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Urban Improv (Freelance Players, Inc.)

 8 St John Street
 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
[P] (617) 524-7045
[F] --
www.urbanimprov.org
[email protected]
Kippy Dewey
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INCORPORATED: 1983
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2786576

LAST UPDATED: 12/20/2016
Organization DBA Freelance Players, Inc. dba Urban Improv
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

To catalyze positive youth development with a focus on violence prevention: a rehearsal for life.

Mission Statement

To catalyze positive youth development with a focus on violence prevention: a rehearsal for life.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,464,804.00
Projected Expense $1,456,620.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. Boston Elementary School Workshops
  • 2. Youth Unscripted
  • 3. The Mentoring Program
  • 4. Parents as Partners
  • 5. Assemblies

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

To catalyze positive youth development with a focus on violence prevention: a rehearsal for life.

Background Statement

Urban Improv was created in 1992 as a response to Boston’s escalating youth violence. Directed to children at risk, the program was initially modeled on the Living Stage, a successful community outreach program in Washington D.C. The Freelance Players, Inc., in collaboration with the Boston Public Schools, launched Urban Improv after a year of research, evaluation, and fund raising. A professional acting ensemble with experience in education, psychology, and theater for young people now runs the program.

Impact Statement

During the past school year (2012/2013) we have continued to expand our curriculum that now comprises five continuous years of Workshops (fourth through eighth grade) for students at Boston schools that include kindergarten through eighth grade. Recognizing that the more years students participate in Urban Improv programs, the deeper our impact, we decided to target those Boston elementary schools that include eight grades and add to our fourth and fifth grade curriculum that we have been  presenting since 1983. . In 2011, we added workshops for sixth graders, in 2012 seventh grade workshops and this year we introduced our workshops for eighth graders. Each year we introduce new topics that focus on the development issues and challenges of each age group In October of 2012, we completed the creation of a three year Strategic Plan that has been approved by our Board and is now operational and addresses our goals to deepen our impact, evaluate our impact and prepare for the future of Urban Improv. Already addressing the goals of our new Strategic Plan we broadened our efforts at one of our elementary schools, Mildred Avenue where we introduced Parent as Partners and the Mentoring Program.  This is the first year we have presented the parenting program to parents of children engaged in our five year curriculum. With five years of Workshops, Parents as Partners, and five Mildred Avenue students now enrolled in our Mentoring Program, we now have a comprehensive and long term program that reaches entire families and that we believe offers the best chance of positive behavior change.

Needs Statement

Our goals for the 2016/2017 school year are to:

Continue to teach creative conflict-resolution, empathy, impulse control, and leadership through structured improvisational workshops focused on real-life challenges and choices.

A growing body of evidence shows the positive correlation between children’s social and emotional skills and their education and health outcomes, highlighting the importance of Urban Improv’s programs.

Continue to engage students attending Boston schools that have participated in our 4th - 12 grade programs last year. Schools who will participate beginning October 1 include Boston Teachers’ Union, Cathedral, St. Patrick’s, Hale, Mission Hill, Murphy, Mission Grammar and English High School. This year we will present 458 workshops to over 1,110 Boston students, parents and teachers.

Grow our work with the Boston Public Schools on Social/Emotional Learning (SEL) with the goal of presenting an SEL curriculum for all Boston Public School students.

Provide a minimum of two parent workshops per partner school.

Provide teacher education –

Provide a teacher workshop, utilizing (Urban Improv interactive method including scenes on communicating with students, addressing conflicts between staff members, etc.

Provide teacher meetings at every partner school - discussing Urban Improv’s objectives/goals for the year, expectations of teachers and their students, feedback by teachers prior to workshop with a short survey.

Expand our curriculum and reach to engage special needs students.

Continue to diversify our staff and board.

Continue to increase the number of years Youth Unscripted students participate. This past year 25% of students returned for three years and 50% for two years.

Continue to assess our programs and expand our evaluations. We will this year create evaluations of our new racism workshops and develop evaluations that assess the progress students make from year to year in our 4th -8th Grade Boston workshops and in Youth Unscripted.

