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Operation ABLE of Greater Boston, Inc.

 174 Portland Street
 Boston, MA 02114
[P] (617) 5424180
[F] (617) 5424187
www.operationable.net
[email protected]
Mark Gyurina
INCORPORATED: 1982
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2761871

LAST UPDATED: 03/18/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Operation A.B.L.E. of Greater Boston, Inc., a 501(c)3 organization, is to provide employment and training opportunities to mature workers 45 and older from economically, racially and occupationally diverse backgrounds. A.B.L.E. is equally committed to service Massachusetts employers by providing well-qualified candidates to meet their employment needs and by training employees so they can be as productive as possible at their jobs. Our goal for all ABLE clients is job placement resulting in economic self-sufficiency.

Mission Statement

The mission of Operation A.B.L.E. of Greater Boston, Inc., a 501(c)3 organization, is to provide employment and training opportunities to mature workers 45 and older from economically, racially and occupationally diverse backgrounds. A.B.L.E. is equally committed to service Massachusetts employers by providing well-qualified candidates to meet their employment needs and by training employees so they can be as productive as possible at their jobs. Our goal for all ABLE clients is job placement resulting in economic self-sufficiency.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $2,003,558.00
Projected Expense $2,000,602.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • ABLE Beginnings
  • ABLE Skills2Work
  • AgeWorks
  • Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP)
  • Supports for the Mature Worker

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Operation A.B.L.E. of Greater Boston, Inc., a 501(c)3 organization, is to provide employment and training opportunities to mature workers 45 and older from economically, racially and occupationally diverse backgrounds. A.B.L.E. is equally committed to service Massachusetts employers by providing well-qualified candidates to meet their employment needs and by training employees so they can be as productive as possible at their jobs. Our goal for all ABLE clients is job placement resulting in economic self-sufficiency.

Background Statement

Founded in 1982 as Careers for Later Years by Ezra Merrill, former president of H.P. Hood, Operation A.B.L.E. was originally dedicated to providing technical assistance to area non-profits. Mr. Merrill recruited retired senior officers from companies throughout Greater Boston to staff the organization. Several years later, during the economic downturn of the mid-1980s, Mr. Merrill reconsidered the organization's mission. The downturn, which had an unusually large effect on mature workers who found it difficult to re-enter the job market after losing their jobs, led Mr. Merrill to set up two separate organizations.

 

The Careers for Later Years component became the Executive Service Corps. Operation A.B.L.E. of Greater Boston was designed to serve as an employment and training resource for an economically, occupationally and racially diverse population of older job seekers and continues to this day as the leading provider of workforce development services to the mature worker

The following are A.B.L.E.'s major programs: (The agency serves individuals of all ages, but most participants in the following programs are unemployed and economically disadvantaged mature workers over the age of 45)
  • Skills2Work – an 18-week, full-time, computer and office skills training program for low-income mature workers.
  • SCSEP – provides on-the-job training at community-based non-profit or government agencies for low income job seekers 55 and older.
  • Medical Office Skills  – an 18 - week training program which prepares individuals for a range of opportunities in administrative jobs in Boston's healthcare industry
  • ABLE AgeWorks – placing individuals over the age of 55 into tailored volunteer positions.
  • ABLE Beginnings – a six-week basic computer class with a focus on preparing unemployed individuals for the modern, computer-based job search. 

Impact Statement

  • Since its founding in 1982, ABLE has helped almost 32,000 older workers gain sustainable employment. In FY 2014 94 clients graduated from our training programs and 170 seniors participated in the Department of Labor's Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). Last fiscal year, in the midst of a challenging job market, especially for mature workers, we were able to place 120 ABLE graduates into jobs. 

     

    The following are some of our accomplishments from the past year:  

    • Got 120 job seekers 45+ back to work.

     

    • Doubled the number of job seekers served at Operation A.B.L.E. this year! 

     

    • Remembered our Honorary Chairman and one of the original incorporators of Operation A.B.L.E., Caleb Loring, Jr., who recently died.

     

    • Awarded a coveted Highland Street Foundation grant for the outstanding service we provide to the community.

     

    • Launched a new Medical Office Training program this year to help get 45+ job seekers into the healthcare field.

     

    • Partnered with AARP and the SBA to offer an all-day conference on How to Start Your Own Business.  

