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Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (ASF) works to improve the health and well-being of vulnerable people by developing "leaders in service": individuals who are dedicated to and skilled in expanding the capacity of communities to address health and social needs, and whose actions influence and inspire others. 

In January 2012, the American Medical Association’s newsletter reported that “85% of primary care physicians and pediatricians say their patients have health concerns caused by unmet social needs”— but only 20% of these health professionals feel equipped to help their vulnerable and underserved patients address those social factors (which include low incomes, environmentally unsafe housing, and lack of access to healthy foods, mental health care services, and educational opportunities).
 
ASF's Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program is designed to address that experience gap by developing a professional health care workforce that is trained in addressing not only clinical health issues, but also the social factors that impact health. By partnering with area community-based organizations to carry out yearlong service projects on issues such as homelessness, early childhood education, and refugee and immigrant health, Fellows deliver immediate impact. Through the Fellowship’s leadership development programming, they also develop into a corps of multidisciplinary health professionals with the capacity to address these factors on an ongoing and effective basis throughout their careers.

Mission Statement

The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (ASF) works to improve the health and well-being of vulnerable people by developing "leaders in service": individuals who are dedicated to and skilled in expanding the capacity of communities to address health and social needs, and whose actions influence and inspire others. 

In January 2012, the American Medical Association’s newsletter reported that “85% of primary care physicians and pediatricians say their patients have health concerns caused by unmet social needs”— but only 20% of these health professionals feel equipped to help their vulnerable and underserved patients address those social factors (which include low incomes, environmentally unsafe housing, and lack of access to healthy foods, mental health care services, and educational opportunities).
 
ASF's Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program is designed to address that experience gap by developing a professional health care workforce that is trained in addressing not only clinical health issues, but also the social factors that impact health. By partnering with area community-based organizations to carry out yearlong service projects on issues such as homelessness, early childhood education, and refugee and immigrant health, Fellows deliver immediate impact. Through the Fellowship’s leadership development programming, they also develop into a corps of multidisciplinary health professionals with the capacity to address these factors on an ongoing and effective basis throughout their careers.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $178,218.00
Projected Expense $178,218.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2008 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (ASF) works to improve the health and well-being of vulnerable people by developing "leaders in service": individuals who are dedicated to and skilled in expanding the capacity of communities to address health and social needs, and whose actions influence and inspire others. 

In January 2012, the American Medical Association’s newsletter reported that “85% of primary care physicians and pediatricians say their patients have health concerns caused by unmet social needs”— but only 20% of these health professionals feel equipped to help their vulnerable and underserved patients address those social factors (which include low incomes, environmentally unsafe housing, and lack of access to healthy foods, mental health care services, and educational opportunities).
 
ASF's Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program is designed to address that experience gap by developing a professional health care workforce that is trained in addressing not only clinical health issues, but also the social factors that impact health. By partnering with area community-based organizations to carry out yearlong service projects on issues such as homelessness, early childhood education, and refugee and immigrant health, Fellows deliver immediate impact. Through the Fellowship’s leadership development programming, they also develop into a corps of multidisciplinary health professionals with the capacity to address these factors on an ongoing and effective basis throughout their careers.


Background Statement

Originally established in 1940 to support Dr. Albert Schweitzer’s iconic hospital in Africa, ASF launched the Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program in 1992 to extend Dr. Schweitzer’s influence and legacy by offering graduate students a yearlong, multidisciplinary, and culturally competent leadership program that combines a mentored, entrepreneurial 200-hour service learning experience and a reflective approach—resulting in a corps of professionals who are confident in addressing not only clinical health issues, but also the social determinants of health (including education, the environment, and poverty).

Boston is the oldest of 13 Schweitzer sites across the U.S. Since the Boston Program’s inception, its nearly 500 Fellows have provided more than 90,000 hours of community service in partnership with over 250 Boston and Worcester social service agencies -- focusing on everything from improving the physical environment where people live, to promoting early-childhood literacy and parent engagement, to encouraging healthy exercise and nutrition habits, to launching and staffing community health centers and clinics.

