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Melrose Alliance Against Violence

 235 West Foster Street
 Melrose, MA 02176
[P] (781) 662-2010
[F] (781) 662-2009
http://www.maav.org
[email protected]
Rebecca Mooney
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1997
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3293694

LAST UPDATED: 12/22/2016
Organization DBA MAAV
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

MAAV is a community-based organization that focuses on outreach, education, and community collaboration in order to raise awareness of the problems of bullying, teen dating and domestic violence. MAAV promotes programs that work to reduce violence and encourage healthy relationships in the schools and the community.

Mission Statement

MAAV is a community-based organization that focuses on outreach, education, and community collaboration in order to raise awareness of the problems of bullying, teen dating and domestic violence. MAAV promotes programs that work to reduce violence and encourage healthy relationships in the schools and the community.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $162,650.00
Projected Expense $153,020.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Healthy Relationships Program
  • Melrose CARES Community Mentoring Program
  • Student Action Board (SAB)
  • Support Group for Victims & Survivors of Domestic Violence

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

MAAV is a community-based organization that focuses on outreach, education, and community collaboration in order to raise awareness of the problems of bullying, teen dating and domestic violence. MAAV promotes programs that work to reduce violence and encourage healthy relationships in the schools and the community.


Background Statement

The Melrose Alliance Against Violence was formed in 1995 in response to a study by the Melrose League of Women Voters which revealed an urgent need for battered women’s services in the City of Melrose. MAAV was formed with a governing board of representatives from the police, schools, clergy, hospital, League of Women Voters and a battered women’s organization.

A federal grant through the Department of Justice partially funded a Domestic Violence Officer for the Melrose Police Department, and a Program Coordinator to staff MAAV’s office, arranging educational programs for the community and training programs for the police, clergy and healthcare professionals.

In the ensuing years, MAAV expanded and evolved in order to address the underlying causes of domestic violence as well as helping victims connect with the resources they need. In 1998 MAAV began working closely with the Melrose Public Schools to implement prevention programs at the middle and high school levels. The Healthy Relationships Program, a comprehensive teen dating violence prevention program, was instituted at the 8th grade level. In 2000, MAAV developed a Student Action Board that works with MAAV staff to plan and implement violence prevention programs in the schools.

In 2003, MAAV was awarded a federal grant for youth violence prevention, addressing the issues of teen dating violence, bullying and mentoring at the middle school level. Titled the “Melrose CARES Project,” this grant enabled MAAV to hire three part-time staff members in addition to the Executive Director. This was the foundation of what would become the Melrose CARES Community Mentoring Program, which pairs volunteer adults with 7th grade students for a year.

In 2010, MAAV began offering bullying prevention training for students, staff and parents across the state in response to the need and the Massachusetts anti-bullying law. In 2012, the Melrose Public Schools in partnership with MAAV was awarded a 3-year federal grant titled Safe S.T.E.P.S. for Teens (Services, Training, Education and Policies to Reduce Teen Dating Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking). This grant program was offered through the Office on Violence Against Women under the US Department of Justice. Melrose was one of only nine school districts across the country and the only district in New England to be awarded this grant.


Impact Statement

Over the past year, MAAV celebrated twenty years of working in the community with our 20th Anniversary Walk & Candlelight Vigil. Every year, MAAV marks domestic violence awareness month with a Walk Against Violence and a Candlelight Vigil honoring the victims of domestic violence homicide. Our 20th Anniversary Walk was our biggest event to date, drawing more than 750 attendees from Melrose and surrounding communities. The five women who founded MAAV were honored at the event, where we also showed a retrospective video of all of MAAV’s work.

Additional highlights from the past year include a youth leadership summit that we held in February, to mark Teen Dating Violence Prevention Month. Called #BeTheChange, this summit was attended by more than 175 high school students from Melrose and surrounding towns. Student leaders from Melrose High School, who have been working closely with MAAV throughout their time in high school, helped plan and lead the Summit in conjunction with MAAV staff.

Another highlight of the past year was MAAV’s ongoing work with student leaders at Melrose High School. Three of our student leaders were chosen to participate in a series of videos created by the Middlesex District Attorney’s Office, called “Teen Dating A To Generation Z: A Guide To Going Out, Breaking Up And Everything In Between.” These videos were created as a resource for all high school students and staff to use in their own teen dating violence prevention programs.

