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Silent Spring Institute Inc.

 320 Nevada Street, Suite 302
 Newton, MA 02460
[P] (617) 332-4288
[F] (617) 332-4284
www.SilentSpring.org
[email protected]
Catherine Cotton
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1994
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3237106

LAST UPDATED: 06/19/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Silent Spring Institute's mission is to conduct scientific research on the links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer. Since our founding in 1994, we have been on the cutting edge of environmental health research, with a focus on breast cancer prevention. Our studies have created new knowledge about toxic chemicals in our everyday environments and the resulting health risks, specifically breast cancer risk.

As the world's leading scientific research organization dedicated to breast cancer prevention, Silent Spring's work is critical to improving the lives of women and their families. Our work has been published in high-impact peer-reviewed journals and covered extensively by the media. We have also empowered others to extend this work, by producing tools for scientists to more effectively conduct environmental health research, and by working with advocates and policy makers to act in the public interest.

Mission Statement

Silent Spring Institute's mission is to conduct scientific research on the links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer. Since our founding in 1994, we have been on the cutting edge of environmental health research, with a focus on breast cancer prevention. Our studies have created new knowledge about toxic chemicals in our everyday environments and the resulting health risks, specifically breast cancer risk.

As the world's leading scientific research organization dedicated to breast cancer prevention, Silent Spring's work is critical to improving the lives of women and their families. Our work has been published in high-impact peer-reviewed journals and covered extensively by the media. We have also empowered others to extend this work, by producing tools for scientists to more effectively conduct environmental health research, and by working with advocates and policy makers to act in the public interest.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $2,238,927.00
Projected Expense $3,281,759.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • BCScreen
  • Detox Me
  • Healthy Green Campus

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Silent Spring Institute's mission is to conduct scientific research on the links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer. Since our founding in 1994, we have been on the cutting edge of environmental health research, with a focus on breast cancer prevention. Our studies have created new knowledge about toxic chemicals in our everyday environments and the resulting health risks, specifically breast cancer risk.

As the world's leading scientific research organization dedicated to breast cancer prevention, Silent Spring's work is critical to improving the lives of women and their families. Our work has been published in high-impact peer-reviewed journals and covered extensively by the media. We have also empowered others to extend this work, by producing tools for scientists to more effectively conduct environmental health research, and by working with advocates and policy makers to act in the public interest.

Background Statement

Silent Spring Institute was founded in 1994 by leaders of the Massachusetts Breast Cancer Coalition (MBCC) in response to the state cancer registry’s list of cancer incidence rates by town in which Cape Cod stood out with higher breast cancer incidence across the region. MBCC wanted to know why and created “a lab of their own” to research the links between the environment and women’s health. The Cape Cod Study is one of the first to investigate the links between hormone disruptors and human health. It showed that women who lived longer on Cape Cod had higher risk, and that higher risk in the region was not due to an older population, in-migration, or any of the established breast cancer risk factors. Cape Cod remains the only documented region of high breast cancer incidence that is not explained by established risk factors.

Thanks to our more than two decades of scientific research, we know more about the role our environment plays in the development of disease, particularly breast cancer.

- Silent Spring Institute's research is published in more than 80 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles, including American Journal of Public Health, Cancer, Environmental Health Perspectives (the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences journal), and Environmental Science & Technology.
 
- We have provided testimony before legislative and scientific panels and have also produced important resources for researchers to move this area of discovery forward.
 
- Our science has been used by advocates to urge companies and legislators to act in the public interest.

Silent Spring Institute is staffed and led by researchers dedicated to science that serves the public interest. We partner with physicians, public health and community advocates and other scientists to identify and break the links between environmental chemicals and women’s health, especially breast cancer. 


Impact Statement

Silent Spring Institute’s research on environmental chemicals and breast cancer has been referenced hundreds of times by other scientists and cited as foundational in three major federal reports. The Institute was the first to show high levels of flame retardants in homes in California, leading to changes in the state’s unique flammability standard for furniture. Our Household Exposure Study is the most comprehensive assessment of hormone disruptors in the home. The Institute also pioneered new methods of reporting chemical exposure results to participants in environmental health studies.