Deepen and expand our curriculum particularly for our seventh and eighth grade and high school students. Currently our 10 Actor/Educators who plan and facilitate all workshops are participating in YW Boston’s Dialogues sessions focusing on key concepts in racial equity, using personal experiences to foster deeper understanding of race’s impact and relationship building. With the knowledge gleaned from these classes we will explore these issues deeper in our seventh and eighth grade curriculum. The enhanced curriculum will be ready by the beginning of October and will contain new scenes, discussion questions and outcome assessments. It will be piloted with our eighth grade classrooms from October – December, fine-tuned in December and then presented in our winter semester to seventh graders.

Create a curriculum that teachers can bring into the classroom to continue Urban Improv’s lessons.


CEO Statement

Urban Improv, after twenty years of delivering dynamic workshops to the youth of Boston, is proud of the students who are empowered to become the next generation of empathic leaders. Urban Improv is poised to refine and enhance its organization over the next three years with the goal of deepening and sustaining its impact.

Boston and comparable cities throughout the country are in a profound moment of change. The changing profile of the American student is reflective of a more culturally and ethnically diverse population. The challenges of meeting the needs of all students to become positive, engaged citizens is core to the Urban Improv mission. We acknowledge that it is increasingly important for Urban Improv to look for nonprofit partnerships to better utilize scarce resources and to strengthen its impact.

Board Chair Statement

Our programs empower our most at-risk students to make positive choices in their lives when faced with difficult social situations, to resolve conflicts peacefully, advocate effectively, and to demonstrate cooperation and leadership in their classrooms, schools and communities. We believe that the impact can be measured, not just when you see the program in action, but when these young people apply these 21st century skills to stay in school, survive, graduate…and ultimately thrive as positive citizens in our community. In order to provide the most comprehensive programming that will ensure that our students make positive choices we have formed a partnership with the Mildred Avenue Elementary School to create our Model Urban Improv School that provides our core workshop program and mentoring opportunities to the 4th-8th graders, along with a workshop series for parents (“Parents as Partners”) and referrals to our mentoring program. We are excited about the impact we will have on the Mildred Avenue community.Dr. Dancy said it well: "In partnership with Urban Improv, I am on a mission to create a school of excellence for our staff, students and community."
We at Urban Improv have also recently created a powerful and ambitious Strategic Plan.We believe that this plan puts us in a position to increase the impact of our programs, measure that impact, and sustain our organization for the next 20 years.

Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Greater Boston Region-Dorchester Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Charlestown Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-East Boston Neighborhood
Our target population includes families living in Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan, Hyde Park, Brighton, Jamaica Plain, Mission Hill, Charlestown, Chelsea and The Fenway.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  3. Education - Elementary & Secondary Schools

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

1. Boston Elementary School Workshops

 A series of Workshops presented during the school year to over 1,000 inner city Boston students attending fourth through eighth grades. In 2011, we introduced our expanded curriculum that now comprises five continuous years of Workshops at Boston schools comprising kindergarten through eighth grade classrooms. Each classroom attends the series of nine Workshops every year, each addressing a different issue   Recognizing that the more years students participate in our program, the deeper the impact, we decided to target those Boston elementary schools that include eight grades and develop new curriculum for each grade focusing on the development issues and challenges of each age group. In 2011 we added sixth grade, 2012 seventh and this year eighth grade. We continue to develop tools to evaluate our expanded Workshops.
Budget  $911,609.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of the first year of workshops, students will improve their behaviors relating to impulse control, conflict resolution, team work, problem solving, active listening, self esteem and taking responsibility for their actions.
Program Long-Term Success  Development of pro-social behavior:cooperation, self-control, attentiveness and classroom engagement:21st Century Skills Development, decision making
Program Success Monitored By  Students and teachers participate in written surveys administered before and after nine weeks of workshops.  The survey questions rate student behavior in relationship to each of the objectives described above.
Examples of Program Success  Teachers at 11 of the elementary schools that are engaged in our workshops indicated that students had improved in all of the program objectives. 

