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National Alliance on Mental Illness of Massachusetts

 The Schrafft's Center, 529 Main Street, Suite 1M17
 Boston, MA 02129
[P] (800) 370-9085
[F] (617) 580-8673
www.namimass.org
[email protected]
Cheri Andes
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INCORPORATED: 1982
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2777012

LAST UPDATED: 08/29/2018
Organization DBA NAMI Massachusetts
NAMI Mass
The National Alliance on Mental Illness of Massachusetts, Inc.
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Our mission is to improve the quality of life both for people living with mental illnesses and for their families.  

Mission Statement

Our mission is to improve the quality of life both for people living with mental illnesses and for their families.  

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $1,944,738.00
Projected Expense $1,944,700.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Allies for Student Mental Health
  • NAMI Family-to-Family (F2F)
  • NAMI In Our Own Voice (IOOV)
  • NAMI Massachusetts Crisis Intervention and Diversion
  • NAMI Peer-to-Peer

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our mission is to improve the quality of life both for people living with mental illnesses and for their families.  

Background Statement

The National Alliance on Mental Illness of Massachusetts (NAMI Mass) is a nonprofit grassroots education, support and advocacy organization. Founded in 1982 and obtaining 501(c) (3) status in 1999, the state’s voice on mental illness, NAMI Mass, with 20 local affiliates and over 2,500 members is comprised of individuals with mental illness, family members and others in the mental health community.

 

NAMI Mass is committed to programs that are both peer-driven and family-driven; to the key concepts of recovery, resiliency, and support that are essential to wellness and quality of life; and to full and meaningful lives for all persons. Our supporters include individuals, families, local foundations, corporations, churches and professionals. We also receive support from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

 

Even though one in four families experience some form of brain disorder, there are few educational sources that explain the treatment and recovery process. The lack of knowledge about brain disorders in the medical profession and the public is immense. Through peer courses, frequent electronic and print newsletters, NAMI web sites across the Commonwealth, and a close working relationship with many collaborative coalitions, we are able to educate our members and the public. Support for these activities comes from our donors. NAMI has been leading the way to fill the many gaps by acting as an educator and communicator of information.


Impact Statement

2017 Accomplishments:

1.      NAMI Mass offered 31 Family-to-Family (F2F) courses and reached 435 people. F2F is a free 12-week course, which provides education, training, and support to caregivers of adults with severe mental illnesses. 
 
2.      NAMI Mass organized 477 In Our Own Voice (IOOV) presentations and reached 14,532 people. IOOV is a powerful program offered to the public where two people talk about their own recovery from mental illness.
 
 3.      NAMI Mass offered two NAMI Basics classes to Health Alliance Hospital in Leominster and Franciscan Children’s Hospital, a first time class for grandparents at the MSPCC in Jamaica Plain. Basics is a free 6-session course for parents and caregivers of children and/or adolescents living with mental illness, and three 1-day workshops for parents, caregivers, child care providers and school personnel.
 

4.      NAMI Mass's 20 local affiliates offered 40 support groups for family members and/or caregivers of loved ones with mental health condition. 12 of those affiliates also sponsored 20 NAMI Connection peer-led support groups for people living with mental illness

5.      NAMI Mass presented Allies for Student Mental Health 28 times to pre-schools through high schools. Several school superintendents invited us back multiple times to reach every grade level.

6.     NAMI Mass reached 322,834 people across Massachusetts through diversity programs such as Compartiendo Esperanza, Sharing Hope, Bridges of Hope, and the Minority Mental Health Awareness Month campaign, while providing connections to our signature advocacy, education and support services.
 
7.     Over 1,500 new municipal police officers per year receive the 16 hours of interactive content, co-taught by an experienced officer and a licensed mental health clinician through our Criminal Justice Diversion Project.
 
8.    NAMI Mass and Brookline Police Department developed a new regional CIT Training and Technical Assistance Center. Over 70 police officers graduated, representing Brookline, Dedham, Milton, Needham, Newton, Norwood, Walpole, Wellesley, Randolph, and Braintree.
 
9.    Metro Boston Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training for local police officers: over 200 police officers graduated from CIT training as a result of a partnership between the city of Somerville, the Cambridge Police Department, and NAMI Mass.
 
