grounded in the story of Columbia Point, a 1,500-unit public housing project, in Dorchester, MA.

By the 1970s, this federally funded housing development had failed. Seeing an opportunity to create better housing in his native Dorchester, our founder, Joseph E. Corcoran, working with his development company, Corcoran Mullins Jennison, undertook the conversion of the property into 1,238 units of mixed-income housing. The neighborhood was renamed Harbor Point on the Bay.

In realizing this pioneering residential neighborhood, Corcoran partnered with a coalition of residents and community organizations to ensure that local knowledge and quality of life needs shaped the future of Harbor Point. Today, the conversion of Columbia Point into Harbor Point remains a model for the deconcentration of poverty and the preservation of affordable housing; the project informed the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development’s HOPE VI plan and, eventually, the Choice Neighborhood Initiatives program.

Corcoran calls upon all of us to work together to alleviate the concentration of poverty in distressed neighborhoods. Below, Corcoran articulates his inspiration for founding The American City Coalition:

With the program support of our mayors, governors, the President, Congress, and many philanthropists–we can cure inner city poverty. How? Not by improving education and daycare, not by job training and creating job opportunities, not by making the streets and the transit safe, not by creating new, safe commercial areas or by building more attractive housing or focusing on diversity. It is not by making any of these efforts alone; it is by doing them all, at the same time, focused on distressed neighborhoods.

It can be done–but only in partnership with the people who now live in these distressed communities. Initiatives must grow from their resident’s experience and knowledge. Policy makers and implementers must listen to communities and be responsive; it is the only way to empower real partnerships that harness focused investment. (Founder’s Statement)


Impact Statement

If you believe that families are strengthened by access to jobs, quality housing, safe neighborhoods, and good government services and that Boston is made stronger by implementing policies that promote socioeconomic diversity and citizen engagement, then you will appreciate some of TACC’s recent work listed below. Please visit our website and sign up for our quarterly email update and blog to stay informed about TACC’s most recent work.
 
In 2014, TACC’s accomplishments included:
  • Strengthening Boston's Lower Roxbury neighborhood through continued research on the condition of housing; review the resources section of our website to access studies including “Lower Roxbury: Unlocking Investment for this Choice Neighborhood.” TACC supported the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) with the development of a Transformation Plan that will replace obsolete public housing with high-quality, mixed-income housing and drive new investment. 
  • Expanding civic engagement: TACC is working with the citizen-led Roxbury Strategic Master Plan Oversight Committee (RSMPOC) to provide ongoing technical support with the intent of accelerating the development of underutilized public property and expanding engagement. RSMPOC launched Opportunity Roxbury, a website to better ensure the community is informed of the committee’s work and to encourage community and resident engagement. 
  • Changing the business environment to create inner-city jobs through a study that promotes a plan to create four neighborhood revitalization districts along the Fairmount Line. The study advances a business attraction and retention concept that forecasts the creation of 1,900 new jobs and 195 new or expanded businesses in Bostonʼs neediest neighborhoods. 
  • Mentoring for girls strengthens mixed-income communities through a partnership between the Harbor Point Community Task Force and Big Sister Association that came together to launch a pilot program matching 25 girls to mentors. After an evidence-based evaluation, the program design was expanded to reach 150 girls and two additional public housing communities. 
  • Partnering with the Urban Institute on an ongoing project to replicate the Urban Institute's HOST program. HOST is a dual-generation program designed to help families break the cycle of poverty. 
In 2015, TACC will continue to expand existing and develop new engagements that benefit low-income residents of the City of Boston.
 
Organizational goals include:
Ongoing multi-faceted work in Lower Roxbury in partnership with the BHA, the RSMPOC, and others to address housing, economic development, and health in the neighborhood; collaborating with high-level stakeholders to tailor the neighborhood revitalization districts model for Boston and the Fairmount Corridor in order to address underlying economic issues; conducting a senior needs and assets assessment to understand needs of 300 older adults in the Madison Park Village and inform strategies for supportive housing with enhanced services for aging in place.