2. Youth Unscripted

Sixteen weekly (from October to March) 90 minute after school workshops held at English High School for 40 to 50 teens who come from high schools across the city further expands the curriculum and offers participants opportunities to teach the curriculum to younger students. Our Actor/Educators continue to present issues relating to prejudice, peer pressure and bullying but add topics challenging to teens including substance abuse, internet addiction and dating violence Participants are assigned to acting teams which create and present their own scenes addressing the theme of the week. All participants have the opportunity to share their views of the scenes, outcomes and weekly topics. An English High School counselor provides closing exercises that include student assessments of the workshop and topic presented that day.
Budget  $55,243.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success    We measure the short term success of Youth Unscripted on a yearly basis.  Our success includes the number of workshops attended by each participant, their engagement in the program both as actors and as part of discussions and their evaluation of the program via our pre and post program surveys.  Surveys rate student progress in self esteem, conflict resolution, empathy, responsibility for one's actions and community involvement.  Students are also asked if they will continue with the program the following year.
Program Long-Term Success  Our goal for long term success for all of our programs is that participants grow up to be emotionally healthy, community involved and empathetic adults.
Program Success Monitored By  We measure all of our programs via pre amd post program surveys that question participants about their progress achieving program objectives.  We also ask that students provide a few sentences in the post program survey about their own thoughts about Youth Unscripted.
Examples of Program Success  When he began high school Keezie was involved in a shooting: a cousin was killed and Keezie was injured. He tried to turn his life around, participating in Youth Unscripted through high school and becoming an Assistant Director. Keezie was viewed by the Actor/Educators to be very talented and was respected by his peers. In 2008; he graduated from high school and began taking classes at Bay State Community College. Keezie then became homeless and left for Los Angeles where he got into trouble with the police. Returning to Boston he came back to Youth Unscripted to try again assisting our Actor/Educators with the participants.He stayed for a few weeks but then disappeared. Recently, a Youth Unscripted staff member saw Keezie. He has just graduated from a job training program and is now working at Harvard in their IT department. Keezie texted last month on the birth of his baby girl showing us a picture of her and thanking us for the lessons he learned at Urban Improv. “Youth Unscripted helped me to not be afraid of myself –It gave me comfort to show my talents. In teaching the younger kids I believe that a chance to teach is a chance to learn. Nothing is written for you in life so being unscripted comes from the heart."

3. The Mentoring Program

Urban Improv's Mentoring Program identifies mentees from the schools where its nine-week workshops are presented. Mentees are selected in consultation with teachers and referring principals. Mentors meet with mentees weekly in one-to-one and group activities that include academic support, cultural enrichment, community involvement and sports. The Mentoring Program which began 14 years ago with two mentors and two mentees now has over 50 mentoring relationships. An end of school year picnic is held where Urban Improv staff, mentors, mentees and their families come together to celebrate.
Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Our goal for short term success is that mentors and mentees spend time together.  The longer the mentor/mentee relationship lasts the more both individuals learn from each other.  Each year the mentorship continues indicates the success of the program and its participants.
Program Long-Term Success  Our goal for long term success for all of our programs is that participants grow up to be emotionally healthy, community involved and empathetic adults.
Program Success Monitored By  At the end of the year, mentors and mentees are asked what they learned from each other.   We also know if the program is working by our success at recruiting new mentors and by their communication with the Mentoring Director.
Examples of Program Success  My name is Yu Jing. I’m studying broadcast journalism at Emerson College. I absolutely love Emerson. I have been a mentee for 10 years.I can honestly say that my mentor is on the top of the list of people who have made an impact on my life. Other than family, I cannot even think of anyone who has been in my life that consistently. Some mentors and mentees are together for a few years before they drift apart but Annie and I have been together for 10 years. That is HALF my life! And for someone to have the love and patience to continue guiding me. the way she does I’m forever grateful. Annie has just opened up my eyes in so many ways that I can’t even explain. She’s a 2nd mother to me - especially since both my parents are from China and don’t speak English perfectly, sometimes it was hard to communicate with them. Being born and raised here in Boston, my views can be different from my parents. With Annie, I am able to talk to her just about everything. She is never judgmental.