MAAV’s primary goals are to continue offering outreach and support services for victims of domestic violence, and to continue offering healthy relationship and teen dating abuse prevention programs at Melrose’s Middle and High Schools. This includes a Healthy Relationships program offered to all 8th grade students, as well as MAAV’s Student Action Board, a peer leadership program for students in grades 10 – 12. It also includes a Students Against Violence Club, open to all high school students.


Needs Statement

1. To continue funding community awareness and outreach activities focused on the issues of bullying, teen dating and domestic violence, and funding for our weekly support group for victims and survivors of domestic violence.

2. To work with our local middle school to offer bullying prevention education to 6th, 7th and 8th grade students and staff.
 
3. To continue funding a three-session Healthy Relationships program offered to all 8th grade students, teaching them to identify early warning signs of abuse, define healthy relationships, and learn about resources for help.
 
4. To fund MAAV’s Student Action Board, a peer leadership program where a select group of MHS students are chosen to work closely with MAAV to plan and implement teen dating violence prevention programs, awareness events and campaigns in their school and community throughout the year, and the Students Against Violence Club, a club open to all students dedicated to raising awareness and promoting healthy teen relationships.
 
5. To continue funding MAAV’s Melrose CARES Community Mentoring Program for middle school students at risk. This program pairs adult volunteers with 7th grade students for one year.

CEO Statement

MAAV is a small organization that is able to accomplish a tremendous amount by leveraging our established partnerships in the community. We believe that the solution to ending relationship violence lies in a multi-level, sustained, community-wide approach. After 20 years, MAAV has established a strong reputation as a leader in innovative programming and community collaboration both within and beyond Melrose.

Our prevention programs in the schools are designed to cultivate leadership among youth and stop teen dating violence before it starts. The Healthy Relationships Program teaches 8th graders the early warning signs of abuse and how to access help for oneself or a friend in trouble. Our Student Action Board of 19 peer leaders at Melrose High School is trained on issues of teen dating abuse and sexual assault, and then educates their peers through assemblies and classroom presentations. We offer trainings on healthy teen relationships to parents, staff and coaches. As a way to extend our reach, last February we hosted a Youth Leadership Summit on Healthy Relationships with 175 students from 10 area middle and high schools. We were honored to be invited to speak at the White House in February of 2013 as part of Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, sharing our expertise with others across the country.

Additionally, MAAV has helped the surrounding communities of Stoneham and Wakefield launch similar organizations, SAAV and WAAV. Although we have grown, the heart of our mission remains the same. MAAV is committed to breaking the cycle of domestic violence through raising awareness in the community, educating and supporting young people, and linking victims to the resources they need in order to live free from violence.


Board Chair Statement

I joined MAAV when my three daughters were young. I realized that having children makes you look at the world differently – specifically, at how children and adults treat each other. By the time kids are school age, they’re experiencing bullying, or being made fun of because of the way they look, or being left out. By the time middle school starts, the pressure intensifies, as kids are targeted because of their beliefs, their sexual orientation, or the color of their hair.

I saw that there were kids who spoke up and kids who said nothing. I wanted my daughters to be able to find their voice – not if, but when these kinds of situations arose. MAAV helps them – and all kids and adults – do that. I loved that MAAV is a community-based organization that focuses on outreach, education and community collaboration in order to raise awareness of the problems of bullying, teen dating abuse and domestic violence. MAAV offers resources to those in need and provides educational programming that informs and empowers educators, students, and community members who want to end bullying, teen dating abuse and domestic violence. This is why I wanted to be a part of this organization and these are the messages I wanted my girls to hear and learn how to be comfortable encouraging others to be as well.

Fifteen years later, I know what gives bystanders the power to speak up: having a whole community behind them. MAAV is creating a community where everyone is talking the same talk, hearing the same messages about reducing domestic violence, and encouraging healthy relationships. That’s why I’m still here.

MAAV’s challenges are similar to other small nonprofit organizations: ensuring stable funding for the organization with a small staff and volunteer Board of Directors. However, due to hard work and the appropriate use of consultants and community resources, MAAV has a strong track record of success in receiving and managing state, federal, local and foundation grants. Grants are part of MAAV’s development plan, which also includes outreach to individual donors, fundraising events and an annual appeal.