Needs Statement

With poverty in the United States escalating to a 50-year high and one in three inner-city families living in poverty, there has never been a more important time to implement transformative plans for urban neighborhoods. In Boston, TACC sees a pressing need for multi-sector, multi-stakeholder partnerships that address complex problems in the areas of housing, education, unemployment, health, transportation, and economic development in the neighborhoods of Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan, and Hyde Park.

TACC’s 2015 organizational plan sets an ambitious goal of doubling the number of projects where they are providing on the ground backbone support, monitoring, strategy, and evaluation. TACC's five most pressing needs are:

1. As a public charity with broad public benefit, TACC has an ongoing need for both diverse and expanded funding to support programs in community planning, supportive services strategy, and economic development.

2. TACC’s work prioritizes collaboration and is guided by the needs and aspirations of a range of partners; thus, TACC continually seeks to identify need and new projects and to expand the range of partnerships with community organization, high-quality service providers, government agencies, and private companies.

3. In order to develop innovative tools that expand resident engagement and optimize continuous feedback, TACC has an ongoing need for funds to support technology.  

4. In 2015, TACC seeks to undertake a longitudinal study of Lower Roxbury in order to monitor and better understand displacement in this neighborhood facing strong transformational forces. TACC plans to conduct an initial baseline study of all 4,000 households and to track change at 2.5, 5, and 10 years.  

5. TACC seeks to disseminate the organization’s work so that it can be utilized by other cities and help shape regional and national policy; TACC has an ongoing need for general operating support for publications, communications, and community convenings. 

 

CEO Statement

I'd like to thank you for your interest in our work. With your support, we've been able to help communities in Boston and across the Northeast to develop neighborhood transformation plans and to strengthen strategies for residential services.

Our work with housing managers, housing authorities, and community-based organizations provides these groups with critical technical assistance and research support that helps stakeholders collaborate on breakthrough strategies.

With poverty in the United States escalating to a 50-year high and one in three inner-city families living in poverty, there has never been a more important time to implement transformative plans for urban neighborhoods.

Please read our Background Statement and the Impact Questions, to learn more about our history that is deeply rooted in Boston and our unique, holistic approach to neighborhood revitalization.

2014 was an important year for us. We expanded our board and entered into several productive new partnerships. Our Impact Statement provides you with an overview of ongoing projects, partnerships, and positive outcomes for people we serve.

Thank you for being part of our neighborhood. I urge you to follow TACC on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter and to visit our website and blog to learn more about TACC’s work and to sign up for our quarterly updates.

If I can answer any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at neil_mccullagh@tamcc.org or 617.822.7267; it would be a pleasure to speak with you about The American City Coalition and our collaborative approach to neighborhood revitalization.

Warm Regards,
Neil McCullagh


Board Chair Statement

Founder and Board Chair Statement

In a 2007 speech, Melinda Gates published a letter explaining what motivated her and her husband:

“We knew what we stood for: that all lives have equal value – that starving children in African and Indian slums are just as precious as your children or mine, that families struggling in American cities matter just as much as families in safe suburban neighborhoods. Ultimately all people, no matter where they live, deserve a chance to live a healthy, productive life.”

I agree with Melinda. TACC strives to create safe, healthy productive neighborhoods. We live in a great nation, which has known economic prosperity like no other in history, but we still have desperate slums in every major city. We can eliminate these places that breed homelessness and crime. We don’t need new resources, but to direct public and private resources to focus on areas of concentrated poverty.

With the program support of our Mayors, Governors, the President, Congress, and the many philanthropists – we can cure inner city poverty. How? Not by improving education and day care, not by job training and creating job opportunities, not by making the streets and the transit safe, not by creating new safe commercial areas or by building more attractive housing or focusing on diversity. It is not by making any of these efforts alone; it is by doing them all, at the same time, focused on distressed neighborhoods.

The first years of any effort are dedicated to planning with community partners and developing a common understanding of how a community will change. Then the resources from every segment of our society must be mobilized, including Federal, state and local governments, and enlightened foundations (like the Gates Foundation), who have demonstrated their commitment to the poorest of the poor in our own country and around the world. But the most essential players will be the suffering people of these neighborhoods, who will lead their own neighbors to embrace these efforts for themselves and their children.