     

    • Hosted two Job Fairs for Job Seekers 45+. Over 400 job seekers and 20 companies participated.

      

    • Added three new A.B.L.E. Board members.

     

    • Revamped our website and marketing materials.

     

    • Provided tax preparation service to low-income Boston residents.  The total amount refunded to taxpayers was $35,706. The average refund was $1,020. 

     

    • Provided two cycles of healthy eating and shopping tips to low-income residents once a week for five weeks.

    Our goals for the current year:

    • Secure the funding to support the hiring of an Database Administrator and a Director of Development;

    • Build capacity to continue the process of establishing the ABLE Career Center for Mature Workers

    • Build our fee-for-service division by engaging employers in contracting with ABLE to provide training to their incumbent workforce

    • Establish a more flexible menu of services to meet the diverse workforce development needs of our target population. 

     

     


Needs Statement

The agency's top five most pressing needs are the following:
  1. To develop the capacity to provide our clients, and all unemployed mature workers, with the individual and family supports they may need to: fully participate in and complete skills training and employment programs;  conduct a successful job search; and secure and retain meaningful employment. 
  2. A Director of Development to establish an agency fundraising plan with an emphasis on increasing the amount of support from individual donors.
  3. A more diverse funding stream.  The agency is too dependent on public dollars and needs to access a greater percentage of funding support from private sources, especially corporations and individual donors. 
  4. The capacity to provide all of the employment and training services needed by the mature worker to get back to work.  Our services are currently limited to those we receive public funding for.  We can only serve those who are eligible and the numbers to be served will be limited by available funding.
  5. The urgent need to enhance our marketing efforts and expand our public presence.  Specifically we need to update our website and improve the agency's social media presence.       

 


CEO Statement

The number of people aged 45 and over in America has been increasing and will continue to grow as life expectancy continues to increase and the baby-boom generation ages. This is even more evident in MA, as the state has a larger proportion of older residents than the rest of the country.

Labor force participation rates among older Americans have also been growing and are expected to increase in the upcoming years. Combine this with the fact that in the next twenty years, the MA population of people who are in the traditional working years (25 to 54) will decline substantially. As a result, all of the expected future growth in theMassachusettslabor force will occur among workers aged 55 and over. These individuals want and need to work, but will require skills upgrading along with intensive supports and assistance in finding and keeping a job. 

These trends in regional labor market demographics are currently being overshadowed by the current recession. Like all workers, those over 45 are feeling the effects of the depressed job market. They take much longer to find a job after a layoff - according to recent AARP report, older workers are out of work for more than 44 weeks, compared to 33 weeks for younger workers. We also know that the likelihood of finding a job falls drastically the longer a person has been unemployed.

These are indeed challenging times but ABLE has been meeting the workforce development needs of the mature worker for over thirty years and we look forward to continuing our mission of helping to ensure economic self-sufficieny for all ABLE clients, even during these uncertain times. 

Board Chair Statement

Operation A.B.L.E. is currently at a very interesting time in its existence. The current recession is changing how we deliver workforce development services to the target population. Our traditional method of delivery – longer-term skills training programs, will become less important as public funding sources are drying up and potential participants, who are dealing with unprecedented financial pressures, need to quickly get back to work and support themselves and their families. To complicate matters, the current recession is also masking the real issue – the aging of the state’s population and how that will affect the labor market. Between 2010 and 2030, 100 percent of the growth in theMassachusettslabor force will come from workers who are 55 years of age or older. If the state is to have enough workers to maintain its economic edge, it is crucial that we take steps to strengthen the labor force attachment of older workers.

As the economy improves, we know that there will be significant demand for workforce development services from both mature job seekers and from employers. If ABLE is to maintain its presence as the leading provider of workforce development services to the mature worker, we need to develop a strategy of both meeting the current employment and retraining needs of our target population and also start developing the programs and services that will help both job seekers and employers thrive in the upcoming years.

The ABLE Board is poised and ready to help the agency meet the challenges of the next few years.  We have recently completed a new strategic planning process and we are actively measuring the effectiveness of current programs and exploring new program possibilities.  Recognizing the fact that partnerships with employers, educational institutions and other human service providers will play a major role in the agency's effectiveness in serving the mature worker, we are looking at the community and our networks to broker these relationships and help develop a thriving network of organizations committed to ensuring the success of the mature worker in the region's economy.   