10.  The NAMI Mass COMPASS handled 2,231 cases for family members, caregivers, and individuals with a mental health condition. 
 

Needs Statement

1. NAMI Mass needs to increase its staffing budget to allow part-time staff more working hours. We only employ 3 full-time staff members, and the remaining 3/4 of our staff works part-time, some not even enough to entitle them to benefits. Our part-time staff works diligently on program and membership development regardless, but deserve more working hours to accomplish necessary tasks. 
 
2. NAMI Mass needs to hire a legislative advocate. Our current budget does not allow for additional staff members. In lieu of a legal specialist, our Executive Director must take on the additional responsibilities of researching injustices and publishing position statements on legal matters relating to mental health, of which there are many, so these issues are not getting the time or attention they deserve.
3. NAMI Mass needs resources to train more facilitators/teachers/speakers for our Family-to-Family, NAMI Basics, Allies for Student Mental Health, In Our Own Voice, Peer-to-Peer, Family support groups and NAMI Connection recovery support groups; so that these programs can expand to new areas and more people can have access to the help they need.
 
5. NAMI Mass needs more funding to continue providing and expanding the education and support programs we currently offer.

CEO Statement

The mission of the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Massachusetts (NAMI Mass) is to improve the quality of life for people with mental illness and their families. We strive to do this effectively every day. From our NAMI COMPASS that assists thousands of people each year to navigate the mental health system to our Criminal Justice Diversion Project that has as its objective to keep non-violent individuals with mental illness out of the criminal justice system.

Established over 30 years ago, NAMI Massachusetts is a franchise of the national organization based in Virginia.  The NAMI Mass state office is located in Boston, MA and currently has 20 affiliates (local chapters) throughout the Commonwealth. 

NAMI began as an organization to help parents deal with the generally held psychiatric opinion of the 70s that they were the cause of their loved one's mental illness. NAMI, through our now evidenced-based, signature program Family-to-Family, gives family members and caregivers coping skills, communication tips, problem-solving and listening techniques, information on brain disorders and treatments, guidance on locating appropriate supports and services within the community, advocacy skills to improve and expand the services available, self-care advice, and strategies to handle crises and relapse.

NAMI Massachusetts offers family members and caregivers NAMI Family-to-Family, NAMI Basics (for parents/caregivers of children/adolescents) and over 40 support groups across the state. For individuals with mental illness (peers), we offer the NAMI Peer-to-Peer education program, NAMI Connection, about 20 recovery support groups across the state, and In Our Own Voice, a powerful presentation of peers journeys to recovery. Allies for Student Mental Health is a two-hour professional development program designed to help K-12 teachers, parents and school staff work as allies to identify and understand mental health conditions that can have a significant impact on students’ academic success and overall well-being. All NAMI’s programs are free and open to the public. The tenet behind all NAMI programs is that recovery is possible. You can read about these programs in our Giving Common profile.
 
NAMI Massachusetts is a volunteer-driven organization. Hundreds of volunteers facilitate our programs, staff local helplines, and accomplish our grassroots advocacy. 
 
One in five adults in the U.S. experience a mental illness each year as well as approximately the same for children and adolescents.  This means the Massachusetts population of over six million would have about 280,000 children and adolescents with behavioral health problems and about a million adults having these brain disorders.
 
With mental illness more common than heart disease, diabetes, and all forms of cancer combined, NAMI’s programs supporting both families and
individuals with mental illness are vital. The hope and empathy that NAMI Massachusetts staff and volunteers demonstrate are fundamental to both the well-being of family members and the road to recovery and productive lives of individuals with mental illness. 
 
After reviewing this profile, I hope you will come to appreciate our enthusiasm for what we provide to caregivers and peers, and feel compelled to donate to us.

Thank you for your time and consideration,

Cheri Andes
Executive Director

Board Chair Statement

In all of NAMI’s programs, we are there to support every individual, from every walk of life, who may be dealing with symptoms of mental illness. Recovery is a very real state for illnesses once believed untreatable.
 
Our support programs give what no other treatment plans can provide: Connection, hope, acceptance and a way to build resiliency, in whatever journey that may be for both the individual and for their family. Connecting with others and knowing you are not alone, can be life changing. Hope and knowledge are invaluable.

