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Boston Medical Center Corporation

 1 Boston Medical Center Place
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 638-8990
[F] (617) 638-8983
www.bmc.org
[email protected]
Kristen Gleason
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INCORPORATED: 1996
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3314093

LAST UPDATED: 03/01/2017
Organization DBA Boston Medical Center
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Our Mission: Boston Medical Center will provide consistently excellent and accessible health services to all in need of care regardless of status and ability to pay.

Our Vision: Our vision is to meet the health needs of the people of Boston and its surrounding communities by providing high quality comprehensive care to all, particularly mindful of the needs of the vulnerable populations, through our integrated delivery system, in an ethically and financially responsible manner.

Mission Statement

Our Mission: Boston Medical Center will provide consistently excellent and accessible health services to all in need of care regardless of status and ability to pay.

Our Vision: Our vision is to meet the health needs of the people of Boston and its surrounding communities by providing high quality comprehensive care to all, particularly mindful of the needs of the vulnerable populations, through our integrated delivery system, in an ethically and financially responsible manner.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2016 to Sept 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,015,051,000.00
Projected Expense $1,014,540,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Birth Sisters Program
  • Children's Health Watch
  • Grow Clinic for Children
  • Nutrition and Weight Management Center
  • Preventive Food Pantry and Demonstration Kitchen

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our Mission: Boston Medical Center will provide consistently excellent and accessible health services to all in need of care regardless of status and ability to pay.

Our Vision: Our vision is to meet the health needs of the people of Boston and its surrounding communities by providing high quality comprehensive care to all, particularly mindful of the needs of the vulnerable populations, through our integrated delivery system, in an ethically and financially responsible manner.


Background Statement

Boston Medical Center formed in July 1996 when three of Boston’s leading hospitals – Boston City Hospital, Boston University Medical Center Hospital and the Boston Rehabilitation Hospital – combined in the country’s first merger of two city hospitals with a private academic medical center. In partnership with Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, BMC has emerged as not only a premier academic medical center, but also the largest safety net hospital in New England.BMC has enthusiastically embraced its role to serve those communities most in need. Its many social services and innovative outreach programs are emblematic of its mission to serve all patients, regardless of status or ability to pay.


Impact Statement

Boston Medical Center has many accomplishments to be proud of.  In 2011, we celebrated the opening of the beautiful Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Ambulatory Care Center, the culmination of five years of careful planning and execution by our staff. This new outpatient facility is not only a top notch resource for our patients, but also one very visible symbol of BMC’s bright future. With the busiest Level-1 Trauma Center in New England, BMC's Emergency Department serves nearly 130,000 patients each year, and is a national model for emergency services.  BMC also received the American Heart Association's "Gold Plus" Award, which recognizes its compliance with the "Get with the Guidelines - Stroke" program.

 Boston Medical Center also faces many challenges in the face of the changing health care system in this country.  In 2011 we underwent a strategic planning process, and the result was our "Be Exceptional" strategic plan.  The ultimate goal of this plan is to provide the right care for every patient - no less...no more.  To accomplish this, BMC will standardize the care it provides, increase employee engagement and continuously measure itself as a means to continuously improve.  The organization will sharpen its focus on the patient experience, quality, reliability and effectiveness.

 


Needs Statement

1. Programmatic needs - see program section

2. Capital needs - renovation and expansion of clinical areas to serve our patient population


CEO Statement

Dear Friends of Boston Medical Center,

Every day, I witness the unique combination of expertise, innovation and compassion that defines our ongoing mission of exceptional care, without exception. We strive to put our patients first—providing them with the highest quality, coordinated and state-of-the-art care available, anywhere. Our patients deserve no less.

Our expert medical staff and researchers are the foundation for the quality care BMC delivers. In 2011, 67 BMC physicians in 29 different specialties were honored on the Boston Magazine “Top Docs” list—more than two and a half times the number two years ago. On the academic front, our research enterprise thrived this past year, with nearly 600 projects underway. Our investigators are leaders in areas including Parkinson’s disease, cardiology, vascular biology, regenerative medicine, geriatrics, endocrinology and infectious disease.