Accomplishments

1. Detox Me mobile app: A clean lifestyle guide that walks users through simple, research-based tips on how to reduce their exposures to potentially harmful chemicals. www.detoxmeapp.org

2. Healthy Green Campus: A project focused on making human health an integral part of sustainability practices on college campuses by raising awareness of the link between health and exposure to everyday toxic chemicals. www.healthygreencampus.org

3. Contaminants in drinking water: our research on drinking water revealed dozens of pollutants from household wastewater—pharmaceuticals and consumer product chemicals—in private wells on Cape Cod. http://bit.ly/1Pl0WcM

Goals

1. Launch a new biomonitoring service for tracking individual everyday chemical exposures and reporting results back to study participants using our new Digital Exposure Report-Back Interface (DERBI). http://bit.ly/1XUX6ZE

2. Develop ultra-fast chemical screening tools that will allow researchers to test hundreds of chemicals at once and zero in on those most likely to increase breast cancer risk. This high throughput screening technology will help government agencies regulate chemicals more effectively and assist companies in developing greener products. http://bit.ly/1rxfUnV

3. Ensure that prevention research is an integral part of the national cancer research agenda, including the National Cancer Moonshot Initiative.


Needs Statement

Breast cancer is the leading cause of death among U.S. women in their late thirties to early fifties, causing great suffering, disability, and cost for hundreds of thousands of families every year. The high risk of breast cancer in in the U.S. and the rising incidence worldwide can only be stopped by prevention. Silent Spring Institute’s more than two decades of research demonstrates that prevention is possible. Only 5-10 percent of breast cancers are due to high-risk inherited genes, and 80% of women diagnosed are the first in their families to get the disease.

While several factors that influence breast cancer risk are fairly well understood, relatively little research has focused on the role of toxic chemicals. Evidence shows, however, that dozens of chemicals can mimic estrogen (a known breast cancer risk-factor), cause mammary gland tumors in animal studies, or distort development of the breast in ways that increase later susceptibility to cancer.

The majority of funds for breast cancer and health research are allocated to finding better treatments, which is important for improving outcomes. Yet investment in prevention could reduce the burden of disease in the first place. To get there, we need more data, faster—and a radical shift in awareness that action to stop toxics can save lives.

 


CEO Statement


Board Chair Statement

Most people associated with Silent Spring Institute – board members, staff, supporters – get involved for reasons that both are personal and hopeful. Often, the personal reason is a breast cancer diagnosis, a loved one who has had the disease, or perhaps elevated risk factors that create
anxiety about an outcome that seems all but inevitable. But the hopeful reason is two-fold: Silent Spring Institute is the only scientific research organization dedicated to studying opportunities for breast cancer prevention and its impacts are societal.
 
From its beginning more than 20 years ago, Silent Spring Institute’s groundbreaking studies have sought to uncover the links to potential environmental causes of breast cancer, to see if we can prevent the disease from occurring in the first place. Our scientists have made significant contributions to the knowledge base of how we are exposed to chemicals in common products, such as household cleaners and personal care products, and how that exposure can affect our health
and increase the risk for breast cancer.
 
Our work has also resulted in changes to rules and regulations that will help limit harmful exposures to people everywhere. For example, Silent Spring’s studies found that chemicals used in flame retardants applied to furniture – chemicals known to cause cancer and disrupt hormone systems in animals -- were showing up in household dust as well the blood and urine of residents in homes in California. Armed with this knowledge, the state of California changed its regulation that had required manufacturers to use toxic flame retardants on furniture sold in stores there; as a result, it is now possible in states across the U.S. to buy furniture made without chemical flame retardants.
 
The City of Boston recently followed suit, adopting a policy that no longer requires these toxic and unnecessary flame retardants to be used in public spaces. For a relatively small organization, Silent Spring Institute has a big impact! 
 
I devote my time and share my treasure with Silent Spring Institute because this organization does incredibly important work that no one else is doing. Understanding how we are exposed to harmful chemicals that are associated with breast cancer gives us an opportunity to make changes at a public health level that affect each of us personally.