 


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Operation A.B.L.E. serves residents of Eastern MA with a focus on those living in the Greater Boston area, especially those towns and cities accessible to Downtown Boston via public transportation.   

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Job Training
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

ABLE Beginnings

ABLE Beginnings
Designed for job seekers with limited computer knowledge, ABLE Beginnings is a six-week, classroom-based program providing job seekers with the basic skills needed to conduct an effective job search. It gives job seekers the technology skills and self-confidence needed to compete aggressively in today’s job market.

 

Program Description

  • Basic skills instruction in navigating the internet, using email, keyboarding, MS Word, Excel, data entry, interviewing, and mastery of on-line applications
  • Intro to social media for job hunting 
  • Job search support; resume and cover letter writing
  • Six-week course, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Budget  $31,800.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success  Short term success is determined by the number who demonstrate computer skills acquisition, the number of students who attend every day, the number who are able to compose serviceable resumes and cover letters, the number who are able to complete an online application, and the number who either go on to other training or who secure employment. 
Program Long-Term Success  The long-term success of this program will be determined by the number of graduates who use their new computer knowledge to eventually gain employment or enter a "next step" skills training program.  The program is not job-focused (does not provide job development and placement services) but does provide students with the tools to apply for jobs via technology - e.g. online applications, email and through the Internet. 
Program Success Monitored By  Through ongoing testing and assessment of student computer skills, we are able to determine whether students are acquiring the necessary skills and able to progress to the next topic.  We also can measure success by attendance rates, class interactions and interviews, program/staff evaluations, and post-graduation communication with participants.
Examples of Program Success 
Carmen A. is a 55 year-old who is taking care of her elderly parents.  She has years of experience in the entertainment field, but due to the current economy, she was finding it very difficult making ends meet.  With her outgoing manner and excellent customer servicee skills, she wanted to work as a receptionist but she lacked computer skills.
 
Her computer skills were too low for our Skills2Work program, so she enrolled in our Beginnings Program.  She was then accepted into our Skills2Work program where she flourished.  After a successful internship, she is now looking for a receptionist job, which she should find soon.  By the way, her singing talents are such that we invited her to sing at our graduation ceremony.     

ABLE Skills2Work

ABLE Skills2Work
ABLE Skills2Work provides 12 weeks of classroom-based, instructor-led training in Microsoft Office and Windows. Classroom training, which includes extensive job search support and emphasis on job hunting in the Internet age, is followed by a six-week internship with a local employer.

 Program Description

  • In-depth instruction in the MS Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, 2003 & 2010 and Outlook 2010), QuickBooks, and Medical Terminology
  • Emphasis on building strong communications and customer relations skills
  • One (or more) screening interviews for open positions with area employers
  • Twelve weeks of classes, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
  • Six-week internship to apply newly acquired skills in a work setting

 

Budget  $230,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 
Short-term program success is determined by the extent to which students: achieve expected program competencies in both the technical skills curriculum and the job search component; attend all scheduled classes; complete the program; parcipate fully in the program internship; conduct an active and complete job search; secure job interviews; secure and retain training-related employment.
Program Long-Term Success 

The goal of this and all ABLE skills training programs is economic self-sufficiency for the participant and his/her family.  With the skills gained in this program, the graduate will be able to secure a good job, retain and grow in that job, and achieve future wage gains, job promotions and career growth.  

Program Success Monitored By  In measuring program progress, we look at three factors:

Performance -- measured by the number of students enrolling and the overall percent of students completing the program, finding employment, retaining in the job and attaining a job upgrade or wage increase.

  • Employer involvement -- Our success in partnering with local employers and to ensure the hiring of our graduates. 
  • Funding/Stability -- The extent to which we are able to secure the funding necessary to continue to offer the program.

In measuring student progress, we look at various measures including attainment of program competencies, commitment and motivation based on attendance and classroom participation, graduation/completion rate, the number of graduates being placed into good, training-related employment and the percent of those workers both retaining employment and moving on to better jobs and possible career growth. We expect a 90% completion rate, an 80% job placement rate and an 85% job retention rate.