Today, graduate student Schweitzer Fellows at 13 program sites across the country (Baltimore, Bay Area, Boston, Chicago, Columbus, Greater Philadelphia, Houston, Indiana, Los Angeles, New Hampshire-Vermont, New Orleans, North Carolina, and Pittsburgh) deliver more than 50,000 hours of service to 30,000 low-income clients each year.

99 percent of ASF's 2,500+ Schweitzer Fellows for Life (program alumni) say that ASF is integral to sustaining their ongoing commitment to serving vulnerable communities throughout their lives and careers.


Impact Statement

In the last program year, Boston Schweitzer Fellows served more than 6,000 low-income individuals primarily from African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian communities.

81% of Fellows’ Schweitzer projects were sustained by their community site because of their demonstrated success in meeting local health needs.

For example, Schweitzer Fellow Daniel Hatfield (a student at Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy) partnered with the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center (EBNHC) to develop a running program for boys at the Mario Umana Middle School. Over the course of the 2010-2011 school year, the boys ran a collective 740 miles; improved running time from an average of 15:14 minutes per mile to 9:46 minutes per mile; decreased their BMI; and increased their confidence, self-esteem, and ability to set and achieve goals. In fall 2011, the EBNHC expanded Hatfield’s Schweitzer project to over 100 boys and girls and have hired Hatfield to run the program part-time as he finishes his PhD at Tufts. (Watch a Neighborhood Network News report on Hatfield’s Schweitzer project here.) 

Additionally, ASF’s evaluation data indicates that Fellows are more likely to continue to work with vulnerable populations and are better equipped to do so as a result of their Fellowship experience:
·       92% of Fellows said that the Fellowship made them more comfortable integrating themselves into a community in a culturally appropriate manner
·       96% of Fellows said that participation in the Fellowship increased their comfort level in addressing the social determinants of health

In the next year, the Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program aims to continue to develop leaders and deliver high-quality, culturally competent services to people in need; engage new partners and sponsors; and raise awareness of its demonstrated success in developing change agents who throughout their careers increase the capacity of communities to meet the needs of underserved people.


Needs Statement

The Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program is 100% dependent on private grant and gift support from individuals and institutions.
 
Our most pressing financial needs include:
·Program Director salary
·Stipends and insurance for Fellows
·Expenses related to curriculum development and training for emerging healthcare providers (Boston Fellows) that will prepare them to work with underserved communities to promote and sustain behaviors for life-long health in order to help reduce the prevalence of chronic health issues among vulnerable populations
·Program administration, which includes processing of fellowships, reporting, and evaluation.
·Expenses related to logistics of orientation and monthly meetings, mentorship and site visits, recruitment, and follow-up

CEO Statement

I came to my role as The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship’s (ASF) Executive Director with great respect and admiration for the more than 2,500 Fellows who are now Dr. Schweitzer’s living legacy—and also a tremendous sense of urgency.

Due to the passage of the Affordable Care Act, an estimated 32 million previously uninsured people will soon be entering our country’s health care system for the first time. Now more than ever, it is essential that we focus on developing a multidisciplinary corps of health professionals who have the dedication, skills, and cultural competency to effectively meet the health needs of these and other underserved people.

ASF’s programming is unique and effective in accomplishing this goal. First, being a Schweitzer Fellow is a personal pursuit, not a “plug in” volunteer opportunity.Instead of simply volunteering to fill a pre-set role, Fellows must partner with community-based organizations to identify an unmet health need, design a sustainable service project with a demonstrable enduring impact on that need, and bring that project from idea to implementation and impact.

Second, many health service opportunities for professional students are options to fill the summer gap—but ASF is a meaningful and integrated part of health education.By participating in the Schweitzer Fellowship while they’re in school, and for a full year, Fellows learn to make working with underserved people part of their“regular life.”

