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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Big Brothers Big Sisters of Hampden County mission is to strengthen our community’s future through one-to-one mentoring services to children and youth. Our vision is successful mentoring relationships for all children who need and want them, contributing to brighter futures, better schools, and stronger communities for all.

Mission Statement

The Big Brothers Big Sisters of Hampden County mission is to strengthen our community’s future through one-to-one mentoring services to children and youth. Our vision is successful mentoring relationships for all children who need and want them, contributing to brighter futures, better schools, and stronger communities for all.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $442,795.00
Projected Expense $442,933.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community-Based Mentoring Program
  • School-Based Mentoring Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Big Brothers Big Sisters of Hampden County mission is to strengthen our community’s future through one-to-one mentoring services to children and youth. Our vision is successful mentoring relationships for all children who need and want them, contributing to brighter futures, better schools, and stronger communities for all.

Background Statement

BBBSHC has provided one-to-one mentoring services to youth, ages 7-18, since the agency’s inception in 1967. BBBSHC continues to expand its original and most enduring program, the Community-Based Mentoring Program, in which volunteers and children do activities together out in the community. Additionally, the agency initiated its first school-based mentoring program in 1995. In school-based programs, volunteers and children are individually matched in one-to-one mentoring relationships and they meet weekly at the child’s school. The agency secured a three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2007, which has enabled the agency to rigorously test and improve its school-based model.
 
BBBSHC was founded and continues to serve youth who need, want and benefit from more caring adults in their lives. The agency served 331 youth in mentoring relationships in 2011, a more than 5% increase compared to 2010. Currently, 88% of BBBSHC youth are not living in homes with two parents; 19% have an incarcerated family member; and 90% are eligible for free/reduced public school lunch. The following are the percentages of youth identified by race: 42% Hispanic, 22% African American, 18% Multi-racial and 18% Caucasian.
 
According to 2008 county level data through the National Juvenile Court Data Archive, Hampden Country has the highest rate of petitioned delinquency cases of any of the 11 reporting counties in Massachusetts. Hampden  County’s petition rate (4,282) is most closely followed by Suffolk County’s rate of 4,006. Youth in Springfield, Hampden County’s largest city and the second largest school district in Massachusetts, face a number of challenges, including poverty and school dropout, which position them to be at extremely high risk for involvement in gangs and the juvenile justice system. Headquartered in Springfield, over 70% of youth served by BBBSHC reside in Springfield. Springfield youth and families are among the state’s most vulnerable citizens. Indicators of community risk compared within Massachusetts includeSpringfield’s highest per capita violent crime and murder rates among cities over 100,000, highest percentage “under age 18 in poverty” and third lowest graduation rate (after Lawrence and Holyoke). 85.5% of Springfield Public Schools’ 25,230 students (21,572) received free or reduced price lunches in 2010-2011. There is no question that Springfield youth need and benefit from mentoring.

Impact Statement

Both as a BBBS agency and within our network, BBBSHC has a strong track record of building quality mentoring relationships. In April 2011, BBBSHC was selected as 1 of 18 agencies (1 of 4 in the Northeast) to receive a 2010 Gold Standard Award from BBBSA based on strong financial and programmatic growth and top quality service delivery. BBBSHC is committed to monitoring educational impacts, including grade advancement. In Academic Year 2010-2011, 92% of CBMP Little Brothers/Sisters advanced to their next grade on time [4 graduating from high school] and an additional 5% advanced upon successful completion of summer school. These positive findings about grade advancement echo parents' evaluations of their sons' and daughters' growth within the program. Examples of results from 2011 parent Program Outcome Evaluation surveys are as follows: 90.6% increased self-confidence; 69.7% improved academic performance; 73.9% improved attitude towards school and 67.5% improved classroom behavior. The average Strength of Relationship score for community-based matches in 2011, on a 5 point scale, was 4.3 for youth and 4.2 for volunteers.

