Share |
Organization DBA Mujeres Unidas Avanzando
Women United Advancing
Former Names Mujeres Unidas en Acción (2011)
Women United in Action (2011)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission at Mujeres Unidas Avanzando is to offer an educational program that provides low-income Latina women and their families the educational and social services they need to empower themselves; to become self-sufficient; and to participate more actively in political, social and economic life, not only in the Latino community, but also in society at large. When students first enter our program, they often lack all or most of the following: a diploma; knowledge of English; marketable job skills; health insurance; stable housing; self-esteem; a positive attitude; and most importantly, a place to find education, peer support, empowerment, and healing. MUA works as agents of change, creating opportunities and access to resources through educational programs that generate our advancement as women.

Mission Statement

The mission at Mujeres Unidas Avanzando is to offer an educational program that provides low-income Latina women and their families the educational and social services they need to empower themselves; to become self-sufficient; and to participate more actively in political, social and economic life, not only in the Latino community, but also in society at large. When students first enter our program, they often lack all or most of the following: a diploma; knowledge of English; marketable job skills; health insurance; stable housing; self-esteem; a positive attitude; and most importantly, a place to find education, peer support, empowerment, and healing. MUA works as agents of change, creating opportunities and access to resources through educational programs that generate our advancement as women.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Projected Income $682,834.00
Projected Expense $682,834.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • --

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission at Mujeres Unidas Avanzando is to offer an educational program that provides low-income Latina women and their families the educational and social services they need to empower themselves; to become self-sufficient; and to participate more actively in political, social and economic life, not only in the Latino community, but also in society at large. When students first enter our program, they often lack all or most of the following: a diploma; knowledge of English; marketable job skills; health insurance; stable housing; self-esteem; a positive attitude; and most importantly, a place to find education, peer support, empowerment, and healing. MUA works as agents of change, creating opportunities and access to resources through educational programs that generate our advancement as women.

Background Statement

 

Mujeres Unidas Avanzando (MUA, formerly Mujeres Unidas en Acción), has been meeting the educational needs of low-incomeLatinawomen for 33 years, helping them build skills for full, self-sufficient lives.  MUA’s mission is to provide low-income Latinas the tools needed to empower themselves and effect liberating changes in their lives; those of their families; and society at large.  During the winter of 1979, while teaching residents of low-income housing how to set up insulation material, a group of We-Can volunteers discovered that a great number of Latinas did not know how to speak English.  The majority was low-income, unmarried mothers with little or no education in their native language.  We-Can volunteers gathered in a local church basement to teach English to low-income mothers.  Our program has grown from a handful of students gathering in a basement under the tutelage of volunteers to an 8,900 square foot building serving 493 students and 68 children a year. 

 

     MUA has a track record of encouragingLatinawomen to believe in themselves and to grow into leadership roles within the community.  Building from this foundation, students are then in a position to serve as mentors to their peers and families, and as leaders within the community. 

 

     Since our program’s inception in 1979, we have helped 7,185 women and 1,420 children. To date, roughly 1,470 women have obtained their GEDs; 3,800 women have learned English; 3,900 are working; 730 have enrolled in college; 660 have found housing; and more. 1,280 children have gained readiness for school.

 

Our goal is to help low-income mothers to take the initial steps to move out of poverty and to earn a living wage to support themselves and their families. 

At MUA, the objectives of our program are to help women to:

·       Learn English and increase their civic participation;

·       Obtain their GEDs;

·       Develop technology skills, in preparation to be part of the knowledge economy;

·       Enter employment for the first time or get a better paying job with benefits;

·       Receive the education needed to create a home environment for their children that is conducive to literacy development and to partner in their children’s education;

·       Achieve a higher level of education, including college and vocational training; 

·       Access free or reduced-cost health care and identify their primary care provider;

·       And/or secure stable, safe housing and live free from an abusive spouse or partner.

 


 


Impact Statement

Top accomplishments from the past year:

 1.    MUA launched our weekend Bridge to College program in March of 2011. The curriculum integrates note taking skills, memory and concentration, time management, and test taking strategies.  Instructors supplement classes with study skills enhancement seminars, one-on-one tutoring, and mentoring.   

  

2.     After careful examination of our GED data, MUA noticed that an ongoing trend is the amount of time it takes for GED students to successfully pass the GED math exam, which remains the most difficult exam to pass and which often results in low scores the first time that students take it at theGEDTestingCenter.   MUA’s organizational improvement goal was to integrate a new mathematics class to assist the number of students successfully passing the GED mathematics exam by 25% (last year we had 20 and this year MUA’s target was 25).

      MUA hired an instructor that taught just mathematics five days a week, two hours a day.  In December , we evaluated the overall success of the new mathematics class, including investigating test scores, and discuss what worked and what needs improvement for the upcoming fiscal year.  As a result, 22 students passed the GED in mathematics exam.

