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Organization DBA Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation
Former Names Brazelton Foundation, Inc. (1996)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Brazelton Touchpoints Project, Inc. (d/b/a Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation) was incorporated to raise and receive philanthropic resources to support the work of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center. Together with families, providers and communities, the Brazelton Touchpoints Center develops and applies knowledge of early childhood development to practice and policy through professional and organizational development, evaluation, advocacy and awareness and serving as a resource for proven practices. The vision of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center is that all children grow up to be adults who can cope with adversity, strengthen their communities, constructively participate in civic life and nurture the next generation to be prepared to do the same.

Mission Statement

The Brazelton Touchpoints Project, Inc. (d/b/a Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation) was incorporated to raise and receive philanthropic resources to support the work of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center. Together with families, providers and communities, the Brazelton Touchpoints Center develops and applies knowledge of early childhood development to practice and policy through professional and organizational development, evaluation, advocacy and awareness and serving as a resource for proven practices. The vision of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center is that all children grow up to be adults who can cope with adversity, strengthen their communities, constructively participate in civic life and nurture the next generation to be prepared to do the same.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $3,643,040.00
Projected Expense $3,267,249.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Brazelton Touchpoints Center

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Brazelton Touchpoints Project, Inc. (d/b/a Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation) was incorporated to raise and receive philanthropic resources to support the work of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center. Together with families, providers and communities, the Brazelton Touchpoints Center develops and applies knowledge of early childhood development to practice and policy through professional and organizational development, evaluation, advocacy and awareness and serving as a resource for proven practices. The vision of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center is that all children grow up to be adults who can cope with adversity, strengthen their communities, constructively participate in civic life and nurture the next generation to be prepared to do the same.

Background Statement

The Brazelton Touchpoints Project, Inc. (d/b/a Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation) was incorporated to raise and receive philanthropic resources to support the work of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center, which was founded by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D., and colleagues in 1996. The work of Dr. Brazelton and the Brazelton Touchpoints Center is carried out at Boston Children’s Hospital and is largely supported by fee for service, private philanthropy and private and public funding, in addition to support from the Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation.
In addition to its Touchpoints professional development and evaluation work, the Brazelton Touchpoints Center now hosts: National Center on Parent, Family and Community Engagement, funded and supported by a multi-year grant to BTC from the Office of Head Start; Tribal Touchpoints Initiative, involving 19 Native community partnerships; Touchpoints National Network, involving over 150 communities in 34 states; and Brazelton Institute, also based at Boston Children’s Hospital, which trains providers and disseminates the NBO (Newborn Behavioral Observation) and NBAS (Newborn Behavioral Assessment Scale) around the world.
To learn more, please visit www.brazeltontouchpoints.org.

Impact Statement

Donations to the Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation from friends in communities across the country make a vital difference in our ability to sustain and expand the work of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center (BTC). Contributions help build stronger families and communities, giving thousands more children the nurturing and care they need for a happy, healthy future.

 

BTC has built upon its early days of training individual practitioners to transforming programs and to effectively partnering in community self-strengthening and systems building efforts. Over the past 15 years, BTC has brought Touchpoints principles to all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 8 American Indian Tribes, in the full range of early childhood settings.

 

BTC’s history of optimizing family and community resources to build strong foundations for healthy development and early learning in the earliest years has been well established nationally and internationally. The most recent evidence of our success in the engagement of families and communities in the healthy development and early learning of young children is a 5-year grant award from the US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Head Start, to establish a National Center on Parent, Family and Community Engagement.

 

To support and sustain continued growth and development of BTC, we will continue to expand and diversify financial resources, through both private philanthropic and public partnerships. Current resource development priorities of the Foundation include:

  • Building the Brazelton Fund for the Future, a major donor initiative, to raise $2-$3 M to support future growth and development
  • Conducting annual fundraising activities for general operating support for BTC
  • Raising funds for special projects, purposes and initiatives that advance the work of BTC

Needs Statement

The role of the Foundation board includes:

  • Promoting research, practices and principles based on the early research and practices of Dr. T. Berry Brazelton and his colleagues, to ensure its continuous development and rapid expansion, now and in the future, as a force to guide the delivery of child and family services in this country
  • Generating funding to support the work of BTC and identifying and securing other resources

 

In addition to its resource development focus, the Foundation hosts:

  • A Speaker’s Bureau, offering parents nights, professional seminars and keynote addresses to groups interested in parenting and child development
  • An incubator for Family Connections, a promising mental health prevention model for families facing adversity
  • An incubator for the development of a web-based learning community initially for families and practitioners working with children with autism spectrum disorders

 

Current priorities of the Foundation include:
  • Building the Brazelton Fund for the Future, a major donor initiative to raise $2-$3M to support future growth and development
  • Conducting annual fundraising activities for general operating support for BTC
  • Raising funds for special projects, purposes and initiatives that advance the work of BTC

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Throughout the United States
Internationally
STATEWIDE
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Organization Categories

  1. Social Science - Behavioral Science
  2. Public & Societal Benefit - Public & Societal Benefit NEC
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development NEC

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Brazelton Touchpoints Center

The Brazelton Touchpoints Center (BTC) is an academic center, based at Boston Children’s Hospital, a Harvard Medical School Hospital, that translates cutting edge research on early childhood development into practices and policies that enable children, families and communities to thrive.

