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Northeast Behavioral Health Corporation

 199 Rosewood Drive
 Danvers, MA 01923
[P] (978) 968-1700
[F] (978) 531-8920
www.nebhealth.org
info@nebhealth.org
Aine Greaney
Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1958
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2777145

LAST UPDATED: 02/26/2015
Organization DBA Lahey Health Behavioral Services
Former Names CAB Health and Recovery Services (2009)
Health and Education Services (2009)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

    To provide personal, compassionate, state-of-the-art integrated behavioral healthcare that makes a difference in the lives of the people and communities we serve.

     

Mission Statement

    To provide personal, compassionate, state-of-the-art integrated behavioral healthcare that makes a difference in the lives of the people and communities we serve.

     


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2012 to Sept 30, 2013
Projected Income $89,501,000.00
Projected Expense $88,774,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. Family, Residential and Children’s Behavioral Health Services
  • 2. Outpatient Counseling Clinics and Pharmacological Care
  • 3. Emergency Psychiatric Care
  • 4. Addiction treatment

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

    To provide personal, compassionate, state-of-the-art integrated behavioral healthcare that makes a difference in the lives of the people and communities we serve.

     


Background Statement

We are a nonprofit agency that works with families, individuals and teens who are struggling with mental health issues, behavioral disorders and/or problems related to drugs and alcohol. As a merged agency, we have almost 90 years of shared experience (we were formerly known as CAB Health & Recovery and Health & Education Services) and a solid reputation as a leading provider of quality care. Here’s just a sampling of our services: 
Outpatient Counseling – Depression, eating disorders, trauma, school-based student assistance
Children’s Behavioral Health – CSAs (community service agency), In-Home Therapy and Therapeutic Mentoring
Substance abuse treatment – Outpatient and inpatient treatment and prevention for adults and teens
Psychiatric emergency services and psychiatric psychopharmacological care
Employee Assistance Programs - For business and non-profits 
Youth residential programs and specialized alternative day schools 
 

Impact Statement

Last year, across our clinical sites and in the community, we served over 50,000 individuals and families. We performed a strategic assessment of each of our 32 services in an effort to advance their quality, relevance and efficiency. We focused on ways to link and coordinate the various aspects of our clients’ physical, psychosocial and behavioral health needs. Our goal is to continue to build a vibrant, integrated care delivery system that reduces costs while advancing our clients’ health outcomes.

We are proud of our FY ’12 performance benchmarks, which include the following:

• Since 2009, Massachusetts’ emergency psychiatric services initiative has worked to transition emergency care into community-based and less restrictive settings. In FY ’12, the statewide performance benchmark targeted a reduction of inpatient referrals to 35%. Last year, our emergency teams exceeded this target by 4%.

• Statewide data show a 31% completion rate of residential addiction treatment, such as step-down care and halfway houses. In FY ’12, 47% of our residential clients completed treatment.

• In satisfaction surveys, 95% of our clients reported that they would refer a family member or friend to our services — a 5% increase on last year.

• In our Gloucester and Danvers-based methadone treatment programs, 97% of opiate clients reported a 12-month period of abstinence. The state-reported average is 88%.


Needs Statement

Dear Donor,
Since 1958, we have provided treatment, counseling and support to thousands of men, women and children in greater Boston and the Merrimack Valley. Our programs reach out to people struggling with difficult life situations, often at the very lowest times in their lives. We offer hope, shelter, education, counseling and support.
 
Our staff provides expert, compassionate care to each one of the adults, teens and children we serve. Share in some of our clients' stories.
 
Whether it's $10 or $10,000, your donation helps us to continue our work, and you are helping a family, friend or neighbor to improve their lives. You may designate your donation to a specific program that matches your funding priorities.
 