Examples of Program Success  Less than a year following a layoff from a family owed bakery, Joan A enrolled in A.B.L.E.’s Skills2Worktraining program, determined to strengthen her computer and communication skills so she could re-enter the workforce with confidence. With her newly acquired computer and office skills, combined with her strong customer service skills, Joan pursued her long-held goal of landing a job in the hospitality industry as an event planner. But an unfulfilling six-week internship doing just that made Joan realize that event planning was not the career she wanted. So with a stellar evaluation and reference from the internship, Joan focused her efforts on the hospitality and food service industry. Eventually, thanks to her unwavering persistence and confidence along with her improved job search skills, she found just what she was looking for: a job at Harvard University as a Lead Dining Services/Pantry Steward.

AgeWorks

Age Works - ABLE's Volunteer and Midternship Placement Program
This strategic volunteering initiative places volunteers in non-paid professional community service positions in the Greater Boston area.  

Made possible by a grant from the Tufts Health Plan Foundation and The Clowes Fund, AgeWorks is designed to provide meaningful volunteer placements that will enhance the personal and professional lifestyle of the participants and provide valuable volunteer services to non-profit agencies.

Budget  $46,300.00
Category  Philanthropy, Voluntarism & Grantmaking, General/Other Volunteer Training & Placement
Population Served Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
Short-term success in this program is demonstrated by participants' improved feeling of self-worth and vitality through the volunteer experience.  There is also the benefit received by the host agency as they are able to utilize the skills and contributions provided by the volunteer - especially in this time of tighter budgets and smaller staffs - and trying to deal with increasing demand from the community. 
Program Long-Term Success 
The goal of the program is that all participants, through volunteering with local non-profits, will feel better about themselves, demonstrate a greater satisfaction with their lives and develop an appreciation for the work being done by local non-profit and human service agencies.  
 
Some participants will also use the volunteer experience as a "springboard" to paid employment by gaining new skills, improving their current skills, building thier networks, and improving their self-confidence.   
Program Success Monitored By 
We conduct program evaluations through surveys and communications with participants and host agencies.  We are in constant contact with both parties to ensure a meaningful and beneficial match between volunteer and agency/project.
Examples of Program Success 
Last year, we exceeded our placement goal by matching 46 volunteers with positions with local non-profits.  Placements covered a wide range of skill levels and interests from a rolling librarian in a hospital to an architect working with a neighborhood community development organization. 
 
What makes the program successful is that we make a concerted effort to ensure that the placement matches the needs and interests of the volunteer and those of the host agency.  And we provide the follow-up and support services to ensure an ongoing successful match. 

Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP)

Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP)

The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), funded by the U.S. Department of Labor, provides a stipend to eligible low-income individuals age 55 and older as they learn new skills and gain work experience leading to meaningful employment.

Program Description

·        Train on-the-job, 20 hours per week, in a local non-profit or government agency

·        Receive a $9.00 per hour stipend

·        Develop skills to transition to unsubsidized employment

·        Receive ongoing job search assistance 

Budget  $974,933.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term program success is determined by the extent to which participants:  participate fully in the program's on-the-job training component; attain the goals as detailed in their training plan; attend all scheduled classes; demonstrate motivation and interest in securing unsubsidized employment; conduct an active and complete job search; secure job interviews; and secure and retain training-related employment.
Program Long-Term Success  The goal of this and all ABLE skills training programs is economic self-sufficiency for the participant and his/her family.  With the skills gained in this program, the graduate will be able to secure a good job, retain and grow in that job, and achieve future wage gains, job promotions and career growth.  
Program Success Monitored By  In measuring program progress, we look at three factors:
  • Performance -- measured by the number of students enrolling and the overall percent of students fulfiling their responsibilities with their host agencies as detailed in their employment/training plan; finding employment, retaining in the job and attaining a job upgrade or wage increase.
  • Employer involvement -- Our success in partnering with local employers and to ensure the hiring of our graduates. 
  • Funding/Stability -- The extent to which we are able to secure the funding necessary to continue to offer the program.

In measuring student progress, we look at various measures including attainment of program competencies, graduation/completion rate, the number of graduates being placed into good, training-related employment and the percent of those workers both retaining employment and moving on to better jobs and possible career growth. We expect a 85% completion rate, a 45% job placement rate and an 80% job retention rate.