Geographic Area Served

NORTHEAST REGION, MA

MAAV is based in Melrose, Massachusetts, and is committed to offering programs and services for residents of the entire city, including over 3,500 students in the public schools. We also serve residents of surrounding communities such as Malden, Saugus, Wakefield, Stoneham and Medford, as well as anyone who contacts us through our web site, by phone or email.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Violence Shelters and Services
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Healthy Relationships Program

3-session program offered through the 8th grade Health classes reaching approximately 300 students. This is our foundational education program which teaches students to identify early warning signs of abuse, define healthy relationships, and learn about resources for help. The program features a survivor of teen dating abuse who shares her personal story, followed by 2 sessions led by MAAV trainers. The goal of the program is to stop teen dating violence before it starts. Every student receives a folder of materials, including a Teen Palm Card listing hotlines and resources for a range of teen issues. The interactive play “Remote Control” is brought in towards the end of the school year to reinforce the lessons of the program and reach any students who do not have Health.

Budget  $6,800.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

100% of students will be able to identify warning signs of abusive relationships and name strategies for helping themselves or a friend end an unhealthy relationship.

Program Long-Term Success 

100% of 8th grade students in Melrose will receive education on Healthy Relationships, allowing them to identify and deal with unhealthy relationships of their own and their peers. Students will be educated on warning signs of abusive relationships and will learn strategies for safely dealing with abusive relationships and breaking up. Students will be able to put their strategies to use in the real world.

Program Success Monitored By 

All students who participate in the Healthy Relationships program write a letter to one of the speakers, a woman who shares her personal story of dating abuse. These letters discuss which part of the victim’s story resonates with them, allowing us to assess the impact of her presentation. At the end of the Healthy Relationships program, the students complete a written survey that includes questions about the program and what they have learned.

Examples of Program Success 

In MAAV’s 18 years of implementing the Healthy Relationships Program, over 90% of survey respondents indicate they can identify multiple types of abuse, recognize the early warning signs of abuse, and know how to access resources for help. Thousands of letters to the survivor speaker indicate the impact of the presentation. Students are asked to write, among other things, one thing they learned from the presentation and one thing they will do differently now. A common theme is that students will look out for their friends, and tell a trusted adult if they or someone they know needs help.


Melrose CARES Community Mentoring Program

The Melrose CARES Community Mentoring Program was launched in 2005 as part of a joint youth violence prevention initiative between MAAV and the Melrose Veterans Memorial Middle School. This year-long program pairs a middle school student with a volunteer adult mentor who can provide ongoing guidance and support. The mentoring program uses an innovative model that combines the strengths of group-based and one-on-one approaches to address major risk factors for youth violence - exposure to bullying and domestic violence - with the protective factor of a caring, consistent adult. Volunteer mentors must be 21 years of age and willing to commit one year to the program. They are interviewed and screened, and must submit to a CORI check. Students are referred to the program through the Middle School’s Guidance Department with parental permission. Mentors and mentees are matched based on gender, interests, and personality.

Budget  $16,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Short-term, the Mentoring Program aims to promote an increased connection to school and community, and to help students develop a positive relationship with an adult role model other than a family member. Success in seen when mentors assist their mentees is setting at least one school-related goal, such as completing a school project, improving grades, or joining an extra-curricular activity. It’s also seen when mentored students report an improved attitude toward school, when guidance counselors and teachers report improved behavior and grades at school, and when attendance at community and volunteer events is seen.

Program Long-Term Success 

Our program targets students ages 11-15 from troubled home environments and at risk for dropping out of school, exhibiting aggressive behavior or being victims of aggressive behavior. The majority of students referred to the program exhibit a cluster of risk factors for future violence, including aggressiveness, low levels of parental involvement and child maltreatment, academic failure and low bonding to school, exposure to violence and racial prejudice. The goal of the program is to increase students’ self-confidence, self-esteem and resiliency through the ongoing support of a caring, consistent adult mentor. Every aspect of our program is designed to promote positive youth-adult relationships, with the goal of changing the youth’s mindset toward future adult relationships. Long-term goals also include keeping these students in school, preventing future violence, and decreasing risky behaviors such as drug use and underage drinking.

