Share |
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Julie's is a community based family support and education program that is committed to the development of strong, stable, healthy family functioning. Julie's provides services that enable poor, at-risk mothers and their children to transform their lives and become healthy, successful, and economically self-sufficient members of their communities.

Mission Statement

Julie's is a community based family support and education program that is committed to the development of strong, stable, healthy family functioning. Julie's provides services that enable poor, at-risk mothers and their children to transform their lives and become healthy, successful, and economically self-sufficient members of their communities.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $1,423,485.00
Projected Expense $1,259,120.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Adult and Children's Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Julie's is a community based family support and education program that is committed to the development of strong, stable, healthy family functioning. Julie's provides services that enable poor, at-risk mothers and their children to transform their lives and become healthy, successful, and economically self-sufficient members of their communities.

Background Statement

Julie’s was founded in 1974 by two educators, Sister Jean Sullivan, SND and Sister Louise Kearns, SND, who had been working closely with struggling, female-headed families living in crisis at the margins of society. Julie's began as two independent organizations: Julie's Children's House and the Adult Learning Program which merged in 1980. Julie's Children's House provided care and educational services to low-income, pre-school age children and their parents who lived in South Boston's D Street Public Housing Project. The Adult Learning Program provided adult education and support to poor, female head-of-households in the same community. In 2004, Julie’s moved into our own facility on Dorchester Street in South Boston and became a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with a Board of Directors. We now house all of our services in a building owned by the George Robert White Fund, a trust managed by the City of Boston. In September of 2011 the Board authorized the formation of a strategic planning process to create an organizational structure that supports the long-term viability of Julie's current range of services; creates a new platform that enhances Julie's capacity to add additional components to its core curricula and expand our reach to alumni; reaches more families; and secures $3M in multi-year gifts and pledges to fund proposed changes and expansion. This "Strategic Plan for Change and Expansion," which led to the formulation of our "Family Wellness and Support Program," transitions our founders, Sister Louise Kearns, SND and Sister Jean Sullivan, SND into new roles here at Julie's. As of 7/1/2014, they transitioned out of their roles as Director of Children's Services and Director of Adult Services into "Coordinators of the Family Wellness and Support Program." At the same time, our longtime Director of Operations, Bob Monahan transitioned to Executive Director. Other longtime employees, Ann D;Auria and Dianne Driscoll assumed Louise and Jean's administrative tasks. Despite these current organizational changes our mission remains the same - Julie's is a community-based family support and education program that is committed to the development of strong, stable, healthy family functioning. Julie';s provides services that enable poor, at-risk mothers and their children to transform their lives and become healthy, successful, and economically self-sufficient members of their communities. Julie's has an effective and innovative model with a unique and comprehensive approach to helping families break out of deprivation.

Impact Statement

Adult Services - Our adult learners here at Julie’s set personal, educational, family and career goals which are monitored by staff and students on a weekly, quarterly, and yearly basis. In addition, holistic services (academic, life skills, family literacy, counseling, advocacy, emergency support, and child care) aid our adult learners to attain their objectives. As measured by standardized assessments, 52% of students made educational progress (for many starting at a 6th or 7th grade level.)
 
Children’s Services – We continue to ensure that 100% of our Montessori graduates entering 1st grade consistently test above grade level (Scholastic School Readiness Test.) All 16 children enrolled this year tested at 80-90th percentile this past year. Children graduate from our Montessori preschool to first grade with consistently high levels of motivation, ability and academic preparation. Children who graduate from our program are frequently the first in the family to finish high school, with many more going on to college and a more secure future.
 
Organization - We are pleased to report that our Strategic Plan for Change and Expansion rolled out, as scheduled on July 1 with Bob Monahan stepping into the role of Executive Director 
 
Development - Starting this past spring and into last summer, four members of our Board met to resurrect our Board Development Committee.  As a result of this renewed effort, we added three new board members,each with the ability to enhance some aspect of Julie’s (fundraising, development, etc.)
 
Organizational goals - Further implementation of our Strategic plan and development of our Family Wellness and Support Program. 
 
