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Organization DBA Citizen Schools Massachusetts
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Citizen Schools’ mission is to change the life trajectories of low-income students. We partner with middle schools to close the achievement gap by expanding the learning day. Our extended day programs combine hands-on learning and leadership development to build the skills that students need in order to succeed in middle school and advance toward high school graduation, college attainment, and positions of leadership in their careers and communities. Students work closely with talented volunteers and our staff of front-line educators and learn to make the connection between current learning in middle school and future success, while building the skills they need to pursue fulfilling careers.   

 


 

Mission Statement

Citizen Schools’ mission is to change the life trajectories of low-income students. We partner with middle schools to close the achievement gap by expanding the learning day. Our extended day programs combine hands-on learning and leadership development to build the skills that students need in order to succeed in middle school and advance toward high school graduation, college attainment, and positions of leadership in their careers and communities. Students work closely with talented volunteers and our staff of front-line educators and learn to make the connection between current learning in middle school and future success, while building the skills they need to pursue fulfilling careers.   

 


 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $5,245,923.00
Projected Expense $4,978,349.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Deepening the Impact of Expanded Learning Time for low income middle school students in Greater Boston

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Citizen Schools’ mission is to change the life trajectories of low-income students. We partner with middle schools to close the achievement gap by expanding the learning day. Our extended day programs combine hands-on learning and leadership development to build the skills that students need in order to succeed in middle school and advance toward high school graduation, college attainment, and positions of leadership in their careers and communities. Students work closely with talented volunteers and our staff of front-line educators and learn to make the connection between current learning in middle school and future success, while building the skills they need to pursue fulfilling careers.   

 


 


Background Statement

In 1995, Boston was a city searching for answers to an exhausting downward spiral of youth crime, crumbling neighborhoods, and struggling public schools. Three opportunities awaited discovery: the long, empty hours of out-of-school time; the crucial transition of middle school in a child’s education; and the cumulative power of real-world professionals teaching their knowledge to kids, hands-on.

The social entrepreneurs who brought the idea and the place together were Citizen Schools co-founders Eric Schwarz and Ned Rimer. They decided to volunteer to teach twenty 5th graders at Dorchester's Paul A. Dever school. As a former reporter, Eric taught an apprenticeship in journalism. Drawing on his years running the EMT squad at the University of Vermont, Ned taught first aid. Together with a bare-bones staff, they called themselves Citizen Teachers. Neither predicted the spectacular response of the children involved—how much they learned, and how much they loved it.

Today, Citizen Schools operates its program in 7 states across the country, serving nearly 5,000 students and engaging 4,000 volunteers. During the 2016-17 school year, Citizen Schools is serving more than 1,700 students at 6 school sites in Boston and Chelsea. In these ELT schools, our district and school partners make Citizen Schools a mandatory part of a lengthened school day – with Citizen Schools providing a “second shift” of educators in the final three hours of the day to provide its unique brand of academic support, college to career connection curricula, and semester-long apprenticeships led by community volunteers. In the ELT model, students essentially enroll in Citizen Schools by enrolling at their school. We have operated ELT programs since 2006 and have found that ELT programs offer the potential to reach the full range of students (including those who might not opt into our program on their own) and generate substantial, school-wide impact.


Impact Statement

 

Recent Accomplishments
 
STEM Programming

Citizen Schools’ apprenticeships are the cornerstone of our program model, as they provide both academic enrichment and opportunities for community engagement while motivating students to think broader about their futures. Each year, Citizen Schools continues to intensify our STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) program offerings at our sites in Massachusetts. During the 2015-2016 school year, 53% of all apprenticeships offered were in the STEM fields. Citizen Schools continued to build strong relationships with leading companies and universities to create a robust pipeline of volunteers to deliver STEM apprenticeships including EMC, Bank of America, MIT, Northeastern University and Biogen Idec.

Long-Term Impact of ELT

Citizen Schools has new data about our Boston alumni that continues to prove that participation in our program boosts the odds of college enrollment, persistence, and graduation:

• 9 out of 10 Citizen Schools alumni passed state high school exit exams in math and English, closing the achievement gap in high school. Citizen Schools alumni achieved an on-time high school graduation rate 12 percentage points higher than matched peers (71% vs. 59%).

• Citizen Schools Massachusetts alumni are enrolling in college at a rate of 67%, surpassing the rate for students in the U.S. from all income levels (63%), significantly exceeding the rate of their low-income peers nationally (41%), closing the achievement gap for college enrollment.

• Abt Associates recently completed a national study of Citizen Schools’ full-grade Expanded Learning Time programs. The most promising results related to student engagement and aspirations; for example, Citizen Schools participants were more likely to report that the program helps their self-esteem and pro-social behaviors and more likely to participate in activities to learn about college and careers. Student achievement trends were positive, with average gains equivalent to an additional two months of learning.


Needs Statement

 

1) Sourcing community volunteers: Apprenticeships are the centerpiece of our program, involving students in relevant, hands-on projects through which they explore new fields and careers. Each year, we must recruit over 800 volunteers to lead apprenticeships.

