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Project Hope (Little Sisters of the Assumption Family Health Services, Inc.)

 550 Dudley Street
 Roxbury, MA 02119
[P] (617) 442-1880
[F] (617) 238-0473
http://www.prohope.org
[email protected]
Christine Dixon
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INCORPORATED: 1981
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2748880

LAST UPDATED: 10/01/2018
Organization DBA Project Hope
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Project Hope works in partnership with hundreds of families every year to help them move up and out of poverty. We do this by being a catalyst for change in the lives of families and in the systems that keep them poor; developing and providing family support solutions to alleviate poverty and homelessness; and advocating for just public policies that strengthen families.
 
Project Hope’s holistic and integrated approach is rooted in the concept of transformation through which women gain the tools, self–esteem and confidence needed to take control of their lives and seek a better future for their children. They have an opportunity to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty, serving as role models of self-confidence, empowerment, and accomplishment to their children and within the community.

Mission Statement

Project Hope works in partnership with hundreds of families every year to help them move up and out of poverty. We do this by being a catalyst for change in the lives of families and in the systems that keep them poor; developing and providing family support solutions to alleviate poverty and homelessness; and advocating for just public policies that strengthen families.
 
Project Hope’s holistic and integrated approach is rooted in the concept of transformation through which women gain the tools, self–esteem and confidence needed to take control of their lives and seek a better future for their children. They have an opportunity to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty, serving as role models of self-confidence, empowerment, and accomplishment to their children and within the community.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $4,956,100.00
Projected Expense $4,900,371.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Adult Education Services
  • Family Shelter
  • Housing Services
  • Job Training and Placement
  • Speakers Bureau

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Project Hope works in partnership with hundreds of families every year to help them move up and out of poverty. We do this by being a catalyst for change in the lives of families and in the systems that keep them poor; developing and providing family support solutions to alleviate poverty and homelessness; and advocating for just public policies that strengthen families.
 
Project Hope’s holistic and integrated approach is rooted in the concept of transformation through which women gain the tools, self–esteem and confidence needed to take control of their lives and seek a better future for their children. They have an opportunity to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty, serving as role models of self-confidence, empowerment, and accomplishment to their children and within the community.

Background Statement

Project Hope Project Hope was founded in 1981 by the Little Sisters of the Assumption who established one of the first emergency family shelters in the state. Today the agency offers comprehensive wrap around services, including temporary housing, housing search assistance, adult basic education, job training, a family childcare network and case management services for every individual or family enrolled in our programs. Our case managers were renamed "Family Partners" in 2018, more clearly representing their important and close relationship with families as they work with them to achieve personal goals and economic self-sufficiency. In the past year, Project Hope has increasingly emphasized collaborative projects with community partners, including Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (DSNI), to provide more comprehensive solutions and resources to those we serve in the neighborhood.

Project Hope primarily serves very low-income, single mothers with young or school-age children. Based on data collected at intake, 82 percent of our participants have household incomes of less than $25,000 and 63 percent have incomes of less than $15,000. Sixty-three percent live in Dorchester and Roxbury, 59 percent are African American, and 41 percent are Hispanic. Thirty-nine percent of participants live in a household where a language other than English is spoken primarily, 67 percent live in a one-parent household, and 81 percent live in a household where a woman is the primary financial provider. About one-fifth of our adult participants (21%) were homeless as children.


Impact Statement

Project Hope works to have an impact at both the family level, empowering families through education, housing stability and job training, and at the community level. Empowering homeless and low-income families in Dorchester and Roxbury for 30 years is Project Hope's greatest achievement. As residents' needs evolve, the agency worked hand-in-hand with the community, encouraging them to dream and advocate for themselves, while simultaneously providing pathways and resources to see those dreams realized. Significant achievements include:

  • Project Hope was the first shelter to build affordable housing in the area: the Magnolia Street Cooperative Housing;
  • Project Hope built the first silver LEED certified building in Roxbury, sparking the development of affordable housing, commercial space, and community gardens in the Dudley neighborhood;
  • Project Hope is a founder and board member of the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (DSNI);
  • Our workforce development program was chosen as a 2010 Social Innovation Forum winner; and
  • We created a Speakers Bureau composed of present and former participants who travel throughout greater Boston to share their stories and highlight solutions to poverty and homelessness.

Needs Statement

Since its founding in 1981, Project Hope has seen the Dudley neighborhood transformed from a community on a steep decline to a revitalized neighborhood with newly built affordable housing, community gardens, and thriving businesses. But while the infrastructure of the neighborhood has improved, the social economics have not. Many residents in the Dudley neighborhood and surrounding areas continue to struggle to overcome the disadvantages of poverty. According to a report from The Boston Foundation’s Boston Indicators Project, in Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan, 425 of children live in poverty, and 50 percent of residents lack a high school diploma.

The number of individuals experiencing homelessness in Massachusetts has more than doubled since 1990. While the City of Boston has seen some slight decreases in overall homelessness in the past year, the number of individuals, and especially families, experiencing homelessness and housing instability remains very high. On January 31, 2018, there were 3,624 families with children and pregnant women in MA's Emergency Assistance (EA) shelter program. 55 of these families with children were being sheltered in motels and does not include those families who are doubled up, living in unsafe conditions, or sleeping in their cars.


CEO Statement

For eight years, I have been proud to be a part of Project Hope's innovate response to the community's needs.

37 years ago, the Little Sisters of Assumption saw that homelessness was growing in the community so they opened their doors and invited homeless families to live with them. HOPE stands for "House Open People Enter." Since 1981 when the Little Sisters transformed their home into one of the state's first emergency family homeless shelters, they have listened to the needs of the women and their children, and they have created a variety of programs in order to help them get back on their feet.