Examples of Program Success 
Last year the SCSEP program exceeded its enrollment goal -  demostrating the attraction of the program and the increasing need for those over 55 to secure assistance in returning to the workplace. 
 
We served 170 individuals vs. a goal of 166 and also exceeded our expected placement rate.  The program continues to be successful as we are already over our enrollment goal for the year -- this in spite of receiving fewer funds form the federal government to run the program this year.   

Supports for the Mature Worker

The ABLE Mature Worker Career Center will serve the needs of unemployed and underemployed individuals over the age of 45 by combining accessible skills training and employment services with the support services mature workers need to reenter the workforce. Recognizing the fact that it is very difficult to conduct, and commit to, a successful job search when personal and family issues stand in the way, Center staff will provide a range of support services designed to eliminate the personal/family issues that can interfere with success in securing employment. Scheduled activities will include: (1) case management, referral, counseling and support services; (2) workshops providing information (financial planning, dependent care resources, access to government benefits, housing referral etc.) or focusing on enrichment and self-improvement (team-building, time management, self-esteem building, nutrition, exercise etc.); and (3) a forum for networking and peer support activities.
Budget  110,000
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 

Relieving some of the stress and anxiety brought upon by personal/family issues and financial insecurity will help ABLE participants better concentrate on their training and job search. Ultimately, they will be better prepared (and in a stronger emotional state) to interview for and secure employment.

The following are the major outcomes that have been established for the project. These are outcomes that we expect to achieve due to the provision of the added client support and case management services.

* A minimum of 70 participants will be enrolled in the Skills2Work program during the twelve-month grant cycle.
* A minimum of 90% of participants will complete the program.
* A minimum of 70% of program participants will be placed into training-related employment.
* A minimum of 85% of placed graduates will be working six months after placement
* A minimum of 80% of those retained will see a job upgrade or promotion one year after placement.
Program Long-Term Success  As mentioned below, as a result of these services we should see an improvement in the participant completion, job placement/retention rate and greater prospects for growth and promotion on the job.Long-term, we would expect more clients to achieve individual and family self-sufficiency. This proposed project will be a major component of the ABLE "Mature Worker Career Center". As we develop the ability to provide the personal and family supports our current clients need to complete training, conduct a comprehensive job search and achieve success on the job, we can then build on this capacity and provide these supports to all of Boston's unemployed mature workers. Major funders, such as the Boston Foundation and Highland Street, are supporting implementation of the Center. With their ongoing support along with the investment of other funders, we will be well on our way of establishing a comprehensive, “one stop” service center for the mature worker.
Program Success Monitored By  As a result of this program, we will see an increase in the number of mature workers receiving social services, case management and counseling assistance and personal/family supports. This will be measured through recording: the number of clients scheduling appointments for support services; the attendance at workshops and group information sessions; the number of client referrals to outside agencies for services; and the number of participants who acknowledge success in overcoming (or dealing with) barriers to job search participation and/or employment. A process evaluation is also conducted in all agency programs and includes the following evaluation tools: project documentation; interviews and surveys with referral agencies; client satisfaction survey responses; client focus groups; and interviews with staff. We also communicate with hiring employers to ensure that the skills taught in ABLE training programs are those most needed by area businesses.
Examples of Program Success 

The key to ABLE’s success is that we help our clients throughout the entire process. At each step of the way, we provide support and encouragement to people facing the uncertainty and fear of prolonged unemployment. With this program, we will be able to provide more intensive and varied services as well as developing the capacity to serve a greater number of participants.

The provision of case management and client support services make a difference! Phillip H enrolled in the Skills2Work program to upgrade his computer skills.He is in his early 60s, unemployed, had very little money and was in danger of losing his housing. To supplement his income, he was referred to SNAP and Social Security. For housing assistance, he was directed to Cambridge Legal Services and MBHP. Finally he was referred to “Dress for Success” where he received a new set of interview clothes. As a result of these supports and assistance, Phillip secured a job as a security guard making over $18 per hour.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Current ABLE services are very successful but focus only on skills training and employment services – and these are restricted to those who are eligible and fortunate enough to secure limited (and diminishing) resources. The agency does not have the capacity or the funding to provide job seekers with many of the services they need to get back to work – we are forced to turn them away or refer them to the overburdened One Stop Career Center system. Mature job seekers need a wider range of services – some longer term, such as skills training, career counseling and job development, and some of a shorter-term, one-time nature such as resume development, interview practice, job search workshops and skills assessment.  Most importantly, our experience shows that the mature job seeker needs intensive, individually-tailored services combined with one-on-one support and personal encouragement.  
 