Our education programs, teach families methods of coping, how to partner with their loved ones, how to help build resiliency, and how to navigate a complicated mental health system. Many members have emerged from an emotional crisis, because of symptoms of an illness, to later becoming leaders, helping and inspiring others. NAMI is available through 20 locations in Massachusetts.

Your donation to NAMI Mass helps us continue to provide critical support and education programs, in the community, when and where it’s needed.

One in five people will have experience with a mental illness; few people are untouched by these brain disorders. In Massachusetts, everyone can reach out to NAMI for help.

Tom Scurfield
NAMI Massachusetts Board President

Geographic Area Served

Massachusetts-All Regions

NAMI Massachusetts has 20 Affiliates (local chapters) serving communities throughout the Commonwealth.
 
 

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Associations - Multipurpose
  2. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Support NEC
  3. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Allies for Student Mental Health

Allies for Student Mental Health is a two-hour professional development program designed to help K-12 teachers, parents and school staff work as allies to identify and understand mental health conditions that can have significant impact on students’ academic success and overall well-being.

The program is presented by a panel of engaging speakers with uniquely relevant expertise and perspectives:

  • A young adult challenged by mental health issues as a student speaks about his/her experience in school.
  • A teacher offers personal classroom experiences, pedagogical strategies, and resources/tools for educators.
  • A parent shares the struggles and successes as his/her child progressed through the school system and tips for communicating with families.
 For more info, visit http://namimass.org/programs/allies-for-student-mental-health
Budget  $21,230.00
Category  Education, General/Other Teacher & Faculty
Population Served Adults People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 
  • Improved ability to recognize signs and symptoms of common youth mental health conditions
  • Awareness of resources, tools and strategies available to teachers, parents and staff
  • Increased success for vulnerable students
  • Program Long-Term Success 
    • Improved ability to recognize signs and symptoms of common youth mental health conditions
    • Awareness of resources, tools and strategies available to teachers, parents and staff
    • Increased success for vulnerable students
    Program Success Monitored By  Evaluations completed by participants. 
    Examples of Program Success  Program started in FY 2016

    NAMI Family-to-Family (F2F)

    NAMI Family-to-Family is NAMI's signature program, which provides free education and training to family caregivers of individuals living with severe mental illness. Over the course of the 12 week program, caregivers discuss the clinical treatments of various illnesses, learn coping skills, and feel genuine support from facilitators and the group.

     

    Family-to-Family courses are led by volunteer teachers, all of whom are caregivers, and most have been through the program themselves. They are the experts when it comes to navigating the mental health system. Family-to-Family teachers have lived the journey and can relate on a personal level to those seeking knowledge and comfort.

     

    Family-to-Family teachers are trained by NAMI Mass according to the best practices instituted by NAMI National. The highest standards are maintained by this practice and are governed by the oversight of each program’s Steering Committee and the Education Committee.
     
    A tribute video containing moving testimonials about the NAMI Family-to-Family program from family members and course instructors. http://youtu.be/zdwh6WM8E6M
    Budget  $60,522.00
    Category  Human Services, General/Other Family Preservation
    Population Served People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Families
    Program Short-Term Success 

    In the short-term, caregivers receive support and guidance from others who have lived through similar experiences. During the 12 week program, participants meet others who are also struggling and seeking help. The effect seen most immediately is the realization that caregivers are not alone. Because of the stigma associated with mental illness, it is easy for those affected to feel that they are the only ones suffering. This falsehood is one of the first to be corrected in the Family-to Family class because participants see immediately that there are others facing the same challenges. This knowledge is empowering; it is proof that others need help and there are resources available. Family-to-Family teachers are living evidence that implementation of the strategies and coping skills learned in the classroom can dramatically improve the relationship between caregiver and loved-one. Though caregivers will hopefully go on to put the knowledge they gain into practice, the program's immediate goal is to give family members network of support. 

    Program Long-Term Success 

    The goal of the Family-to-Family program is to provide family members with the strategies, education, and coping-skills they need to care for their loved one. It is our hope that caregivers continue to use what they have learned even after the program has ended. In the long-term, caregivers have gained a better understanding of their loved one's illness, how to be a better ally, and the resources available that may make their task a little easier. 