 2) Recruiting and training the talent to deliver our programs: Citizen Schools must maintain and grow a pipeline of skilled, motivated educators, and provides them with the tools, training, and evaluation necessary to provide high-quality ELT programming for our students.

3) Developing and sustaining school and district partnerships: Establishing deep and effective partnerships with our schools and districts are a key component in successful ELT implementation.  

4) Sustainability: We will support growth in Boston through a combination of public support from state and federal sources including Boston Public Schools and AmeriCorps. We will also leverage private support from foundations and corporations.

5) Serving students with special needs: We are committed to creating an inclusive learning environment for our students. We strive to provide ample training to our  staff to better serve all students, including those with special needs, since our program is mandatory for all students in a particular grade or school.

 


CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement

 

On March 6, 2014, Citizen Schools was pleased to welcome business and finance leaders in New York City to hear Larry discuss education and the economy, and the key reasons why he believes Citizen Schools is a solution to our most pressing education challenges.

“I believe the battle for America’s future, and its legitimacy, will be won or lost in its public schools,” Summers said in his speech. “The approach being pioneered and driven by Citizen Schools is a remarkably effective approach, a remarkably scalable approach, and an approach consistent with the broad value of American society – that Americans are people who pitch in with a sense of community to solve problems.”

To read Larry’s full speech and learn more about his perspective on closing the opportunity gap, visit: http://www.scribd.com/doc/212127530/Education-and-the-Economy-A-Conversation-with-Lawrence-H-Summers


 


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Greater Boston Region-Charlestown Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Dorchester Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Roxbury Neighborhood
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

 

Citizen Schools serves students at Dever-McCormack K-8 School, Edwards Middle School, Trotter Innovation School, and the Orchard Gardens K-8 School. The majority of students at our Boston sites come from some of the most impoverished neighborhoods in the city including Dudley Square, Roxbury, Dorchester, East Boston, and Mattapan. In 2013-14, we launched a new site at the Joseph Browne School in Chelsea, in an effort to expand ELT to other high need districts in Greater Boston. In our fourth year of our partnership, we are serving over 800 students at two schools in Chelsea. 

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Citizen Participation

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Deepening the Impact of Expanded Learning Time for low income middle school students in Greater Boston

The Citizen Schools Expanded Learning Time program in Massachusetts extends the learning day for all students in a grade by 35% with an integrated program of academics and youth development run by a ‘second shift’ of staff and volunteers. The model includes three primary elements: (1) weekly, semester-long apprenticeships, hands-on courses led by community volunteers in which students explore new fields and careers – from robotics to marketing to real estate development – and then share back what they have learned to the community in events called WOW!s; (2) daily academic instruction, homework time and staff-led, standards-aligned lessons in English Language Arts and math; and (3) weekly College to Career Connections, a combination of college visits and a research-based curriculum. Our program is designed to help all students experience mastery and positive recognition, develop concrete visions of success, and build the skills, attitudes, and beliefs they need to reach their goals.

Budget  $3,537,102.00
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Citizen Schools places a high value on using data to monitor the quality and impact of its program. For the 2014-15 school year in Boston, we will strive to achieve the following specific outcomes related to program quality, student engagement, and learning:
Student Engagement and Program Quality
* 90% attendance rate in grade levels served by Citizen Schools.
* 80% of rows on the Instructional Rubric for teaching staff will be rated "Developing Proficiency" or above, indicating that Citizen Schools' staff are on track in developing core teaching skills.
* 80% of apprenticeship experiences are rated healthy by Citizen Teachers through the Citizen Teacher Partnership Health Rubric.
* 80% of school partnerships are rated healthy by Citizen Schools campus leaders and school partners.
Student Achievement
* 70% of students achieve benchmarks for mastery of select 21st century skills targeted through their apprenticeships.
* 80% of students demonstrate mastery in the core subjects taught in the Citizen Schools academic support component measured through performance on unit assessments.
* An increased percentage of students meet or exceed annual growth targets relative to the prior year's performance on Common Core assessments, based on the results of the Student Growth Percentile (SGP).

 
 
 
Program Long-Term Success 

Citizen Schools’ long-term vision is to close the opportunity and achievement gaps in low-income communities so that all kids graduate high school ready for college and career.

While we plan to grow enrollment to serve 50% of Boston’s 6th graders by 2017, we would still reach only a small portion of high-need schools and students. Thus our long-range vision includes systemic advocacy necessary to scale “ELT done right”. We have always had a dual focus on direct programmatic work and systemic change. We believe that each of these elements informs and strengthens the other; our direct experience as a partner to schools and districts increases our knowledge and credibility as an advocate, while our advocacy work creates the conditions for sustainability and impact beyond the limited footprint of our own network. In 2012-13, our systemic change efforts continue as we share what we learn with the field, advocate for our policy priorities, and seek to transform public education.