While the neighborhood has seen physical change and is a focal point of Imagine Boston 2030, residents are still under-educated, underemployed and at risk of displacement amid gentrification. In a city where more than 50% of residents have at least a bachelor’s degree, only 18% of Roxbury residents have a bachelor’s, and 44% do not have a high school degree. In a city whose median income is $82K (2016), the median income of Roxbury households is $40K and our participants report incomes of less than $25K. Yet rents and costs throughout Boston continue to climb. Our participants strive not only for focused learning and training, but for greater stability, security and empowerment. They hope for a more stable home and they wish to provide for their children.

A top organizational priority over the next two years is to gain a clear understanding of community needs in light of changing neighborhood demographics and amidst massive urban renewal and planning. While Project Hope has always been deeply connected to the community, these changes and movements are of such massive and historic proportions that we are prioritizing and emphasizing a more data-driven and analytical approach to adapting and growing our programs to meet the needs of our community.

Project Hope grows and celebrates with its partners. When we have the most impact, it comes about in partnership and collaboration, not in isolation. Our agency and community partnerships allow us to become stronger and to be innovative in our approach. We are particularly proud of our collaboration with the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (DSNI) and the our joint “No Child Goes Homeless” initiative, which targets children who are homeless or at risk of homelessness in Boston Public Schools. Project Hope provides housing search and case management services to these children and families.

Christine Dixon, LICSW

Executive Director, Project Hope


Board Chair Statement

If you are reading this, we have something in common: we both strive to understand the issues and challenges of non-profit organizations. As board chair at Project Hope I have had the privilege of working with talented committed staff who work every day on these issues and challenges and they do a great job; especially over the past two years when the organization went through a tricky transition from its founder, Sister Margaret Leonard.

The transition was challenging, and as a consequence were some missed opportunities and one-time costs that created a significant deficit for FY 17, but because of resourceful staff and a very committed board of directors we finished FY 18 with an operating surplus and the promotion of a long-term staff person, Christine Dixon as the new executive director. Together we will continue the reputation of innovation that has been key to Project Hope’s impact.

That innovation takes its form within a framework of collaboration, with other organizations and with the families in the Dudley Street neighborhood of Dorchester and Roxbury. We collaborate with other organizations to leverage our assets, such as leasing space in out LEED certified building and joint fund-raising efforts in conjunction with the City of Boston to expand programming in the Boston Public Schools. We are not interested in “recreating the wheel”; we work with others to keep the wheels rolling. This is especially true with the families who participate in our programs: Adult Education, Family Child Care, Family Shelter and Homelessness Prevention. These families have been battered by circumstance and poverty but in partnership with Project Hope a path is set. Consider Susan who had a 4th grade reading level, no high school diploma and had been living in various shelters with her daughter for over five years.

As you might imagine, her confidence in herself had been eroded, but she was determined to do whatever she could to stabilize her life for her and her daughter. Despite this determination, it was not easy for Susan. She was often late to class because of transportation or child care issues, practical issues anyone might face but which can be derailing when you have no support or discretionary resources. Staff at Project Hope worked closely with Susan to manage these very practical issues and establish a sense of trust and it was not long before Susan became more at ease and able to focus on her studies.

We often see that when a woman feels care and support, she is free to breathe a little, and then to excel. By the end of first semester, Susan passed three of the five required High School Equivalency exams. And at the end of last year, Susan graduated with her high school diploma. This type of success occurs for more than 700 families a year at Project Hope; our purpose is to provide opportunity and the supportive relationships necessary to realize that opportunity. In the words of our Director of Adult Education: “People come to us broken sometimes, and they can’t see in themselves what we see in them,” says Donna. “We were able to show Susan and others what we saw in her, and she finally saw something in herself.”

Maureen Pompeo

Chair, Project Hope Board of Directors


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Greater Boston Region-Roxbury Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Dorchester Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Mattapan Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Jamaica Plain Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Mission Hill Neighborhood
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Project Hope primarily serves very low income, single mothers with young or school-age children in the Dorchester/Roxbury communities of Boston, where 26% of all residents and 36% of children are living in poverty. 86% of our participants have household incomes of less than $25,000; 65% have incomes of less than $15,000.16% of our adult participants were homeless as children. 1 in 5 Dorchester/Roxbury residents (21%) do not have a high school diploma.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Homeless Services/Centers
  2. Housing, Shelter - Temporary Housing
  3. Education - Adult Education

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Adult Education Services

For the past 28 years, Project Hope’s Adult Education Services has offered Adult Basic Education (ABE) classes to women seeking to get their high school equivalency, or HiSET. The ABE program was taught in the Family Shelter and the pedagogy recognized the importance of empowerment for women. With a move to our Community Building in 2006 and increasing immigration to the neighborhood, we also began to offer English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes.

While the educational experiences of the women vary greatly, their primary goal is overwhelmingly the same: they wish to attain a higher level of learning that will enable them to secure a sustainable living wage. Fifty percent of our adult learners are unemployed and many of those who are employed are trying to earn their Hi-Set or improve their English to get a better job or a promotion. These women wish to provide for their families and take better care of their children. Through this process, they also aim to become independent, secure, and empowered.