4. Parents as Partners

Workshops which were piloted for three years with the Boys and Girls Club of Boston have now become part of our five year curriculum for students at Boston elementary schools offering kindergarten through eighth grade. This year we began working with parents at the Mildred Avenue school. The goals are to help parents become strong advocates for their children and gain effective communication skills. Adding Parents as Partners to our elementary school programming also addresses our goal to deepen our impact, By engaging the parents of children attending our workshops we are making sure that our message of positive youth development continues at home.
Budget  $18,343.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Families Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  Parents will improve communication skills with their children. Parents will gain a stronger understanding of the challenges their children face in their daily lives. Parents will gain confidence in advocating for their children. Parents will complete pre and post evaluation surveys.
Program Long-Term Success  Our goal for long term success for all of our programs is that all of our young participanta grow up to be emotionally healthy, community involved and empathetic adults.
Program Success Monitored By  We provide pre and post program surveys for participants of all programs.
Examples of Program Success 
Over 100 parents attended Parents as Partners during the three years we offered the program at the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston.  Parents at one program planned to continue the program on their own. “One (BGCB) member was very shy and having behavioral issues at the Club. Her mother didn’t understand how Club staff were working to resolve her daughter’s problems,” Kelly Pielech, Club Education Director said. “This program helped the member gain confidence and learn to resolve conflict with her peers."

5. Assemblies

Urban Improv's assemblies are the only program where there is a fee. Approximately 30 to 35 assemblies are presented each year throughout Massachusetts and beyond to schools and communities requesting presentations that addresses issues challenging the young people and families of that community. Assemblies are presented by our Actor/Educators and based on workshops. Over the past few years many of our assemblies have addressed bullying and cyber bullying
Budget  $37,400.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families
Program Short-Term Success  Our short term success includes positive feed back from the groups to whom we present, continuation of discussion of the topics we present and requests that we come back for additional presentations as well as referrals to other groups.
Program Long-Term Success  Our goal for long term success for all of our programs is that participants grow up to be emotionally healthy, community involved and empathetic adults.
Program Success Monitored By  We send surveys to school administrators and group directors including ministers and rabbis at churches where we present assemblies. 
Examples of Program Success  Response from school principal where we presented an assembly to 220 students. The topics were very relevant.The cyber bullying scenario was particularly useful to both students and faculty, as we realized that although the students are very aware and able to identify 'traditional' forms of bullying, they were much less able to identify cyber bullying, and they were distinctly unaware of the legal side. We particularly liked the way the actors and facilitator worked to involve the students.We liked that the actors did not allow simplistic resolutions, challenging the students to face the reality and the difficulties.We thought the scenarios were pitched very appropriately for the age groups. The scenarios had clearly been carefully created.One student – over heard in the audience - said it best:"God,that is so REAL!"I loved that the characters were all complex rather than simplistic. Your visit provided all sorts of inspiration for follow-up discussions.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The challenges facing Urban Improv are described in the goals and objectives of our Strategic Plan and include deepening and broadening our impact, evaluating our progress and the progress of participants and sustaining our organization in the future. Urban Improv along with most human service provides faces the challenge of providing more services to more people with a limited number of staff. Each of our troupes of Actor/Educators comprises five members. Our ten troupe members present the Workshop series to 1,000 to 1,200 students from 48 classrooms in eight grades each year. In order to add more workshops, we need another troupe which increases our budget significantly. Each time we add another school with eight grades, we are adding at least 16 more classes (two per grade) and need additional Actor/Educators. Evaluation is another challenge. Currently we are doing internal evaluations utilizing pre and post program surveys of students and teachers. In order to make these assessments as effective as possible we need consultants to review our survey, and make sure it is designed to meet our goals accurately. We also need systems that will make outcome assessment efficient and speedy. In order to achieve the first two goals we need to increase our budget. We realize that raising more money is common to all non-profits but we also realize that it is also the greatest challenge for all of us. Urban Improv's current board donates their time and money to make sure that we provide the highest quality of services and pay our bills. However, many of our members have served for several years and look to recruit new and younger board members. We consider ourselves extremely lucky in having a strong board which has also taken on the task of board outreach. +