The agency measures progress on an ongoing basis against service and youth outcome goals that are established annually. The following are agency goals for 2012:

  1. Serve a total of 245 youth in community-based and 100 youth in school-based programs
  2. Case Managers will provide pre-match orientations, trainings, coaching and relationship assistance (match support) for 100% of volunteers, youth and families
  3. BBBSHC will achieve an average community-based match length of 24 or more months in 2012
  4. Overall scores for the volunteer and youth on the Strength of Relationship survey will average 4 on a 5 point scale
  5. 90% of youth will demonstrate improvement in 1 of 4 academic categories on the Youth Outcome Survey (Scholastic Competency, Grades, Educational Expectations and Truancy)
  6. 92% of matched youth will advance to their next grade on time

Needs Statement

According to Mass Mentoring Counts 2010, Mass Mentoring Partnership's biennial survey on mentoring in MA, of the more than 22,800 youth in formal mentoring relationships in Massachusetts, only 1613 of them are in the western part of the state with 515 on waiting lists. Considering that 85.6% of the more than 25,000 students in the Springfield Public Schools are from low income households, the need for quality growth in mentoring Springfield is clear. As the largest mentoring organization in Western MA, BBBSHC plays an important role in bridging this gap in services. The following are the agency's top 5 needs to achieve its mentoring mission:

  1. Volunteers, including increased numbers of men and volunteers of color
  2. Clothing (through individual donations and drives) and bin location donations for the agency's clothing donation business, which provides significant unrestricted resources for the agency
  3.  Funds to offset the elimination of the Mentoring Children of Prisoners Program nationally, which resulted in an $80,000 reduction to FY2013 awards
  4. Event participation as volunteers, sponsors and in kind donors. An example of an in kind donation that would impact the agency's net proceeds is the donation of space for a dinner event.
  5.  Corporate partners to encourage school-based volunteerism.

CEO Statement

After 45 years as an agency and 22 as its Executive Director, it is exciting to lead an agency that continues to grow and improve, despite the enormous challenges that have been faced by the non-profit sector in the past few years. At a time when many people question whether or not there is truly a way to help our most vulnerable youth avoid the problems of poverty and helplessness, our greatest strength is a program that is proven effective. Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring programs have been proven to have a dramatic deterrent effect on the initiation of drug and alcohol abuse and a significant positive effect on the child’s attitudes toward school, peers, parents and teachers. The seminal Public/Private Ventures study confirmed what we inherently knew: children are more likely to excel and make better choices with their lives when they experience the encouragement and powerful influence of a mentoring relationship.

An agency strength is our constant process of evaluating and improving our services. The many systems with which we are able to measure our own progress and our accomplishments in comparison to other strong Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies have confirmed that we have developed consistent, high quality mentoring services. The Gold Standard Award we received in 2011 was partially a reflection of service delivery results that exceeded national averages in all seven areas measured. Additionally, consistent annual achievement of a high average match length in the Community-Based Mentoring Program has confirmed that mentors are staying with youth and making an impact.
 
Other strengths include the partnerships we have developed in the community with public schools, colleges and corporations; our dynamic and involved Board of Directors and our dedicated, skilled staff; the flexibility our programs offer to volunteers; and the consistent improvement across many behaviors that we see among the children matched in the program.

Board Chair Statement

My involvement at BBBSHC began over a decade ago when I became a big brother in the community based program. Through this involvement, I began volunteering in the Bowl for Kids’ Sake fundraiser. I have since been a team captain every year; resulting in a tradition for my company that raises thousands of dollars annually for BBBSHC. I also mentored a student in the Lunch Buddies program for almost 4 years. My board involvement has been a multi-year commitment as a member, officer, and now President.