     

    After 20 years providing classes across the country, Family-to-Family has been recognized as an "evidence-based" practice. In 2011 Lisa B. Dixon, M.D. of the University of Maryland, published a study which found that the Family-to-Family program “increased participants’ empowerment within the family, service system, and community,” (Dixon, 2011).   Dixon’s study concludes that “Family-to-Family may influence how family members solve internal problems and navigate emotional difficulties,” (Dixon, 2011). 

     

    Program Success Monitored By 
    Family-to-Family participants are asked to complete evaluation forms at the end of the 12 week program. 6 months later, our Family to Family state coordinator follows up with families to see that they are continuing to employ tools and coping strategies learned in the course. 
    Examples of Program Success 

     Lisa B. Dixon of the University of Maryland found that “individuals who attended at least one Family-to-Family session… [showed] significantly reduced depression and overall distress,” (Dixon, 2011).   Dixons data shows that “emotion-focused coping improved with respect to acceptance of mental illness,” and “Family-to-Family reduced anxiety scores of participants,” (Dixon, 2011).

    Upon completing the course, participants are asked for their comments. The following are personal testimonies from class graduates: 
    • “This was a life changing experience. It has helped me handle many difficult situations. Better understanding of myself and my sister in dealing with this disease.”
    • “When I am fearful and scared, I can become calm and hopeful by drawing on the education and support and caring I have experienced these past 12 weeks. I have looked forward to every class. I know more than before not only about my loved one but about me. I need to continue learning, I want to – you opened the door.”

    NAMI In Our Own Voice (IOOV)

    NAMI In Our Own Voice is a powerful presentation program NAMI offers to audiences of all kinds in an effort to educate the public about mental illness. For each presentation, two speakers living with mental illness tell their stories of recovery along with an educational video. Speakers are trained, following NAMI National guidelines, to tell their stories with dignity and to diplomatically answer questions about their illness and mental illness in general. Our statewide coordinator arranges presentations all over Massachusetts for schools, health organizations, churches, police forces, peers, lay audiences, and any other interested parties.

     

    The program consists of several segments. The first is called “Dark Days” a description of the most difficult episodes the speakers have experienced in learning to cope with their illness. Though these are often the most painful memories to discuss, they convey the severity of debilitating mental illness, which often goes unseen. Audiences see the person in recovery living a productive life, but the program allows them to hear about the journey it took to get there. The following segments discuss coping mechanisms, treatment methods, and hopes for the future. Recovery is a lifelong process, and In Our Own Voice presenters are living proof that a person’s diagnosis does not define them as an individual.


    The In Our Own Voice program and its impact on participant's lives... in their own voice. http://youtu.be/GgDA1lmOKBY
    Budget  $77,731.00
    Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other
    Population Served General/Unspecified People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
    Program Short-Term Success 

    By the end of a presentation, the audience undoubtedly has a better understanding of the challenges faced by a person living with mental illness. The results vary from group to group, depending on the focus of the audience.  For example, many people have difficulty navigating their insurance plan, so a presentation given to a health plan organization should give the audience a better understanding of what they could do to streamline their processes and provide quality care. In the short- term, In Our Own Voice aims to actively change the minds of audiences, one presentation at a time.

    Program Long-Term Success 

    The long term goal of In Our Own Voice is to educate the general public about mental illness. Through sharing stories of lived experience and successful recovery, we hope to break down the stigma associated with mental illness. Many people living with a diagnosis fear disclosing their illness to employers, co-workers, classmates, family, and friends. This injustice often prevents those in need from seeking help and taking preventative measures to manage their illness like any physical ailment. All of NAMI’s advocacy efforts focus on breaking down stereotypes so that people with mental illness may be treated fairly by employers, government, and other citizens.

    Program Success Monitored By 

    After the presentation, audiences are asked to complete a survey which asks about the educational quality of the program and offers further informational resources.

    Examples of Program Success 
    “An over-achiever and Class President, with a full scholarship…., I suddenly was struck down in my 20’s by my emerging  illness. Overwhelmed by the symptoms, with the young adult onset, I became disorganized, and for years my decision-making deteriorated, non-sensible, non-functional.  I wanted to get well…. NAMI helped me back to “My Do-Over.”