Budget  $333,057.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Females Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Families
Program Short-Term Success 
Project Hope served a total of 95 students in its fiscal year 2018: 58 ABE students and 37 ESOL students. Key performance indicators and outcomes are noted below:
• 74% of ABE students made MAPT (Mass Adult Proficiency Test) gains and 50% made EFL (Educational Functioning Level) gains
• 9% (5 students) passed 4 of the 5 Hi-Set exams
• 5% (3 students) obtained their Hi-Set
• 65% (24 students) completed two cycles of ESOL training; 69% improved their BEST Plus score; and 46% improved their BEST literacy score
• 42% (40 students) obtained or retained employment while in school
• 75% attended at least one of our three family literacy activities
In 2018, Project Hope reported a ratio of attended hours to planned hours of 97%. This is higher than the program average in Boston of 78%.
2019 Goals
Project Hope’s fiscal year 2019 goals for the Adult Education Services program are ambitious and timely. We know we are at a critical turning point for the program and the Program Strategy Committee and program director are taking all facets of the program into account including strongest community need, program design, integration with career/workforce program, measuring and evaluating program needs and impact, and the development of funding plans that are focused on the private sector. In light of these overarching strategic considerations, we have not lost sight of the importance of program continuity and have developed the following outcome goals for our fiscal year 2019:
• Enrollment of at least 84 AES students (52 ABE and 32 ESOL);
• 100 percent of students will take Career Workshops course and career counseling;
• 65% (34 students) of ABE students will advance one grade level equivalent (GLE);
• 50% (26 students) of ABE students will pass at least 2 of the 5 Hi-Set exams;
• 25% (13 students) of ABE students will obtain their Hi-Set; and
• 75% of ESOL students will advance at one SPL (Student Performance Level).
With 100 percent of ABE/ESOL students now taking the Career Workshop and receiving career counseling, we expect to more accurately measure outcomes on job placement and promotion.
Program Long-Term Success  .Best practices in AES include tight ties to workforce preparation in curriculum content and in supplementary activities. In 2017-2018, we have begun to address this need as follows:
• This year our Workforce Development and Employment Partnership Program (WDEP) launched a new program called “Tracks to Employment.” With fewer eligibility requirements for enrollment, more people in the struggle for employment are able to enter Project Hope through this program, which guides them through important initial activities to achieve employment: goal setting, identifying paths forward, developing presentation skills, confidence building, etc. The program attracts participants with more barriers to attaining a job, even at the entry level, and therefore helps them to begin on a path toward more opportunity. It is a 3-week, 3 days per week program which will be offered four times a year.
• Our Workforce Program will also be running six workshops for all Adult Education Students, including those in our ESOL program. The workshops are included in their classroom time and incorporated into the curriculum, so that as women are gaining skills in writing, they are also working on their resumes. Other components these workshops will cover include public speaking and interview techniques, goal setting, using the internet and social media to conduct a job search and more.
• Recognizing that each woman who enters our Adult Education program has different needs and challenges to address around obtaining employment, our AES Family Partners will identify those women who are ready to engage in one-on-one employment counseling with WDEP after the school day is complete.
• Strong computer skills are indispensable in many job settings. We are seeking to equip students with laptops to enhance their study and their skills.
• WDEP and AES are also working together on joint community events, such as a job fair that was held in partnership with new employer/hospitality partner Colwen Hotels. The job fair was held in August 2018, attracted 95 attendees and featured a resume-writing workshop.
Program Success Monitored By 

Project Hope uses Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), an internet-based case management database designed by Social Solutions. ETO requires staff to link their interactions with participants directly to measurable program outcomes. ETO not only provides our staff with a consistent method and framework for documentation, but also allows staff to record every aspect of case management services including referrals, services provided, and various other data elements to help case managers determine if their efforts are effectively meeting the needs of those they serve.

We have continued to make progress toward ensuring that ETO is aligned with program goals and indicators. A dedicated full-time staff person oversees ETO and works closely with program directors and staff to make sure the system is responsive to their program needs and goals. We now have a tool in ETO that captures how many families have been placed in permanent housing through our Shelter and Housing programs and tracks the number of families we help to avoid eviction. The Workforce Development and Employer Partnerships (WDEP) team enters data into ETO on job placements for graduates of its programs. Adult Education Services (AES) team enters attendance data for its students in both ETO and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education’s SMARTT data system.

In 2017 Project Hope replaced the Family Assessment Matrix (FAM) with a new tool called the Participant Assessment. The new assessment consists primarily of questions and multiple-choice answers, which provides us with more granular and consistent data than the score-based FAM did. The Project Hope Assessment tracks outcomes in key areas, including income and benefits; employment and job training; housing; language and education; childcare; health; finances; immigration; and transportation. Family Partners (case managers) complete an assessment for each participant at least once every 3 months.

With this more detailed tracking, we are better able to capture the day to day work of families and Family Partners as they progress toward their goals. For example, a participant in our workforce development program might not have a job yet, but she is working on her resume, practicing her interviewing skills, and obtaining professional clothing in preparation for employment. These are the types of activities that were not being captured in any systematic way until we implemented the new assessment.

Our holistic approach to case management means that the Family Partners assist families in areas outside of their department’s domain. For example, the adult education staff assist students with housing issues, and staff in the shelter help families find childcare. The Participant Assessment will enable us to take stock of activities and outcomes across programs.