As health care reform is implemented and the health care landscape is poised to change dramatically, BMC remains uniquely positioned to thrive as a center of medical excellence, integrated with our 15 community health center partners and our BMC HealthNet Plan. We’re proud that the HealthNet Plan was ranked 4th in the nation by US News & World Report in 2010. The HealthNet Plan continues to allow us to pilot innovations that enable BMC to provide the best in care management.

In early spring 2011, we celebrated the opening of the beautiful Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Ambulatory Care Center, the culmination of five years of careful planning and execution by our staff. As more and more health care services are provided in an ambulatory care setting, this new outpatient facility is not only a top notch resource for our patients, but also one very visible symbol of BMC’s bright future.

These are challenging times for all health care organizations, but there is no question that BMC, in touching thousands of lives every day, plays a vital and irreplaceable role in Boston’s health care system. I am so proud to lead an institution that is a national model of care, and caring, for all.

Kathleen E. Walsh

President and Chief Executive Officer


Board Chair Statement

Dear Friends of Boston Medical Center,

Every day, I witness the unique combination of expertise, innovation and compassion that defines our ongoing mission of exceptional care, without exception. We strive to put our patients first—providing them with the highest quality, coordinated and state-of-the-art care available, anywhere. Our patients deserve no less.

Our expert medical staff and researchers are the foundation for the quality care BMC delivers. In 2011, 67 BMC physicians in 29 different specialties were honored on the Boston Magazine “Top Docs” list—more than two and a half times the number two years ago. On the academic front, our research enterprise thrived this past year, with nearly 600 projects underway. Our investigators are leaders in areas including Parkinson’s disease, cardiology, vascular biology, regenerative medicine, geriatrics, endocrinology and infectious disease.

As health care reform is implemented and the health care landscape is poised to change dramatically, BMC remains uniquely positioned to thrive as a center of medical excellence, integrated with our 15 community health center partners and our BMC HealthNet Plan. We’re proud that the HealthNet Plan was ranked 4th in the nation by US News & World Report in 2010. The HealthNet Plan continues to allow us to pilot innovations that enable BMC to provide the best in care management.

In early spring 2011, we celebrated the opening of the beautiful Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Ambulatory Care Center, the culmination of five years of careful planning and execution by our staff. As more and more health care services are provided in an ambulatory care setting, this new outpatient facility is not only a top notch resource for our patients, but also one very visible symbol of BMC’s bright future.

These are challenging times for all health care organizations, but there is no question that BMC, in touching thousands of lives every day, plays a vital and irreplaceable role in Boston’s health care system. I am so proud to lead an institution that is a national model of care, and caring, for all.

Kathleen E. Walsh


President and Chief Executive Officer



Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
BERKSHIRE REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
The majority - 65% - of Boston Medical Center patients live in the city of Boston, especially the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Roxbury, South End, and Mattapan.  We also see patients in Massachusetts from the South Shore, Cape Cod and Islands, and Metrowest.  Two-thirds of our more than 200,000 patients have incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty level, and two-thirds are minorities. Most depend on Medicaid, Commonwealth Care, and other government-based insurance to access health care.

Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Hospitals
  2. Medical Research -
  3. Human Services -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Birth Sisters Program

Birth Sisters is a home visiting and labor support program that assists expectant and new mothers at risk for complications due to medical or social factors. It is also a workforce development program. Founded in 1999, the Birth Sisters Program fills a need in low-income communities for culturally competent education and support for at-risk mothers-to-be and their infants. A Birth Sister from the same culture and community as the mother assists during pregnancy, childbirth and early motherhood, becoming a crucial link between the family and health care system. The mothers are vulnerable – including those who are socially isolated, those in domestic violence situations, and those who are particularly at-risk for having infants with significant medical problems and families with complex psychosocial issues. A Birth Sister develops a unique relationship throughout the perinatal period that allows her to impact the mother’s lifestyle choices and the health status of mother and baby.
Budget  $431,142
Category  Health Care, General/Other Maternal & Infant Care
Population Served Females Infants to Preschool (under age 5) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

The Birth Sisters program has been linked to significantly higher breastfeeding rates and fewer cesarean deliveries. BMC’s breastfeeding initiation rates rose from 58% to 93.5% and have remained at high levels. Women with Birth Sisters have been more likely to plan to breastfeed and to breastfeed immediately after delivery.