Program Success Monitored By 

Citizen Schools is deeply committed to evaluation and uses a combination of internal and external evaluation methods and metrics. Internally, Citizen Schools uses a Program Scorecard to track performance against targets for key metrics of dosage (the number of hours of programming students receive), program quality, and short-term student outcomes that are aligned with Citizen Schools' Theory of Student Impact. Measures of dosage include attendance and the percentage of students who participate for a full year. Measures of program quality include staff instructional proficiency, apprenticeship quality, and constituent satisfaction.

Short-term outcomes include academic skills (grades and test scores in English Language Arts and math), 21st century skills (measured using an observational rubric), and access and beliefs related to college and career preparation and self-efficacy (measured by student surveys). Results are reported to staff in real-time to inform their work.

 

Examples of Program Success 

In 2013-14, Citizen Schools set forth the following goals and achieved the subsequent outcomes:

Goal: At least 75% of students will improve their leadership and oral communication skills.

Outcome: 61% of students improved their leadership and oral communication skills according to teacher surveys.

Goal: Students who are thriving academically will continue their strong performance: 85% of students with A/B grades will maintain an A/B grade in English Language Arts; 85% of students will do so in math. (These levels are based upon our experience working with students across our network and tracking changes in grades during the middle school years).

Outcome: 89% of students maintained an A/B grade in ELA and 86% did so in math.

Goal: Daily attendance will average 91% or higher.

Outcome: Citizen Schools Massachusetts’ campuses achieved an average daily attendance rate of 95%.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Emily McCann
CEO Term Start Feb 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Emily Buxton McCann, who replaces Steven Rothstein, previously served as chief financial officer, chief operating officer and president over her 13 year tenure at Citizen Schools.

Prior to joining Citizen Schools, Ms. McCann led business planning and development at the Walt Disney Co. and served as an analyst in mergers and acquisitions at J.P. Morgan. She serves on several national non-profit boards including, Teach Plus and Good Sports. She received a bachelor's degree from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Business School.
Co-CEO Ms. Megan Bird
Co-CEO Term Start June 2016
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience

Megan Bird began her 10-year career with Citizen Schools as a Teaching Fellow, and advanced to the role of Campus Director and Regional Manager of Program, before becoming Massachusetts Executive Director. Megan received her bachelor's degree in Spanish from Wellesley College. She serves on the Orchard Gardens K-8 School Board of Advisors located in Roxbury, MA.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Emily McCann President --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 105
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 800
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 56%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 31
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 6
Caucasian: 40
Hispanic/Latino: 12
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 2
Other (if specified): 8
Gender Female: 68
Male: 32
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Larry Summers
Board Chair Company Affiliation Harvard University
Board Chair Term Jan 2014 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Eryn Bingle Office of Congressman Jim Himes Voting
Tim Conway NewStar Financials Inc. Voting
Ms. Laura DeBonis Independent Consultant Voting
Mr. Rob Dickey Jones Lang LaSalle Voting
Seth Kalvert TripAdvisor Voting
Emily McCann Citizen Schools Voting
Mr. Gerry McGraw Fidelity Investments Voting
Ms. Rosemary Reilly WilmerHale NonVoting
Mr. Ned Rimer Citizen Schools Voting
Mr. Eric Schwarz Citizen Schools Voting
Ms. Susan Seibert Jones Day Voting
Mr. Edward Skloot Center for Strategic Philanthropy Voting
Mr. Larry Summers Harvard University Voting
Mr. Sanjeev Verma Airvana Voting
Mr. Omar Wasow Harvard University Voting
Ms. Lynn Wiatrowski Bank of America Merrill Lynch Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jim Burton Fidelity Brokerage Services --
Mr. Brian Chu Centerbridge Partners LP NonVoting
Todd Eckler Fiduciary Trust --
Ms. Peni Garber ABRY Partners --
Ms. Kristin Hendler Independent Consultant --
Mr. Akhil Nigam MassChallenge NonVoting
Mr. Brooks Tingle John Hancock --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 86%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 25%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $5,245,923.00
Projected Expense $4,978,349.00
Form 990s

2015 IRS 990

2014 IRS 990

2013 IRS 990

2012 IRS 990

2011 IRS 990

2010 IRS 990

2009 IRS 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $22,506,055 $28,372,579 $32,603,931
Total Expenses $27,665,516 $31,574,159 $32,218,216

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $9,723,751 $10,514,940 $9,692,408
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $9,723,751 $10,514,940 $9,692,408
Individual Contributions $10,416,478 $15,773,066 $20,978,616
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $4,482 $10,021 $21,648
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $2,361,344 $2,074,552 $1,911,259
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $22,200,785 $25,530,064 $26,327,187
Administration Expense $2,697,977 $3,010,232 $3,000,005
Fundraising Expense $2,766,754 $3,033,863 $2,891,024
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.81 0.90 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 81% 82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 14% 12% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $9,630,386 $14,847,878 $17,766,136
Current Assets $7,848,932 $11,890,666 $14,726,519
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
Current Liabilities $1,457,846 $1,515,877 $1,232,555
Total Net Assets $8,172,540 $13,332,001 $16,533,581

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.38 7.84 11.95

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials and reflects Citizen Schools' national operations. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Local budget estimates for each year are available from Citizen Schools upon request.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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