Children's Services - We plan to continue to prepare our children for success in the first grade via the Montessori method. Our goal remains at 100% of children entering first grade above reading level. 
 
Adult Services - We plan to move forward with implementation of our "Family Wellness and Support Program" which will enable us to enhance the effectiveness of our current program and reach more families. Our "part time" option will target adult learners who sign onto the core program but due to circumstances find it difficult to keep these commitments. These adult learners will work with Srs. Jean and Louise to identify barriers and obstacles and create a revised plan for their ongoing engagement in the program.
 

Needs Statement

This time of transition for Julie's, which began in 2011 with a board directed search for a "succession plan" for our founders, Sister Jean Sullivan, SND, and Sister Louise Kearns, SND, has evolved into something much bigger than initially anticipated. Now named,"The Strategic Plan for Change and Expansion," it transitions our founders into new roles, while honoring their commitment to impoverished women and children for over 50 years. Jean and Louise's innate skills for counseling, supporting and guiding women and children will continue to be utilized. They will be able to reach out to alumni, and people who, due to life challenges, cannot currently commit to the core program. This part-time option, referred to as the "Flex Program," will enable us to reach even more families than we do currently. This is a most intriguing time for Julie’s as we enter the implementation phase of our Strategic Plan for Change and Expansion. We are currently planning a large scale event to honor our co-founders and to fund the Family Wellness and Support Program which is their legacy. We believe that after 40 years in operation,we have weathered a storm and have built a platform in place to secure the long term financial viability of Julie’s.

CEO Statement

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR COMMENTS
 
On July 1, 2014, I embraced the awesome responsibilities and opportunities of serving as the Executive Director of Julie’s Family Learning Program, Inc. (Julie’s). This promotion followed a forty-year history of working with the Co-Founders of Julie’s, Sr. Louise Kearns, SND, and Sr. Jean Sullivan, SND. A full history of this engagement is detailed in our report.
 
Also, on July 1, 2014, we began the implementation phase of our Strategic Plan for Change and Expansion. There are three main tenants of the plan:
 
1. develop a transition plan that enables our co-founders to stay connected to Julie’s by creating a new Family Wellness and Support Program;
 
2. develop a leadership succession plan, which includes changes at the Executive and Program areas;
 
3. secure the resources required to secure and honor the legacy of our co-founders.
 
In addition to my promotion, we are promoting two long-time (35 plus years) employees to assume additional leadership responsibilities. Our Education Coordinator now also assumes the responsibilities as the Director of Adult Services, and our Toddler Coordinator will now also assume the responsibilities as the Director of Child Care Services. Srs. Louise and Jean transition to managing the new Family Wellness and Support Program which leverages their counseling skills and decades of experience working with poor families. The new program will allow us to expand our services to women-in-crisis, alumnae, and the community. While Jean and Louise’s focus will be creating the Family Wellness and Support Program, their vision of and passion for Julie’s remains unwavering, and they will continue to serve as enthusiastic spokespeople for Julie’s for many years to come.
 
A MESSAGE FROM OUR CO-FOUNDERS, SR. LOUISE KEARNS, SND, AND SR. JEAN SULLIVAN, SND
 
We are so grateful to all who have supported this miracle we call Julie’s since its genesis in 1974. We ask that you continue to support the important work of Julie’s as we transition to our new roles as Co-Directors of our new Family Wellness and Support Program.This new platform allows us to provide the intensive case management and one-to-one counseling to some of the most vulnerable, albeit courageous,mothers in our communities. Our day-to-day responsibilities as Director of Adult Services and Director of Children’s Services respectively consistently interrupted our ability to engage mothers in crises when they needed us the most.
 
While we harbor a range of emotions, we are steadfast in our support, gratitude and faith in our replacements. Long-time Director of Education, Ann D’Auria, will assume the additional responsibilities of Director of Adult Services, and long-time Toddler Coordinator, Dianne Driscoll, will assume the additional responsibilities of Director of Children’s Services. After 40 years of working with our current Director of Operations, Bob Monahan, we place our trust and faith in him as he now assumes the responsibilities as our Executive Director. Bob is well versed in the collaborative decision-making philosophy of Julie’s and our SND community.
 