Examples of Program Success 

To illustrate the impact of our wrap around care and service to students, we would like to share the journey of Susan, one of our adult learners in the AES program. As Project Hope continues its mission to embrace women where their educational needs begin, we are guided by the experiences of women like Susan, who came to Project Hope last year. Susan wanted a high school diploma to build a better life for her child and her. She had been living in scattered site shelters for five years, usually motels. She showed great stress and lack of confidence when she arrived at Project Hope to enroll in classes. Her initial placement test results showed that Susan’s reading and math skills were at a 4th grade level. Our Adult Education Program Director Donna Henderson described Susan as, “A woman who had clearly given up on herself. She thought she deserved to pay her entire life for every mistake she had ever made.” During her first weeks in class, Susan was often late because of childcare issues, something not accommodated by many AES programs in the city. She struggled to focus. Donna, together with our Family Partner Vanessa and our educators, embraced Susan, assured her that they believed in her, and that she was not alone. They had joined her struggle and would help her to address and manage child care and housing issues. While her challenges could not be resolved quickly, it was not long before she became more at ease and able to focus on her studies. We often see that when a woman feels care and support, she is free to breathe a little, and then excel. We were amazed by how quickly things began to turn around for Susan as her stress lessened and her confidence grew. By the end of first semester, Susan passed three HiSet exams. “People come to us broken sometimes, and they can’t see in themselves what we see in them,” says Donna. “We were able to show her what we saw in her, and she finally saw something in herself.” Susan graduated our HiSet program at the end of last year and today has her own apartment and a job she enjoys.


Family Shelter

The Family Shelter offers a high-quality, caring shelter environment for 11 families who have become homeless.One of the first homeless family shelters in the state, the Family Shelter is now a model for its respectful and empowering approach.It is a safe and supportive home for women and their children and strives to empower families on their path out of poverty through a combination of high quality care and services.We partner with the families in our Shelter as they face the difficulties of finding and keeping permanent housing: long waiting lists for public housing (currently five years or more); fewer subsidies for market rate housing; increasing rents; rising costs for heat, food and child care; and low numbers of slots for job training programs.The challenges are daunting and discouraging.Families routinely arrive at the shelter with few belongings.Through the provision of basic necessities—bedding, clothing, food, and personal care items—Project Hope brings a measure of increased comfort, dignity, and care for the women and children who call the Shelter their temporary home.
Budget  $949,592.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Homeless Shelter
Population Served Families Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Our shelter served 11 families at a time throughout 2018, providing comfort, care, case management support to women as they sought to stabalize their lives and live independently. Over the course of the year, Project Hope welcomed a total of 22 families to the shelter, and helped 11 move into permanent housing. 
Program Long-Term Success 
The number of individuals experiencing homelessness in Massachusetts has more than doubled since 1990. While the City of Boston has seen some slight decreases in overall homelessness in the past year, the number of individuals, and especially families, experiencing homelessness and housing instability remains very high. According to numbers from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's 2017 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress, there were 17,565 people in Massachusetts counted as experiencing homelessness during the January 2017 point-in-time count conducted by the HUD Continuam of Care across the state. This included an estimated 11,298 people in families with children. On January 31, 2018, there were 3,624 families with children and pregnant women in Massachusetts’ Emergency Assistance (EA) shelter program. 55 of these families with children were being sheltered in motels. This number does not include those families who are doubled up, living in unsafe conditions, or sleeping in their cars.
Project Hope's founding purpose and core services address this issue head on. The agency launched with an Emergency Shelter (the former home of the Little Sisters of the Assumption) in the neighborhood and the Shelter still serves up to 25 families per year (11-12 at a time) and we are seeking to expand the Shelter via a capital campaign. The needs of the women in the Shelter provided the impetus to launch not only more comprehensive housing services, but also Adult Education and Workforce Development programs to provide a pathway to moving to a home as well as the means to sustain that home.
Program Success Monitored By 

Project Hope uses Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), an internet-based case management database designed by Social Solutions. ETO requires staff to link their interactions with participants directly to measurable program outcomes. ETO not only provides our staff with a consistent method and framework for documentation, but also allows staff to record every aspect of case management services including referrals, services provided, and various other data elements to help case managers determine if their efforts are effectively meeting the needs of those they serve.

We have continued to make progress toward ensuring that ETO is aligned with program goals and indicators. A dedicated full-time staff person oversees ETO and works closely with program directors and staff to make sure the system is responsive to their program needs and goals. We now have a tool in ETO that captures how many families have been placed in permanent housing through our Shelter and Housing programs and tracks the number of families we help to avoid eviction. The Workforce Development and Employer Partnerships (WDEP) team enters data into ETO on job placements for graduates of its programs. Adult Education Services (AES) team enters attendance data for its students in both ETO and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education’s SMARTT data system.

In 2017 Project Hope replaced the Family Assessment Matrix (FAM) with a new tool called the Participant Assessment. The new assessment consists primarily of questions and multiple-choice answers, which provides us with more granular and consistent data than the score-based FAM did. The Project Hope Assessment tracks outcomes in key areas, including income and benefits; employment and job training; housing; language and education; childcare; health; finances; immigration; and transportation. Family Partners (case managers) complete an assessment for each participant at least once every 3 months.

With this more detailed tracking, we are better able to capture the day to day work of families and Family Partners as they progress toward their goals. For example, a participant in our workforce development program might not have a job yet, but she is working on her resume, practicing her interviewing skills, and obtaining professional clothing in preparation for employment. These are the types of activities that were not being captured in any systematic way until we implemented the new assessment.

Our holistic approach to case management means that the Family Partners assist families in areas outside of their department’s domain. For example, the adult education staff assist students with housing issues, and staff in the shelter help families find childcare. The Participant Assessment will enable us to take stock of activities and outcomes across programs.

Examples of Program Success 

The Project Hope Family Shelter has been providing a high-quality and nurturing shelter environment since 1981. We strive to empower families through services that promote each family’s strengths and encourage them on their path out of poverty. Each year homeless women and their children work to move into homes of their own and achieve greater economic self-sufficiency.

Project Hope’s vision is rooted in the concept of transformation, the process through which women gain the tools, self–esteem and confidence necessary to take control of their lives and develop the courage to seek a better future for their children, despite the enormous challenges they face. Some of the women currently seeking to create a better future are:

· NNjiba, a 35 year old mother of a one year old daughter. Her daughter is in daycare while Njiba performs community service 4 days a week. Njiba is a competent woman and uses her skills to volunteer at Project Hope, helping with administrative functions in a number of departments. She is a model resident with a positive attitude. She gives advice and assists the other residents in any way she can. Once her legal status is resolved, we know she will be able to forge ahead and take charge of her future.

