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Criminal Justice Policy Coalition Inc.

 549 Columbus Avenue
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 807-0111
[F] --
http://www.cjpc.org
director@cjpc.org
Rachel Corey
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INCORPORATED: 2002
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3573526

LAST UPDATED: 10/28/2016
Organization DBA Criminal Justice Policy Coalition
Criminal Justice Policy Coalition
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Criminal Justice Policy Coalition is a member-based, non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of effective, just, and humane criminal justice policy in Massachusetts. We seek to accomplish this by expanding the public discourse on criminal justice, promoting dialogue and cooperation among diverse stakeholders, and building support for policies that better protect our communities, promote accountability and change for offenders, and provide restitution to victims. We hold occasional networking meetings on a variety of criminal justice issues, sponsor public forums and conferences, organize legislative action, and provide support and coordination to groups engaged in advocacy.

Mission Statement

The Criminal Justice Policy Coalition is a member-based, non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of effective, just, and humane criminal justice policy in Massachusetts. We seek to accomplish this by expanding the public discourse on criminal justice, promoting dialogue and cooperation among diverse stakeholders, and building support for policies that better protect our communities, promote accountability and change for offenders, and provide restitution to victims. We hold occasional networking meetings on a variety of criminal justice issues, sponsor public forums and conferences, organize legislative action, and provide support and coordination to groups engaged in advocacy.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $161,070.00
Projected Expense $153,160.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Liason Project
  • The Coalition for Effective Public Safety (CEPS)
  • The Massachusetts Bail Fund
  • The Sex Offender Policy Reform Initiative (SOPRI)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Criminal Justice Policy Coalition is a member-based, non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of effective, just, and humane criminal justice policy in Massachusetts. We seek to accomplish this by expanding the public discourse on criminal justice, promoting dialogue and cooperation among diverse stakeholders, and building support for policies that better protect our communities, promote accountability and change for offenders, and provide restitution to victims. We hold occasional networking meetings on a variety of criminal justice issues, sponsor public forums and conferences, organize legislative action, and provide support and coordination to groups engaged in advocacy.

Background Statement

The Criminal Justice Policy Coalition (CJPC) was created in 1996 in order to bring together those individuals and organizations concerned about the individual and societal repercussions of the increasingly retributive nature of criminal justice policy in Massachusetts. In 2002 the CJPC was incorporated and received its 501c3 status from the IRS. The CJPC is run by a ten-person board of directors. All work is done by the staff, the volunteer board and interns.

Impact Statement

Top accomplishments in 2016:
 
1. Collaboratively designed and coordinated the first annual Massachusetts and the Carceral State Conference with the Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law, the National Lawyers Guild - Massachusetts Chapter and the Coalition for Effective Public Safety
 
2. Fund a position to work exclusively with people convicted of sex offenses and the direct service agencies they interact with to improve the re-entry and reduce recidivism.
 
3.  Over 300 people have been bailed out by the Massachusetts Bail Fund, a project of CJPC, since it's inception in 2013.
 
Goals for 2017:
 
1. Fund a position to organize people who have loved ones incarcerated in Massachusetts to organize for criminal justice reform and improvement to communities
 
2. Create sustainable salaries for employees 

Needs Statement

During the 2015 fiscal year, the Criminal Justice Policy Coalition’s operating budget was under $70,000; however, our projected budget for the 2016 fiscal year surpasses $100,000 and we expect our budget to expand further in the 2017 fiscal year. CJPC is is most in need of funding or support in the following areas:

  1. Establishing more full and part-time employment opportunities to expand CJPC’s ability to meet the needs of those with whom we work, including some of those most marginalized by society. In particular, CJPC is seeking to hire an organizer that can work directly with the loved one’s of individuals who are currently incarcerated to provide them with support and resources to navigate this confusing and trying period in their lives. Additionally, we hope to hire a full-time employee to lead our Sex Offender’s Policy Reform Initiative (SOPRI).

  2. CJPC currently corresponds with more than 100 individuals who are incarcerated; all correspondence is done by mail. Accordingly, a large portion of CJPC’s budget must be devoted to the high costs associated postage, mailing, and printing.

  3. CJPC is additionally seeking monetary support for consulting/legal services that will assist in the creation of a new strategic plan for future expansion, organizational compliance, and fundraising.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
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Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Civil Rights, Social Action, & Advocacy N.E.C.
  2. Crime & Legal - Related - Alliances & Advocacy
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Liason Project

The Criminal Justice Policy Coalition is one of the only organizations in Massachusetts to cultivate a deep network of liaisons currently and formerly incarcerated across the state. Currently, CJPC corresponds with more than 100 liaisons and members of their families who are often also disenfranchised by harsh sentencing laws and limited resources for support. We serve as a bridge between these individuals and the service network to ensure they have the greatest chance for a successful life following incarceration. Further, CJPC is unique in that our correspondence is used to highlight the voices of those most affected by criminal justice reform when presenting to state legislatures and other interest groups.