We will be taking sabbatical from June 18, 2014, to September 19, 2014. We plan to use this time to rest, recover and renew so we can bring our best wisdom and energy to the next phase of our journey in advancing the mission of Julie’s and St. Julie.
 
Along with this excitement and enthusiasm, we also recognize that financially the past five years have been very challenging. We made the reductions needed to weather the economic crises of 2009. The combination of these personnel and non-personnel cuts and building our fundraising capacity enabled us to weather the economic crises. These capacity building efforts include:·
 
In February of 2013 we secured the resources needed to hire a part-time development associate. We had three goals in mind. One focused on the timely submission of grant proposals and reports.
 
The second goal focused on submitting LOI’s and proposals to new prospects based on our internal research. The third focused on building our capacity to reach current and new donors via social networking. The results exceeded our expectations. In a little over one year, we added 319 new donors and 180 in-kind donors to our database. We now have over 300 new friends via Facebook and created a new platform via Constant Contact. Building this capacity is essential to securing the long-term viability of Julie’s.
 
Our Board Nominating Committee added four new board members this calendar year, with a capacity to give and get, dramatically enhancing the organization’s capacity to reach new and larger donors.
 
The former Board Chair of our Development Committee has agreed to chair the “Friends of Julie’s Committee.” The goal is to find meaningful ways to update and reconnect to those who contributed to our “Home For Julie’s Campaign” in 2003, former Board members, and recipients of our annual Angel Award. They may be in a position to support us again. As we share the exciting updates relative to our Strategic Plan for Change and Expansion, they may also be in a position to connect us to new prospects and donors.
 
We are also a participating agency in the Full Frame Initiative. Directed by Katya Fels Smyth, the Full Frame Initiative studies the approaches and values that non-profits utilize to transform lives.
 
The Full Frame’s ultimate goal is to assist programs to expand and replicate, as well as leverage programs that have proven results in the most cost-effective way possible. This will enhance Julie’s outcomes, as well as help to develop more accurate and useful metrics of accountability and progress. Significantly, it is contributing to a national dialogue that informs and is embraced by funders, policy makers, constituents and program.
 
On May 14, 2014, we will honor the legacy of our Co-Founders. Srs. Louise and Jean have been working with the poor for over 50 years. Our gift to Srs. Louise and Jean is to secure the multi-year resources to ensure the viability of Julie’s for families in need of support and transformation.
 
Robert D. Monahan
Executive Director
 

Board Chair Statement

Families matter: I have always known that. From the time I was a little girl and my dad would take my sibling and me to Castle Island for a ride on the swings and a frosty at Sullivan’s, I realized this. I continue to realize as I sit around a fireplace reading with my five children and husband. Families matter is one of the themes or slogans of Julie’s Family Learning Program. When I first walked into Julie’s more than twenty five years ago and witnessed a program that helped moms and children’s be a strong family unit, I knew this program was unique and understood its capacity to change generational cycles of poverty and despair. I first became involved in Julie’s as a student at Harvard College. Through Phillips Brooks House at Harvard, I organized a tutoring program for the women of Julie’s. Students from Harvard traveled weekly to South Boston to provide tutoring services. I was so captivated by Julie’s that I worked to make Julie’s a VISTA site and after graduation I served as a VISTA volunteer working full time in the adult program providing GED tutoring and support in the development area. I returned to school and completed law school following my work experience at Julie’s. Since that time, I have been working as a member of the advisory council and then Board of Julie’s. Presently, I am Chair of the Board of Directors.


Unfortunately, families need help. Fortunately, families are not frozen in time or set in stone but are ever changing. Families can transform. Julie’s helps families matter positively. Julie’s Family Learning Program is a vibrant program that continues to help families change. As an organization, Julie’s has grown and change. More than ten years ago, Julie’s became its own nonprofit organization with tax exempt status. Julie’s has continued to grow and expand its board to enlist the skill sets of diverse and talented people willing to share their time and wisdom. Julie’s continues to face the seemingly insurmountable challenges of increasing its revenues to meet its expenditures. Nonetheless, as a Board, we have continued to adapt and accept the challenge by using creative methods of fundraising involving grassroots community support, an expanded  social media presence, collaborative initiatives and increased grant applications.