It can be done – but only in partnership with the people who now live in these distressed communities. Initiatives must grow from their resident’s experience and resident knowledge. Policy makers and implementers must listen to communities and be responsive; it is the only way to empower real partnerships that harness focused investment.

I am not advocating a novel approach. It has been done successfully on a limited but effective scale. Neighborhoods have been turned-around from areas of desperation to communities of hope and strength. There are private, for-profit, and not-for-profit organizations that have worked seamlessly in concert in many major cities in America. We must learn from the best of those successful projects and repeat the activities neighborhood by neighborhood.

Melinda Gates is right. “Ultimately all people, no matter where they live, deserve a healthy, productive life.”

Joseph E Corcoran

The American City Coalition, Founder and Board Chair
Corcoran Jennison Companies, Chairman Emeritus


Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Hyde Park

TACC works in areas of concentrated poverty throughout the City of Boston. The organization has a long-term engagement and deep commitment to the Roxbury neighborhood. TACC is also committed to multiple short- and long-term engagements in Dorchester, Mattapan, and Hyde Park.

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  2. Human Services - Family Services
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Urban & Community Economic Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Community Planning

TACC’s community planning program provides in-depth analyses of neighborhoods’ needs and potential strategies for change. Utilized by governmental agencies (planning commissions, housing authorities, and elected officials) and private-sector developers, these studies connect major revitalization entities to the interests of all stakeholders.

 
TACC supports cross-sector partnerships by bringing together new partners with ingrained incentives to promote positive physical and social change as well opening up dialogue between organizations that have frequently been working side by side in the same neighborhood, but often within silos.
 
With extensive knowledge of the public, private, and nonprofit sectors, TACC strategizes across sectors and systems to implement transformation plans and increase public and private investment in the neighborhoods that need it most. Implementation is further advanced by TACC’s capacity to develop test fits and other clear schematics that outline actionable, incremental steps, building momentum and upstream solutions that have the greatest potential impact on a community.
Budget  $316,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Neighborhood Revitalization
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Walk to Work Communities: TACC brought together a coalition of six organizations to undertake a three-month collaborative planning exercise that considered the development needs of Newmarket and Upham’s Corner. This area is one of Boston’s three industrial districts strategically critical to the functioning of the city. The area has vast potential for the creation of sustainable inner-city jobs. TACC’s study is a transformation plan for a vibrant “walk to work” community.

Lower Roxbury: TACC has published four community and urban planning studies focused on need and strategies for the redevelopment of Lower Roxbury. The most recent study, “Lower Roxbury: Equity and Housing Publication” (2014), utilizes all of the available vacant and underutilized property in Lower Roxbury to develop a scenario that demonstrates how affordable housing can be preserved without losing a single unit, and how challenges can be overcome through focused, place-based investment, policy development, and social programming.
 
Complete Streets: TACC facilitated a Complete Streets Planning Initiative focused on the redesign of Mt. Vernon Street into a multi-modal corridor, which will be equally accessible to pedestrians, bicyclists, public transit, and cars.
Program Long-Term Success 

The goal of TACC’s community planning work is to bring partners together to identify the neighborhood’s need and potential strategies for change. After documenting a community’s vision, TACC seeks to provide clear schematics and incremental steps to promote and realize this vision.

Through this program, TACC creates transformational plans for communities to overcome barriers and identify opportunities to dramatically change the physical environment at the neighborhood and household level, so that all families can live in safe communities with access to living wage jobs, good schools, and quality housing.
Program Success Monitored By 

Specific indicators and measurements are set for individual projects. TACC works collaboratively and strives to mutually establish goals and outcome measurements with all partners in order to meet a community’s need. For community planning, monitoring success generally includes resident participation rate, business participation rate, as well as the participation of other key stakeholders such as nonprofit organizations, elected officials, and government agencies in the process. In evaluating community engagement, process evaluation is also used to measure success using surveys and focus groups and establishing continuous feedback loops. Long-term success is tied to implementation and the degree to which the community vision is realized. TACC’s community planning work delivers a strong return on investment by developing community transformation plans that outline short- and long-term implementable actions that can drive public and private investment.