Budget  --
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success 

Most importantly, our correspondence serves to show every individual with whom we interact that they are valued regardless of their past transgressions. Oftentimes, individuals who are incarcerated are not afforded the support they need during their time in prison and once they are released. We strive to break down these barriers by connecting them with necessary resources and service providers, and lending them an ear to listen to their struggles so that they know their lives do still matter.

Program Long-Term Success 

Our correspondence with individuals who are currently incarcerated will broaden the scope of criminal justice reform and advocacy in Massachusetts. Through our correspondence and strong partnerships with other organizations, we will build a vast coalition of individuals who are incarcerated, service providers, and elected officials through which we can provide resources and empowerment to those most affected by the criminal justice policies in Massachusetts. The stories of incarcerated individuals will be used to highlight the need for new policy measures to state legislatures and influence the passage of new bills. 

Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
Within the past 12 months, the Criminal Justice Policy Coalition has doubled its network of liaisons. Through our correspondence, we have worked with individuals to host events and workshops on the outside, including "The Emancipation Initiative" which aims to educate people about life within Massachusetts prisons and advocate for an abolition of the sentence: Life without the Possibility of Parole (LWOP). 
 
Additionally, the liaison project has allowed CJPC to connect individuals who are incarcerated with numerous organizations throughout Massachusetts, including Black and Pink, the Jobs Not Jails Coalition, and Prisoner's Legal Services  

The Coalition for Effective Public Safety (CEPS)

The Criminal Justice Policy Coalition co-coordinates the Coalition for Effective Public Safety (CEPS) with Prisoner's Legal Services (PLS). CEPS provides an outlet expand the dialogue amongst numerous  grassroots organizations to provide a platform to share ideas and successful tactics aimed at broadening the scope of criminal justice reform and advocacy in Massachusetts. Through our strong partnership with other organizations, we have built a vast coalition of incarcerated individuals, service providers, and elected officials.
 
Moreover, CEPS serves as an opportunity to collect and share data regarding various policies and trends within the Massachusetts prison system. For example, members of CEPS attend public parole hearings for individuals sentenced to second degree life sentences to collect information and research on the need for parole reform. This information is later presented to lawmakers and outside advocacy groups. 
Budget  --
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success 
Currently, there is an opening on the Massachusetts Parole Board. We are advocating that a mental health expert to be appointed to the parole board vacancy. The mental health concerns of individuals is often not given adequate attention, it is our aim that through the appointment of a mental health expert to the parole board, more just and positive votes will be cast for individuals. Additionally, this appointment can provide a means for individuals to receive the necessary treatment for rehabilitation and their health.
 
Program Long-Term Success 
Through our work with the Coalition for Effective Public Safety, CJPC is fighting to bring an end to solitary confinement and improve conditions for people who are incarcerated. In Massachusetts, an individual may be held in solitary for up to 10 years for one disciplinary infraction, and despite making up just 4% of the national prison population, more than 50% of all prison suicides nationwide are committed by individuals housed in solitary confinement. CJPC and CEPS aims to eliminate the use of solitary confinement in the state of Massachusetts. 
 
Additionally, CJPC and CEPS advocates for the abolishment of the sentence of Life Without the Possibility of Parole (LWOP). 
 
 
 
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
Among the most successful of our initiatives has been our solitary awareness events held on the 23rd of each month to recognize the 23 or more hours every day that people are held in solitary confinement. In June 2016, we held a chalk walk outside of South Station in Boston in which volunteers chalked facts about solitary confinement across the front walkway to the station. The following month, in conjunction with another member of CEPS, Black and Pink, we placed a mock solitary cell in the Boston Commons. Both events drew new supporters and successfully raised awareness about the dangers of solitary confinement.
 
Additionally, in November of 2015, we screened a recent documentary by Prisoners’ Legal Services about solitary confinement in Massachusetts, “Solitary Voices.” 

Through these initiatives, we have successfully raised awareness and positively influenced the public discourse. However, there remains monumental work to be done towards accomplishing these reforms. 
   
 
 

The Massachusetts Bail Fund

The Massachusetts Bail Fund pays up to $500 bail so that low-income people can stay free while they work towards resolving their case, allowing individuals, families, and communities to stay productive, together, and stable. As cases end, bail money is returned to the fund and reused for new clients. The need is far far greater than we could have imagined, and we need to take a break to recoup enough money to continue posting bail. 

The Bail Fund is run completely by volunteers who process requests, communicate with attorneys, families, and jails. We sift through referrals, and we sit in jails for hours waiting for bail commissioners to come and take our money. We post bail for people so they can go home instead of spending one more night in jail. We do this for no other reason than we believe that pre-trial incarceration, for even one day, is disastrous for people, families, and communities.