· J Jenny is a 22 year old mother of four year old twin boys and a one year old baby girl. Jenny attends a day program in human services at Goodwill Industries. Every day she has her children up and eating breakfast early so they can be ready for the bus to pick them up at 7:50 am. She then she gets herself ready to get to class by 9 am. Jenny returns after class at 3:30 to meet her children’s bus at 3:40, and then she spends the afternoon and evening caring for them, getting her homework done and completing her chores. This woman has a full plate for someone so young; we support her as she takes the steps to be an excellent provider for her children.

Linda is attending the adult education program at Project Hope. Her day starts with getting her one year old son ready for daycare. She then gets transportation to her treatment program, and manages to still get to Project Hope for her 9:00 am class. She has overcome challenges and barriers with the support that she has received at the shelter. She has become a more confident student, mother and person. Today Linda has a section eight and recently moved into her apartment.


Housing Services

Project Hope’s Housing Services Program is focused on helping families access affordable housing and preventing evictions. In order to meet these housing needs, the Housing Service Program provides case management services to assess needs and develop individual service plans; assistance with obtaining housing; and short-term financial assistance to prevent eviction and help families maintain their current housing. In addition to helping community residents who are experiencing a housing crisis, Housing Services supports Project Hope participants enrolled in our job training, adult education and child care programs who are facing homelessness, housing instability or eviction. Housing Services helps stem homelessness for over 200 families each year, including the 11 families living in the Project Hope Family Shelter.

Our direct Housing services include: 

Housing Search and Rapid Re-Housing: Our Housing Search services include meeting with families to create a housing plan, assisting them to detail their housing history, which is required by potential landlords, running CORI and credit reports and anticipating potential issues that may come up with their housing applications as a result of the information on these reports. We also assist families to complete housing applications, prepare for and accompany families to housing interviews, and build relationships with property owners to match families with potential available units. Staff keep abreast of all new housing opportunities to ensure that the families that we work with have the chance to connect to all potential housing options. We provide housing search services for families referred from our shelter, from other Project Hope programs, from local schools, and the DHCD office.

Eviction Prevention: Project Hope screens potential tenants referred by property managers to ensure that they meet income eligibility guidelines and other requirements set by funding sources, such as meet HUD’s At-Risk definition, including that they have insufficient financial resources or social networks to prevent homelessness. 

Case management: Case management services are offered to families. At Project Hope, case management is a collaborative process and is focused on a family’s strengths, and is relationship-based. Our case managers are called "Family Partners" and s work with families to complete a thorough assessment of strengths and needs and together develop an Individualized Family Service Plan, detailing goals and steps needed to reach those goals. Family Partners help connect a family to various services within Project Hope and will continue to be their guide/coach/partner as they navigate through the continuum of services. They make referrals to outside agencies and services and make these connections seamless as we have various referrals partners and contacts in the community. The Family Partner and family build a trusting and genuine relationship throughout the time they work together and both have the chance to witness the growth that happens as a result of this supportive relationship.

Shelter Diversion: Housing Services has staff located at two Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) offices, in Dudley Square and Chelsea. Families who are homeless, or on the verge of homelessness, and seeking access to emergency shelter are provided with support and alternatives to shelter. If families are facing eviction, Housing Services staff will contact landlords to see if arrangements can be made to pay back owed rent and preserve the family’s housing. 

Advocacy: In collaboration with organizations such as Homes for Families, Citizens’ Housing and Planning Association (CHAPA), and the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless, the Housing Services Department advocates for increased funding for affordable housing and homelessness prevention programs, as well as for policy changes that would benefit families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. 

 
 
 
 
Budget  $1,247,466.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Housing Counseling
Population Served Homeless Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
In Fiscal Year 2018 Project Hope served 196 families to obtain or maintain stable housing.
  • 29 evictions were prevented through our Eviction Prevention program
  • 92 families received housing through our Housing program 
  • 75 families were diverted from shelter through out Diversion program
 
Program Long-Term Success  Project Hope enjoys deep collaboration with the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (DSNI). Six years ago our organizations partnered to launch the “No Child Goes Homeless” initiative which targets children who are homeless or at risk of homelessness in Boston Public Schools.  What began as a pilot project in three Roxbury neighborhood schools, with Project Hope providing housing search and case management services to children and families, has recently rolled into the Family Led Stability Project together with the City of Boston, Higher Ground, New Lease for Homeless Families, and DSNI. With increasing opportunities in the City and with private donors, the collaborative has jointly applied to and received funding from the City of Boston, Liberty Mutual, Boston Children's Hospital and the Miller Innovation Fund. We have also been working together with our community partners on funding requests to larger national foundations. This highly strategic initiative is strengthening our community partnerships and our awareness and outreach efforts to national and local donors. Most importantly, it is exponentially increasing our service to children and families in the neighborhood. The initiative has a strong foundation for scalability and replication through the Boston Public School system.
Program Success Monitored By 

Project Hope uses Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), an internet-based case management database designed by Social Solutions. ETO requires staff to link their interactions with participants directly to measurable program outcomes. ETO not only provides our staff with a consistent method and framework for documentation, but also allows staff to record every aspect of case management services including referrals, services provided, and various other data elements to help case managers determine if their efforts are effectively meeting the needs of those they serve.