Examples of Program Success 

Boston Housing Authority (BHA) and the Whittier Street Transformation Plan: As outlined above, TACC has published four community and urban planning studies focused on need and strategies for the redevelopment of Lower Roxbury. TACC’s study, “Lower Roxbury: Unlocking Investment for this Choice Neighborhood,” was an important resource for the BHA’s Whittier Street Choice Neighborhood Transformation Plan; TACC’s work contributed to this plan in the areas of people and neighborhood. Projects focused on people included the identification of high-quality service providers to support the upward economic mobility of current residents. Projects focused on neighborhood included The Roxbury Loop, an upstream planning intervention that promotes health, culture, and community during the redevelopment of this public housing community.

Mt. Vernon Street: When announcing the RFP for the street, the Boston Redevelopment Authority credited TACC for the initial study that led to the RFP; they wrote, “TACC’s…concept plan proposes specific strategies to support the anticipated increase in residents, students, workers, and visitors along the mid-section of Mt. Vernon."


Economic Development Program: Local

TACC's economic development program develops strategies on both a systemic and local level to strengthen low-income communities. On a systemic level, TACC works to change the overall business climate to attract businesses and create jobs in areas of concentrated poverty; on a local level, TACC works with individual businesses, commercial building owners, and Main Street organizations to locate or expand businesses in low-income neighborhoods.

 

Local: Current local economic development is focused on Upham’s Corner in Dorchester, as well as support for business development in three station areas along the Fairmount Line.

Budget  $162,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Community Economic Development
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Local: TACC provides strategic support and capacity development to local businesses, frequently working through local Boston Main Street organization. With Main Street organizations, TACC helps to build a strategic vision that is informed by data. Our technical assistance frequently includes digital and urban planning support, helping to build the tools (websites, parking studies, site test-fits) the organization needs to communicate more effectively with the community as well as with the city. For local businesses, technical assistance generally focuses on business development in order to meet the needs of area residents.

Program Long-Term Success 

The goal of both the systemic and local economic development programs is to remove the barriers to economic opportunity for individuals, families, and neighborhoods. TACC believes that all residents and neighborhoods should have equitable access to education, jobs, and public transportation.

At the July 7, 2013 opening of a new MBTA Fairmount Line station, Governor Deval Patrick of Massachusetts said, “We all know that reliable public transportation translates into jobs, economic opportunity, and a higher quality of life.” In Boston, transit equity remains a barrier to economic opportunity for many; the Fairmount Line is at the core of this inequity. The commuter line radiates south out of South Station, but for years, limited stops, infrequent service, and high fares, did little to connect the neighborhoods with the highest concentration of minority, low-income, and transit-dependent residents of Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan, and Hyde Park to the mainstream economy of Boston or each other. Unemployment in the region is 15.6%.

Program Success Monitored By 

Specific indicators and measurements are set for individual projects. However, overall program success is monitored by the number of new jobs created, the number of residents in the district that are employed, and the number of new or expanded businesses located in the region. TACC works collaboratively and therefore the organization monitors the number of residents and public and private partners actively collaborating on our projects.

Examples of Program Success 

Local: In Dorchester, TACC partners with Upham’s Corner Main Street (UCMS), a community-led business district planning agency working to build a vibrant commercial district. According to the Executive Director, “TACC advances the mission of Upham’s Corner Main Street by adding capacity; TACC brings knowledge resources to the table. The partnership with TACC is long-standing and multifaceted. It is one of UPCM’s closest relationships.”