Elizabeth Russell has led BBBSHC for 22 years, building a strong agency and enduring legacy. Through her efforts to establish Hartsprings Foundation, the clothing donation business that has been the largest funding source for BBBSHC since 1998, the lives of thousands of kids have been transformed by positive, encouraging mentors. She has also managed a dedicated staff which, through hard work and passion, has built a service record on par with the highest performing BBBS agencies. The Gold Standard Award BBBSHC received in 2011 was a tribute to the staff’s accomplishments in the field. Amazingly, our comparatively small agency is in the top tier of BBBS agencies nationally. For a community with the second largest school district and one of the lowest graduation rates in Massachusetts, it is imperative youth have access to BBBSHC’s top quality mentoring services. Our agency has been able to provide these mentoring services in the past and our challenge will be to continue to provide high quality mentoring prospectively.
After years of building infrastructure, achieving expansion goals and winning competitive grants, 2011 was marked with challenges the agency has not experienced in its decades of history. Two significant funding sources were impacted by unforeseen events. First, the Mentoring Children of Prisoners Program was eliminated at the federal level, which translated to a loss of an anticipated $80,000. Additionally, Hartsprings Foundation has seen dramatically diminished clothing donations and net proceeds due to severe weather, increased diesel prices and reduced clothing turnover. While BBBSHC’s board and staff could not have anticipated these funding losses, all are taking steps to ensure the agency resolves these difficulties. BBBSHC has remained committed to seeking and serving youth with incarcerated family members with its law enforcement partner and is developing new funding partners in order to achieve service goals. Hartsprings is also working on a new plan with its business partner and is developing donation mechanisms that are less dependent on truck routes and less costly to maintain. Over time, Hartsprings will return to or exceed its previous level of profitability.
It has been tremendously meaningful to me personally to contribute to BBBSHC and our success in fulfilling our mission. My family has witnessed my personal growth and deepening connection to the community’s youth through BBBSHC. To honor my mother, my family has established a charitable fund in her name to provide special support to BBBSHC. Linking her cherished legacy to my own at BBBSHC is an inspirational means to make a powerful and lasting impact on youth and families and champion an organization doing important work in a community I love.

Geographic Area Served

PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA

All of Hampden County and the Hampshire County towns of Granby and South Hadley. Main service areas in Hampden County include Springfield, Holyoke, Chicopee and Westfield. The agency's headquarters is in Springfield (01103); over 70% of youth who are currently being served reside in Springfield.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Big Brother, Big Sisters
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Community-Based Mentoring Program

Community-Based Mentoring Program (CBMP):The agency’s original and most enduring program, community-based mentoring is a flexible mentoring option for volunteers. Mentors meet with youth for eight hours per month after school and on weekends in the community. The minimum match length is one year.
  • Children and Allies Mentoring Program (CHAMP): In 2009, with a federal Mentoring Children of Prisoners award, BBBSHC launched CHAMP. CHAMP services are focused on matching volunteers with children of incarcerated parents. In partnership with the Hampden County Sheriff’s Department and Correctional Center (HCCC), BBBSHC seeks youth referrals from men incarcerated at HCCC and from visiting families. BBBSHC staff members presented the partnership as a successful model at the final Mentoring Children of Prisoners National Conference in May 2011.
Budget  $292,245.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
  • 90% of youth will improve in 1 of 4 educational outcomes monitored on the Youth Outcome Survey (truance, educational expectations, scholastic competency, grades)
  • 100% of youth will improve in 1 major category on the YOS
  • The average Strength of Relationship score for youth will be at least 4 on a 5 point scale
  • The average Strength of Relationship score for volunteers will be at least 4 on a 5 point scale
Program Long-Term Success 
  • 92% of enrolled youth will advance grades and graduate from high school on time.
  • No enrolled youth will become involved with the juvenile justice system or, if involved at enrollment, commit additional offenses.
  • Program Success Monitored By 

    Through Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, BBBSHC has access to outcomes measurement tools that have been designed by national researchers for reliability. BBBSHC utilizes the Agency Information Management (AIM) system for case and data management. AIM is also an evaluation tool, with the option for collecting and scoring forms online. BBBSHC will utilize theYouth Outcome Survey, which measures impact in areas such as relationships, academics and risk behaviors. Surveys are administered only to the child, prior to the child being matched (baseline), and at year end. Additionally, theStrength of Relationshipsurvey measures the connectedness between the mentor and mentee. This survey is administered in the third and twelfth month of the relationship and then annually throughout the life of the relationship. All surveys are collected by case managers, who also keep case notes from frequent match support contacts with caregivers, youth and volunteers.