Program Success Monitored By 

Mentored students complete surveys and interviews at the beginning and end of their participation in the mentoring program. The survey includes a series of questions regarding social relationships, risky behaviors, self-confidence, etc. Responses are then compared at the end of the year to gauge any positive changes regarding these issues. The interviews, which also are conducted with parents and mentors, allow program staff to explore in more depth any additional issues. Data on students’ school-based performance is recorded by the Melrose Public Schools using a comprehensive software program that tracks excused and unexcused absences, grades, tardiness, health and behavioral issues and discipline infractions by 26 specific categories. Data is collected and compared at the end of each school year in the following categories: 1) grade point average; 2) school attendance; 3) number of discipline infractions at school; 4) number of violence-related incidences at school.

Examples of Program Success 

Over half of the participants in the program in 2015-2016 showed an increase in Grade Point Average. Each year, mentors assist their mentees in reaching their personal goals. The goal for one of our 8th graders was to attend the local vocational-technical high school. In order to achieve that goal, his mentor worked with him throughout the year to improve his grades and decrease his tardiness. Another shy and socially isolated mentee set a goal of joining an extra-curricular group. Her mentor helped this mentee research all options and settle on Dance Team as the perfect fit, thus increasing her mentee’s self-confidence and connection to school.


Student Action Board (SAB)

A select group of Melrose High School students that work closely with MAAV and MHS to plan and implement teen dating violence prevention programs, awareness events and campaigns in their school and community throughout the year. For example, the SAB involves hundreds of MHS students in MAAV’s Annual Walk, sponsors assemblies on teen dating abuse, and leads sessions on healthy relationships for all 9th graders through Freshman Seminar classes. They also oversee the Students Against Violence Club, a violence prevention club that is open to all students at Melrose High School.

Budget  $5,800.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

19 high school students will present to their peers at the high school and younger students at the nearby Middle School, training these students on issues of teen dating violence and sexual assault.

Program Long-Term Success 

19 high school students will be trained on the issues of teen dating violence and sexual assault in order to educate 100% of their high school peers on these topics. These student leaders will help change the culture of the high school by serving as peer educators and role models.

Program Success Monitored By 

We monitor reports of teen dating violence at the high school, and are encouraged when we see teens reporting concerns about a friend or classmate. This tells us that students are responding to the information presented by members of the Student Action Board.

Examples of Program Success 

We have seen cases over the years where members of the Student Action Board have been able to help friends find their way out of abusive relationships. We have been especially encouraged to hear reports of them doing so even after they leave Melrose High School for college. One female Student Action Board alum reported that she was able to safely intervene in what she feared was a potential sexual assault by using distraction tactics she had learned while in high school. A male alum reported recognizing the signs of an abusive relationship in college, and helping the female victim safely break up with her partner.


Support Group for Victims & Survivors of Domestic Violence

“Moving Forward in Your Relationships” is a confidential, weekly support group MAAV offers at no charge to victims and survivors of domestic violence, or anyone struggling in an unhealthy relationship. The group is led by a licensed clinical social worker and focuses on issues such as healthy communication skills, coping with stress, self-care and the impact of domestic violence on children. New members are always welcome.

Budget  $4,000.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Family Violence Counseling
Population Served Females Adults Victims
Program Short-Term Success 

Short term improvements will focus on the physical and emotional well-being of the women in the group. At the end of each six- to eight-week session, women participating in the group will show greater improvement in psychological distress symptoms and higher feelings of social support.

Program Long-Term Success 

The long-term goals of the Support Group are to facilitate recovery from trauma; decrease isolation; promote healthy relationships and increase safety for victims. Additionally, the support group aims to provide education on domestic violence and related issues, such as self-care, setting boundaries and returning to intimacy. The group empowers participants by providing ongoing emotional support, and helping victims acquire the knowledge and skills to move forward with their lives and their relationships. The program builds self-confidence and self-esteem, allowing women to re-introduce into the community.

Program Success Monitored By 

Members of the support group complete evaluations at the end of each six- to eight-week session. These evaluations let us know whether the topics covered in the group are useful to the participants and whether the leader is effective. The evaluations also include questions on the efficacy of the group, allowing participants to self report on changes in their emotional and physical well-being since the start of the group.