We have continued to make progress toward ensuring that ETO is aligned with program goals and indicators. A dedicated full-time staff person oversees ETO and works closely with program directors and staff to make sure the system is responsive to their program needs and goals. We now have a tool in ETO that captures how many families have been placed in permanent housing through our Shelter and Housing programs and tracks the number of families we help to avoid eviction. The Workforce Development and Employer Partnerships (WDEP) team enters data into ETO on job placements for graduates of its programs. Adult Education Services (AES) team enters attendance data for its students in both ETO and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education’s SMARTT data system.

In 2017 Project Hope replaced the Family Assessment Matrix (FAM) with a new tool called the Participant Assessment. The new assessment consists primarily of questions and multiple-choice answers, which provides us with more granular and consistent data than the score-based FAM did. The Project Hope Assessment tracks outcomes in key areas, including income and benefits; employment and job training; housing; language and education; childcare; health; finances; immigration; and transportation. Family Partners (case managers) complete an assessment for each participant at least once every 3 months.

With this more detailed tracking, we are better able to capture the day to day work of families and Family Partners as they progress toward their goals. For example, a participant in our workforce development program might not have a job yet, but she is working on her resume, practicing her interviewing skills, and obtaining professional clothing in preparation for employment. These are the types of activities that were not being captured in any systematic way until we implemented the new assessment.

Our holistic approach to case management means that the Family Partners assist families in areas outside of their department’s domain. For example, the adult education staff assist students with housing issues, and staff in the shelter help families find childcare. The Participant Assessment will enable us to take stock of activities and outcomes across programs.

A Sample of measures from new assessment includes:

Number of people who increase their income

Number of people who increase work hours

Number of people who obtain Fuel Assistance

Number of people who complete a level of ESOL

Number of people who obtain a childcare subsidy

Number of people who obtain health insurance

Number of people who open a bank account

Examples of Program Success  Valentine immigrated to the United States from Haiti as a child, leaving behind most of her family and emotional support. After a difficult divorce, she is raising her two sons ages 5 and 9 by herself. As a single mother with limited income, she struggled to pay her rent and was on the verge of being evicted. Valentine was referred to Project Hope’s Housing Department by Greater Boston Legal Services. Project Hope and Greater Boston Legal Services were able to work together to save her Section 8 voucher, and her family was able to stay in their apartment.

Job Training and Placement

Project Hope's Workforce Development Program (WDEP) was founded in 2004 and prepares low-income residents of Boston for entry-level and mid-level employment primarily in the healthcare field and expanding to include other industries. The program serves as many as 100 people each year, primarily single mothers who are unemployed or underemployed. 75% of our participants enter Project Hope with annual household incomes of less than $25,000. In the neighborhoods of Roxbury and North Dorchester, 42% of families live in poverty, and 50% of residents lack a high school diploma. Employment opportunities in the area are limited and, while many employers are interested in hiring from within this community, they need assurance that residents are well-trained and have the necessary support systems in place to remain in their jobs. Residents need entry-level employment in settings that offer benefits and career pathways. They need to find employment in order to meet specific goals of transitioning off of welfare, becoming re-employed after extended periods on unemployment benefits, or advancing from being underemployed in part-time or unstable positions. WDEP bridges the gap between employers and residents.

Activities: WDEP recruits and supports community residents with job readiness training, access to career ladder job opportunities, and ongoing case management support throughout the training program and for a full year after job placement. At twice monthly Open Houses, all new applicants participate in a screening and assessment process to determine their level of job readiness. Based on the candidate’s level of job readiness, they may be placed in one of the following programs:

· Community Partners in Health Professions (CPHP): A 8-week, full-time job readiness training program covering a wide range of topics including communication skills, customer service skills, and problem solving. Graduates access employment opportunities and receive referrals to Partners Health Care and Tufts Health Plan.

CCertified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Program: Partners HealthCare Workforce Development, in conjunction with the Academy for Healthcare Training, is offering a free CNA training program in which our participants, upon successful graduation of the program, earn dual Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide certificates, receive placement assistance focusing on full-time CNA employment within the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network, and are eligible to sit for the Massachusetts Nurse Aide Certification Exam (within 30 days of program completion) with exam fees covered by Partners HealthCare.

· Partners in Career & Workforce Development: An 8-week, full-time training program including 4 weeks of classroom instruction and a 4-week administrative internship at a Partners HealthCare affiliate. Graduates are prioritized for hiring for administrative jobs in Partners’ hospitals.

· Tracks to Employment: A new 3-week part-time workshop series, this track focuses on essential skills needed to conduct a successful job search and obtain employment.

Project Hope’s Family Child Care Business Enterprise (FCCBE) maintains a robust network of 20 highly trained home-based family day care providers. FCCBE helps with licensing and business set-up, serves as the conduit for state child care subsidies, ensures quality services, and works with the providers long-term on their continued educational and professional development. Many of the children enrolled in our child care program are at risk for difficulties with healthy development and future school performance, and face challenges such as family homelessness and poverty, parental job instability, and parents with limited education. The families we see are desperate for subsidized child care so the parents can work or attend school. FCCBE fills a critical gap in child care services for many low-income families in the community.

Budget  $828,986.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Females Families
Program Short-Term Success 

In Fiscal Year 2018, WDEP reported the following successes:

Total number of adults receiving training who completed program: 71 people

Total number placed in jobs: 43 people

o Full time: 41 people

o Part time: 2 people

Average starting hourly wage: $15.40

Program Long-Term Success 
For workforce training, recruitment and assessment are based on employer requirements. We closely monitor specific employer qualifications and then mirror those qualifications for program entrance. WDEP employers for the healthcare industry require candidates to have a high school diploma or equivalent, while our new Track to Employment program does not have this requirement and is more flexible to better serve residents with more employment barriers. The program works to balance the needs of employers with our commitment to serving our community so they are enrolled in or referred to the best program possible for their pathway to stronger employment and success.
 