Work in Upham’s Corner has included a parking study for the Strand Theater, an anchor institution and economic engine in the neighborhood. According to the Executive Director, “This study was very useful when working with the Boston Redevelopment Authority planning initiative. It was helpful to have that parking study and be able to say there needs to be better signage at Columbia Road or better marking for the parking garage.”
Additionally, TACC developed specific and appropriate plans for the expansion of a local, family-owned supermarket. These entrepreneurs are utilizing the plans to expand their store in order to meet the needs of residents. TACC has also provided technical assistance on the renovation and economic development plans to position the 25,000 s.f. of available retail space at the Masonic Hall as a hub for arts, culture, and innovation and create more permanent jobs. Most recently, TACC partnered with Historic Boston on a proposal to restore and repurpose a long-vacant comfort station into The Bike Kitchen, a community bike shop and café.

Economic Development Program: Systemic

TACC's economic development program develops strategies on both a systemic and local level to strengthen low-income communities. On a systemic level, TACC works to change the overall business climate to attract businesses and create jobs in areas of concentrated poverty; on a local level, TACC works with individual businesses, commercial building owners, and Main Street organizations to locate or expand businesses in low-income neighborhoods.

Systemic: In Boston, current systemic economic development is focused on creating Neighborhood Revitalization Districts in the Fairmount Corridor. Districts work to address underlying economic issues rather than focusing on one specific problem. The goal is to bring new jobs and businesses to the area by working with the city and state to alter the business environment through the reduction or elimination of state, corporate, property, payroll, and income taxes.
Budget  $169,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Regional Economic Development
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Systemic: TACC issued the study, “Neighborhood Revitalization Districts: Pathways to Prosperity Along the Fairmont Indigo Corridor, A Guide to Incentives for Advancing Economic Growth.” The study promotes a plan to create four neighborhood revitalization districts along the Fairmount Line. Districts work to address underlying economic issues rather than focusing on one specific problem. The study forecasts benefits within the first two to three years of implementation that include: 1,900 new jobs; 1,250 of these new jobs would be held by residents of the Pathways to Prosperity district, a wider 7.76 square mile zone along the corridor; and 195 new or expanded businesses. Employers that open or expand businesses in the district would benefit from reduced state, corporate, and property taxes.

Program Long-Term Success 

The goal of both the systemic and local economic development programs is to remove the barriers to economic opportunity for individuals, families, and neighborhoods. TACC believes that all residents and neighborhoods should have equitable access to education, jobs, and public transportation.

At the July 7, 2013 opening of a new MBTA Fairmount Line station, Governor Patrick of Massachusetts said, “We all know that reliable public transportation translates into jobs, economic opportunity, and a higher quality of life.” In Boston, transit equity remains a barrier to economic opportunity for many; the Fairmount Line is at the core of this inequity. The commuter line radiates south out of South Station, but for years, limited stops, infrequent service, and high fares did little to connect the neighborhoods with the highest concentration of minority, low-income, and transit-dependent residents of Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan, and Hyde Park to the mainstream economy of Boston or each other. Unemployment in the region is 15.6%.
Program Success Monitored By 

Specific indicators and measurements are set for individual projects. However, overall program success is monitored by the number of new jobs created, the number of residents in the district that are employed, and the number of new or expanded businesses located in the region. TACC works collaboratively and therefore the organization monitors the number of residents and public and private partners actively collaborating on our projects.

Examples of Program Success 

Systemic: TACC issued the 33-page study titled, “Neighborhood Revitalization Districts: Pathways to Prosperity Along the Fairmont Indigo Corridor, A Guide to Incentives for Advancing Economic Growth.” The Boston Foundation hosted a meeting on TACC’s study; 38 high-level decision makers participated in a discussion on the use of local and state tax incentives to stimulate business development and job growth in Lower Roxbury and surrounding neighborhoods. TACC’s study of districts was well-received by stakeholders; this momentum will be sustained through supportive studies detailing impact on prospective businesses and refined estimates of additional jobs, businesses, and income. With the support of key decision makers including John Barros, Chief of Economic Development for Boston, and The Boston Foundation, in 2015 TACC will engage the real estate and economic development firm HR & A to conduct additional analyses and shape a communication strategy to build on the study of revitalization districts. TACC will continue to work with high-level stakeholders to tailor the model for Boston and the corridor.


