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Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators

 639 Granite Street , Suite 112
 Braintree , MA 02184
[P] (614) 556-7887
[F] --
www.cjca.net
[email protected]
Wendi Faulkner
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INCORPORATED: 1994
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3237796

LAST UPDATED: 11/05/2018
Organization DBA CJCA
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA) is a national non-profit organization, formed in 1994 to improve local juvenile correctional services, programs and practices so the youths within the systems succeed when they return to the community and to provide national leadership and leadership development for the individuals responsible for the systems. CJCA represents the youth correctional CEOs in 50 states, Puerto Rico and major metropolitan counties.

CJCA fulfills its mission through educational activities and programs as well as research and technical assistance projects.

Mission Statement

The Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA) is a national non-profit organization, formed in 1994 to improve local juvenile correctional services, programs and practices so the youths within the systems succeed when they return to the community and to provide national leadership and leadership development for the individuals responsible for the systems. CJCA represents the youth correctional CEOs in 50 states, Puerto Rico and major metropolitan counties.

CJCA fulfills its mission through educational activities and programs as well as research and technical assistance projects.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $1,427,929.00
Projected Expense $1,370,964.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Positive Youth Development

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA) is a national non-profit organization, formed in 1994 to improve local juvenile correctional services, programs and practices so the youths within the systems succeed when they return to the community and to provide national leadership and leadership development for the individuals responsible for the systems. CJCA represents the youth correctional CEOs in 50 states, Puerto Rico and major metropolitan counties.

CJCA fulfills its mission through educational activities and programs as well as research and technical assistance projects.


Background Statement

The Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA) represents the youth correction chief executive officers in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and major metropolitan counties. Since 1994, CJCA has worked to improve youth correctional services and practices by uniting the nation’s youth correctional chief executives and by providing a source of positive support for these leaders.

CJCA was founded with two overarching objectives: to influence the development of juvenile justice policy nationally and to support administrators locally. CJCA is committed to moving youth corrections forward and fulfills its mission to improve systems and practices so young offenders’ lives are improved by their contact with the juvenile justice system and future crime is prevented. CJCA works on three levels to lead and support the field in its work:

1. At the national level – CJCA continues to serve as leadership and a voice for juvenile corrections by representing the system and issues unique to youths on national boards and organizations and educating federal policy-makers and legislators about juvenile services and needs.

2. At the state level – CJCA continues to expand its training, technical assistance and mentoring services provided directly to the juvenile chief executive officers in each state so they have the most effective and innovative information and tools to fund agencies, facilities and programs that help youths improve their skills and chances for success.

3. At the field and practitioner level – CJCA continues to expand its work on several technical assistance and grant projects that provide tools and support to the individuals in most direct contact with young offenders.


Impact Statement

Did you know that over 90% of the juvenile population has reported some level of traumatic events in their lives prior to entering the juvenile justice system. Our youths’ exposure to trauma has a monumental impact on their educational, mental & emotional development. However, only a limited amount of juvenile justice system facilities are creating a Trauma Informed Care (TIC) environment utilizing the positive youth development (PYD) approach.

PYD is defined as: an intentional, pro-social approach that engages youth within their communities, schools, organizations, peer groups& families in a manner that is productive & constructive; recognizes, utilizes, and enhances youths' strengths; & promotes positive outcomes for young people by providing opportunities for creative outlets, fostering positive relationships & support needed to build on their leadership strengths.

Research has shed light on adolescent behavior, developmental growth & on how systems can respond in developmentally appropriate ways. Despite the overwhelming support for the PYD approach, the field of juvenile justice is only beginning to understand the value of achieving successful outcomes. Therefore, we want to develop a Positive Youth Development Campaign that will help bring awareness, training & sustainability to ensure PYD approaches are offered in a trauma informed care environment throughout the juvenile justice system.