Third, ASF is an interdisciplinary experience, not an isolated one.In order to address health disparities on a large scale, health professionals must be able to work comfortably with leaders in allied fields. By sharing their intensive Fellowship experience with health-oriented students from other fields, Fellows emerge with the skill set necessary to effect large-scale change.

And finally, ASF is a gateway for lifelong service; not an endpoint to a one-time volunteer project. Fellows exit their initial year with a hard-earned blueprint for how to consistently integrate service into their (very busy) lives. They become “Fellows for Life” committed to supporting each other in creating change and improving health throughout their careers.

I am honored to work for an organization that answers the increasingly important need to equip emerging professionals with the skills and training to improve the health and well-being of vulnerable communities.

 -- Sylvia Stevens-Edouard, MS, ASF Executive Director


Board Chair Statement

I am honored to serve on the ASF Board of Directors because I see firsthand how the Schweitzer Fellowship experience becomes a blueprint for a lifelong commitment to societal health and community service by our Fellows and alumni (or Fellows for Life).  This commitment translates into empowerment for the community members with whom they work.

I believe that ASF’s most enduring impact is through its ability to develop change agents who throughout their careers increase the capacity of communities to meet the needs of the underserved:

·       Rushika Fernandopulle, MD, MPP,was in the inaugural class of Boston Schweitzer Fellows in 1992-93. Rushika is internationally recognized for his pioneering work to transform primary care through the creation of an innovative practice, Iora Health. Rushika has been featured in the New Yorker, Forbes, and British Medical Journal (BMJ)Dr. Fernandopulle also co-authoredUninsured in America, published in 2005, a groundbreaking look at the human costs and personal stories of being uninsured in America.

·       Claude-Alix Jacob, MPH,served as a Chicago Schweitzer Fellow in 1997-98. Claude-Alix is currently the Chief Public Health Officer for the City of Cambridge, serves on the board of the National Association of County and City Health Officials, and serves on the Advisory Board for the Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program. 

·       Ezra Barzilay, MD,served as a Boston Schweitzer Fellow in 1997-98. Today, Ezra works for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), where he serves as the Lead of the National Surveillance Team and the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System in the Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch. Dr. Barzilay also serves as a trainer and expert consultant for the World Health Organization.

As the inaugural U.S. Schweitzer Fellows Program site, the Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program plays an integral role in improving the health and well-being of vulnerable people and communities in the Boston area. I am very proud of the nearly 500 Boston Schweitzer Fellows who have provided more than 90,000 hours of community service in partnership with over 250 Boston and Worcester social service agencies since 1992.

One of our greatest organizational challenges this year is one that many nonprofits are facing: the struggling economy and its implications for philanthropic support. However, I look forward to building on the strong encouragement and valuable support that our organization receives from donors, partners, mentors, and Fellows for Life.

 --Ralph Fuccillo, Chair, ASF Board of Directors


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (please select all areas as well)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- West Roxbury
METROWEST REGION, MA
Schweitzer Fellows carry out service projects that meet the needs of underserved communities throughout Boston, the greater Boston area, and Worcester.

Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Health Support
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program

The Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program trains graduate health professional students to create change and improve health. A new class of 15-25 multidisciplinary Boston Schweitzer Fellows begins its work in April of each year. Each Boston Schweitzer Fellow uses a community-based participatory engagement process to develop and implement a 200-hour service project. This participatory process requires constant feedback from the partnering organization and the clients being served. To ensure appropriate oversight, a site mentor and academic mentor provide each Fellow with practical and academic support throughout the year-long service project. Fellows also meet monthly and participate in a leadership development program that involves skills trainings on issues including cultural competency, advocacy, program design and implementation, and health literacy, as well as structured individual and group reflection. The Fellowship’s emphasis on cultural competency, interdisciplinary collaboration, and informal networking reflects a comprehensive approach to improving the health of vulnerable communities.