Our involvement with program participants continues for at least a year after they find or stabilize housing, complete their education course, or are placed in a job. In some cases, Family Partners are in touch with their clients beyond one year.
Program Success Monitored By 

Project Hope uses Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), an internet-based case management database designed by Social Solutions. ETO requires staff to link their interactions with participants directly to measurable program outcomes. ETO not only provides our staff with a consistent method and framework for documentation, but also allows staff to record every aspect of case management services including referrals, services provided, and various other data elements to help case managers determine if their efforts are effectively meeting the needs of those they serve.

We have continued to make progress toward ensuring that ETO is aligned with program goals and indicators. A dedicated full-time staff person oversees ETO and works closely with program directors and staff to make sure the system is responsive to their program needs and goals. We now have a tool in ETO that captures how many families have been placed in permanent housing through our Shelter and Housing programs and tracks the number of families we help to avoid eviction. The Workforce Development and Employer Partnerships (WDEP) team enters data into ETO on job placements for graduates of its programs. Adult Education Services (AES) team enters attendance data for its students in both ETO and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education’s SMARTT data system.

In 2017 Project Hope replaced the Family Assessment Matrix (FAM) with a new tool called the Participant Assessment. The new assessment consists primarily of questions and multiple-choice answers, which provides us with more granular and consistent data than the score-based FAM did. The Project Hope Assessment tracks outcomes in key areas, including income and benefits; employment and job training; housing; language and education; childcare; health; finances; immigration; and transportation. Family Partners (case managers) complete an assessment for each participant at least once every 3 months.

With this more detailed tracking, we are better able to capture the day to day work of families and Family Partners as they progress toward their goals. For example, a participant in our workforce development program might not have a job yet, but she is working on her resume, practicing her interviewing skills, and obtaining professional clothing in preparation for employment. These are the types of activities that were not being captured in any systematic way until we implemented the new assessment.

Our holistic approach to case management means that the Family Partners assist families in areas outside of their department’s domain. For example, the adult education staff assist students with housing issues, and staff in the shelter help families find childcare. The Participant Assessment will enable us to take stock of activities and outcomes across programs.

Examples of Program Success 

Carmen began with Project Hope as a Family Child Care provider in March of this year. For many years she worked as a home health aide but loved to work with children and needed to increase her income. Carmen was referred to us through another, long-time provider, who suggested that she start attending Project Hope’s trainings to see if she might like to become a provider of quality family childcare out of her home. Carmen connected with Project Hope.

Along with help setting up her home and getting the necessary paperwork in order, Carmen needed assistance with her license to care for six children. A paperwork mishap through the licensing board meant that she went several weeks without income. Project Hope staff intervened on her behalf and went in person to acquire the necessary licensing so Carmen could really get started in her new career, guiding the growth and development of the children in her care.

This May, Carmen graduated from Urban College with an associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education. She is working on improving her work and her space with the help and guidance of Project Hope’s Family Childcare staff. Her mother is working with her as an assistant, and together they hope to expand to care for more children in the future. In addition to the opportunity to have lasting impact on the lives of developing children, Carmen is pleased that her income is so much higher than it was in her past job. She is now working for herself and invested 100 percent in making her business successful.


Speakers Bureau

Project Hope’s Speakers Bureau is made up of 50 ambassadors to whom we offer workshops on a wide variety of topics related to public speaking.The women gather to share a meal, see presentations and participate in skill and confidence building activities.Workshop topics have included communicating with presence, dealing with awkward situations, and using small talk to have a big impact.Throughout the year, Ambassadors go on speaking engagements to share their experience and strength to audiences large and small.While at engagements, Ambassadors have the opportunity to network with a variety of people.In addition, seasoned Ambassadors serve as mentors for new members, helping them with workshop activities, offering support and feedback and answering questions.
Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Public, Society Benefit, General/Other
Population Served Females
Program Short-Term Success  .
Program Long-Term Success  .
Program Success Monitored By  ETO
Examples of Program Success  .

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Alongside agency growth and vast community change, come challenges. Our present challenges are focused on Adult Education Services strategy and funding and sustainability for the agency as a whole.

1. Adult Education Services Partnerships

We recognize the value in deepening partnerships with other programs serving adult education needs within the community and we know from experience with other programs that this is critical to best practices and innovation. Our Board has created a Program Strategy Committee that is focused on helping us think through the steps and stages of building and strengthening partnerships for our Adult Education program. The Committee has started to explore efforts including deepening our partnership with hospitality partners for recruitment and internship possibilities and working more closely with Roxbury Community College.

2. Funding/Sustainability

Project Hope has emerged from two challenging fiscal years marked by leadership transition and financial shortfalls. Having just ended our fiscal year 2018 with a surplus, we are now in a stronger position to look carefully at our revenue streams to determine a sustainable balance between private and public funding and consider the positioning of Project Hope’s programs within the strategic framework of State, City and community planning. Our Board and leadership have started to review top funding models for non-profits, including those presented by Stanford’s Social Innovation Center and the Bridgespan Group, and Harvard Business School’s Community Action Partnership will be working with us as an in-kind consultancy to consider these models our strategic planning and fundraising strategy.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Christine Dixon
CEO Term Start Nov 2017
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Christine joined Project Hope in January 2011 after over two decades of experience in the Human Services field. Prior to joining Project Hope, Christine worked for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health with families placed in hotels, motels and scattered site shelters by the Department of Housing and Community Development as well as the Dimock Community Health Center in Roxbury, where she was the Mental Health Specialist in their Head Start and Early Head Start programs. There she provided play therapy services to children, technical assistance to classroom teachers, and training for staff and parents. Christine has extensive experience in working with children and families around issues of homelessness and has been a leader at Project Hope on several initiatives in partnership with agencies and city stakeholders. As Deputy Director at Project Hope, Christine worked hand-in-hand with the executive director to chart Project Hope’s future growth and strategic planning. She has held increasing internal and external responsibilities, ranging from program management and development to administrative roles within the agency. Christine is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker with a Master's degree in Social Work from Boston University and a Bachelor's degree from the College of the Holy Cross.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start Jan 2011
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Linda Wood_Boyle Sept 2015 July 2017
Sr. Margaret Leonard Jan 1981 Sept 2015

