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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Boston HERC’s mission is to enable at-risk Latino, and other disadvantaged youth, to gain access to a higher education, break the cycle of poverty, and become agents of change in the community.

Mission Statement

The Boston HERC’s mission is to enable at-risk Latino, and other disadvantaged youth, to gain access to a higher education, break the cycle of poverty, and become agents of change in the community.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year June 01, 2014 to May 31, 2015
Projected Income $701,659.00
Projected Expense $701,659.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Passport to College

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Boston HERC’s mission is to enable at-risk Latino, and other disadvantaged youth, to gain access to a higher education, break the cycle of poverty, and become agents of change in the community.

Background Statement

Founded in 1999 to fill a gap in community-based education programming for underrepresented young people and their families, Boston HERC operates under the auspices of its parent organization (and fiscal conduit), the Congregación León de Judá (CLJ). CLJ is one of New England’s largest Latino congregations, with a membership now exceeding 1,500. The Boston HERC’s core programs include a drop-in college advising service, one-on-one mentoring, an adult education program – and, since 2004, our intensive Passport to College college preparatory program.
In 2004, the Boston HERC launched the Passport to College Program. Passport’s focus is first-generation, low-income youth attending some of Boston Public School’s (BPS) most under-resourced high schools. The Boston HERC’s Passport to College Program offers comprehensive, culturally relevant academic enrichment and college preparatory programming, resulting in a near perfect track record. Targeting low and moderate-income, first-generation college-bound African American and Latino high school juniors and seniors, Passport to College helps students develop the skills, motivation, and determination necessary for long-term academic success. When the Passport to College program was initiated in 2004, only one in four in Black and Latino public school graduates actually completed college following enrollment, according to a significant Boston Foundation Report. Yet since that time, over 100 Passport Scholars (as participants are known) have graduated from the program, and a striking 87% have gone on to graduate from college—on time.
Based on this track record of success, in 2012 Passport to College was selected by Liberty Mutual to fuel a targeted scale-up taking the Passport Program from the Community-Based setting we have served since the program's inception in 2004, to serving cohorts of first-generation juniors and seniors inside BPS’s most critically-underserved schools. In the first of year of this scale-up, Passport quadrupled its student enrollment and saw a six-fold increase in the number of high schools offering Passport in their classrooms (from one high school to six).

Impact Statement

Boston HERC's Recent Accomplishments:
 Nearly 9 out of 10 (87%) of Passport students who enroll in college are graduating from college within five years of enrollment; since the inception of the programPassport’s "across the program retention rate" (including its School-Based and Community-Based Programs) for the 2014 academic year was 82%Each (100%) Passport student completing the Community-Based program, and 92% of Passport students completing the School-Based program, have gone on to collegeBetween 2005 and 2014, 86% of our “Passport Alumni” are attending four-year colleges (58% of Passport students attend private 4-year colleges [non-Ivy League]; 22% attend MA four-year state universities; 6% attend Ivy League schools; 13% attend 2-year colleges; and 1% attend vocational colleges); colleges Passport graduates have gone on to attend include Harvard University, Smith College, Columbia University, and the University of PennsylvaniaBoston HERC alumni are now employed in a variety of settings including MFS Financial, BNY Mellon, the Boston Private Industry Council, Boston Trinity Academy, and Year Up. One Passport alumni (Suyeng Quant) currently serves on our governing Board. Between the Fall of 2014 and the Fall of 2016, we anticipate the following specific outcomes:
Launch Passport Scholars School-Based cohorts in eight high schools located within the BPS “Circle of Promise” by the Fall of 2016 (Passport is currently in six);Continue to serve this cohort beyond their graduation from high school and until they successfully complete college;Serve 1,074 first-generation students by Fall 2016;See 693 of them enroll in and complete college within 5 years;Increase the expected college completion rate for this cohort by 102%.

Needs Statement

(1) Passport to College Coach(es): Currently Passport Coaches serve 6 BPS non-exam schools. Our plan is to serve 8 non-exam high schools by 2016. But there are 22 BPS high schools that could use a Passport Coach. Each Coach costs $41,390 (Salary - $29,211; Benefits - $5,842; Taxes & Admin costs - $6,336).

(2) Development Director/GrantWriter: Currently, all proposals and development work is done by the Executive Director and Program staff. Estimated annual salary and equipping costs: $52,000

 (3) Marketing/Promotional Tools: Costs associated with the tools that communicate to Passport Scholars that they are part of a community, and that communicates to the world the magic of the Passport Program, including: T-Shirts, Polo Shirts, Lanyards, etc., $2,548; upgrade Boston HERC website, $3,300; social media and promotional videos, $3,800; brochures, business cards, promo cards, & postage, $3,877; banner and table displays, $1,475; TOTAL MARKETING COSTS, $15,000.

 (4) Hardware/Software Upgrades: Keeping up with the growth of the Passport Program requires the following hardware/software upgrades: $11,400 for desktop computers (12 desktops @ $950); $5,243 for laptops (7 Toshiba laptops @ $749); $3,495 for LCD Projectors (5 projectors @ $699); $1,478 for 2 Network Projectors (@ 739).