Supportive Services Advisory

Through the supportive services advisory program, TACC brings innovative program models to residents of mixed-income and public housing. From workforce training to youth mentoring, TACC develops programs that connect individuals with quality education and the mainstream economy. By aligning individual, household, and community systems with public, private, and nonprofit resources, TACC better ensures that all of Boston’s residents have access to the essential services needed to support their wellbeing.

TACC takes a holistic look at the needs of people and the places in which they live. Starting an engagement with a comprehensive community needs assessment, TACC learns from residents firsthand about their needs and establishes baseline information.

 

By building strategies that meet the complex and unique needs of mixed-income and public housing residents, TACC also contributes to the regional and national dialogue on service delivery models for large-scale public and mixed-income communities and neighborhoods of concentrated poverty.

Budget  $309,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Mentoring: With Big Sister and others, TACCC designed a mentoring program for girls ages 7 to 15 at Harbor Point, a mixed-income community with 400 affordable units. The pilot served 22% of girls. Building on success evaluated through an evidence-based study, the partnership expanded the model to two BHA public housing communities.

Community Needs: Currently, TACC is conducting a senior needs and assets assessment to understand needs of 300 older adults in the Madison Park Village. Data collected will be used to evaluate existing services and inform strategies for supportive housing with enhanced services for aging in place.
 
Choice Neighborhoods: TACC provided technical assistance to BHA in areas of people and neighborhood for Whittier Street Choice Neighborhood Transformation Plan by evaluating resident need and identifying service providers to increase economic mobility of households. TACC also developed the Roxbury Loop, a planning project that supports health, culture, and community.
 
Dual-Generation: With The Urban Institute, TACC brought Housing Opportunities and Services Together (HOST), an innovative dual-generation model, to a mixed-income community in Pittsburgh.
Program Long-Term Success 

The goal of TACC’s supportive services advisory program is to strengthen vulnerable families by providing the supports needed on the individual, family, and community levels to access jobs, education, and health services while living in quality housing in safe communities.

 

TACC takes a holistic look at the needs of people and place together and holds specific expertise in meeting the needs of large-scale public and mixed-income communities using dual-generation strategies. Even when housing conditions are improved, many residents still struggle to make ends meet and face complicated barriers to self-sufficiency, including poor physical and mental health, low literacy, and weak attachment to the labor force.

In partnership and alongside others supporting vulnerable families, TACC develops strategies that align individual, family, and community systems with public, private, and nonprofit resources in order to improve social services delivery systems and the quality of life for residents.

Program Success Monitored By 

Specific indictors and measurements are set for individual projects. Across all programs, TACC seeks to establish a clear results framework that uses both process evaluation and outcome evaluation as tools to measure success over time. TACC works collaboratively and strives to mutually establish goals and outcome measurements with all partners in order to meet a community’s need. When appropriate, TACC integrates technology tools such as Effort to Outcomes to track performance.

Examples of Program Success 

Mentoring: Big Sister Association named collaboration between TACC, Harbor Point Community Task Force, and property management the Community Partnership of the Year. Mia Roberts, Vice President at Big Sister, explains why the partnership is exceptional. “This partnership stands as an example of what can be accomplished when everyone has mutually established goals and holds each other accountable to the community’s need. This partnership is an example of what organizations can do together when all oars are in the water and everyone is rowing together.”

Evaluation of the pilot included focus groups and comparison of multiple indicators with other school- and community-based mentoring programs. 100% of participants saw the program as helping avoid risky behavior. 89% of participants showed improvement in grades. The program redesigned in response to feedback and outcomes and expanded to serve 150 girls living in subsidized units at three sites. 
 
Dual-Generation: With a grant from Grable Foundation, TACC and its partners launched a critical, early component of HOST through outreach and programming for youth. Youth workers were tasked with engaging hard-to-serve older youth ages 13 to 18. They succeeded at the task by growing participation by over 23% and fostering a culture of participation and trust.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Neil McCullagh
CEO Term Start Jan 2010
CEO Email neil_mccullagh@tamcc.org
CEO Experience
Neil McCullagh is the executive director of The American City Coalition (TACC), a nonprofit provider of technical assistance and expertise to address complex problems in areas of concentrated poverty. TACC advances integrated approaches that drive public and private resources to work on behalf of low-income residents. The result is accelerated community transformation and improved quality of life for residents.
 