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Kippy Dewey
CEO Term Start Sept 1993
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Executive Director: Freelance Players,. Founding Executive Director: Creative Arts at Park. Education Program Instructor: Next Move Theater. Director: Next Move Unlimited, Theater Instructor: Milton Academy. Artist in Residence: schools in Boston, Brookline, Watertown. Education and Training: Bennington College, B.A. Accomplishments and/or Awards Received: Recipient; MCC grants for Artist in Residence programs and Cultural Resources grant (Cultural Education Collaborative).
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Narcissa Campion Managing Director
Music Director: Dexter School, Chair Music Department:Creative Arts at Park, Awards: Residencies at Palenvillle Inter Arts Community, Cummington Community of the Arts and Djerassi Foundation Resident Arts Program.
Education: Goucher College, Wellesley College, Longy School of Music.
Mr. Toby Dewey Artistic Director
Co-Founder of Urban Improv,  Director - Charles River Creative Arts Program, Director - Cambridge of Weston Summer Arts Program.
Education: BA -Beloit College, M.Ed. -Antioch College. 
Ms. Francie Walton Karlen Director of Strategy and Advancement --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Award for excellence in arts management of an organization with a budget of less than $1 million Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston --
Best Children’s Programming, for original, two-part television special, “RE:ACTION!,” simulcast on WGBH, WCVB, and NECN. New England Emmy Awards --
National semifinalist, “Coming Up Taller” President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Urban Improv collaborates with the Boston Public Schools. Principals and teachers at our collaborating schools provide time during the school day for their classrooms to attend our Workshops.  Classroom teachers accompany their classrooms to our Workshop sites at the Reggie Lewis and Vine Street Community Centers.   Teachers of our fourth and fifth grade participants refer students to the Mentoring Program. English High School provides space and a counselor for Youth Unscripted that takes place after school and is attended by high school students from across the city.  We also collaborate with the Southern Jamaica Plain Community Health Center and the Hyde Square Task Force that refer students to Youth Unscripted and help us to plan, implement and evaluate our programming.
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The challenges facing Urban Improv are described in the goals and objectives of our three year Strategic Plan (October 1,2012 - September 30, 2015) and include deepening and broadening our impact, evaluating our progress and the progress of participants and sustaining our organization in the future. Urban Improv along with most human service provides faces the challenge of providing more services to more people with a limited number of staff. Each of our troupes of Actor/Educators comprises five members. Our ten troupe members provide workshop series to 1,000 to 1,200 students from 48 classrooms in eight grades each year. In order to add more workshops, we need another troupe which increases our budget significantly. Each time we add another school with eight grades, we are adding at least 16 more classes (two per grade) and need additional Actor/Educators. Evaluation is another challenge. Currently we are doing internal evaluations utilizing pre and post program surveys of students and teachers. In order to make these assessments as effective as possible we need consultants to review our survey, and make sure it is designed to meet our goals accurately. We also need the systems that will make outcome assessment efficient and speedy. In order to achieve the first two goals we need to increase our budget. We realize that raising more money is common to all non-profits but we also realize that it is also the greatest challenge for all of us. Urban Improv's current board donates their time and money to make sure that we provide the highest quality of services and pay our bills. However, many of our members have served for several years and look to recruit new and younger board members. We consider ourselves extremely lucky in having a strong board which has also taken on the task of board outreach.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 11
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 25
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 11
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