    A NAMI support group welcomed me, I met others in all stages of recovery, I was inspired. I could get well!  NAMI helped me pull pieces of my life together, and helped our family with the tools to be partners in recovery. NAMI is a lifeline for me and my family, giving us confidence and calmness to navigate a new and productive normal.”
        

    NAMI Massachusetts Crisis Intervention and Diversion

    The Crisis Intervention and Diversion Project seeks to prevent the unnecessary arrest, detention, and incarceration of individuals who live with mental illness. In order to effect this social change, the Project will develop a statewide strategy to create and promote high quality police and first responder training programs on interacting with persons living with mental illness.

    Major achievements include

    • Collaborated with the Municipal Police Training Committee (MPTC) and the Department of Mental Health (DMH) to develop and launch an innovative new mental health curriculum for all municipal police recruits as well as mandatory in-service training for current municipal officers. By the end of 2015, all police officers in the Commonwealth received important training on responding to individuals with mental illness.
    • Partnered with the Somerville and Cambridge Police Departments to develop a Regional Crisis Intervention Training and Technical Assistance Center, with support from DMH. Over 90 officers from Cambridge, Belmont, Brookline, Everett, Malden, Medford, and Somerville have graduated from the Center’s 40-hour mental health training.
    • Created a Community-to-Community Mentoring Initiative that has provided technical support to communities in order to assemble sustainable community stakeholder groups and create collaborative responses to mental health issues.
    • Established an Advisory Group on Criminal Justice Diversion which includes representatives from state and local law enforcement, the judiciary, mental health providers and advocates, the Department of Mental Health, the Attorney General’s Office, the Department of Probation, District Attorney offices, and peers.
    • Initiated an Information-Sharing Project with the Cambridge Police Department and DMH to clarify and facilitate communication between law enforcement, mental health, and other systems. The project is producing education materials that demystify the legal parameters of information-sharing.

    For more details and resources please visit http://www.namimass.org/programs/nami-mass-crisis-intervention-and-diversion-project

    Budget  $125,000.00
    Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Crisis Intervention Programs
    Population Served People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities People/Families with of People with Disabilities Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
    Program Short-Term Success 

    The Criminal Justice Diversion Project built interdisciplinary partnerships across the Commonwealth, through the CJDP’s Advisory Group and other projects. They continued to train police officers all over the state to better handle mental health crises. They also developed materials to clarify and facilitate the process of information-sharing between law enforcement and other systems. 

    Program Long-Term Success 
    This project aims to develop a statewide strategy to make high quality training on mental illness accessible to police departments in all 351 cities and towns in Massachusetts.
     
    By September 2015, all Massachusetts police officers will have received training on responding to individuals with mental illness and/or other disabilities.
    Program Success Monitored By 

    Program success is monitored both empirically and subjectively in the following ways:

    1.       How many of the 351 cities and towns in Massachusetts have a mental health training program, or specialized police response to persons with mental illness.

    2.       Do all cities and towns have access to psychiatric crisis stabilization programs that integrate law enforcement into the program?

    3.       Have we documented increased diversion and lower incarceration rates for justice-involved persons with mental illness?

    4.       Has every police academy recruit received an updated and expanded training on mental illness and related disorders as opposed to the four hours currently provided?

    5.       Has a stable funding stream for police training been identified and implemented?

    6.       Have we documented an increase in the number of commercial insurance companies who cover Emergency Service Programs?

    Examples of Program Success 

    Please see page six of the 2017 Annual Report.

     

    NAMI Peer-to-Peer

    NAMI Peer-to-Peer is a 10-week recovery-focused educational program for adults who wish to establish and maintain wellness in response to mental health challenges. The course provides critical information and strategies related to living with mental illness. The class is taught by ‘Mentors’ who are trained by NAMI. Great value is placed on the individual experiences of each person in the class and participants are empowered and invited to share their own stories, coping tools that they have used and to comment on the information provided.
     
    Incorporating presentations, discussion and exercises, this program provides a solid foundation for the recovery process. Peer-to-Peer gives participants a varied selection of tools and strategies designed to improve decision making skills, identify and overcome triggers and recognize the impact of emotions on actions. 
     