With 18 years of leadership experience and a record of accomplishment advancing innovative programming in complex organizations and environments, Neil joined TACC in 2010 as executive director. His leadership is built on extensive domestic and international experience directing social change initiatives and performance management and evaluation systems for community development, education, economic development, and housing.
 
From 2004 to 2010, Neil worked with Global Communities serving as country director in Azerbaijan and deputy country director in Mongolia. In Azerbaijan, Neil directed a multi-year community development program funded by the United States Agency for International Development that focused on improving participatory governance and decision-making. In Mongolia, he co-directed operations of a multi-city, United States government-funded, private sector development program. He also oversaw all aspects of a reconstruction and refugee resettlement program in post-war Kosovo.

Concurrently, Neil serves as the Director of the Corcoran Center for Real Estate and Urban Action at Boston College. His practical experience informs his leadership and teaching at Boston College, where he teaches the clinical component of Real Estate and Urban Action, a course which analyzes the factors critical to the successful transformation of urban neighborhoods, including a component on Choice Neighborhoods. He has published articles on fostering quality of life for residents of mixed-income communities including, “Driving Quality of Life in Mixed- Income Communities” in the Journal of Housing & Community Development. Neil sits on multiple boards and committees in education and community development.

Neil holds an undergraduate degree from Boston College; he received an M.B.A. from Boston University and an M.P.A. from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. He has served as a member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and was awarded the Roy and Lila Ash Fellowship for Innovations in Democracy and Governance from the Kennedy School.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Alexandra Curley Senior Associate for Research
Alex brings more than a decade of experience researching urban poverty, public and mixed-income housing, as well as supportive services programs focused on the well-being of lower-income communities in the United States and Europe. She is a specialist in the program evaluation of large-scale governmental initiatives such as HOPE VI and Choice Neighborhoods. By carefully synthesizing large quantities of information and utilizing user-friendly formats, she places a high priority on making findings accessible to all. At TACC, Alex develops and implements resident and community needs assessments in mixed-income communities and high-poverty housing projects. She assessed and co-authored the article, "Driving Quality of Life in Mixed-Income Communities," on the quality of life management practice at Harbor Point in Dorchester, MA (see Journal of Housing and Community Development, May/June 2013).
 
Alex has worked with the Urban Institute, the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, as well as the OTB Research Institute for Housing and Urban Mobility Studies in the Netherlands. She holds an undergraduate degree from Northeastern and a Ph.D. in Sociology from Boston University.
 
 
 
Ms. Felicia Khan Senior Associate for Programs

Felicia brings twenty years of community development and project management experience in the United States, Asia, Africa, and Europe to the planning, development, and implementation of programs at TACC. Working with the Ford Foundation, Living Cities, and the International Institute of Rural Reconstruction, she has contributed to individual and organizational capacity building and poverty alleviation efforts across the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. She is a former director at the International Institute for Rural Reconstruction and serves as a consultant to the Harvard Business School. As a trained engineer, Felicia’s expertise spans engineering and information technology built during eight years of work with AT&T and Lucent Technologies in the United States and China.

Felicia holds an undergraduate degree from the University of New Hampshire, an M.S. in Interdisciplinary Telecommunications from the University of Colorado, and an M.P.A in Economic and Political Development from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.
Mr. Zachary Nieder Senior Associate

Zach brings research experience in city planning, health policy, and international development to his work at TACC. Previously, he worked with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council on an assessment of hospital-based community investments in Massachusetts. In this capacity, he worked to shape policies that led to more effective investments in the neighborhoods that the healthcare providers served. In addition, Zach managed the creation of a neighborhood revitalization plan with the City of Somerville on the MBTA Green Line extension into Union Square. Prior to graduate school, Zach worked as a researcher at both the Harvard Global Health Institute and the Center for Health Decision Science.