    Examples of Program Success 

    According to BBBS data, only 6 agencies in the national network exceeded BBBSHC’s 12 month community-based match retention rate in 2010. Additionally, BBBSHC is committed to monitoring educational impacts, including grade advancement. In Academic Year 2010-2011, 92% of CBMP Little Brothers/Sisters advanced to their next grade on time [4 graduating from high school] and an additional 5% advanced upon successful completion of summer school. These positive findings about grade advancement echo parents' evaluations of their sons' and daughters' growth within the program. Examples of results from 2011 parent Program Outcome Evaluation surveys are as follows: 90.6% increased self-confidence; 69.7% improved academic performance; 73.9% improved attitude towards school and 67.5% improved classroom behavior. The average Strength of Relationship score for community-based matches in 2011, on a 5 point scale, was 4.3 for youth and 4.2 for volunteers.


    School-Based Mentoring Program

    School-Based Mentoring Program: Mentors meet with youth during the academic year within the following programs:

    • Lunch Buddies: The Lunch Buddies program was created in 2004 to provide busy professionals with an opportunity to spend 1/2 hour each week meeting with an elementary school student at his/her school. The majority of school sites are in Springfield, with one site in Holyoke.
    • Mentor Springfield: Middle school students meet with mentors for one hour per week. The overall goal of the program is to prepare middle school students for the transition to high school and increase the graduation rate.
    • Career Pathways: BBBSHC's newest program initiative is a partnership with MassMutual Financial Group and Springfield School Volunteers (SSV). High school students meet with their mentors weekly at MassMutual to explore the world of work. Youth learn the importance of doing their best in school, showing up on time, interacting positively with peers/colleagues and other transferable skills.
    Budget  $146,122.00
    Category  Youth Development, General/Other
    Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations
    Program Short-Term Success 
    By the end of 2012:
    • 90% of youth will improve in 1 of 4 educational outcomes monitored on the Youth Outcome Survey (truancy, educational expectations, scholastic competency, grades)
    • 100% of youth will improve in 1 major category measured on the YOS
    •  The average Strength of Relationship score for volunteers will be at least 4 on a 5 point scale.
    • The average Strength of Relationship score for youth will be at least 4 on a 5 point scale.
    Program Long-Term Success 
    • 92% of enrolled youth will advance grades and graduate from high school on time.
    • No enrolled youth will become involved with the juvenile justice system or, if involved at enrollment, commit additional offenses.
    Program Success Monitored By 

    Through Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, BBBSHC has access to outcomes measurement tools that have been designed by national researchers for reliability. BBBSHC utilizes the Agency Information Management (AIM) system for case and data management. AIM is also an evaluation tool, with the option for collecting and scoring forms online. BBBSHC will utilize the Youth Outcome Survey, which measures impact in areas such as relationships, academics and risk behaviors. Surveys are administered only to the child, prior to the child being matched (baseline), and at year end. Additionally, the Strength of Relationship survey measures the connectedness between the mentor and mentee. This survey is administered in the third and twelfth month of the relationship and then annually throughout the life of the relationship. All surveys are collected by case managers, who also keep case notes from frequent match support contacts with caregivers, youth and volunteers.

    Examples of Program Success  Based on evaluations of Academic Year 2011-2012, 100% of Mentor Springfield youth and 92.9% of Career Pathways youth improved in one major category measured on the Youth Outcome Survey. Career Pathways youth are participating in college and career opportunities: 1 youth received a $20,000 college scholarship; 2 youth were selected for prestigious MassMutual summer internships; 37% of youth earned summer jobs by the end of the school year; 67% of seniors had been accepted and committed to colleges by the end of the school year.

    CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

    As a mentoring model, Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) programming leads on a national level as a research-based prevention strategy for youth development. BBBS programming’s proven effectiveness as a risky behavior prevention strategy extends to violence prevention: the BBBS model is 1 of the 11 "model" programs that meet rigorous Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence "Blueprints for Violence Prevention" selection criteria; over 900 violence prevention programs have been measured.
     