All of us atNortheast Behavioral Healthare very grateful to the private foundations, corporations and individuals who have chosen to support our work.
Thank you,
Kevin P. Norton
President of Northeast Behavioral Health

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
NORTHEAST REGION, MA

Northeastern Massachusetts
North Shore
Merrimack Valley
Greater Boston
Boston
Beverly
Danvers
Lynn
Salem
Peabody
Gloucester
Lawrence
Haverhill
Newburyport
Amesbury
Rowley
Ipswich
Lowell
Tewksbury
Topsfield
 
 

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Substance Abuse Dependency, Prevention & Treatment
  2. Human Services -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

1. Family, Residential and Children’s Behavioral Health Services

 12 towns on the North Shore; 13 towns in the Merrimack Valley

a) Community & home-based care-For families who have a child with a serious behavioral, emotional or mental health diagnosis. The Community Services Agency (CSA) teams provide family-centric wraparound services in the child’s home & in the community.

Sample Program:The In-Home Therapy Program supports families in the Merrimack Valley & on the North Shore with a child who has significant behavioral health needs. IHT helps the family to build skills, including problem-solving, limit setting, risk management, safety planning, communication & developing natural supports. In-home therapists can also refer youth to our Therapeutic Mentoring program, which pairs youth with trained mentors who work toward defined goals.Budget: Haverhill: $1,742,366, Beverly: $2,076,326, Lawrence: $2,098,356 

b) Residential care–For latency-age youth & teenagers referred by the MA Dept of Children and Families (DCF), Dept of Mental Health (DMH) & Dept of Youth Services (DYS). Access STAR in Salem, Hill House in Beverly, Nexus in Beverly. Also Adolescent Residential Treatment Center in Danvers, a 15-bed program for boys in recovery from addiction.

c)Student Assistance Program provides specialized teen counseling in 5 local middle and high schools. 

d) NBH operates a Chapter 766 approved alternative school for students with severe emotional disorders, trauma issues, psychiatric diagnoses, & learning disabilities. Solstice in Rowley. 

e)VOCAL Children’s Program–Free, confidential services for children ages 4+ who have experienced physical or sexual abuse, witnessed domestic violence or suffered multiple traumas.
Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Outpatient Mental Health Treatment
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Families
Program Short-Term Success 
Long term and short term success is measured through an IAP that is developed in collaboration with the family, and awareness around medical necessity criteria, to address families' specific needs and goals. Both short term and long term goals are designed to be measurable and achievable specific to the individual/family. Therefore each family's definition of success can look very different from another family's.
Program Long-Term Success 

Long term and short term success is measured through an IAP that is developed in collaboration with the family, and awareness around medical necessity criteria, to address families' specific needs and goals. Both short term and long term goals are designed to be measurable and achievable specific to the individual/family. Therefore each family's definition of success can look very different from another family's.

Program Success Monitored By 

IHT monitors youth success in various ways, including decrease in disruptive behaviors, increase in overall wellbeing, and safety maintained in the community; all of these indicators are determined and achieved in collaboration with family and providers.

Examples of Program Success 

Success of the IHT program often hinges on success felt & defined by families. Examples of success include increased family communication, decrease in unsafe behaviors, etc. We have found that what our families see as success are many small achievements that ultimately lead to short- and long-term sustainability. A small success of having a child be able to get out of bed in the morning and onto the bus, has much larger ramifications such as, but not limited to, a parent's decreased anxiety from knowing that attendance will increase, the child will continue to get necessary education and social stimulation, a CHINS may not need to be filed, and a daily decrease in tension at home. Our services are defined to reflect the true vision and voice of the family, so a family experiencing success directly correlates to what the program measures as success.


2. Outpatient Counseling Clinics and Pharmacological Care

(a)  Outpatient clinics: Presenting conditions: Anxiety, depression, serious mental illness, substance use, and dual-diagnosed patients. Salem, Beverly, Haverhill, Ipswich, Lawrence and Gloucester

(b) VOCAL (Victims of Crime and Loss) works with children ages 4+ and adults who have been victims of or witnesses to homicide, assault, sexual assault and domestic violence. Using a highly specialized set of therapies, the VOCAL therapists work with victims. The children’s VOCAL program uses creative therapeutic tools to help children and adolescents to heal in a supportive environment.  
(c) Employee Assistance Programs (EAP) – Contracted EAP services for businesses and non-profits.
(d) Day Treatment Programs – Offer curriculum-specific training programs for adults with significant mental illness. We offer behavioral therapy, psycho-social rehabilitation, peer facilitated meetings and more. Beverly and Haverhill 
Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Outpatient Mental Health Treatment
Population Served At-Risk Populations People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
.
Program Long-Term Success 
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Program Success Monitored By 
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Examples of Program Success 
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3. Emergency Psychiatric Care

North of Lynn to the NH border; west to and including greater Lowell-24/7 care

NBH operates four of the 17 mobile crisis teams in Massachusetts launched by MBHP in 2009 to reduce ER visits for psychiatric crises cases and to provide more appropriate, community-based evaluations and care. The mobile teams respond to 24/7 calls and provide evaluations for adults and children in schools, homes, community settings and hospital ERs.