He holds an undergraduate degree from the University of St. Andrews and M.S. in Health Policy and Management from the Harvard School of Public Health. His graduate research focused on the intersection between health policy and city planning, including targeted capital investments, workforce training and development, as well as hospital-supported neighborhood revitalization.
Ms. Charlotte Rice Senior Associate, Development and Communications

Charlotte brings extensive experience in the nonprofit and education sectors. For over a decade, Charlotte worked at Parsons The New School for Design in New York City, where she founded and implemented the Parsons Scholars Program, a selective, citywide college access program for low-income youth motivated by an interest in the field of design. At Parsons, Charlotte also served on the faculty and held a series of leadership positions, most recently serving as the Director of the Office of Summer, Pre-Enrollment, and Special Programs. After leaving Parsons, Charlotte founded her own firm consulting universities and nonprofit organizations to enhance programs and develop grants that address equity and access and facilitate growth and revenue; she holds particular expertise in summer and out-of-school programs, pre-professional training, and pathways to careers.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

TACC’s work prioritizes collaboration and is guided by the needs and aspirations of a range of partners from residents and community-based organizations to local governments and private-sector developers. TACC stridently believe that no one organization alone can meet the complex needs of at-risk communities. Furthermore, organizations and institutions that share a common goal but continue to work within their own silos are less able to make the transformational impact needed in Boston’s neighborhoods.
 
TACC’s current collaborations/partnerships include:
Big Sister Association of Greater Boston
Boston Housing Authority
Dudley Square Main Streets
Historic Boston Incorporated
National Initiative on Mixed-Income Housing
New England Center of Arts and Technology
Newmarket Business Association
Roxbury Strategic Master Plan Oversight Committee
United Neighbors of Lower Roxbury
Upham’s Corner Main Street
Urban Institute
Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts
Whittier Street Health Center

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 75%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1
Gender Female: 4
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Joseph E. Corcoran
Board Chair Company Affiliation Corcoran Jennison Companies
Board Chair Term Nov 2013 - Nov 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jack Connors The Connors Family Office Voting
Mr. Joseph E. Corcoran Corcoran Jennison Companies Voting
Ms. Dharshi Dupee Corcoran Jennison Companies Voting
Ms. Heidi Glunz McDonald's Corporation Voting
Mr. Neil McCullagh The American City Coalition NonVoting
Mr. Derek Van Bever Harvard Business School Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Indian
Gender Female: 2
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 33%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 50%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $1,121,074.00
Projected Expense $1,121,074.00
Form 990s

2013 TACC 990PF

2012 TACC 990PF

2011 TACC 990PF

Audit Documents

2013 TACC Compilation

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $742,753 $402,036 $261,550
Total Expenses $635,169 $443,568 $245,718

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $730,000 $402,036 $250,000
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $12,753 -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- $11,550

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $541,455 $381,252 $205,235
Administration Expense $67,994 $49,633 $36,737
Fundraising Expense $25,720 $12,683 $3,746
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.17 0.91 1.06
Program Expense/Total Expenses 85% 86% 84%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% 3% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $114,018 $21,459 $34,825
Current Assets $114,018 $21,459 $34,825
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $13,141 $28,166 $0
Total Net Assets $100,877 $-6,707 $34,825

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 8.68 0.76 --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's Compilation for FY 2013 and per the organization's IRS Form 990-PFs for FY 2012 and 2011. The breakout of functional expenses for FY 2012 and FY 2011 was provided by the organization, as that detail was not available in the 990-PFs. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, the American City Coalition, Inc. has notified the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) of its intent to terminate its private nonoperating foundation status under section 507(b)(1)(B) of the IRS Code. As approved by the IRS, in the above posted letter dated June 10, 2014, the American City Coalition, Inc. will be treated as a public charity described in sections 509(a)(1) and 170(b)(1)(A)(vi) of the Code for an advanced ruling period of 60 months beginning on January 1, 2015. Please see the above IRS Letter of Determination for further information.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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