    For more details about the program, visit  http://www.namimass.org/programs/nami-peer-to-peer
     
     
    Budget  $62,048.00
    Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
    Population Served Adults People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
    Program Short-Term Success  Program introduced in 2014, under evaluation.
    Program Long-Term Success  Program introduced in 2014 as a pilot for three years, under evaluation.
    Program Success Monitored By  Program introduced in 2014, under evaluation.
    Examples of Program Success  Program introduced in 2014, under evaluation.

    CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

    In all of NAMI’s programs, we are there to support every individual, from every walk of life, who may be dealing with symptoms of mental illness. Recovery is a very real state for illnesses once believed untreatable.

    Our support programs give what no other treatment plans can provide: Connection, hope, acceptance and a way to build resiliency, in whatever journey that may be for both the individual and for their family. Connecting with others and knowing you are not alone, can be life changing. Hope and knowledge are invaluable.

    Our education programs, teach families methods of coping, how to partner with their loved ones, how to help build resiliency, and how to navigate a complicated mental health system. Many members have emerged from an emotional crisis, because of symptoms of an illness, to later becoming leaders, helping and inspiring others. NAMI is available through 20 locations in Massachusetts.

    Management


    CEO/Executive Director Ms. Cheri Andes
    CEO Term Start Nov 2017
    CEO Email [email protected]
    CEO Experience

    She led the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization (GBIO) for nine years and is widely credited with spearheading the organization’s significant contribution to passing health care reform in the State. She is also credited with leading a grassroots process for defining what affordable and quality coverage would look like for the state’s poorest residents.”

    Most recently, Ms. Andes has worked as the Director Of Organizing Strategy with Leadership for Educational Equity, helping to found and mentor new educational equity organizations in New York, Connecticut and Boston. She holds a BA in English from Bucknell University and a MA in Pastoral Ministry from Boston College.

    Co-CEO --
    Co-CEO Term Start --
    Co-CEO Email --
    Co-CEO Experience --

    Former CEOs and Terms

    Name Start End
    Ms. Laurie Martinelli June 2008 May 2017
    Ms. Karen Gromis June 2017 Oct 2017

    Senior Staff

    Name Title Experience/Biography
    Ms. Ayanna Alimayu Office Manager --
    Ms. June Binney Criminal Justice Diversion Project Director --
    Mr. Ilya Cherkasov Director of Family Programs --
    Mr. Larry DeAngelo Affiliate Liaison --
    Ms. Marilyn DeSantis Bookkeeper/Donor Relations --
    Ms. Jill Gichuhi COMPASS Assistant Director --
    Ms. Karen Gromis Deputy Director Karen Gromis has been with the organization since 2007.
    Ms. Judi Maguire Director of Children and Adolescent Programs and Peer Support Programs --
    Ms. Kati Mapa Criminal Justice Project Assistant --
    Mr. Steve Shea Helpline Operator & Resource Specialist --
    Ms. Ruthanne Switzer Bookeeper --
    Ms. Megan Wiechnik COMPASS Director --
    Ms. Eliza Wiliamson In Our Own Voice Program Director --

    Awards

    Award Awarding Organization Year
    -- -- --

    Affiliations

    Affiliation Year
    National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) 1982
    Member of state association of nonprofits? No
    Name of state association --

    External Assessments and Accreditations

    External Assessment or Accreditation Year
    -- --

    Collaborations

    --

    CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

    --

    Foundation Comments

    --

    Staff Information

    Number of Full Time Staff 3
    Number of Part Time Staff 9
    Number of Volunteers 500
    Number of Contract Staff 2
    Staff Retention Rate % 100%

    Staff Demographics

    Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
    Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
    Caucasian: 11
    Hispanic/Latino: 0
    Native American/American Indian: 0
    Other: 0
    Other (if specified): --
    Gender Female: 10
    Male: 3
    Not Specified 0

    Plans & Policies

    Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
    Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
    Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
    Management Succession Plan No
    Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
    Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
    Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
    Whistle Blower Policy Yes
    Document Destruction Policy Yes
    Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
    State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
    State Registration --

    Risk Management Provisions

    --

    Reporting and Evaluations

    Management Reports to Board? Yes
    CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
    Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
    Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

    Governance


    Board Chair Mr. Tom Scurfield
    Board Chair Company Affiliation Shaw Group
    Board Chair Term Oct 2015 - Oct 2018
    Board Co-Chair Ms. Mathieu Bermingham
    Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
    Board Co-Chair Term Oct 2013 - Oct 2017