Geographic Area Served

NATIONAL
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Organization Categories

  1. Medical Research - Research Institutes & Public Policy Analysis
  2. Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines - Research Institutes & Public Policy Analysis
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

BCScreen

With more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce and only a tiny fraction tested for safety, we are developing new methods to rapidly screen chemicals to see which ones increase breast cancer risk. In collaboration with researchers at University of California, Berkeley, we are using robotic technologies to test hundreds of chemicals at once on human breast cells. This breakthrough technology is a game changer. Conventional toxicological screens are slow and cumbersome because they test one chemical at a time. With this rapid screening technology, we will be able to get more information faster than ever before on which chemicals pose the greatest risk. New funding will enable us to test additional chemicals and increase our impact through this groundbreaking research initiative to advance “green chemistry,” and ultimately the development of safer products.

We are seeking $1 million to be able to test additional high-priority chemicals and ramp up the statistical power of the program as a whole in collaboration with allies who are committed to turning the results into action.

Budget  $1,000,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Preventive Health
Population Served Females Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Currently, we are working with a specific gene expression platform to identify gene expression signatures characteristic of breast carcinogens that act via diverse biological pathways. We hope to complete experiments comparing expression signatures for 10 chemicals in 3000 genes by the end of 2016, and analyze those data and publish in 2017. We then plan to test an additional 100 chemicals using this platform to further develop the gene expression signatures. We also expect to be publishing an analysis of activity of 100 animal breast carcinogens in a large suite of chemical tests conducted by EPA within the coming 6 months. Another element we are launching is developing adverse outcome pathway models to integrate into OECD project.

Program Long-Term Success 

Our goal is to develop and validate a set of biological activity tests that indicate a chemical may increase risk of breast cancer. This is an important time for this project because the field of chemical safety testing is in transition from older methods, involving analyzing chemical exposures on animals, to 21st century methods, which involve investigation of each chemical's biological activity, often in cell culture, and then making inferences (validating these inferences is part of the research) about what the ultimate adverse health outcome might be. Ultimately, we expect the tests we specify will include both types of experimental analysis.

Our approach to investigating breast cancer prevention is to identify key biological pathways and chemicals that may affect those pathways. This is an important complement to most of the research underway to develop generalized chemical testing methods, which focus on identifying common pathways of chemical toxicity, but may miss pathways specific to diseases, such as breast cancer.

Program Success Monitored By 

Success will be seen through publication of our findings, successful collaborations with academic and biotech labs and winning new grants. We are knowledgeable about the standards of both the EPA and NTP - and our ability to translate and integrate our results into ongoing regulatory processes is fundamental to our success.

Examples of Program Success 
The causes of breast cancer are more complex to identify, compared with other types of cancer. Progression is influenced by hormones and growth factors as well as traditional carcinogenic triggers such as genotoxicity. Our ability to identify chemicals that can increase breast cancer risk depends on our ability to test for many different types of biological activity, including endocrine activity. Peer reviewed articles in Environmental Health Perspectives (Rudel 2007, Rudel 2011, Rudel 2014 and Schwarzmann 2015, all available on Silent Spring Institute’s website) demonstrate why breast cancer related chemical testing is so important and explains in more detail the rationale for the research approach.
 
In March 2016, a group of leading breast cancer researchers and government scientists convened at University of California, Berkeley in early March to discuss ways to improve the methods scientists use to identify chemicals that increase breast cancer risk. Spearheaded by Silent Spring Institute, the meeting explored how basic research could help inform chemical testing and policy decisions aimed at preventing breast cancer.
 
This meeting was made possible by a grant from the California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP). The program funds a number of research projects directed at identifying and eliminating the environmental causes of breast cancer. The gathering included presentations by several CBCRP grant recipients in addition to scientists from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program.
 
An article is in development that will highlight biological activities among chemicals that cause breast tumors in animal studies. An existing public data set from EPA was used in order to illustrate which biological pathways seem most influential in producing breast tumors.

Detox Me

There is a wealth of evidence to suggest that common chemicals in everyday products pose real health risks. Detox Me is Silent Spring’s first mobile application helping consumers address concerns posed by chemical exposures in everyday products. Developed by our scientists, the app offers research-based tips on how to avoid certain chemicals at home and at work, and it tracks progress to see how well you “detox” your life. Detox Me empowers users to take control of their environments and to make better choices to safeguard health. Silent Spring Institute believes knowledge is not just power, but a prescription for prevention.