Peer counseling has been recognized as one of the few interventions that consistently raise breastfeeding rates among minority women and low-income women, who breastfeed significantly less than white women and women with higher incomes. Breastfeeding is important as it yields significant long-term health benefits for child and mother. Breast-fed infants have lower rates of ear infections, diarrhea, respiratory tract infections, future diabetes and obesity, and other medical problems than bottle-fed babies. Breastfeeding mothers benefit from a reduction in future risk of ovarian and breast cancer
Program Long-Term Success 

Only a handful of programs in the United States offer peer support to prenatal and postnatal women. Through the Birth Sisters Program, expectant and new mothers receive evidence-based, culturally competent support and education.

African American women in Boston, compared to White women, are more than 4 times more likely to deliver an infant who will die before its first birthday (The Health of Boston2006, 2003 statistics). African American and Latino woman also have a disparate incidence of low birth weight and preterm births.

Moreover, healthy attachment between parent and baby depends on both the emotional well-being and parenting skill of the mother. This attachment impacts the future well-being of the child for many years. Birth Sisters aims to support the well-being and parenting skills of expectant and new mothers in order to support the optimal health and development of infants born at Boston MedicalCenter.

Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored by various measured indicators, such as percentage of new mothers at BMC who breastfeed their newborns; number of births at BMC assisted with a Birth Sister; and infant mortality rate.
Examples of Program Success 

Currently there are 12 per diem Birth Sisters who speak 10 languages. Some are former patients who chose to become Birth Sisters as a result of their experience. BMC trains Birth Sisters, typically unskilled women, and provides them with a certificate at successful completion of the program. They receive a small per diem for their services, helping them economically. The Birth Sisters Program offers an entryway to the workforce; many have gone on to become nursing assistants, interpreters, nurses, midwives and public health professionals.

Birth Sisters is directed by Julie Mottl-Santiago, CNM, MPH. This program supported 410 families in 2010 and 365 in 2011; an increase in staffing would allow an increase in numbers served. In addition to documenting rates of participation, patient demographics and social service referrals, the Birth Sisters program also tracks breastfeeding initiation rates and postpartum medical appointments for women with Birth Sisters.


Children's Health Watch

Children’s HealthWatch is a pediatric research center dedicated to monitoring the impact of economic conditions & public policies on the health & development of children ages 0-4 from low-income families. Since 1998, we have provided policymakers & the public withtimely scientific evidence regarding powerful public policies & programs that improve young children’s health & development. 

 As scientists & advocates, we focus on oft ignored material hardships—insufficient food, unstable housing, and inadequate heat. Findings are distributed via peer-reviewed journal articles, policy reports & briefs, & op-eds. Our principal investigators have testified before Congress & state legislatures. Led from Boston Medical Center (our fiscal agent), we collect data in Baltimore, Boston, Little Rock, Minneapolis, & Philadelphia. The majority of children in our dataset are low-income urban children of color. Ours is the largest, most current clinical dataset in the U.S. on young, low-income children.

Budget  $1,400,000
Category  Health Care, General/Other Early Intervention & Prevention
Population Served Families Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

In 2011, Children’s HealthWatch raised awareness about our policy-relevant findings through:

·         25 stories featuring our work and/or our researchers in media outlets including: CNN, ABC News, NBC,The Boston Globe,andThe Philadelphia Inquirer.

·         25 conference or special presentations, at venues including the: John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s How Housing Matters Forum, and National Low-Income Housing Coalition Annual Conference.