    Board Members

    Name Company Affiliations Status
    Mr. Sam Botsford Community Volunteer Voting
    Dr. Barrie Baker Public Plans division at Tufts Health Plan Voting
    Dr. Mathieu Bermingham Psychiatrist Voting
    Bishop & Senior Pastor Neal Boyd Endtime Revival Holiness Church Voting
    Ms. Julia Cardosa Criolas Uninas Voting
    Ms. Kathleen Considine Retired Voting
    Ms. Bernice Drumheller Community Volunteer Voting
    Mr. Michael Fetcho Retired Voting
    Mr. Andrew Gerber Austen Riggs Center Voting
    Mr. Mel Greenberg Esq. Seder and Chandler Voting
    Ms. Mary Jean Guidette Retired Voting
    Mr. William Lahey Esq. Anderson & Kreiger, LLP Voting
    Ms. Monica Luke The Living Assistance Fund Voting
    Mr. Roy Lynch NAMI Dorchester-Mattapan-Roxbury Voting
    Mr. Ed Manzi Jr. Fidelity Bank Voting
    Dr. Tonisha Pinckney Anna Maria College Voting
    Ms. Ewa Pytowska NAMI Boston Voting
    Mr. Tom Scurfield Shaw Group Voting

    Constituent Board Members

    Name Company Affiliations Status
    -- -- --

    Youth Board Members

    Name Company Affiliations Status
    -- -- --

    Advisory Board Members

    Name Company Affiliations Status
    -- -- --

    Board Demographics

    Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
    Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
    Caucasian: 14
    Hispanic/Latino: 0
    Native American/American Indian: 0
    Other: 0
    Other (if specified): --
    Gender Female: 8
    Male: 10
    Not Specified 0

    Board Information

    Board Term Lengths 3
    Board Term Limits 2
    Board Meeting Attendance % --
    Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
    Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
    Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
    Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 94%
    Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

    Standing Committees

    • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
    • Education
    • Membership
    • Public Policy/Advocacy

    CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

    A copy of the Board of Director Meetings Minutes are available here: http://www.namimass.org/contact/board-of-directors-and-minutes.

    Foundation Comments

    --

    Financials


    Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

    Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

    Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

    Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

    Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

    Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
    Total Revenue $1,528,285 $1,292,245 $1,238,552
    Total Expenses $1,357,025 $1,330,946 $1,232,313

    Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

    Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
    Foundation and
    Corporation Contributions
    -- -- --
    Government Contributions $0 $0 $433,410
        Federal -- -- --
        State -- -- --
        Local -- -- --
        Unspecified -- -- $433,410
    Individual Contributions $732,118 $305,269 $298,401
    Indirect Public Support -- -- --
    Earned Revenue $327,992 $516,487 $37,921
    Investment Income, Net of Losses $8,397 $6,922 $3,086
    Membership Dues -- -- --
    Special Events $459,778 $463,567 $464,534
    Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
    Other -- -- $1,200

    Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

    Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
    Program Expense $1,280,905 $1,236,208 $1,157,408
    Administration Expense $76,120 $94,738 $67,077
    Fundraising Expense -- -- $7,828
    Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
    Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.13 0.97 1.01
    Program Expense/Total Expenses 94% 93% 94%
    Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 1%

    Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

    Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
    Total Assets $1,616,251 $1,435,654 $1,446,322
    Current Assets $1,551,818 $1,314,034 $1,328,279
    Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
    Current Liabilities $332,054 $322,718 $281,342
    Total Net Assets $1,284,197 $1,112,936 $1,164,980

    Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

    Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
    1st (Source and Amount) -- --
    -- --
    -- --
    2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
    -- --
    -- --
    3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
    -- --
    -- --

    Financial Planning

    Endowment Value --
    Spending Policy Income Only
    Percentage(If selected) --
    Credit Line No
    Reserve Fund Yes
    How many months does reserve cover? --

    Capital Campaign

    Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
    Capital Campaign Purpose --
    Campaign Goal --
    Capital Campaign Dates -
    Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
    Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

    Short Term Solvency

    Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
    Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.67 4.07 4.72

    Long Term Solvency

    Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
    Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

    CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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    Foundation Comments

    Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

    Impact

    The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


    1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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    2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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    3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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    4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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    5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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