In addition to the mobile teams, the program provides short-term inpatient stabilization units (adults), plus a network of specialized emergency and follow-up care (children and teens).

Sample program: The Danvers Jail Diversion Program is a pre-arrest program that works collaboratively with the Danvers Police Department to provide better and safer services for those who have psychiatric and/or substance abuse disorders, developmental disabilities and other behavioral issues. The program prevents people with these disorders from being inappropriately arrested, jailed or hospitalized. The Danvers JDP also diverts these individuals from local ERs, thereby increasing access to community resources and controlling costs for local emergency care.
Budget  .
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other
Population Served People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
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Program Long-Term Success 
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Program Success Monitored By 
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Examples of Program Success 
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4. Addiction treatment

Ranges from acute inpatient care to outpatient counseling clinics

(a)   Acute care: Inpatient detoxification units – Boston, Danvers, Tewksbury. Total beds:138 (CARF Accredited)

(b)  Post-detoxification care: Half-way houses and step-down programs – Lynn, Danvers, Tewksbury.

(c)   Outpatient counseling – Beverly (specialized substance use treatment), Haverhill, Ipswich, Lawrence, Gloucester and Salem.

(d)  Outpatient Methadone clinics – Danvers and Gloucester

 

Sample Program: The Ryan House, Lynn, Mass.The Ryan House is a working half-way house program for men and women in recovery from substance use. This highly structured, supervised program offers recovering addicts an opportunity to live a sober lifestyle, while also receiving group counseling, individualized case management, self-help meetings, recreational programs and life skills training. 

Budget  .
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Substance Abuse
Population Served Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers At-Risk Populations Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
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Program Long-Term Success 
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Program Success Monitored By 
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Examples of Program Success 
http://nebhealth.org/clientstories/Curtisonly.pdf

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 We are a non-profit agency that provides mental health, substance abuse and social services to adults, youth and families in greater Boston and in the Merrimack Valley. 

 
In agency-wide client-satisfaction surveys, 95% of the people we serve state that they would recommend our services to a family member or friend. 

From our outpatient clinics to our residential treatment homes, we have the expertise to help you to learn the skills to manage multiple issues, including depression, anxiety, trauma, addiction and many others.
 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Kevin P Norton
CEO Term Start Sept 1993
CEO Email knorton@nebhealth.org
CEO Experience

Kevin P. Norton is the President and CEO of Northeast Behavioral Health, which merged two affiliated, non-profit agencies--Health & Education Services (HES) and CAB Health & Recovery Services, Inc. (CAB)--to create a single behavioral health agency.    

Previously, Norton served as President and CEO of CAB Health & Recovery Services, Inc., where he has worked since 1993. 

 

As President and CEO of CAB, Norton helped to position the non-profit agency as a leading provider of substance use disorder treatment services in northeastern Massachusetts and greater Boston. Under his stewardship, the agency developed an integrated system of treatments and options for adults, families and teens. Also, CAB earned a strong local and regional reputation for its responsive and research-supported treatments.    

 

As President and CEO of the new, merged entity, Norton leads the strategic positioning of the agency as one of the leading behavioral health providers in Massachusetts.  