Families matter. Generous giving to support families matters. Please continue to support Julie’s Family Learning Program.

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
For the 2014 fiscal year, 200 women and children accessed services from our programs. Of the families in the program, 35% live in South Boston, and 65% live in other Boston neighborhoods and shelters in the Metro Boston area, such as Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, Roslindale, Brighton, Braintree and Chelsea. Thirty-four percent live in public housing developments, 17% in Section 8 (HUD) voucher housing, 15% are living in shelters, 17% are living with family or friends, and 17% are renting apartments. 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Services
  2. Education - Adult Education
  3. Education - Preschools

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Adult and Children's Services


Julie’s provides mothers and their children with an array of services that helps them systematically tackle their multiple challenges while strengthening the family unit. While the mothers are working on gaining education and employment skills, their young children are receiving high quality attention on location in our licensed childcare facility and Montessori pre-school. Furthermore, they participate in a variety of constructive parent-child activities as a family unit, including family literacy classes and family field trips. Julie’s unique model of integrated familysupport strengthens the bonds between family members and increases the likelihood that both parent and child will succeed.  On average, the adults complete the intensive program in 36 months. The program operates Monday through Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. A typical day for our mothers includes two education classes, two life skills classes, one 15 minute break, and a 30 minute lunch break.
Our staff meets every Friday to review the case management and learning plans of every adult learner, child, and adjunct individuals attending Jule’s. This is also a time for individual counseling, and home visits. The families use Fridays to go to medical, school, or legal appointments. Our school year operates according to the Boston Public School schedule. We have three semester cycles: September-December, January-June, and July-August. We are licensed for 45 children, and 55 children were served at different times in our preschool programs over the course of the year, with some children transitioning to first grade, moving, or otherwise transitioning. We had 35 women in our core adult services
program, 25 in our alumnae program, and 85 for emergency supports and counseling over the year.
Budget  $1,065,944.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Families Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Adults
Program Short-Term Success  Adult learners are tested biannually – Massachusetts Adult Proficiency Test (MAPT) and individual progress is tracked with the Massachusetts Department of Education’s System for Managing Accountability and Results through Technology (SMARTT) System. Montessori graduates are tested as well (Scholastic School Readiness Test.) Staff meets every Friday to case manage each adult, each child and each family.Test.) Staff meets every Friday to case manage each adult, each child and each family.
Program Long-Term Success  We know from our alumni that children who graduate from our licensed, certified Montessori program are frequently the first in the family to finish high school, many going on to college and a more secure future. The families who arrive at our door face a myriad of sometimes catastrophic situations. They may be homeless or victims of domestic abuse. They may be trying to break the vicious circle of insecure, dead-end jobs that keep them living from hand to mouth, temporary shelter to temporary shelter. As a result, the children often have been subjected to highly challenging life and school experiences. For many of the families, the solutions currently available in Boston can seem overwhelming. Often the services a family may need are spread throughout the city in a hodge-podge of conflicting schedules, requirements and locations. Even when they find appropriate services, their hands are often tied because they cannot afford reliable and safe child-care which would enable them to access those services. Centralization of services along with our collaborative style and intergenerational approach to changing the lives of low-income families has a long-lasting impact. Over 40 years, we have seen hundreds of families break the cycle of poverty by setting educational and workforce development goals, coupled with life skills education.
Program Success Monitored By  We keep detailed reports on attendance for both the adult learners and the children. Each department (infant, toddler, Montessori and adult services) provide detailed reports on current accomplishments and achievements, for example, 3 women out of 45 were able to remove themselves from public assistance. 1 woman received her B.A. 1 woman received her A.A. 2 women registered to vote. 16 women voted in federal, state, or local elections. Adult learners showed gains in math skills, as shown by the results of the Massachusetts Adult Proficiency Test (MAPT) as required by the Department of Education – 10 out of 15 women showed improvement. 2 students completed all 5 of the GED tests in June.
Examples of Program Success  Over a 40 year period, our comprehensive, holistic approach has helped hundreds of families break the cycle of poverty. Our Montessori preschool consistently positions their graduates for success in the first grade and beyond. Our adults work on their issues and education hurdles at their own pace, no one is rushed or held to a specific method..beyond. Our adults work on their issues and education hurdles at their own pace, no one is rushed or held to a specific method.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Robert D. Monahan
CEO Term Start July 2004
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Robert is currently the Executive Director for Julie’s Family Learning Program,Inc. As the Executive Director, Robert oversees and manages Julie’s financial, fundraising, human resources, and facility systems, and manages a staff of over 15 people. Previously Bob was the Director of Operations here at Julie’s. Robert graduated from Boston College High School in 1972 and from Harvard University with a BA degree in Psychology and Social Relations in 1976.