 3.  MUA worked with theFairHousingCenterinDorchesterto develop a curriculum for all three levels of ESOL.  We piloted it this past year and will offer it again.   Topics included fair housing laws, discrimination, tenants’ rights, and skits involving a landlord and prospective tenant to develop the skills and strategies to recognize and respond to housing discrimination.  

 

  

Top goals for the current year:

 

 1.  Finishing the capital campaign, to retire all debt for MUA's property;

2.  Diversifying our funding sources to include federal grant money and community partnerships;

3.  Launching a workplace education program in partnership with a local retailer. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Needs Statement

Top 5 most pressing needs:
 
 1.  Volunteers to mentor students and help them in their job searches (interview prep, leads, résumé and cover letter writing);
 
2.  Volunteers to assist in the child care;
 
3.  Volunteers to tutor students in English, computers, and the GED in Spanish;
 
4. Development and funding for a distance learning (pilot program)-The Distance Learning Program will complement an integral part of MUA's mission, to be there 24/7 for the Latinas we serve-days, weekends, and online. The 30-hour Learning for the Future courses will be facilitated by an online instructor and support staff. The Learning for the Future program will offer adults with no or limited English proficiency an opportunity to acquire and learn the English language communications skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in a competency-based format. The curriculum will meet the diverse needs of students, ranging from the English of daily living to the language required for entry into vocational and academic programs.  The budget for this program is $15,000.
 
5.  Development and funding for Workplace ESOL- to plan and develop workplace education activities with local employers to address the needs of MUA's growing and diverse unemployed and underemployed workers. MUA is looking into gathering a consortium of employers to partner for a planning grant, and to then submit an implementation grant. We will draw potential employers from where our students are currently employed, which includes local supermarkets and retail shops. The workplace classes will help students to build their English-language skills, soft skills, and on-the-job skills, which will result in improved revenues and performance, a win-win for all parties. The budget for this program is $75,000.  
 
 

CEO Statement

 

Dear Friends of MUA,

 

     On behalf of the women studying and working at Mujeres Unidas Avanzando, (MUA) I thank you for taking the time to read this profile and learn about MUA.   Despite a slow but steady improvement in the stock and housing markets and a gradual decline in unemployment, MUA has seen the effects of the Recession at the board, staff, and student level...job losses, personal financial crises, bankruptcy, loss of health insurance, increasing dependency upon government benefits, weekly visits to the local food bank....however, at MUA, when facing challenges, we face them head on and look for ways to solve them, not for ways out.

 

     Thankfully, due to sound governance by our board and collective (administrative body) MUA has maintained the  same level of programming as last year.  This is wonderful news, especially as we served a record number of493 students this past fiscal year, the majority of whom were referred from 43 women’s shelters inBostonand its environs, as well as 68 children in our childcare program.

 

     MUA’s students and their children are the driving force behind my ability to do my job well.  Each one comes to us seeking assistance for a distinct reason-be it education, counseling, or other- but they all share one vision:  all have the ability and desire to overcome the difficulties and hardships in their lives.  They seek the tools and resources needed to empower themselves and effect liberating changes in their lives and those of their families.   

 

     The road to success and independence for our women is a long one.  MUA could not serve these women were it not for the support of our staff, our student body, our gracious funders, and those organizations and agencies which donate their time, expertise, and workshops to help MUA fulfill our mission, especially as they face their own economic certainty.  

 

     What we have documented in profile are some of the most tangible evidence of this success.  I sincerely hope it will  provide a sense of the valuable work carried out by our agency, and will make you feel proud to know that your generosity and continuous support has contributed towards a stronger community.

 

     On behalf of the students, staff and board of MUA, we thank you for your sustained commitment to Mujeres Unidas Avanzando.  

         

Sincerely,

 

Felisa White

Executive Director

 

 


 


Board Chair Statement

Mujeres Unidas Avanzando (MUA) is proud to provide low-income Latinas the literacy support in English, native language, and technology that they need to become more productive members of society and obtain their long-term goals of English proficiency, employment, and their high school equivalencies. Our programs, funded by donors such as you, will leverage and extend MUA's reach and impact.  They are designed to help address achievement gaps in the Adult Basic Education (ABE) community by promoting literacy learning.  Reaching out to these adults helps give them a second chance at a bright future.

 

Guillermina Diaz Amaro, Board President


Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
MUA serves virtually all of Boston's neighborhoods, with over half coming from Dorchester.  Other widely represented neighborhoods include Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, South Boston, East Boston, and Roslindale.  