Detox Me helps users take control of potential exposures to toxic chemicals with a personalized guide— users learn about chemicals in products, track progress, get reminders, and celebrate milestones. Each Detox Me tip offers an easy action and a compelling explanation of how small changes can lead to better health. Reducing exposure to toxic chemicals is important —in fact, it’s the heart of the work at Silent Spring Institute—and the app is an easy, fun, and effective tool for users to make their lives healthier.

Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Preventive Health
Population Served Families
Program Short-Term Success  User base continues to grow
Program Long-Term Success  More people learn about potential toxic exposures in their daily lives and how to avoid them.
Program Success Monitored By  We currently monitor success through downloads of the app and feedback from users.
Examples of Program Success  Positive reviews on social media and growing user base

Healthy Green Campus

The mission of Healthy Green Campus Project is to make human health an integral part of sustainability practices on college campuses. By raising awareness of the link between health and exposure to everyday toxic chemicals, we hope to inspire students and academic leaders to consider not only their carbon footprint, but also their chemical footprint.  The idea for the project emerged from a desire to change the way people think about the pursuit not only of a “green” environment, but also one that sustains human health. By merging the two concepts, we hope to create a healthier environment in which communities can live and thrive for generations to come.
 
The Project has two areas of work: education and outreach; and research and dissemination of findings. Silent Spring Institute has the lead in developing new campus partnerships, conducting outreach and education with sustainability professionals and students, who often work with Silent Spring's team to gather air and dust samples.  Analysis of gathered samples and dissemination of results are done collaboratively with colleagues at  Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
 
The Healthy Green Campus Project was founded in 2014 by the Silent Spring Institute in collaboration with the Center for Health and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and with Harvard University’s Office for Sustainability. 
 
Budget  $500,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Preventive Health
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Development and coordinated implementation of evidence-based purchasing recommendations that will reduce chemical exposures on campus.
Program Long-Term Success  Integration of chemicals and health into higher education sustainability programs.
Program Success Monitored By  Engagement, education, and research with campus partners.
Examples of Program Success  Environmental sampling in student spaces on campuses, supporting campuses in signing flame retardant-free furniture purchasing pledge, guest lectures on environmental health on partner campuses.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Julia G. Brody PhD
CEO Term Start May 1996
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Julia Brody, PhD, leads a program of community-engaged research on breast cancer and the environment at Silent Spring Institute, a nonprofit founded 20 years ago by breast cancer activists to focus on prevention.

Dr. Brody recently co-authored a study of 102 common chemicals that cause mammary gland tumors in animals, published in the NIH journal Environmental Health Perspectives. Earlier, she led a scientific review on breast cancer and environmental pollutants, diet, body size, and physical activity, published in Cancer, that has been referenced hundreds of times and cited as foundational by the President’s Cancer Panel, the Institute of Medicine and the federal interagency (IBCERCC) report on breast cancer and the environment.
 
Brody’s research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health and published in leading scientific journals. She presented one of the Distinguished Lectures at the National Cancer Institute and the Keystone Science Lecture at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and she served on the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council, appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Her research was recognized by an Environmental Merit Award from the US Environmental Protection Agency. She earned her PhD at the University of Texas at Austin and her AB at Harvard University.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms Ruthann Rudel Director of Research

 

Ruthann Rudel is the research director at Silent Spring Institute, where she leads major exposure and toxicology research programs focusing on hormonally active chemicals and biological mechanisms by which chemicals may influence women’s health, especially breast cancer. Her innovations in “breast cancer toxicology” include major peer-reviewed articles that identify chemicals that cause breast tumors or alter breast development in animal models, and a new article that identifies high priority potential breast carcinogens based on rodent studies and describes methods to measure them in women. Rudel leads a program to integrate breast cancer etiology into computational toxicology by developing breast cancer-relevant high throughput chemical screening tests.

She also directs the Institute’s Household Exposure Study, which has been described as the “most comprehensive analysis to date” of exposures in homes and is widely cited. Major contributions from the household exposure studies include making the first measurements of PBDE flame retardants in US homes, identifying previously unrecognized sources of ongoing PCB exposures in homes, and the discovery that PBDE exposures are higher in California due to unique furniture flammability standards.