Upon graduating from Harvard, Robert served as the Program Director and Director of the Tynan Community Center. In 1983 Robert served as the Director of the South Boston Boys & Girls Club (BGCB). Robert would later serve as BGCB’s Chief Operating Officer and Vice President of Strategic Partnerships.


In 1985 Julie’s Children’s House and the Adult Learning Program jointly moved into the South Boston Clubhouse, where Robert was serving as the Clubhouse Director,becoming a program of Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston. In 1991 the partnership was officially renamed Julie’s Family Learning Program.

In 2003 Robert teamed up with Sr. Louise and Sr. Jean to transition Julie’s from a program of BGCB to an independent non profit. In 2004, upon completion of the successful “Home For Julie’s” campaign, Julie’s moved into its first ever permanent home at the newly renovated George Robert White Fund Building in South Boston. As of July 1, Robert will transition into the role of Executive Director, while maintaining all of his current responsibilities as Director of Operations here at Julie’s.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mrs. Ann D'Auria Director of Adult Services Ann is currently the Adult Services Manager and Director of Adult Education. She supervises and manages the program’s educational and vocational services. She has been here in that position since 1981. Previously she was an instructor at the TEC Collaborative in Wellesley, MA., and a Social Studies and English teacher at Cardinal Cushing High School. Ann has her BA and her M.Ed. from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, graduating from both summa cum laude. She has continued her education with coursework in adult reading disabilities at Cambridge Adult Learning Center. Ann has worked closely with Sisters Jean and Louise for many years, and therefore was identified by the management team as the perfect candidate to assume Sister Louise’s administrative tasks. As of 7/1/2014 she transitioned to become Adult Service Manager and Director of Adult Education, reporting directly to the Executive Director. She will have several staff reporting in to her.
Ms. Dianne Driscoll Director of Children's Services Dianne is currently the Children’s Services Manager, Toddler Coordinator and Lead Teacher for the Toddler Room in our licensed, certified day care center. She is also an alumna of the program and has been affiliated with us since 1980. An Americorps Volunteer in 1994, she went on to work as a licensed teacher here, with a promotion to Lead Teacher in 2001. She earned her GED in 1981, and her Associates degree in Child Psychology in 1991 from Bunker Hill Community College. She has continued her education with many classes at the Urban College of Boston, such as Infant/Toddler Curriculum Development, Observing and Recording, and Guidance and Discipline. Dianne has worked closely with Sisters Jean and Louise for many years, and therefore was identified by the management team as the perfect candidate to assume Sister Jean’s administrative tasks. As of 7/1/2014 she transitioned to become Children’s Services Manager and Toddler Coordinator, reporting directly to the Executive Director. She will have several staff reporting in to her.
Sr. Louise Kearns SND Co-Founder and previous Director of Adult Services, Family Wellness and Support Manager Sister Louise Kearns, SND, joined the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur in 1959. She received a B.A. in Education and Biology from Emmanuel College and later earned a Masters in education and counseling from Antioch College. In 1969, Sr. Louise moved into the D Street Housing Project in South Boston, where she taught junior high school students, and began a summer youth program. While working in the projects, she became increasingly aware of the immense challenges facing poor families headed single mothers. Her experiences lead her to finally establish an Adult Learning Program in 1979 in the community. The program provided the mothers with educational services and peer support, while their young children received quality day care. The following year, Sister Louise joined hands with Sr. Jean Sullivan to create Julie’s Family Learning Program. For over 50 years, Sister Louise has lived and worked with the poor and marginalized. She has been on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the women currently in the program and our alumnae. As of July 1, 2014 Sister Louise transitioned to the role as Family Wellness and Support Program Manager. This transition will utilize Sister Louise’s exceptional skills of counseling and assisting at risk families, while honoring her commitment and contribution to Julie’s.
Sr. Jean Sullivan SND Co-Founder and previous Director of Children’s Services Family Wellness and Support Manager