    BBBS mentoring is one of only six named Substance Abuse Prevention/Treatment interventions listed as “Social Programs that Work”according to the Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy. The Coalition was founded to increase government effectiveness through evaluating and ranking programs with demonstrated results. Moreover, the National Registry of Effective Program Practices (NREPP), which is part of SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), has reviewed and lists the Big Brothers Big Sisters Community-Based program within its registry of evidence-based interventions. In addition, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has listed BBBS mentoring as an “exemplary” practice in its Model Programs Guide; BBBS mentoring is also featured as “what works” in juvenile justice on the Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website.
     
    Most recently, Philanthropedia’s panel of experts ranked BBBS as the number one most effective national program serving at-risk youth.

    Management


    CEO/Executive Director Ms. Elizabeth T. Russell
    CEO Term Start Sept 1989
    CEO Email [email protected]
    CEO Experience Key achievements as BBBSHC Executive Director (1989 – present) · Increased agency annual income by 400% · Created innovative program designs geared to Hampden County youth, families, volunteers and partners · Increased number of children served from 20 per year to over 300 · Created a business partnership that has generated as much as $300,000 net profit per year Key achievements as Western Massachusetts Girl Scout Council Executive Director (1987-1989) · Increased girl membership by 20% · Eliminated $100,000 deficit in first 6 months · Restructured staff positions to increase quality of service delivery Key achievements as Big Brothers Big Sisters of Franklin County Executive Director (1977–1987) · Created fundraisers that remain major sources of agency funding today · Created a new program design replicated by agencies across the country · Instituted risk management procedures that became national models Consultant & Trainer in Board Development (1984 - present) · Trained approximately 400 not-for-profit Boards Recent accomplishments · Member of Massachusetts Mentoring Partnership Providers Council · Agency received the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America “Gold Standard” Award (2011) · Secured three-year U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services grant for $240,000 (2009) · Secured three-year U.S. Dept. of Education Grant for $504,000 (2008)
    Co-CEO --
    Co-CEO Term Start --
    Co-CEO Email --
    Co-CEO Experience --

    Former CEOs and Terms

    Name Start End
    -- -- --

    Senior Staff

    Name Title Experience/Biography
    Mr. David Beturne Director of Program Services --
    Ms. Rebel A. McKinley Director of Development --

    Awards

    Award Awarding Organization Year
    Gold Standard Award Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 2011

    Affiliations

    Affiliation Year
    Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter 1967
    Member of state association of nonprofits? No
    Name of state association --

    External Assessments and Accreditations

    External Assessment or Accreditation Year
    -- --

    Collaborations

    BBBSHC has deep ties to the community, receiving youth referrals from numerous social service agencies and recruiting volunteers broadly throughout Western Massachusetts. Additionally, as non-profit that has operated in the local community for 45 years, the agency's event fundraising and funding partner network is extensive. The agency maintains formal partnerships with Memoranda of Understanding with Springfield School Volunteers and the Hampden County Sheriff's Department and Correctional Center.

    CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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    Foundation Comments

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    Staff Information

    Number of Full Time Staff 5
    Number of Part Time Staff 1
    Number of Volunteers 350
    Number of Contract Staff 0
    Staff Retention Rate % 72%

    Staff Demographics

    Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
    Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
    Caucasian: 4
    Hispanic/Latino: 1
    Native American/American Indian: 0
    Other: 0
    Other (if specified): --
    Gender Female: 4
    Male: 2
    Not Specified 0

    Plans & Policies

    Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
    Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
    Years Strategic Plan Considers --
    Management Succession Plan No
    Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
    Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
    Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
    Whistle Blower Policy No
    Document Destruction Policy Yes
    Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
    State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
    State Registration Yes

    Risk Management Provisions

    --

    Reporting and Evaluations

    Management Reports to Board? Yes
    CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
    Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
    Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

    Governance


    Board Chair Mr. Daniel Morrill
    Board Chair Company Affiliation Wolf and Company, Inc.
    Board Chair Term Sept 2011 - Sept 2013
    Board Co-Chair --
    Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
    Board Co-Chair Term -