Silent Spring Institute’s research has been conducted in collaboration with co-investigators at Harvard, Brown, Tufts, UC-Berkeley, USGS, and the US Centers for Disease Control. Ruthann is currently serving on a National Academy of Sciences panel on low dose effects of endocrine disruptors. She has served on the US National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Counselors and is an adjunct Research Associate in the Brown University School of Medicine.

Silent Spring Institute is the only organization dedicated to scientific research on the environment and women’s health with a goal of breast cancer prevention.

 

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 11
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 18
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): Multiple Ethnicities
Gender Female: 21
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Cynthia Barakatt
Board Chair Company Affiliation Boston University
Board Chair Term Jan 2012 -
Board Co-Chair Ms. Jeanne Mockard
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation none
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2012 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Lawrence N. Bailis Brandeis University NonVoting
Cynthia Barakatt Boston University Voting
Ellen Calmas Neighborhood Pay Services Voting
Dr. John K. Erban MD Tufts Cancer Center Voting
Jennifer Gorke Massachusetts Division of Health Care Finance and Policy Voting
Margaret Kripke University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Voting
Jeanne Mockard Private Investment Manager Voting
Dr. Cathie Ragovin Psychiatrist, Private Practice Voting
Patti Stoll Harvard School of Public Health Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Board Chair Comment:

Most people associated with Silent Spring Institute – board members, staff, supporters – get involved for reasons that both are personal and hopeful. Often, the personal reason is a breast cancer diagnosis, a loved one who has had the disease, or perhaps elevated risk factors that create anxiety about an outcome that seems all but inevitable. But the hopeful reason is two-fold: Silent Spring Institute is the only scientific research organization dedicated to studying opportunities for breast cancer prevention and its impacts are societal.

From its beginning more than 20 years ago, Silent Spring Institute’s groundbreaking studies have sought to uncover the links to potential environmental causes of breast cancer, to see if we can prevent the disease from occurring in the first place. Our scientists have made significant contributions to the knowledge base of how we are exposed to chemicals in common products, such as household cleaners and personal care products, and how that exposure can affect our health and increase the risk for breast cancer.

Our work has also resulted in changes to rules and regulations that will help limit harmful exposures to people everywhere. For example, Silent Spring’s studies found that chemicals used in flame retardants applied to furniture – chemicals known to cause cancer and disrupt hormone systems in animals -- were showing up in household dust as well the blood and urine of residents in homes in California. Armed with this knowledge, the state of California changed its regulation that had required manufacturers to use toxic flame retardants on furniture sold in stores there; as a result, it is now possible in states across the U.S. to buy furniture made without chemical flame retardants. The City of Boston recently followed suit, adopting a policy that no longer requires these toxic and unnecessary flame retardants to be used in public spaces. For a relatively small organization, Silent Spring Institute has a big impact!

I devote my time and share my treasure with Silent Spring Institute because this organization does incredibly important work that no one else is doing. Understanding how we are exposed to harmful chemicals that are associated with breast cancer gives us an opportunity to make changes at a societal level that affect each of us personally.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $2,238,927.00
Projected Expense $3,281,759.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 900

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financial Report

2014 Audited Financial Report

2013 Audited Financial Report

2012 Audited Financial Report

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,666,614 $2,746,151 $2,209,697
Total Expenses $2,290,538 $1,997,399 $1,662,818

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $378,180 $1,162,168 $1,364,052
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $378,180 $1,162,168 $1,364,052
Individual Contributions $1,082,812 $1,564,735 $779,121
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $21,216 $14,971 $59,838
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,217 $1,952 $1,661
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $180,839 -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $1,350 $2,325 $5,025

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,835,274 $1,598,385 $1,281,135
Administration Expense $204,652 $245,021 $240,078
Fundraising Expense $250,612 $153,993 $141,605
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.73 1.37 1.33
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 80% 77%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 15% 6% 7%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $2,871,771 $3,514,928 $2,819,800
Current Assets $2,857,966 $3,500,481 $2,807,776
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $252,520 $271,753 $325,377
Total Net Assets $2,619,251 $3,243,175 $2,494,423

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 11.32 12.88 8.63

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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