Budget  --
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Inmate Support
Population Served Adults Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  We understand that spending even one day in jail can have disastrous effects on someone's life and we act accordingly. The Massachusetts Bail Fund seeks to allow the most number of low-income individuals to post bail, particularly those who would otherwise agree to a guilty plea agreement for an offense they may be innocent of  committing so that they do not lose their job due to absences. 
Program Long-Term Success  The Massachusetts Bail Fund accepts referrals for clients represented by court-appointed counsel whose bail is $500.00 or less. If you clients bail is over $500.00 but family and friends can come up with the difference, the Massachusetts Bail Fund will combine funds and post the clients bail.  
Program Success Monitored By 
Examples of Program Success 
60% of our clients cases are dismissed. More than half of our clients would have spent time in jail for no reason if the Bail Fund wasn't there with up to $500 plus a non refundable $40 fee.
 
We ask nothing of our clients except - come to court and take care of your legal issues. And they do - our forfeiture rate is so low as to be almost negligible. Over 90% of our clients come back to court as required.
 
We have posted over $160,000.00 in bail for over 350 people. A year ago we were posting bail in one county. Now we are in five counties. In June of 2015, we posted bail for three clients, and spent $1200.00. In May of 2016 we posted bail for 39 Clients and spent $18,751.00.

The Sex Offender Policy Reform Initiative (SOPRI)

People convicted of sex offenses face barriers in accessing service networks. They are often turned away from services offered to other people returning from incarceration due to the stigma of having a sex offense on
their CORI. Thus the need for more innovative approaches to their care is vital to not only their lives, but the public safety of everyone. This is not to negate the harm that many of them have caused, but if and when they rejoin the public,it is in everyone’s interest for them to have the stability they need to live productive, law-abiding lives.
 
This program will employ someone with experience helping people on the registry re-enter society successfully to improve public safety. They
will work with both people on the registry as well as the many agencies involved – DOC, probation, parole, police, direct services, non-profit re-entry organizations and victim rights advocates – to improve the Commonwealth’s response to people re-entering society.
Budget  --
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
Additionally, through the work of the coordinator, this project will focus on decreasing the stigma associated with working with people on the public sex offender registry and reducing the number of individuals on the registry who are homeless. There is a lot attention, especially in the city of Boston, regarding chronic homelessness. In order to combat this challenge, people convicted of sex offenses must be given the chance to apply for and earn housing.
 
The project coordinator will also attend and contribute to monthly housing, employment and continuum-of- care meetings with service providers to catalogue, assess and problem solve the unique challenges that arise for people with sex offense histories re-entering society.
 
Program Long-Term Success 
The goal of this project is to serve as a national model for service providers and state officials to emphasize that people convicted of sex offenses need a unique support system that has not yet been established. This project must serve people on the registry directly to help rebuild trust amongst registrants and supplement the severe lack of services currently available.
SOPRI will also have a public education component to demystify people returning from incarceration on a sex offense and educate about current laws. The project coordinator will build relationships with landlords, nursing homes and employers to show that people with sex offense histories have a support network that offers accountability and to allay their fears of housing and/or employing a person convicted of a sex offense.
Program Success Monitored By 
One of the benchmarks of this project will be increasing service networks knowledge of the public registry, how people get on it, actual rates of recidivism of sexually based crimes and where they can refer people who are on the registry. At the beginning of this project, all service organizations that work with formerly incarcerated people will be contacted and invited to participate in a pre-test survey. This survey will assess what information various re-entry and service organizations have regarding services for individuals on the public registry. 
 
Using the information collected by the survey and outside research, the project coordinator will put together annual reports about its progress and challenges. They will also engage with service providers, policy makers and the general public about the successes and shortcomings. By building a broader network of support, the coalition will grow through word of mouth and trustworthy rapport among members and outside individuals.
 
Examples of Program Success  The SOPRI program is still in its infancy. This section will be updated as the program expands in the near future. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Rachel Corey
CEO Term Start Mar 2014
CEO Email director@cjpc.org
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
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Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 51
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 1
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Eric Tennen Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Swomley & Tennen, LLP
Board Chair Term June 2009 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Arthur Bembury Partakers Voting
Reverend Ralph Galen Unitarian Universalist Church Voting
Mr. Nathaniel Harrison Retired Voting
Ms. Allison Jordan Lavenburg Esq. Committee for Public Counsel Services Voting
Ms. Susan McLaughlin Town of Stow, MA Voting
Mr. Ed O'Connell Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the U.S. Senate Voting
Ms. Kathy Reboul Mediation Works Inc. Voting
Mr. Walter Stone Retired Voting
Mr. Eric Tennen Esq. Swomley & Tennen, LLP Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 55%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $161,070.00
Projected Expense $153,160.00
Form 990s --
Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Total Revenue $87,082 -- --
Total Expenses $51,277 -- --

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$40,000 -- --
Government Contributions $0 -- --
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $47,082 -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Program Expense $37,127 -- --
Administration Expense $10,512 -- --
Fundraising Expense $3,638 -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.70 -- --
Program Expense/Total Expenses 72% -- --
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% -- --

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Total Assets $65,049 -- --
Current Assets $65,049 -- --
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- --
Current Liabilities $0 -- --
Total Net Assets $65,049 -- --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 -- --
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% -- --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above for FY15 is per the nonprofit. The organization does not have any financial data prior to FY15.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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