    Board Members

    Name Company Affiliations Status
    Mr. Hugh Barrett MassMutual Financial Group Voting
    Mr. Michael Buckmaster NUVO Bank and Trust Company Voting
    Ms. Eileen Casey United Bank Voting
    Ms. Lynn DeNucci Merrill Lynch Voting
    Ms. Patricia M. Faginski St. Germain Investment Management Voting
    Ms. Andrea Hill-Cataldo Johnson & Hill Staffing Services Voting
    Mr. Ronn Johnson R.D. Johnson Consultants Voting
    Mr. Peter J. Pappas Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Voting
    Mr. Jim Puhala MassMutual Financial Group Voting
    Mr. Fred Rowe III Atlantic Realty Advisors Voting
    Mr. Louis J. Scungio Freedom Credit Union Voting
    Ms. Teresa Utt Andrew Associates Voting
    Ms. Donna Wexler Bacon Wilson, P.C. Voting

    Constituent Board Members

    Name Company Affiliations Status
    -- -- --

    Youth Board Members

    Name Company Affiliations Status
    -- -- --

    Advisory Board Members

    Name Company Affiliations Status
    -- -- --

    Board Demographics

    Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
    Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
    Caucasian: 13
    Hispanic/Latino: 0
    Native American/American Indian: 0
    Other: 0
    Other (if specified): --
    Gender Female: 6
    Male: 8
    Not Specified 0

    Board Information

    Board Term Lengths 2
    Board Term Limits 3
    Board Meeting Attendance % 69%
    Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
    Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
    Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
    Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 71%
    Constituency Includes Client Representation No

    Standing Committees

    • Executive
    • Finance
    • Nominating

    CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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    Foundation Comments

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    Financials


    Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

    Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

    Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

    Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

    Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
    Projected Income $442,795.00
    Projected Expense $442,933.00
    Form 990s

    2011 990

    2010 990

    2009 990

    Audit Documents

    2011 Financial Statements

    2010 Financial Statements

    2009 Financial Statements

    IRS Letter of Exemption

    IRS Letter of Determination

    Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

    Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
    Total Revenue $739,162 $773,909 $596,356
    Total Expenses $762,546 $715,465 $586,205

    Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

    Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
    Foundation and
    Corporation Contributions
    $298,500 $150,000 $120,000
    Government Contributions $103,185 $247,776 $164,195
        Federal $103,185 $247,776 $164,195
        State -- -- --
        Local -- -- --
        Unspecified -- -- --
    Individual Contributions $182,421 $238,596 $138,375
    Indirect Public Support $46,640 $46,640 $57,535
    Earned Revenue -- -- --
    Investment Income, Net of Losses $5,123 $4,003 $9,302
    Membership Dues -- -- --
    Special Events $71,373 $71,962 $9,302
    Revenue In-Kind $30,754 $14,300 $14,300
    Other $1,166 $632 $448

    Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

    Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
    Program Expense $645,875 $627,393 $511,626
    Administration Expense $45,797 $45,006 $33,494
    Fundraising Expense $70,874 $43,066 $41,085
    Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
    Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.97 1.08 1.02
    Program Expense/Total Expenses 85% 88% 87%
    Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 10% 6% 8%

    Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

    Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
    Total Assets $398,918 $454,105 $450,617
    Current Assets $338,146 $388,296 $388,662
    Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
    Current Liabilities $42,607 $74,410 $129,366
    Total Net Assets $356,311 $379,695 $321,251

    Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

    Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
    1st (Source and Amount) -- --
    -- --
    -- --
    2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
    -- --
    -- --
    3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
    -- --
    -- --

    Financial Planning

    Endowment Value --
    Spending Policy N/A
    Percentage(If selected) --
    Credit Line Yes
    Reserve Fund Yes
    How many months does reserve cover? 5.00

    Capital Campaign

    Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
    Capital Campaign Purpose --
    Campaign Goal --
    Capital Campaign Dates -
    Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
    Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

    Short Term Solvency

    Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
    Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 7.94 5.22 3.00

    Long Term Solvency

    Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
    Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

    CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

    --

    Foundation Comments

    Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakout was not available, except contributions from Hartford Foundation, which was organized to fund raise for the nonprofit, whose contributions are listed as foundation and corporation for differentiation purposes.

    Documents


    Other Documents

    No Other Documents currently available.

    Impact

    The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


    1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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    2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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    3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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    4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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    5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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