 Our 2011 reports and articles included:

·         Behind Closed Doors: The hidden health impacts of being behind on rent

·         Real Cost of a Healthy Diet: 2011

·         LIHEAP Stabilizes Family Housing and Protects Children’s Health

·         Too Many Hurdles: Barriers to Receiving SNAP Put Children’s Health at Risk

·         Federal Programs that Protect Young Children’s Health

                       Boost to SNAP Benefits Protected Young Children’s Healtlth
 
Program Long-Term Success 

While many factors impact national & state policies, many have highlighted our influence in policy & practice discussions. Our scientific credibility leads policymakers & media outlets to consider us a key source when making decisions about or reporting on issues we research.

Since our founding, we have authored: > 20 peer-reviewed articles on topics including the interaction between child health & development and policy choices regarding: welfare reform, food insecurity & food assistance programs, maternal depression, multiple hardships, low income heating assistance, children of immigrants, & housing insecurity; ~ 40 research-based reports & policy action briefs on topics including the interaction between child health & development and: welfare reform; public assistance programs like WIC, SNAP, & housing subsidies; the real cost of a healthy diet; energy insecurity; food insecurity; affordable health care.

Program Success Monitored By 

Our most important measure of success is our impact on public policy for young children; we are dedicated to building the evidence base through scientific excellence for policies that support children’s well-being.   We are committed to a consistent output of high-quality research in forms appealing to a range of audiences; peer-reviewed articles primarily target other researchers, & reports and policy briefs target decision-makers.  We track our performance in a database in a variety of ways, from individual legislative visits to conference presentations, new partnerships to email open rates.  We also monitor the level & quality of media coverage we bring to this vulnerable, often hidden population.   

For process monitoring, we routinely apply principles of project evaluation consistent with the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention’s Framework for Program Evaluation. Additionally, we track our outreach workers’ referrals for interviewed families to needed services and supports.

Examples of Program Success 

Our work has been cited on the floor of the U.S. & Massachusetts Houses of Representatives.

In March 2012, Children’s HealthWatch co-sponsored the Witnesses to Hunger Exhibit & events at the Massachusetts State House. These events drew US Representative McGovern, & Massachusetts public officials including: Lieutenant Governor Murray; House Speaker DeLeo; Senate President Murray; Senators McGee & Eldridge; & Representatives Honan, Rushing, Fox, Khan & Wolf. Fox 25 News,The Boston Globe, & othersfeatured our researchers in coverage. A senior staff member for one participating legislator said the legislators were very moved & would look to us for future input.

In summer 2011, Univision Boston, New England Cable News, WBUR,The Boston Globe(twice), Fox 25 News, ABC News (twice), CNN (twice), and others interviewed Children’s HealthWatch researchers for stories related to alarming increases in child food insecurity and child underweight documented by our research.


Grow Clinic for Children

Founded in 1984, the BMC Grow Clinic is regarded as a national model for the treatment of malnutrition in inner-city children. As part of BMC’s Pediatrics Department, the primary goal of the Grow Clinic is to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary medical, nutritional, social services and dietary assistance to children from the Greater Boston area diagnosed with Failure to Thrive (FTT). Children with FTT have significant difficulty growing because of malnutrition associated with poverty, illness and family stress. The effects of FTT include shortened attention spans, emotional problems, delayed cognitive development, lasting growth failure, and frequent and serious illness, which can result in hospitalization.  The Grow Clinic provides medical treatment, nutritional assessment, home health education, family advocacy, access to the BMC therapeutic Food Pantry and other services, children’s clothes, diapers, books and educational toys.
Budget  $935,662
Category  Health Care, General/Other Early Intervention & Prevention
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  The short term success of this program is best defined in the children we serve.  The Grow Clinic works with children who are at a critical juncture.  Lack of adequate nutrition and related factors at an early can create development deficits that are difficult to correct.  Attacking this issue as early as possible prevents a child from falling behind early and helps make sure are able to develop normally.
Program Long-Term Success 

The Grow Clinic is regarded as a national model for the treatment of malnutrition in inner-city children. The staff provides hundreds of technical assistance sessions and educational programs at national, state and local levels for policy makers, educators, philanthropists and health care providers to raise public consciousness about childhood malnutrition and the need for FTT services. 