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Adult Education
  2. Human Services - Ethnic/Immigrant Services
  3. Human Services - Child Day Care

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

--

Programs

--

We offer English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes; GED preparation in Spanish; computer classes; health workshops and focus groups; career, individual, and domestic violence counseling; Family Literacy; one-on-one tutoring provided by volunteers; and free, onsite childcare that allows mothers with children ages one to five years to participate in MUA?s program. Classes run from 9:30-1:30 to enable mothers to attend our program. We provide train tokens and monthly bus and subway passes to students in shelters and who live long distances from MUA to defray their transportation costs. All services are free. For FY '06, we served 350 women and 75 children in the childcare.
Budget  --
Category  --
Population Served --
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  Since our program?s inception in 1979, we have helped 5,325 women and 1,045 children. To date, roughly 1,250 women have obtained their GEDs; 3,000 women have learned English; 3,500 are working; 600 have enrolled in college; 500 have found housing; and more. 1,000 children have gained readiness for school.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

     Due to State and foundation budget cuts as a result of the recession, MUA has been forced to put off program expansion, despite a growing need for our services in this economy.  MUA is serving a record 500 families and there are 136 on our waiting list. 

 

     MUA acquired our current location at54 Clayton Streetin August 2007.  The building is 8,900 square feet, including classrooms, the child care, and administrative offices.  The dwelling next door is up for sale, but MUA lacks the funding at present to purchase and repair it.  The additional facilities would provide extra room for parking, the child care, and classrooms to operate workforce development activities.

 

     The fundraising team and board are looking for additional grant funding to realize this goal, which is limited due to the stock market and falling Massachusetts revenues.  

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Felisa A. White
CEO Term Start Jan 1994
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Ms White has been in the field of Adult Education for over 30 years.  She has been a Program Coordinator at Mujeres Unidas en Accion for the last 15 years.  Her background includes a BA in Languages from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, undergraduate courses in ESOL at UMass Boston and Management courses at Newbury College.  She actively represents MUA in the Latino community as well as a member of the steering committee at the Dorchester Adult Literacy Coalition.  Ms. White is bilingual English-Spanish.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
United Way Member Agency 1992
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Boston Career Link (BCL)-for trainings and job search assistance.
The Dorchester Adult Literacy Coalition-a network of 21+ agencies that provides integrated services to adults living in Dorchester.   

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 9
Number of Volunteers 124
Number of Contract Staff 9
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: --
Asian American/Pacific Islander: --
Caucasian: --
Hispanic/Latino: --
Native American/American Indian: --
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: --
Male: --
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration No

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Guillermina Diaz Amaro
Board Chair Company Affiliation Bank of America
Board Chair Term Jan 2005 - Jan 2014
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Guillermina Diaz Amaro Bank of America Voting
Ms. Alma Feliciano ALPFA Voting
Ms. Susan McDonald Bank of America Voting
Ms. Monica Pomare Boston Public Schools Voting
Ms. Jovanny Soto Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 88%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Finance
  • Marketing

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Projected Income $682,834.00
Projected Expense $682,834.00
Form 990s

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

2008 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $676,538 $793,455 $1,005,292
Total Expenses $778,919 $763,701 $828,712

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$296,429 $367,609 $534,087
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal $0 $0 $0
    State $0 $0 $0
    Local $0 $0 $0
    Unspecified $0 $0 $0
Individual Contributions $11,516 $13,656 $9,805
Indirect Public Support $0 $0 $0
Earned Revenue $366,353 $408,843 $453,594
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,240 $3,347 $7,806
Membership Dues $0 $0 $0
Special Events $0 $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind $0 $0 $0
Other $0 $0 $0

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $571,083 $556,766 $560,297
Administration Expense $115,492 $109,736 $182,410
Fundraising Expense $92,344 $97,199 $86,005
Payments to Affiliates $0 $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.87 1.04 1.21
Program Expense/Total Expenses 73% 73% 68%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 30% 25% 16%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets $1,436,206 $1,619,081 $1,590,925
Current Assets $498,558 $671,958 $646,313
Long-Term Liabilities $294,970 $376,737 $394,734
Current Liabilities $49,632 $48,359 $31,960
Total Net Assets $1,091,604 $1,193,985 $1,164,231

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) Department of Elementary and Secondary Education $327,743.00
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education- $326,243.00
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education $349,665.00
2nd (Source and Amount) Amelia Peabody Foundation $54,000.00
Mabel Louise Riley Foundation $100,000.00
Amelia Peabody Foundation $50,000.00
3rd (Source and Amount) English for New Bostonians $29,000.00
Amelia Peabody Foundation $55,000.00
United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack County $47,435.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose To raise all funding pertaining to the development of 54 Clayton Street, including the purchase of the property and repairs
Campaign Goal $1,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates June 2006 - June 2014
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $647,500.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 10.05 13.90 20.22

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 21% 23% 25%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

This nonprofit's financial summary data in charts and graphs is based on audited financials.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--