Our goal is to provide these services (and more) through our proposed Mature Worker Career Center.  Through the Center, mature workers will receive all the necessary workforce development services plus the support and counseling services the unemployed worker needs to focus on, and succeed with his/her job search. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Joan G Cirillo
CEO Term Start Sept 2000
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Joan Cirillo, President/CEO of Operation A.B.L.E. of Greater Boston, Inc. has overall responsibility for managing the agency. Ms. Cirillo has Masters degrees in both Education and Business Administration. Prior to assuming the leadership of the agency, she successfully ran training departments for 10 years at John Hancock Financial Services and Bank of Boston. She has been involved in workforce development issues for almost twenty years. She served as Director of Employment & Training Services at Operation A.B.L.E. for six years before becoming Executive Director 14 years ago. She sits on three local Workforce Investment Boards and the Statewide Workforce Investment Board where she serves on the Executive Committee as well. 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Mark Gyurina Director of Training Services Mark Gyurina, Director of Training Services, joined Operation A.B.L.E. in March of 2008 and brings over 20 years of experience in helping to meet the workforce development needs of Boston-area residents. He has designed and implemented a number of initiatives and programs designed to meet the employment, training, and education needs of a wide range of individuals including welfare recipients, dislocated workers, older workers, individuals with disabilities, incumbent workers and young adults. He also has many years of experience writing successful grant proposals in both the public and private funding sectors. 
Mr. Richard Ludwig Chief Financial Officer --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Champions in Action Citizens Bank 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

A.B.L.E. has Memoranda of Agreements (MOAs) with 10 local Workforce Investment Boards and 12 One-Stop Career Centers in MA. We depend on the Centers for referrals to our programs, job search workshops, additional counseling, access to job listings, and participation in job fairs. 

A.B.L.E. also has MOAs with over 200 non-profit agencies which provide supervision, on-the-job training, and internships to clients in our SCSEP program. We also utilize these partners for clients who need assistance in areas including housing, transportation, dependent care, fuel assistance, medical care, clothing and food, and access to government benefits. 

Our most important partnership is that with employers. There is a positive correlation between strong placement performance and the extent of employer involvement in the program. In addition to assisting us in developing a curriculum that incorporates the skills required by employers, they serve on our Employer Advisory Committee and get to know our students as they visit the class and conduct workshops on topics such as "Interviewing" and  "Workplace Communications". They also host company tours, provide job shadowing opportunities and internships, lead practice interview sessions, and provide instructional materials to the program.

 

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

ABLE is fortunate to have skilled, professional staff who distinguish themselves by their commitment to the agency and to their clients.  There is very little turnover - most staff have been here for at least five years - and we go throgh extraordinatry efforts to retain these excellent employees. 
 
Our goal is to build our capacity by adding a Director of Development and an Informational Technology Director.  There is great need for both positions.  Current funding limitations make it difficult to hire for these positions, but we are actively engaged in identifying and securing the funding to make this happen. 

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 54
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 12
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 10
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration No