The Grow Clinic is an example of BMC’s commitment to serve vulnerable populations, regardless of status or ability to pay. By providing medical treatment, family advocacy services, food, education in nutrition, and cooking demonstrations to its patients, BMC will be able to effectively fight against the ravages of malnutrition and hunger with both preventive and therapeutic measures. Malnutrition and hunger are both medical and social conditions and, thus, need to be treated in a multidisciplinary fashion.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Grow Clinic now provides services to an average of 244 patients and their families per year, with clinic visits totaling an approximate yearly average of 1,100. Most patient families are low income, and many do not speak English as a first language. The average patient age at referral is 16 months, with an approximate third being under 12 months.

Dr. Deborah Frank, BMC Department of Pediatrics and founder and Director of the Grow Clinic, oversees a Clinic staff of 22. This staff includes physicians, Registered Dieticians, a Clinical Nutritionist, social workers, and outreach workers who make home visits, advocate for children and families, and assist them in securing vital health care-related services. Outreach staff includes workers who are fluent in Vietnamese, Spanish, and Haitian-Creole.

Examples of Program Success   

Nutrition and Weight Management Center

The Nutrition and Weight Management program at Boston Medical Center is an integral part of the Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes, Nutrition and Weight Management. We offer state-of-the-art diagnostic and treatment services for the entire spectrum of nutritional disorders and weight management for individuals age 18 and older. Our exceptional team of dedicated professionals comprises three physicians specializing in nutrition, nine clinical dietitians including two surgical dietitians and two dietitians who are certified diabetes educators
Budget  $30,000
Category  Health Care, General/Other Patient Care/Health Care Delivery
Population Served Adults Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Boston Medical Center (BMC) provides comprehensive care to more than 10,000 diabetes outpatients, most of whom are low income minorities. BMC also serves as the tertiary care center for 15 community health centers serving an additional 12,000 to 14,000 diabetes patients. One in five of all patients admitted to BMC – about 5,600 patients per year – have a diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetes. 

Our Adult Outpatient Services Fall into Two Distinct Areas
 
Medical Nutrition:Nutritional diagnostic, therapy and counseling services for the purpose of disease management provided by a registered dietitian.
 
Weight Management:We develop and help patients implement personalized strategies to achieve and maintain a healthy body weight (typically defined as a BMI of 18.5 - 24.9 kg/m²). These weight management strategies can be medical and/or surgical in nature.

Program Long-Term Success 

Boston Medical Center’s Center for Nutrition and Weight Management is one of the country’s most comprehensive weight management programs. Viewing obesity as a chronic disease requiring lifelong treatment and medical care provides the foundation for all of our clinical and research endeavors. By offering both medical and surgical interventions, our clinicians are especially skilled at meeting the needs of high risk patients from a variety of ethnic, racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. 

 Researchers in the Center for Nutrition and Weight Management are participating in ongoing research projects including several areas of weight loss, weight maintenance, and the molecular effects of weight change.

Program Success Monitored By  Our exceptional Weight Management Program staff is dedicated to the medical and surgical management of obesity. A national leader in the field, we provide comprehensive, convenient, and effective care. We guide and encourage patients as they learn how to make lifelong changes in eating behavior, food choices, and activity levels. We help them reach your goals through eating plans, behavioral support and exercise.
 
Among other strategies, we believe in the efficacy of group support sessions led by a registered dietitian with experience in weight management. Patients also have individual appointments with a nutrition physician specialist and a dietitian to address medical concerns related to diet and to help with meal planning and behavior modification techniques
Examples of Program Success   

Preventive Food Pantry and Demonstration Kitchen

The only hospital-based facility of its kind in the nation, Boston Medical Center’s Preventive Food Pantry and Demonstration Kitchen opened in October 2001 to address hunger-related illness and malnutrition among its patient population. Individuals at risk of malnutrition – the chronically ill, undernourished children, the elderly, the homeless, and others – are referred to the program by BMC physicians or nutritionists, who provide them with “prescriptions” for supplemental food that best promotes physical health, prevents future illness, and facilitates recovery.The Demonstration Kitchen complements the work of the Pantry by educating patients about nutrition and by demonstrating cooking methods that are compatible with their medical and dietary needs, as prescribed by their physicians.
Budget  $249,792
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Nutrition
Population Served At-Risk Populations Families Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Short-term goals of the Preventive Food Pantry and Demonstration Kitchen:

1.    Continue to serve children and families suffering from hunger and malnutrition by providing access to free food and nutritional counseling.