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
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Organization Categories

  1. Education - Secondary & High Schools
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Passport to College

The Boston HERC Passport to College Program targets students who are first-generation, low-income, and attending failing or under-resourced high schools. Our goal is to double the college enrollment and completion rates for up to 1,100 first-generation BPS students by Fall 2016. Passport Coaches are currently serving over 700 low-income students in the classrooms of 6 critically-underserved BPS high schools. The 18-month Passport experience offers comprehensive college preparatory programming including tutoring, financial aid assistance, parent workshops, SAT training, and college tours. But the core of the trademarked Passport Curriculum is devoted to providing repeated exposure to, and practice in, the Habits of the Mind -- the critical personal management and character development skills needed by all budding professionals, but that are especially scarce among first-generation students. The Habits of the Mind are woven throughout the 50 lessons of the 18-month Passport Curriculum.
Budget  $445,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

KEY OUTCOMES AND SUCCESS INDICATORS Fall 2014 to Fall 2016:
• 80% of the students completing the Passport Community-Based Program will enroll in college, and graduate within 5 years of enrollment.

• 60% of the students completing the Passport School-Based Program will enroll in college, and graduate within 5 years of enrollment.
• 75% of the students who enroll in the Passport Program will complete the 18-month curriculum
• 75% of Passport Seniors will complete at least four college applications
• 75% of Passport Seniors will submit at least 3 independent scholarship applications
• 60% of Passport Juniors and Seniors will participate in at least 2 college visits prior to graduation
• 50% of the parents/guardians of Passport Juniors and Seniors will participate in at least one college readiness/financial aid workshop
• 50% of Passport Students will receive offers of scholarships to their chosen colleges
Program Long-Term Success 

Our goal is to double the college completion rate (102%) for as many as 1,100 first-generation youth attending as many as 8 BPS non-exam high schools by the Fall of 2016. We anticipate the following specific outcomes towards that goal:

· Launch Passport Scholars School-Based cohorts in 8 non-exam BPS high schools by the Fall of 2016 (Passport is currently in 6);

· Continue to serve this cohort beyond their graduation from high school and until they successfully complete college;

· Serve 1,074 first-generation students by Fall 2016;

· See 693 of them enroll in and complete college within 5 years;

· Increase the expected five-year college completion rate for this cohort by 102%.

Program Success Monitored By 

Data gathered from all of our schools remains critical for honing Passport’s effectiveness as a useful tool in the BPS setting. During the academic year, school officials and Passport staff measure Passport's impact using academic and attendance progress reports, teacher feedback on behavior and attitude, student and parent/guardian observations, and students' self-assessment. As a government grant recipient, the Boston HERC keeps detailed demographic data on each of our BPS Passport students, including ethnicity, gender, income status, what Boston neighborhoods they reside in, and what percentage live in public housing. Beyond high school, into college students who complete the Passport Program will receive quarterly follow-up by a Passport Alumni Coordinator (employing a network of Passport Coaches, Passport college graduates, and community-based resources) until the former Passport students complete their journey through college.

Examples of Program Success 

Currently only 32% of BPS black and Latino students, graduating from BPS non-exam schools, are completing their education and graduating from college within seven years. (Boston Indicators Report, Boston Foundation 2012). In contrast, 87% of the first-generation students who go on to college from Passport since the inception of the program in 2004 have graduated within 5-years of enrollment – 82% of students who enrolled in Passport have completed the program, and gone on to college. Nearly all Passport students (90%) are low-income, qualifying for free or reduced lunch; nearly all (90%) are first-generation to college. In the words of one recent Passport graduate: “They helped me find my place and fit into a world I knew nothing about. Their Coaches made me believe I could attend college. Now I do.”


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Samuel Acevedo
CEO Term Start Nov 1999
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
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Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
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Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 103
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 7
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 2
Other (if specified): Haitian
Gender Female: 8
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. David Diaz
Board Chair Company Affiliation Assistant Principal, Boston Public Schools
Board Chair Term May 2014 - Apr 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Betsy Behan Boston Neighborhood Network Voting
Angel Carrasquillo Miami Cafe Voting
David Diaz Boston Public Schools Voting
Iris Figueroa-Jones City of Boston Inspectional Services Department Voting
Herenia Hernandez Somerville Public Schools Voting
Camilo Andres Merchan Winslow Technology Group Voting
Antonio Montenegro HERC/ESOL Program Graduate Voting
Suyeng Quant MFS Financial Voting
Fanny Rodriguez Boston Public Schools Voting
David Santana National Grid Voting
Wilson Santos Boston Public Schools Voting
Rupert Smith Children's Hospital Voting
Odelice Terrero-Ramirez Family Resources Center, Boston Public Schools Voting
Luis Valles Reading Pediatric Associates Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 14
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$374,000 $338,283 $337,277
Government Contributions $25,320 $307,022 $296,181
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $25,320 $307,022 $296,181
Individual Contributions $49,819 $20,261 $20,633
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $9,415 $8,841 $6,514
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $277,101 $548,715 $470,960
Administration Expense $159,980 $101,713 $168,406
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.05 1.04 1.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses 63% 84% 74%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $133,311 $161,657 $110,884
Current Assets $77,172 $92,045 $41,272
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $49,819 $23,025
Total Net Assets $133,311 $111,838 $87,859

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- 1.85 1.79

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's reviewed financials, reflecting solely Boston Higher Education Resource Center’s (HERC) financial data.
 
HERC is fiscally sponsored by the Congregacion Leon de Juda (CLJ) which is part of the American Baptist Churches in the USA. As such, the CLJ falls under the group exemption held by the American Baptist Churches in the USA. Please note, while the American Baptist Churches in the USA is covered under a 501(c)(3) status, it is not required to file an annual return (Form 990) with the IRS because it is a church, as such, no Form 990s are posted above. Audited Financial documents, reflecting the Congregacion Leon de Juda, are posted above for your reference.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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