Current year goals: 1) Hire an Assistant Executive Director (completed) 2) Create & disseminate a Staff Recruitment and Retention Toolkit (in-progress/on target for December completion)3) Create a Positive Youth Development Campaign (in-progress) 4) Increase funding streams through fundraising and grant opportunities (in-progress)5) Create & disseminate a Facility Closure Toolkit (completed). Previous year goals: 1) Create & disseminate a Positive Youth Development Toolkit (completed)2) Increase sponsorships (completed) 3) Increase consultant opportunities (completed)


Needs Statement

Positive Youth Development Program- $225,000

General Operating Support-$250,000

Annual Juvenile Justice Data Year Book- $100,000


CEO Statement

CJCA is committed to improving long-term outcomes for youth involved in the juvenile justice system by improving conditions of confinement through reform strategies focused on positive youth development; reducing incidents of violence; improving facility atmosphere and environments, as well as supporting trauma informed care environments. CJCA will use the grant funds to work directly with systems of care agency leadership and providing technical assistance and resources to further support these reform efforts in a way that is transformational and impacts both the youth and direct care staff.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

NATIONAL
National scope

Organization Categories

  1. Crime & Legal - Related - Correctional Facilities
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Positive Youth Development

Over 90% of the juvenile population has reported some level of traumatic events in their lives prior to entering the correctional setting. Our youths’ exposure to trauma has monumental impact on their educational, mental and emotional development. However, only a limited amount of juvenile correctional facilities are creating a Trauma Informed Care (TIC) environment using the positive youth development (PYD) approach.

PYD is defined as

an intentional, pro-social approach that engages youth within their communities, schools, organizations, peer groups, and families in a manner that is productive and constructive; recognizes, utilizes, and enhances youths' strengths; and promotes positive outcomes for young people by providing opportunities for creative outlets, fostering positive relationships, and furnishing the support needed to build on their leadership strengths.

Research has shed light on adolescent behavior, developmental growth and on how systems can respond in developmentally appropriate ways. Based on these findings, the rethinking of juvenile justice is occurring nationally, including reinforcing age barriers between the juvenile and adult systems. Despite the overwhelming support for the PYD approach, the field of juvenile justice is only beginning to understand the value of achieving successful outcomes.

Budget  $250,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Reduced violence in facilities
Program Long-Term Success  Reduced recidivism rates
Program Success Monitored By  Surveys and interviews with youth and staff
Examples of Program Success 

As a former Deputy Director of Facilities for a state correctional system, I have witnessed the profound impact implementing a positive youth development approach can have in a young person’s life. Our system began with creating jobs for the youth inside the facilities for them to be able to gain work experience to build a resume and learn the fundamentals of financial management. After working in a facility job and obtaining a certain behavior level, we would then provide youth with an opportunity to work for employers in the community to allow them to continue learning and practicing pro-social skills in a “normalized” working environment.

Once youth began earning a paycheck, it would be placed into their own account set up by the facility, in which they could access at any time. However, in order for a youth to use funds out of their account, they had to submit a form to administration indicating the reason why they were requesting a withdraw. Keep in mind that youth could withdraw funds to purchase items for themselves such as name brand clothing or shoes, more expensive toiletries, or their favorite food/snack items. But, youth began submitting withdraw requests for reasons such as to buy my brother/sister a winter coat, to help my mom pay the electric bill, the rent or to buy groceries for my family. This demonstrated their deep level of commitment and responsibility to help care for their families even though they were not physically able to be with them.

In another case, we had a young man enter our system at the age of 15. Two years later, he was able to graduate high school early and started attending vocational classes in the community. Also, while he was attending classes, he started working at a fast food restaurant in the local community. This summer he earned his full certification to be an electrician and can start working immediately in that trade. He has worked hard and has over $6000 saved. He plans to use those funds to secure an apartment of his own and through educational and employment opportunities provided to him by the facility, he will be able to start working in his trade immediately upon his return to the community.