2.    Expand the range of hunger and malnutrition-related problems BMC is able to address with both preventive and therapeutic measures, thereby expanding the population served.

3.    Enable patients to acquire the appropriate food necessary for them to adhere to nutrition therapies prescribed by BMC physicians.

4.    Educate families in food nutrition and provide ethnically-sensitive cooking demonstrations on-site.

Program Long-Term Success 

By providing food, education in nutrition, and cooking demonstrations to its patients, BMC will be able to effectively fight against the ravages of malnutrition and hunger with both preventive and therapeutic measures. Malnutrition is both a medical and a social/economic condition and, thus, needs to be treated in a multidisciplinary fashion. BMC’s Preventive Food Pantry and Demonstration kitchen will represent a unique weapon in the war against hunger and malnutrition, and will provide a model of integrated care that will serve as a national prototype for urban hospitals.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Food Pantry conducts an annual survey of patients receiving services, asking their feedback on the Pantry.  The results are overwhelmingly positive, with comments such as:


·         I really like the food pantry staff because they help me a lot. Also, it’s good for the kids.

·         Thank God for this food pantry. It feed people like me. I can’t get Food Stamps. Please don’t stop.

·         Thank you for making us know that there are people who care about us, and we cannot go hungry because you love to see us happy and healthy.

·         The food pantry helps me out. Many times I don’t have to buy some things.

·         You help me get thru the month.

·         It’s very helpful for me and my family. Times are hard. Thank you, and God bless you.

·         Very courteous and helpful employees, and the food provide is exceptional, especially for special diets due to religious beliefs.

·         They take good care of me. I appreciate the service they give me. I like the quality of food. Thank you very much.

Examples of Program Success  The Food Pantry’s success is best measured by the number of at-risk patients it has served over the past ten years. After serving 18,478 people in the first year of the program, the Pantry now serves nearly 7,000 low-income patients and families per month. In 2011 nutritious food was provided for well over 80,000 clients. Patients are referred to the Food Pantry by BMC health care providers from the Grow Clinic, Pediatric Clinic, Family Medicine, Geriatric Clinic, and Cancer Care, among others. The Pantry, open daily Monday through Friday, is staffed by 3 full-time and 2 part-time workers who distribute and track over 10,000 pounds of food supplies per week to meet patients’ needs. In the Demonstration Kitchen, the Chef/Dietitian conducts culturally appropriate nutrition education and cooking classes to address a variety of medical needs, including cancer care, diabetes management, pediatric failure-to-thrive, allergies, and weight management, among others, as requested by physicians

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Kathleen E. Walsh
CEO Term Start Mar 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Kate Walsh became the president and CEO of Boston Medical Center (BMC) on March 1, 2010.

Prior to her appointment at Boston Medical Center, Ms. Walsh served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Brigham and Women’s Hospital for five years. During her tenure, Brigham and Women’s Hospital moved its patient satisfaction scores to the 95th percentile of benchmark institutions nationally, produced strong operating results based on consistent ambulatory and inpatient growth and set a new standard in patient-focused multidisciplinary care with the opening of the Carl J and Ruth Shapiro Cardiovascular Center.

She served previously as the chief operating officer for Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research.

Ms. Walsh began her career in health care as a summer intern at Brookside Health Center in the Boston neighborhood of Jamaica Plain. Upon finishing graduate school, she worked as a shift supervisor in the emergency department at Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center in the Bronx. From there Ms. Walsh moved to Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, Saint Luke’s – Roosevelt Hospital Center and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. She relocated to Boston and joined Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) as an assistant general director in medical services and was promoted to vice president of medical services and primary care and then to senior vice president of medical services and the MGH Cancer Center.