 
Budget  $178,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Preventive Health
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
Partnering community agencies will state that the Fellows' Schweitzer projects have increased their capacity to address unmet health and social needs.
 
Fellows will report an increased ability to understand and address the impact of the social determinants of health.
 
Clients will report decreased chronic disease risk factors (ex. lower BMI, cessation/modification of risky behaviors) and increased health literacy.
Program Long-Term Success 
Community agencies will have increased capacity to address the health and social needs of their vulnerable clients. The health interventions implemented by the Fellows will improve the health and well-being of their clients as expressed in increased health literacy and reduced chronic disease burden among vulnerable populations.
 
Additionally, the Fellows will be equipped to create further change thanks to the skills they gained during the Fellowship experience. They will go on to serve primarily underserved populations throughout their careers; will feel confident in addressing not just clinical health needs, but also the social determinants of health; and will have the skills to collaborate across disciplines and sectors to bring about big-picture change.
Program Success Monitored By 

Each Fellow works closely with the agency and clients to determine targeted outcomes and select measures that can be used to track progress. Fellows are provided with training on project evaluation to ensure that they identify success measures that focus on reporting the impact of their projects rather that simply measuring activity.

In addition to the specific project evaluations, ASF’s core values require that the Fellows’ community service projects provide immediate and long-term impact with the following outcomes for vulnerable and underserved people:
·       Increased knowledge about health and social issues
·       Broader access to appropriate health and prevention services
·       Increased sense of empowerment to take ownership of their own health and that of their families

To document its results and to continuously improve its programs, ASF conducts systematic evaluations. Surveys and reports capture data on the impact that the projects have on the clients, the host agencies, and the Fellows’ development. Evaluation includes pre- and post-service surveys of Fellows, post-service survey of site mentors, and project evaluation by Fellows and site mentors.

Examples of Program Success 

In the most recent program year, 81% of Boston Fellows’ Schweitzer projects were sustained by their community site because of their demonstrated success in meeting local health needs. ASF’s evaluation data also indicates that Fellows are more likely to continue to work with vulnerable populations and are better equipped to do so as a result of their Fellowship experience. 92% said that the Fellowship made them more comfortable integrating themselves into a community in a culturally appropriate manner. 96% said that participation in the Fellowship increased their comfort level in addressing the social determinants of health.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program is led by a full-time director, Devon Reber, MSW, who is supported by an eight-member volunteer advisory board. A National Office located in Boston provides curriculum, strategic, technical, and operational support for the Boston program and 12 other sites across the country. A 21-member volunteer National Board of Directors holds fiduciary responsibility for The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Sylvia Stevens-Edouard
CEO Term Start June 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Before joining ASF as Executive Director, Sylvia Stevens-Edouard, M.S. was the Senior Director of Children’s Health Initiatives for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, where she developed Jump Up & Go!, Blue Cross Blue Shield Massachusetts’ initiative promoting youth physical activity and nutrition in 1998. She created the 5-2-1 Prescription for Children’s Health message and developed the Jump Up & Go! TV campaign with partner CBS-TV4.

Stevens-Edouard serves on community advisory committees for the Harvard Prevention Research Center, the Center for Sport and Society at Northeastern University and the Northeast Affiliate of the American Diabetes Association. She also is a Trustee for the Boston Children’s Museum, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Museum of Afro American History.

An Emmy award-winning television producer, Stevens-Edouard is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and holds a Masters Degree from Boston University and a Certificate in Community Relations from Boston College.

Co-CEO Devon Reber MSW
Co-CEO Term Start 2005
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience Devon Reber, MSW, joined ASF in September 2005. She currently directs the Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program. Reber has experience working in a variety of non-profit, human service, and public administration agencies. She holds a BA and MSW from Boston College.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Since 1992, Boston Schweitzer Fellows have collaborated with over 250 local organizations, including:

·       Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center

·       Boston Health Care for the Homeless

·       Children’s Hospital, Primary Care Clinic

·       Dimock Center

·       Greater Boston Food Bank

 ·       Pine Street Inn

·       Roca

·       Sociedad Latina

·       TrinityBoston Counseling Center

·       Youth on Fire, Cambridge Cares About AIDS

For a full listing, visit http://www.schweitzerfellowship.org/features/us/bos/bos_community.aspx.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Strategic Plan encompasses ASF as a whole (the Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program is the first of ASF's 13 U.S. Program sites).