Sister Jean Sullivan, SND, joined the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur in 1957. Upon completing her Bachelor of Arts degree at Emmanuel College, she began teaching first grade in communities throughout Massachusetts. During her summer months, she worked with migrants in New Jersey and Delaware. While working with migrant families, she encountered many children who had poor self-esteem and little self-confidence. Sr. Jean began searching for educational approaches that would best help these young children, and ultimately settled on the Montessori method as the most effective. She earned her certification as a Montessori teacher from Cornell University. In 1974 Sr. Jean joined with Sr. Pat O’MaIley to establish Julie’s Children’s House, named after the foundress of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur and Maria Montessori’s first school, the “Children’s House.” The program was unique in that it not only offered a Montessori education to low-income children, it also provided their mothers with monthly home visits and educational sessions on parenting. In 1980 Sister Jean and Sr. Louise Kearns decided to jointly create what is now Julie’s Family Learning Program. For over 50 years, Sister Jean has lived and worked with the poor and marginalized. She has been on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the women currently in the program and our alumnae. As of July 1, 2014 Sister Jean transitioned to the role as Family Wellness and Support Program Manager. This transition will utilize Sister Jean’s exceptional skills of counseling and assisting at risk families, while honoring her commitment and contribution to Julie’s.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Angel Award Oprah Winfrey Network 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 11
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 92%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 16
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 16
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mrs. Theresa Finn-Dever
Board Chair Company Affiliation Riley and Dever, PC
Board Chair Term Nov 2009 -
Board Co-Chair Mrs. Ellen Segal
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term Sept 2012 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Sharon Asiaf South Boston MOMS Club --
Sister Linda Bessom SND MA Coalition for the homeless --
Theresa Finn-Dever Riley and Dever, PC --
Matt Karlyn Cooley, LLP --
Kristen Lambert Vice President, AWAC Services Co --
Joseph Nee Retired --
Diane Newark Development, Carroll School for the Blind --
Ellen Segal Vice Chair of Board --
Sister Jean Stanford SND Boston Health Care for the Homeless --
Michael Stauff retired financial CEO --
Michelle Wu Boston City Councilor at Large --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $1,423,485.00
Projected Expense $1,259,120.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,322,660 $1,206,914 $1,151,391
Total Expenses $1,281,695 $1,206,914 $1,355,311

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $306,353 $233,033 $231,703
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $306,353 $233,033 $231,703
Individual Contributions $754,430 $921,263 $873,139
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $4,860 $7,985 $4,647
Investment Income, Net of Losses $469 $-44 $3,871
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $255,948 $44,677 $38,031
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $600 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,058,886 $1,142,423 $1,121,681
Administration Expense $112,455 $115,196 $117,684
Fundraising Expense $110,354 $127,109 $115,946
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.03 1.00 0.85
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 95% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 8% 11% 10%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,122,051 $1,066,174 $1,255,294
Current Assets $431,988 $297,951 $404,597
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $39,702 $24,790 $36,096
Total Net Assets $1,082,349 $1,041,384 $1,219,198

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 10.88 12.02 11.21

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Our goals include improvement in educational grade levels, technology, and Adult Basic Education skills through on-site class and individual instruction in the GED subjects such as Math, Writing, and Science; improved family functioning, home management and parenting abilities with ongoing life skills classes, workshops, personal and group counseling; healthy development and comprehensive educational preparation for the families’ children while in our early childhood development center and Montessori pre-school; improved job skills through computer literacy classes, career counseling, instruction in interviewing and resume-writing, and college preparation assistance; progress with mental health and behavior related to substance abuse goals by participating in therapeutic and group counseling. For 40 years, Julie’s Family Learning Program has been a small, community-based, non-profit organization dedicated to empowering at-risk, low-income families headed by women to become strong, independent and economically self sufficient.
 