Risk Management Provisions

Disability Insurance
Accident and Injury Coverage
Blanket Personal Property
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Computer Equipment and Software
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
Fiduciary Liability
General Property Coverage
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Professional Liability
Renter's Insurance
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms Ann Anderson
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term Sept 2010 - Sept 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Ann Anderson Retired Voting
Ms. Linda Austin The PFE Group Voting
Ms. Sheila Buckley Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA Voting
Ms. Sandra Casey Buford Ph.D. Color Media Group, LLC Voting
Mr. Richard Curtis State Street Corporation Voting
Mr. Robert DiGiovanni Eastern Bank Voting
Ms. Lydia Greene Tufts Health Plan Voting
Mr. Carmine Guarino Citizens Bank Voting
Ms. Maura McLaughlin Esq. Morgan, Brown & Joy Voting
Ms. Ruth Ann Moriarty Retired Voting
Ms. Janet Prensky Aigner/Prensky Marketing Group Voting
Ms. Bridget Stewart Joslin Diabetes Center Voting
Mr. Steve Taranto Mass General Hospital Voting
Mr. D. Richard Tufenkjian Retired Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jay Babbitt InterContinental Hotel NonVoting
Ms. Megan Bradley Mass General Hospital NonVoting
Ms. Laura Brathwaite-Isaac Pearson Higher Education NonVoting
Mr. William Cain Harvard University NonVoting
Mr. Marc Cirino ACE Employment Services NonVoting
Ms. Jocelyn Dagami Sovereign/Santander Bank NonVoting
Ms. Jody Demty John Hancock Financial Services NonVoting
Ms. Susan Fontana Manpower NonVoting
Ms. Jeanine Hamilton Hire Partnership NonVoting
Mr. Thomas Hickey Raytheon BBN Technologies NonVoting
Mr. Ryan Higginson Suffolk University NonVoting
Mr. Eric Hynes The Skill Bureau NonVoting
Mr. Rick LaFerriere CVS Caremark NonVoting
Mr. George MacKinnon Boston Medical Center NonVoting
Ms. Sheanah McCarthy BNY Mellon NonVoting
Ms. Mary Milley Tufts Health Plan NonVoting
Mr. Robert Molla Unitarian Universalist Association NonVoting
Ms. Sheryl Monteiro Fiduciary Trust Company NonVoting
Ms. Kristen Morreale MIT NonVoting
Ms. Dana Moss Marshalls NonVoting
Ms. Emily Nuse Millenium Partners Sport Management NonVoting
Ms. Meg O'Hara MA One Stop Career Center NonVoting
Ms. Megan Raye Next Step Living NonVoting
Ms. Cheryl Saunders Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates NonVoting
Ms. Stephanie Scenna Northeastern University NonVoting
Ms. Carol Spellman Lahey Clinic NonVoting
Ms. Erin Stewart Eastern Bank NonVoting
Ms. Maryann VaRence Hyatt Regency Boston NonVoting
Mr. Peter Villandry Northeast Security NonVoting
Ms. Cheryl Whitfield Northeastern University NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 9
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 10
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Investment
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Operation ABLE is fortunate to have a very committed and engaged Board of Directors.  Many have been with the agency for many years and bring to the organization a real sense of history and understanding of the challenges facing the mature worker. 
 
We are looking, however, for a more diverse Board, both in age and racial makeup.  We have been successful this year in bringing some younger Board members and we are actively engaged in outreach and recruitment activities to attract members of Boston's minority community.   

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $2,003,558.00
Projected Expense $2,000,602.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $2,097,223 $2,048,967 $2,271,795
Total Expenses $2,105,082 $2,208,105 $2,268,578

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$418,564 $357,177 $316,999
Government Contributions $1,381,128 $1,414,299 $1,482,074
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,381,128 $1,414,299 $1,482,074
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $50,675 $50,734 $10,212
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $82,336 $72,488 $291,475
Revenue In-Kind $164,520 $154,269 $171,035
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $1,734,073 $1,801,885 $1,719,580
Administration Expense $256,951 $247,597 $353,499
Fundraising Expense $114,058 $158,623 $195,499
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 0.93 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 82% 82% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 9% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $679,078 $735,787 $872,065
Current Assets $639,374 $663,246 $779,966
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $128,912 $177,762 $154,902
Total Net Assets $550,166 $558,025 $717,163

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.96 3.73 5.04

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We are pleased to report that the agency reported just a slight deficit of about $8,000 for the most recent fiscal year.  The annual audit of the agency's financial statements also reported, as it does each year, an unqualified opinion that there are no material weaknesses or significant deficiencies.  This was also the case with the agency's compliance in accordance with OMB Circular A-133. 
 
The financial status of the agency is reported to the Board at each of its bi-monthly meeting.  A financial "scorecard" is also prepared to make these reports easy to understand for those Board members lacking a financial background. 
 
Even though we did increase the percentage of private financial support for the agency during the past year, we do feel that we are still too dependent on public funding.  We are looking for a more diverse funding stream with a goal of increasing the amount of support coming in from individuals.   

Foundation Comments

990Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.  

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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