Ms. Walsh received her bachelor’s of arts degree and a master’s degree in public health from Yale University. She also is a member of the Board of Visitors for Northeastern University’s School of Business and is on the Board of Trustees at Emmanuel College.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Elaine Ullian July 1996 Feb 2010

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
David Beck J.D. Vice President and General Counsel --
Alastair Bell Senior Vice President of Operations and Strategy --
Bob Biggio Vice President of Facilities and Support Services --
Joe Camillus Vice President of Ambulatory Operations and Professional Services --
Cindy Charylulu Vice President of Revenue Cycle --
Ravin Davidoff M.D. Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer --
Nancy Gaden Senior Vice President of Clinical Operations and Chief Nursing Officer --
Stanley Hochberg Vice President of Quality, Safety, and Technology, and Chief Quality Officer --
Lisa Kelly-Croswell Vice President of Human Resources --
Richard Silveria Senior Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer --
Norman Stein Vice President of Development --
Jennifer Watson Vice President of Communications and Chief of Staff --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) - Medicare Certification --
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) - Hospital Accreditation --
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) - Laboratory Services Accreditation --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4,596
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 500
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 90%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1,437
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 373
Caucasian: 2,356
Hispanic/Latino: 399
Native American/American Indian: 17
Other: 14
Other (if specified): Other
Gender Female: 3,239
Male: 1,357
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 10
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Martha Samuelson
Board Chair Company Affiliation Analysis Group
Board Chair Term Nov 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. David Ament Managing Partner, Parthenon Capitals Partners Voting
Ms. Karen Antman M.D. Boston University School of Medicine Voting
Ms. Anita Bekenstein Community Volunteer --
Mr. James Blue President, The Bostonian Group Voting
Mr. Barry Bock Boston Health Care for the Homeless --
Mr. David Coleman M.D. Boston Medical Center Voting
Ms. Sandra Cotterell Executive Director, Codman Square Health Center Voting
Mr. Jack Cradock Executive Director, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center --
Mr. Pierre Cremieux Analysis Group --
Ms. Randi Cutler Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Paul Egerman eScription, Inc. Voting
Mr. Edmond English Bob's Discount Furniture Voting
Ms. Ruth Ellen Fitch Community Volunteer --
Ms. Melanie Foley Liberty Mutual Corporation --
Mr. John T. Hailer NGAM Advisors, LP Voting
Mr. William J. Halpin South Boston Community Health Center Voting
Ms. Karen Kames Community Volunteer --
Ms. Azra Kanji ABRY Partners, LLC --
Mr. Manuel Lopes East Boston Neighborhood Health Center --
Dr. Brendan Magauran Boston Medical center --
Mr. Richard A. Marks WS Development --
Mr. Jerod Mayo Optum --
Dr. David McAneny Boston Medical Center --
Ms. Tricia Patrick Advent International Corporation --
Ms. Claire Perlman Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. James S. Phalen State Street Corporation Voting
Ms. Martha Samuelson Analysis Group Voting
Mr. Richard Slifka Global Petroleum Corporation Voting
Dr. Monica Valdes Lupi Boston Public Health Commission --
Ms. Kate Walsh Boston Medical Center Voting
Ms. Kathleen E. Walsh Boston Medical Center --
Mr. Andrew Youniss Rocket Software --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Pamela Adams Community Volunteer --
Mr. Steven Belkin TransNational Group --
Mr. Hal Belodoff President and COO, The Plymouth Rock Company Voting
Mr. Peter Bishop Morgan Stanley Smith Barney --
Mr. James Blue President, The Bostonian Group Voting
Mr. Rick Blume Managing Director, Exvel Medical Ventures Voting
Mr. Taylor Bodman Partner, Brown Brothers Harriman Voting
Mr. Matthew Botein BlackRock, Inc. --
Mr. Ryan Carroll Vice President, Charelsbank Capital Partners Voting
Mr. Marshall Carter Retired --
Ms. Andrea Cohen HouseWorks --
Ms. Donna Cowan Community Volunteer --
Ms. Randi Cutler Community Volunteer --
Mr. Mark DiNapoli Suffolk Construction Company --
Ms. Susan Donahue Community Volunteer --
Mr. Edmond English Bob's Discount Furniture --
Mr. John Fletcher Fletcher Spaght, Inc. --
Mr. Lawrence Goodman Partner, Ernst & Young LLP Voting
Mr. Chris Gordon Managing Director of Bain Capital Partners, LLC Voting
Ms. Melissa Gordon Milton's Distributing --
Mr. Peter Grua HLM Venture Partners --
Mr. John T. Hailer NGAM Advisors, LP --
Mr. Colin Hill GNS Healthcare --
Ms. Shelley Hoon The Hoon Companies, Inc. --
Ms. Karen Kames Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Debra Knez Community Volunteer --
Ms. Pam Kohlberg Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Stacey Lucchino Community Volunteer --
Mr. Jim Masur Babson Capital Management, LLC --
Ms. Martha Samuelson Analysis Group --
Mr. Carmen Scarpa Tudor Ventures --
Ms. Michelle Shell Senior Vice President and Brand Strategist for the LPL Voting
Ms. Kate Walsh President and CEO, Boston Medical Center Voting
Ms. Terry Yoffie Community Volunteer Voting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 26
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 13
Male: 17
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 30%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Audit, Compliance and Controls
  • Compensation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Investment
  • Nominating
  • Real Estate