Directors and Officers Policy

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Ted Clark
Board Chair Company Affiliation Investor
Board Chair Term June 2011 -
Board Co-Chair Mr. George Bennett
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation President & CEO Good Measures
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Lisa Schmid Alvord Producer, Philanthropist Voting
Mr. George Bennett Good Measures, Inc. Voting
Mr. Lee Campbell Jr. Shady Hill School --
Ms. Sarah Chamberlain John Quincy Adams Society Voting
Mr. Ted Clark Investor Voting
Ms. Susan Bredhoff Cohen Producer, self-employed Voting
Mr. Liam Donohue Investor; .406Ventures Voting
Mr. Ron Druker CEO, The Druker Company Voting
Ms. Carol Fulp The Partnership, Inc. Voting
Ms. Ann T. Hall Director, Mentoring Program, Urban Improv Voting
Mr. John Hall Hall Properties, Inc. Voting
Ms. Jillian Hirsch Day Pitney LLC Voting
Mr. Amory Houghton Jr. Retired U.S. Congressman Voting
Ms. Line Lewis Docent, Museum of Fine Arts Voting
Ms. Susie McIntosh Event Planner, self-employed Voting
Ms. Thalia McMillion Educator, Derby Academy Voting
Mr. Steven Moskowitz Executive, Telecommunications Voting
Mr. Gerald O'Connor Attorney, Morse, Barnes-Brown & Pendleton Voting
Dr. Bessel van der Kolk MD The Trauma Center Voting
Ms. Sandy Mitchell Woods Principal, Hale Elementary School Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Joel Alvord Retired, Community Volunteer --
Lisa Schmid Alvord Philanthropist --
Ms. Sally Fay Cottingham Community Volunteer --
Mr. Dan Gerrity Community Volunteer --
Ms. Annie Hall Director Urban Improv Mentor Program --
Ms. Susan Halligan Co-Director, Urban Improv Mentor Program --
Mr. Tom Hamilton Entertainer, Aerosmith --
Ms. Candy Walton Community Volunteer --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 12
Male: 11
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 64%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 11%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The challenges facing Urban Improv are described in the goals and objectives of our Strategic Plan and include deepening and broadening our impact, evaluating our progress and the progress of participants and sustaining our organization in the future.  Urban Improv along with most human service provides faces the challenge of providing more services to more people with a limited number of staff.  Each of our troupes of Actor/Educators comprises five members.  Our ten troupe members provide workshop series to 1,000 to 1,200 students from 48 classrooms in eight grades each year.    In order to add more workshops, we need another troupe which increases our budget significantly.  Each time we add another school with eight grades, we are adding at least 16 more classes (two per grade) and need additional Actor/Educators. 
Evaluation is another challenge.  Currently we are doing internal evaluations utilizing pre and post program surveys of students and teachers.  In order to make these assessments as effective as possible we need consultants to review our survey, and make sure it is  designed to meet our goals accurately.  We also need the systems that will make outcome assessment efficient and speedy.
In order to achieve the first two goals we need to increase our budget.  We realize that raising more money is common to all non-profits but we also realize that it is also the greatest challenge for all of us.   
Urban Improv's current board donates their time and money to make sure that we provide the highest quality of services and pay our bills.  However, many of our members have served for several years and look to recruit new and younger board members.  We consider ourselves extremely lucky in having a strong board which has also taken on the task of board outreach.
 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,464,804.00
Projected Expense $1,456,620.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,294,809 $1,265,229 $1,195,255
Total Expenses $1,319,983 $1,291,944 $1,242,715

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $50,700 $39,900 $31,700
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $50,700 $39,900 $31,700
Individual Contributions $380,988 $396,699 $273,816
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $243,974 $221,424 $204,563
Investment Income, Net of Losses $13,697 $10,558 $7,807
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events $605,450 $596,648 $677,369
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $0 $0

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $894,701 $907,345 $852,007
Administration Expense $145,748 $143,725 $150,646
Fundraising Expense $279,534 $240,874 $240,062
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 0.98 0.96
Program Expense/Total Expenses 68% 70% 69%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 27% 23% 24%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $994,531 $1,038,450 $1,054,044
Current Assets $778,777 $814,452 $862,377
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $29,572 $36,383 $22,230
Total Net Assets $964,959 $1,002,067 $1,031,814

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $149,237.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 26.33 22.39 38.79

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The challenges facing Urban Improv are described in the goals and objectives of our three year Strategic Plan (October 1,2012 - September 30, 2015) and include deepening and broadening our impact, evaluating our progress and the progress of participants and sustaining our organization in the future.  Urban Improv along with most human service provides faces the challenge of providing more services to more people with a limited number of staff.  Each of our troupes of Actor/Educators comprises five members.  Our ten troupe members provide workshop series to 1,000 to 1,200 students from 48 classrooms in eight grades each year.    In order to add more workshops, we need another troupe which increases our budget significantly.  Each time we add another school with eight grades, we are adding at least 16 more classes (two per grade) and need additional Actor/Educators. 
Evaluation is another challenge.  Currently we are doing internal evaluations utilizing pre and post program surveys of students and teachers.  In order to make these assessments as effective as possible we need consultants to review our survey, and make sure it is  designed to meet our goals accurately.  We also need the systems that will make outcome assessment efficient and speedy.
In order to achieve the first two goals we need to increase our budget.  We realize that raising more money is common to all non-profits but we also realize that it is also the greatest challenge for all of us.   
Urban Improv's current board donates their time and money to make sure that we provide the highest quality of services and pay our bills.  However, many of our members have served for several years and look to recruit new and younger board members.  We consider ourselves extremely lucky in having a strong board which has also taken on the task of board outreach.
 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from Foundations and Corporations are listed under Individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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