Examples of Program Success 

Written feedback from participants over the past year indicate that 100% of participants found the support from the group helpful, and 99% were interested in continuing in the group. One participant noted that she could not have gotten through a contentious divorce without the support of the group. Another participant who has suffered from serious mental health issues was able to develop the necessary supports and self-confidence to obtain a new job.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Rebecca Mooney
CEO Term Start Oct 1997
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Rebecca Mooney holds a Master’s degree in Education from Lesley University and has worked in the field of prevention as a non-profit manager for more than 25 years. During her tenure as the Executive Director, Rebecca has spearheaded and implemented a range of violence prevention programs in the schools and community, including bullying prevention, domestic and teen dating violence prevention, mentoring, peer mediation and peer leadership programs. She has overseen the growth of the organization from one part-time employee to a staff of four, participation in the Annual Walk from 100-750 participants, and a current initiative to expand MAAV trainings throughout the state. Prior to her work in Melrose, Rebecca served as a Guidance Counselor and Director of the Andover Peer Counseling Project for the Andover Public Schools, a nationally recognized dissemination project funded through the Department of Education.
Rebecca has served as a trainer, panelist and guest speaker on bullying prevention and teen dating violence for conferences sponsored by the Middlesex District Attorney’s Office, Child Advocacy Center of Boston, Riverside Counseling Center, and Boston Children’s Hospital, among others.
In 2004 Rebecca was honored with the Unsung Heroine Award by the Massachusetts Commission on Women for her contributions to the field of violence prevention. In 2015, she was honored with the “Women Making a Difference” Award by the Zonta Club of Malden.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Alison Bryer Coordinator, Melrose CARES Community Mentoring Program Alison Bryer  is a licensed clinical social worker with 20 years of experience working with youth and their families. She helped launch the Nurturing Families Program at the North Suburban YMCA in Woburn, a program that is very similar to our Melrose CARES Community Mentoring Program. 
Liane Cassavoy Outreach Coordinator

Liane Cassavoy holds a Master’s degree in Journalism from Boston University. She graduated with distinction, and, while a graduate student there, she won second prize in magazine writing competition sponsored by the Society of Professional Journalists. She joined the staff of MAAV as the Outreach Coordinator in 2012.

Before joining MAAV, Liane worked as a freelance journalist, writing about a variety of technology and business topics. Her work has appeared in a variety of national and local publications, including PCWorld, Entrepreneur Magazine, About.com, and others. She also is the author of two business start-up guide books, which were published by Entrepreneur Press.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Joan Bell
Board Chair Company Affiliation City of Melrose
Board Chair Term Nov 2004 -
Board Co-Chair Meredith Baker
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Hallmark Health
Board Co-Chair Term July 2015 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Meredith Baker Hallmark Health Voting
Joan Bell City of Melrose Voting
Mike Bloom Retired Voting
Erin DiSanto Community Volunteer Voting
Jodi Dwyer Hallmark Health Voting
Dan Ehlers Domestic Violence Officer & Detective, City of Melrose Voting
Kate Hartigan Community Volunteer Voting
Mary Landergan Community Volunteer Voting
Mike Lyle Police Chief, City of Melrose Voting
Louise Mason Retired Voting
Beth McCarthy Community Volunteer Voting
Craig Noto Community Volunteer Voting
Sally Stubbs Retired Voting
Karen Willis Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 10
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Community Outreach / Community Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Youth

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $162,650.00
Projected Expense $153,020.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Review

2014 Review

2013 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $208,616 $199,228 $186,674
Total Expenses $169,727 $143,864 $127,453

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$100,063 $113,097 $86,248
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $22,781 $33,872 $21,475
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- $800 $1,900
Investment Income, Net of Losses $259 $156 $156
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $85,513 $51,303 $76,895
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $134,004 $114,323 $99,805
Administration Expense $29,543 $26,519 $22,261
Fundraising Expense $6,180 $3,022 $5,387
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.23 1.38 1.46
Program Expense/Total Expenses 79% 79% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 2% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $291,998 $253,184 $194,516
Current Assets $291,998 $190,508 $131,996
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $4,087 $4,162 $858
Total Net Assets $287,911 $249,022 $193,658

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 12.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 71.45 45.77 153.84

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

MAAV has been a financially stable organization for close to 20 years. For the past 5 years, we have received substantial funding through a large federal grant which has now ended. Our challenge is to maintain the many programs developed through this teen dating violence prevention grant. We are in the process of developing a fundraising plan which uses multiple strategies (fundraising events, grants, individual donors, and an annual appeal) so that MAAV is not dependent on any one source of funding. Our Board of Directors recently completed a training on donor-centered fundraising and will implement a major annual appeal in December of 2016.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's reviewed financials.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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