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

BMC's Board of Trustees is structured into four categories, with varying lengths and limits of terms.  These categories are the result of the merger of Boston City Hospital and University Hospital in 1996.
Class A: 10 members, formerly appointed by the Mayor, now elected by a majority of the Board, provided the Mayor may veto nomination.  May be elected to three consecutive three-year terms.
Class B: 10 members, formerly appointed by the University Hospital trustees, now elected by a majority of the Board.  May be elected to three consecutive three-year terms.
Class C: Six members, consisting of the individuals in the following positions: Executive Director of the Boston Public Health Commission; Dean of the BU School of Medicine; Boston Medical Center President & CEO; President of BMC Medical and Dental Staff; BMC physician-in-chief; and BMC surgeon-in-chief.  Terms are tied to tenure in office.
Class D: 4 members, an individual who serves as a trustee, officer, executive director or medical director of a primary community health center member of Boston HealthNet.  Serve 5-year terms.
Note: Officers of the corporation are not term-limited.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,198,138,398 $1,120,846,589 $1,023,096,786
Total Expenses $1,138,654,337 $1,049,014,589 $1,004,989,786

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $573,510 $996,982 $1,403,834
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $573,510 $996,982 $1,403,834
Individual Contributions $16,901,049 $17,931,304 $4,662,196
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $1,104,907,449 $1,044,496,985 $980,835,855
Investment Income, Net of Losses $66,742,000 $48,774,000 $28,517,000
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $3,924,145 $3,493,014 $3,628,969
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $5,090,245 $5,154,304 $4,048,932

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,030,317,642 $942,768,469 $908,424,362
Administration Expense $104,241,733 $102,972,317 $94,047,240
Fundraising Expense $4,094,962 $3,273,803 $2,518,184
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.05 1.07 1.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses 90% 90% 90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 19% 15% 26%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $2,169,778,000 $1,966,114,000 $1,862,453,000
Current Assets $591,502,000 $479,043,000 $459,591,000
Long-Term Liabilities $693,265,000 $483,209,000 $504,361,000
Current Liabilities $310,453,000 $293,024,000 $250,375,000
Total Net Assets $1,166,060,000 $1,189,881,000 $1,107,717,000

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $715,197,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose Fulfilling BMC’s mission of providing exceptional care, without exception requires the construction of new and the expansion of existing facilities that will consolidate clinical services, enable the hospital to better manage the needs of patients, and allow us to grow in- and outpatient volume. The projects below and other future projects will allow BMC to serve the residents of Boston and New England as the region’s largest safety-net hospital, providing high-quality care at an affordable cost.
Campaign Goal $100,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates Oct 2013 - Sept 2018
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.91 1.63 1.84

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 32% 25% 27%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s, with asset and liability data per the audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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