The goal is to stop the never-ending chain of indigence for families, so that they – and particularly their children – are freed to start afresh, and can thrive once they have secured a permanent and nurturing living and learning environment. Our staff helps each adult learner set personal, educational, family and career goals. These individual goals are jointly evaluated and monitored by staff and students on a weekly, quarterly and yearly basis. Holistic services (academic, life skills, family literacy, personal and group counseling and child care) aid our adult learners, and therefore their families, to attain their personal objectives and to “fix the brokenness in their lives.” Our Montessori preschool consistently positions their graduates to enter first grade with high levels of otivation, ability and academic preparation. The goal is to continue to ensure that 100% of the Montessori graduates test above grade level according to the Scholastic School Readiness Test.
 
We know from our alumni that children who graduate from our licensed, certified Montessori program are frequently the first in the family to finish high school, many going on to college and a more secure future. The families who arrive at our door face a myriad of sometimes catastrophic situations. They may be homeless or victims of domestic abuse. They may be trying to break the vicious circle of insecure, dead-end jobs that keep them living from hand to mouth, temporary shelter to temporary shelter. As a result, the children often have been subjected to highly challenging life and school experiences. For many of the families, the solutions currently available in Boston can seem overwhelming. Often the services a family may need are spread throughout the city in a hodge-podge of conflicting schedules, requirements and locations. Even when they find appropriate services, their hands are often tied because they cannot afford reliable and safe child-care which would enable them to access those services. Centralization of services along with our collaborative style and intergenerational approach to changing the lives of low-income families has a long-lasting impact. Over 40 years, we have seen hundreds of families break the cycle of poverty by setting educational and workforce development goals, coupled with life skills education.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

In September of 2011 the Board authorized the formation of a strategic planning process to create an organizational structure that supports the long-term viability of Julie's current range of services; creates a new platform that enhances Julie's capacity to add additional components to its core curricula and expand our reach to alumni; reaches more families; and secures $3M in multi-year gifts and pledges to fund proposed changes and expansion. This "Strategic Plan for Change and Expansion," which led to the formulation of our "Family Wellness and Support Program," transitions our founders, Sister Louise Kearns, SND and Sister Jean Sullivan, SND into new roles here atJulie's. As of 7/1/2014, they transitioned out of their roles as Director of Children's Services and Director of Adult Services into "Coordinators of the Family Wellness and Support Program." At the same time, our longtime Director of Operations, Bob Monahan transitioned to Executive Director. Other longtime employees, Ann D’Auria and Dianne Driscoll assumed Louise and Jean’s administrative tasks. Transitioning away from the founders led model is the key to sustain Julie's programming for the next 50 years. We are currently planning a large event in the spring to honor our Co-founders for their 50 plus years of commitment to marginalized families in Greater Boston. This event, The Legacy Event has a fundraising goal of $500,000 and would enable us to start our next fiscal year with an improvement on our cash balance. We do start each year with a positive, albeit small, cash balance but realize we need to be more proactive there. This is a new day for Julie’s. We have every confidence and expectation that these our plans can be executed at a level that enhances our organizational effectiveness and fundraising results.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Julie’s prides itself in having a small, cost-effective and dedicated staff that carries out multiple job responsibilities to meet the needs of our families. We experience very little turnover; the longest standing staff member has been with us for 40 years. Staff experience ranges from three to forty+ years. All have worked in educational programs within low-income, urban populations. Each year, Julie’s has approximately 50 volunteers contributing over 500 volunteer hours. Here in South Boston we are active in the South Boston Association of Non Profits, keeping us current in our community. We have been acknowledged by the Full Frame Initiative and in May we were included in a convention of Boston organizations which are committed to finding innovative ways to address poverty and violence and are effective in helping deeply marginalized people and communities make long term change. We have relationships with local parishes and our local MOMS club chapter which donate clothing, new winter coats, gift cards, and holiday gifts for our families. In Children’s Services we have many relationships with child specialists such as Early Intervention (Bay Cove Services,) UMass Boston Baby Lab, and Beacon Services (Behavioral Education, Assessment and Consultation, Inc.) We call upon “The Home” for intensive counseling for our mothers as needed.
 