As a former Deputy Director of Facilities, it became clear that the PYD approach provides young people with more than just a resume or the opportunity to learning a new skill. But, it provides them with a newfound sense of pride and most importantly, it gives them hope for a different future.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael P. Dempsey
CEO Term Start Oct 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience President/Chief Operating Officer 9/2014 – 10/2016 Youth Opportunity Investments, LLC Carmel, IN

Youth Opportunity Investments, LLC is committed to improving the conditions of confinement for youth entrusted to care in detention, residential and correctional facilities through specialized programs focusing on "front end" solutions avoiding unnecessary "deep end" consequences while improving outcomes for youth and their families involved in the juvenile justice system. YOI is committed to "purposeful" care that can impact the outcome of the adjudication process and ensures youth are in the right place, for the right reasons, with access to the right services for the right length of time.
Executive Director, Division of Youth Services 5/2009 - Present Indiana Department of Correction Indianapolis, IN

This is an Executive Director, Department level position overseeing all functions and operations of the Division of Youth Service, including all (6) of the secure IDOC Juvenile Correctional Facilities, operations, treatment programs, services, and re-entry/placements for all adjudicated juvenile delinquents sentenced to the Indiana Department of Correction.
Superintendent 6/2006 – 5/2009 Pendleton Juvenile Correct. Facility Pendleton, IN 11/2003–6/2006 KS Juvenile Correctional Complex Topeka, KS

This is administrative work directing a 350-bed and 270-bed correctional facility which houses maximum as well as lower level security juvenile offenders. Work involves directing the development and implementation of all operating policies, activities, rehabilitation programs, and clinical services for the facility under the jurisdiction of the Kansas Juvenile Justice Authority.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr Ned Loughran Jan 1994 Oct 2016

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Wendi M. Faulkner Assistant Executive Director

Prior to joining the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators, Wendi Faulkner served as Deputy Director of the Division of Facility Support for the Ohio Department of Youth Services. She was responsible for security, classification, operations, unit management, treatment and programming within the DYS facilities. The Division also included Medical Services and the Buckeye United School District. Before this role, she served as the Bureau Chief of the Office of Quality Assurance and Improvement for the Ohio Department of Youth Services. She was responsible for agency quality assurance efforts to include policy, research, auditing, and process improvement. In addition to this considerable responsibility, Ms. Faulkner also had oversight of the agency’s Office of Information Technology Services which involves networking, telecommunications, desktop computing, application development, project management services, and unified communications such as email and calendaring. Serving as a trusting advisor, Ms. Faulkner serves a mentor to those who work under her leadership.

With over 23 years of experience in criminal and juvenile justice, Ms. Faulkner has served on numerous national and statewide policy committees and councils. During her career, she has presented to various audiences on a wide range of criminal justice and juvenile justice topics. Her breadth and scope of the criminal justice and juvenile justice fields, specifically correctional administration, makes her not only a leader, but also a subject matter expert.

Ms. Faulkner received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration from Franklin University, Ohio and a Master of Business Administration with a Leadership concentration.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 15
Number of Contract Staff 5
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Lisa Bjergaard
Board Chair Company Affiliation North Dakota Division of Juvenile Services
Board Chair Term Jan 2018 - Jan 2020
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr Kevin Brown New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission Voting
Ms. Susan Burke Utah Division of Juvenile Justice Services Voting
Mr. Michael Dempsey Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators Voting
Ms. Cindy Mckenzie Montana Youth Services Division Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Education

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $1,427,929.00
Projected Expense $1,370,964.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

Audit Documents

2018 Audit

2017 Audit

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $1,039,920 $965,698 $622,070
Total Expenses $1,078,148 $845,920 $839,102

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $232,237 $181,991 $34,409
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $232,237 $181,991 $34,409
Individual Contributions $124,130 $186,505 $191,940
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $479,516 $378,369 $187,157
Investment Income, Net of Losses $320 $135 $815
Membership Dues $199,977 $217,438 $207,124
Special Events -- $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $3,740 $1,260 $625

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $799,628 $597,489 $571,665
Administration Expense $278,520 $248,431 $267,437
Fundraising Expense -- $0 $0
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.96 1.14 0.74
Program Expense/Total Expenses 74% 71% 68%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $571,818 $775,949 $344,243
Current Assets $562,984 $770,983 $338,452
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $70,000
Current Liabilities $495,855 $565,603 $183,675
Total Net Assets $75,963 $210,346 $90,568

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.14 1.36 1.84

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 20%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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