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Carol Ann McAuliffe Director of Finance Carol Ann McAuliffe joined Project Hope’s Board of Directors in 2003. For the past 8 years, she served as the Treasurer of the Board. In November 2011 she joined Project Hope’s staff as the Director of Finance. Prior to joining Project Hope’s staff, Carol Ann worked for 20 years at Fidelity Investments. She most recently held the position of Vice President in the operations area at Fidelity. She is highly skilled in the areas of accounting, operations management, project management, new product implementation and business planning.

Carol Ann has an undergraduate degree from Boston College and a MBA from Boston University.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
2010 Social Innovator - Employment and Education Root Cause - Social Innovation Forum 2010

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 5 Year Accreditation 1998

Collaborations

Project Hope has developed numerous relationships with partner agencies.  Our Workforce Development and Employer Partnership (WDEP) program has formal relationships with Partners HealthCare and Tufts Health Plan, which offer tremendous career opportunities to our target population of low-income women and single mothers. Jumpstart, a program linking college students with early childhood education activities, chose our Family Child Care Business Enterprise (FCCBE) program as a site for a project designed to enhance literacy curriculum in family child care programs.  FCCBE also partners with Urban College to offer college-level courses on-site at Project Hope. Courses are free to FCCBE providers, as well as providers from other networks. FCCBE is also part of the Boston Medical Center Vital Village initiative, improving the lives of children through educational programming for parents. Families in our Shelter have access to on-site health care through our collaboration with Boston Health Care for the Homeless. As part of the Boston Promise Initiative, our Housing Services program partners with the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative and Boston Public Schools to support homeless families with children enrolled in three neighborhood schools. Housing Services is also a member of a team headed by the Boston Medical Center Children’s Health Watch to implement a “housing pharmacy” for families who receive care at BMC and are experiencing housing instability.  Lastly, Project Hope partners annually with John Hancock and the Boston Athletic Association to sponsor a Project Hope Boston Marathon Team. 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 44
Number of Part Time Staff 11
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 94%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 11
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 24
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 48
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Maureen Pompeo
Board Chair Company Affiliation Strategic Consulting
Board Chair Term Jan 2006 - Jan 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mary Jo Bane Harvard Kennedy School Voting
Michelle Botus One Family Scholar, Sociology Voting
Richard Burns Chief Executive Officer, NHP Foundation Voting
Cheryl Clark Brigham and Women's Hospital Voting
John Egan Partner, Goodwin Proctor LLP Voting
Donna Haig Friedman Center for Social Policy, U Mass Boston Voting
John Gallagher Loomis, Sayles & Company Voting
Jay Gonzalez CeltiCare Health & New Hampshire Healthy Families Voting
John Markey Partner, Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Voting
Nakira Minot Brigham and Women's Hospital Voting
Adelene Perkins Chief Business Officer, Infinity Pharmaceuticals Voting
Maureen Pompeo Strategic Consulting Voting
Lawanda Riggs One Family Scholar, Accounting Voting
Jeri Robinson Vice President, Early Childhood Division, Boston Children’s Museum Voting
Janine Salyards Duff & Phelps Voting
Robert Shanley Financial Consultant Voting
Robert Spellman Finance Voting
Maureen Walker Wellesley College Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 29
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 71
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 65
Male: 35
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $5,163,987 $4,436,535 $5,629,336
Total Expenses $5,731,418 $4,746,964 $4,893,674

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,422,377 $1,423,539 $1,600,691
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $3,161,771 $2,351,802 $2,506,046
Investment Income, Net of Losses $35,210 $28,825 $30,616
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $260,710 $654,561 $385,526
Revenue In-Kind $148,919 $155,808 $231,979
Other $135,000 $-178,000 $874,478

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $4,454,879 $3,574,355 $3,737,714
Administration Expense $871,452 $773,190 $820,874
Fundraising Expense $405,087 $399,419 $335,086
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.90 0.93 1.15
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 75% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 24% 19% 17%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $6,642,376 $7,258,773 $7,833,624
Current Assets $1,457,641 $1,228,532 $1,698,886
Long-Term Liabilities $50,000 $60,000 $70,000
Current Liabilities $470,949 $453,877 $433,360
Total Net Assets $6,121,427 $6,744,896 $7,330,264

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $168,000.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 3.10 2.71 3.92

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 1% 1% 1%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakout was not available.
 
The data above reflects Project Hope only, and does not include the affiliates, Community Hope and Co-Opportunity, Inc. Per the 2016 audit, Project Hope provided financial management services to Co-Opportunity. During fiscal year 2015, Co-Opportunity transferred the Property to Project Hope, who assumed the related debt. Subsequent to transfer, Co-Opportunity dissolved during fiscal year 2015. 
 
Please note, the Other revenue category above, across all three years posted, includes items such as capital grants, gain (loss) on purchase (sale) of land, forgiveness of debt and unrealized gain on investments. Other for FY15 above includes net gain on unwind of Co-Opportunity Inc.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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