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 120
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): Not available for privacy of small staff
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Bruce Auerbach
Board Chair Company Affiliation Sturdy Memorial Hospital
Board Chair Term June 2012 - June 2015
Board Co-Chair Sally Harris
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Salvation Army
Board Co-Chair Term June 2012 - June 2015

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Robert Abernathy American Standard Development Company Voting
Bruce Auerbach Sturdy Memorial Hospital Voting
Harvey Bines Sullivan and Worcester, LLP Voting
Dr. Jimmy Hara Kaiser Permanente Voting
Sally Harris Salvation Army Voting
Timothy Johnson WCVB-TV, ABC News Voting
Stefan Kertesz Univ. of Alabama Birmingham Voting
Dr. Roderick K. King Next Generation Consulting Group Voting
Matthew Klein Blue Ridge Foundation New York Voting
Arthur Kohrman Case Western Reserve University Voting
Robert Lawrence Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Voting
James O'Connell Boston Health Care for the Homeless Voting
Joseph O'Donnell Dartmouth Medical School Voting
Phillip Pulaski Boston Health Care for the Homeless Voting
Mitchell Rabkin Beth Israel Medical Center, Harvard Medical School Voting
Hon. Mark Wolf U.S. Federal Court Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Suzanne Cashman University of Massachusetts Medical School Voting
Mary Higgins Lynn Community Health Center, Schweitzer Fellowship alum --
James Hyde Tufts University School of Medicine Voting
Claude-Alix Jacob City of Cambridge, Schweitzer Fellowship alum Voting
Tanya Maggi New England Conservatory --
Nancy Norman The Dimock Center Voting
Skye K. Schulte Feinstein Kean Healthcare, Schwietzer Fellowship alum Voting
Zirui Song Harvard Medical School, Schweitzer Fellowship Alum Voting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 1
Male: 15
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 82%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Board of Directors listed is ASF's National Board of Directors.
 
The Advisory Board listed is the Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program's Advisory Board.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2008 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $178,218.00
Projected Expense $178,218.00
Form 990s

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2010 Financial Statements 2010

2009 Financial Statements 2009

2008 Financial Statements 2008

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Total Revenue $143,900 $180,320 $162,536
Total Expenses $152,025 $186,903 $159,242

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$81,500 $109,000 $128,530
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal $0 $0 $0
    State $0 $0 $0
    Local $0 $0 $0
    Unspecified $0 $0 $0
Individual Contributions $36,250 $46,320 $9,006
Indirect Public Support $1,150 $0 $0
Earned Revenue $0 $920 $0
Investment Income, Net of Losses $0 $0 $0
Membership Dues $0 $0 $0
Special Events $0 $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind $25,000 $25,000 $25,000
Other $0 $0 $0

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Program Expense $132,025 $166,903 $141,742
Administration Expense $5,000 $5,000 $5,000
Fundraising Expense $15,000 $15,000 $12,500
Payments to Affiliates $0 $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.95 0.96 1.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses 87% 89% 89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 13% 10% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Total Assets $124,239 $160,872 $164,643
Current Assets $0 $0 $0
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $124,239 $160,872 $164,643

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $630,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 4.0%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The income and expense projections refer specifically to ASF's Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program. However, the endowment information refers to ASF overall (the Boston Program and ASF's other program sites), as does the 990s and audits.

Foundation Comments

The numbers in charts and graphs are per the nonprofit organization referring to the Boston Schweitzer Fellows Program, specifically, as opposed to the national program overall.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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