Norton has served on various regional and national advocacy, trade and advisory committees. Currently, he serves as Chair of the Board of Directors of the Association for Behavioral Healthcare (ABH), a Massachusetts-wide trade association for community-based mental health and substance abuse service organizations. He has also served on a national advisory committee of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

 

Norton holds a Master of Business Administration (MBA) from Suffolk University’s Sawyer School of Management and a Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Counseling Psychology from Salem State University. 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Dr. Patrick Aquino MD Medical Director --
Dr. Jeffrey Eisen MD -- --
Ms. Áine Greaney Ellrott Director, Communications --
Mr. Gary Gastman Ph.D. Vice President Addiction Treatment Services --
Mr. Arthur McLeod Vice President of Finance --
Ms. Satya R. Montgomery LICSW, Ph.D. -- --
Mr. Jack Petras MA, LMHC --
Vice President
Ms. Catherine Pietrzak Vice President Ambulatory Division --
Ms. Cynthia Dodick Seyffert Vice President, Human Resources --
Dr. Mary Anna Sullivan MD Chief Medical Officer --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- CARF International 2011
Science and Service Award for its school based drug prevention program at Manchester Essex Middle School. Award was given to organizations & coalitions that provide exemplary evidence based service SAMHSA 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Please see Lahey Health Behavioral Services organizational chart for program operations and management.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 995
Number of Part Time Staff 773
Number of Volunteers 220
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 142
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 34
Caucasian: 1,399
Hispanic/Latino: 171
Native American/American Indian: 3
Other: --
Other (if specified): 19
Gender Female: 1,274
Male: 494
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr Vincent A. Martelli Jr
Board Chair Company Affiliation Martelli & Associates
Board Chair Term Jan 2008 - Dec 2013
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Sheldon Aaronson Retired Voting
Ms. Katherine Barrand Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Gregory A. Bazlewicz M.D. Family Medicine Associates Voting
Mr. Victor A. Capoccia Ph.D. Consultant Voting
Ms. Marjorie Detkin Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Barry Ginsberg M.D. Bayridge Hospital Voting
Mr. Gary Marlow Beverly Hospital Voting
Ms. Monica Noether Ph.D. Charles River Associates Voting
Mr. Kevin P Norton Northeast Behavioral Health Voting
Mr. Timothy O'Connor Lahey Clinic Voting
Mr. A. Heaton Robertson III Brown Brothers Harriman Voting
Mr. Donald Snell Lahey Clinic Voting
Mr. David Spackman Lahey Clinic Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 15
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 86%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2012 to Sept 30, 2013
Projected Income $89,501,000.00
Projected Expense $88,774,000.00
Form 990s

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $111,043,000 $91,073,106 $89,985,392
Total Expenses $109,695,000 $90,040,553 $89,019,340

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$2,154,000 $1,564,879 $1,856,147
Government Contributions $39,311,000 $37,457,965 $40,137,039
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $39,311,000 $37,457,965 $40,137,039
Individual Contributions $1,155,000 $1,094,349 $1,434,106
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $67,996,000 $50,448,664 $46,115,883
Investment Income, Net of Losses $4,000 $2,123 $2,584
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $423,000 $505,126 $439,633

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $99,226,000 $81,106,081 $78,675,318
Administration Expense $10,469,000 $8,934,472 $10,338,647
Fundraising Expense -- $0 $5,375
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.01 1.01 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 90% 90% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $27,588,000 $31,598,494 $31,464,285
Current Assets $13,535,000 $14,864,180 $14,205,945
Long-Term Liabilities $5,381,000 $7,911,428 $8,696,402
Current Liabilities $7,473,000 $10,485,738 $10,629,375
Total Net Assets $14,734,000 $13,201,328 $12,138,508

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
Peter & Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation $125,000.00
Peter & Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation $183,687.00
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
Gilbert Steward $75,000.00
Edward S. and Winifred G. Moseley Foundation $60,000.00
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
Anonymous $50,000.00
George C. Wadleigh Foundation, Inc. $44,000.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.81 1.42 1.34

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 20% 25% 28%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Per the organization: Government Unspecified above comprises a combination of state & federal contracts. Earned Revenue above includes service fees/revenue from public & private insurance payers. Individual Contributions above comprises a combination of in-kind and donations.

Please note: The organization has highlighted the private foundations and individual contributions for the top three funding sources for fiscal years 2012 & 2011 some representing 3-year pledges.
  
Northeast Behavioral Health Corporation was formerly known as CAB Health and Recovery Services and Health & Education Services. Please note some financials documents use these former names.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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