In our 40 year history, we have rarely had more than one to two months’ cash reserves on hand. We are acutely aware that this is not a position of great comfort and have plans to enter FY16 with a minimum of $300,000 cash reserves on hand. Over the past two years we have intentionally enhanced our fundraising capacity with a goal of positioning ourselves for success in FY15. These efforts include adding four new Board members with the capacity to give and get and creating a Friends of Julie’s Committee for current and former Board members who want to stay engaged but not on a Board level. In addition, we have been planning for over a year for a major fundraising event in the spring of 2015. We will honor our Co-Founders with a “Secure Their Legacy” event. We have commitments from some key champions, old and new, to join the committee with a goal to raise $500,000. Our part time development associate, who expanded our social media outreach via facebook, constant contact, twitter and an updated website, is now a full time employee. She has planned an Open House for the fall to bring new awareness for Julie's, and is revamping the December event along with other staff with online auction bidding and new sponsorship opportunities.
 
We participate in both the Full Frame Initiative (FFI) nationwide and the Family Engagement Network and the South Boston Association of Non-Profits in our local neighborhood. Keeping current in our own neighborhood helps us to collaborate with other similar organizations, or organizations that work with different age groups so that we can refer alumni. The FFI is a national nonprofit that works to break the cycles of poverty and violence through system change. FFI has discovered the common DNA among organizations with the best record of success in working with marginalized people and communities. Recognizing that people facing complex problems need support that’s as multi-faceted as the lives they live, these highly effective organizations operate with principles and practices that support people in thefull frameof their lives. Across the country, there are a small number of organizations with outcomes that defy expectations for what is presumed possible for people facing complex and multiple challenges. FFI has discovered how these positive outliers are helping people make dramatic changes that end seemingly unbreakable cycles of poverty and violence. Although these organizations center on different communities and issues – such as domestic violence, juvenile justice, community violence,homelessness, mental health – they share a common DNA: a set of principles and practices that differentiate them from their less successful counterparts. FFI calls it The Full Frame Approach.
 
 
 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Biannually, mothers complete the Massachusetts Adult Proficiency Test (MAPT) to evaluate their progress and determine areas of difficulty. Educational assessment tools include: the Diagnostic Assessment of Reading, Learning Styles Inventory, and Career Inventory Survey. Julie’s tracks our adult learners’ progress with the Massachusetts Department of Education’s System for Managing Accountability and Results Through Technology (SMARTT) system. Mothers also complete evaluations as a group; formal individual evaluations take place at year's end. Likewise, our infant, toddler, and pre-school children are regularly evaluated. Upon enrollment, Julie’s assesses each child’s abilities so that a base-line is determined. Goals are then developed with that child’s mother and are monitored daily. Staff meets individually with each mother to discuss the evaluation results and develops an action plan to advance the child. This progress is also evaluated by the rates of absenteeism, parent reports of children’s problems and successes, and the nature and frequency of parent-child reading sessions. Additionally, there is a review of each child’s progress at weekly staff meetings and at monthly home visits. When a child is about to leave Julie’s to begin grade one, the child takes the Scholarship Readiness Assessment test to determine if she or he is at or above the first-grade level.
 
In Adult Services the addition of the “Part time” program will enable us to reach more adult learners and help more families by acknowledging the challenges met by female headed, single parent families. As for Children’s Services, as we have children in our program from 6 months up to 6 years, we can see children from our current infant cohort thriving and succeeding in our Montessori preschool. Likewise, our preschool graduates will be succeeding and thriving in middle school.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--