BTC partners with professionals, organizations and communities serving families of young children. BTC offers:

  • professional development;
  • knowledge to practice – research and evaluation;
  • practice innovation and technical assistance; and
  • policy advocacy focused on systemic change for children and families.

For more information, please visit www.brazeltontouchpoints.org.

Budget  $7,000,000.00
Category  Social Science; General/Other Behavioral Science Programs
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Families Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

 

Provider outcomes:
  • increased knowledge of child development resulting in more effective recognition and response to the regressions that are an expected part of the developmental process
  • appropriate disciplinary responses to challenging behavior
  • increased cultural sensitivity/better communication with families
  • reduction in conflict between providers and parents around the causes and appropriate responses to challenging behaviors
  • better provider-provider relationships (increased coordination of care)
  • increased ability to discern between behavioral issues needing early intervention and normative developmental disruptions
  • ability to communicate to parents and other caregivers difficult information about a child’s development
System Outcomes:
  • Improved collaboration and coordination of services across disciplines and organizations
  • More quality improvement activities (e.g., frequent, ongoing supervision and reflective practice)
Program Long-Term Success 

Child Outcomes:

  • improvement in measurable developmental outcomes (motoric, social/emotional and cognitive development)
  • receipt of timely & appropriate early intervention services
  • higher scores on measures of attachment (linked to later IQ)
Family outcomes:
  • increased knowledge of child development
  • better relationships with providers (better communication, less frustration, more trust, more confidence in providers, greater satisfaction)
  • reduction in conflict between providers & parents around the causes & appropriate responses to challenging behaviors
  • increased follow through on referrals & recommended treatment regarding developmental delays
  • normalized perception of child behavior & infant temperament
  • stabilization of parenting stress & increased self-efficacy &confidence in their parenting competence
  • increased literacy activities with children
  • positive parent-child interaction/sensitive/responsive care giving
  • appropriate disciplinary responses to challenging behavior
Program Success Monitored By 

Touchpoints facilitates improved child outcomes by enhancing relationships and practical child development knowledge in families, programs, and in early care and education, health, public health, and social service systems. It reconnects families with their communities in ways that build hope and reduce stress.

The Touchpoints Approach (in professional development) has undergone a decade of extensive and in-depth evaluation of its effectiveness, applicability, and validity with a range of participants and organizations and across providers from a number of different disciplines. In sum, Touchpoints works, and skills learned and are maintained over time with reflective practice. We measure knowledge retention and changes in practice, using a variety of standardized tools and indicators to measure learning and practice.

Examples of Program Success 

Touchpoints professional development training has proven effective in myriad settings, from early care/education centers to tribal communities, health, public health and social service sectors.

Findings attributed to using Touchpoints in home visiting programs are associated with:
  • Longer breastfeeding & increased well-child care treatment adherence
  • Fewer hospital emergency room visits
  • More well-child visits & fewer sick-child visits
  • Lower incidence of maternal depression
  • 1% of children served were victims of substantiated abuse or neglect (the rate for those not receiving those services was 2.4%)
  • 93% of children had up to date immunizations (the rate for those not receiving these services is 72.3%)
  • 44% of the children who were exposed to second-hand smoke are no longer exposed; 28% have reduced exposure
  • Home safety improved across all measures, with the largest impact in fire prevention (23%), outdoor safety (38%) & car safety (27%)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

BTC has determined that the most effective, far-reaching way to optimize children’s development so that they are healthy, eager and ready to learn, is not to create costly new programs, reaching small numbers of vulnerable children, but to focus on developing the capacity to understand the neuro-relational, neuro-developmental processes among all providers serving young children from birth to 6, their families and other caregivers.

To deliver its core expertise in optimizing early childhood development, family/parent engagement, and community engagement, BTC provides materialsdevelopment and adaptation; technical assistance for systems and community change; program and evaluation design and implementation; evaluation findings dissemination;and training for individuals and train-the trainer programs to build internal capacity within organizations to deliver training, reflective mentoring/coaching, and systems change.

 

BTC is the national headquarters for a growing learning community, connecting multidisciplinary professionals and organizations in all sectors serving young children and their families. This learning laboratory facilitates the multi-directional development and dissemination of evidence-based, strengths-based, culturally informed, relational, and developmental approaches generated at the grassroots level as well as in academia, and adapted by communities in accordance with local cultures, resources, and needs. Nationwide learning community activities include distance learning (e.g., webinars, teleconferences) and annual training professional development and technical assistance conferences.

 

BTC also brings experience in community engagement and capacity to manage extensive and complex collaborations. These collaborations have included, among many others, American Indian tribes’ early care, public health, mental health and systems building initiatives; Harlem Children’s Zone; and state-wide quality childcare improvement initiatives in North Carolina, Mississippi, Colorado and Utah. BTC has delivered its products and services to a wide range of home visiting and other family support programs, including a statewide program in Maine and county-wide programs in Miami-Dade County (FL), and Santa Clara and Napa Counties (CA). BTC has provided materials, training, and technical assistance to large scale systems and organizations that in turn disseminate these to their grantees and clients, such as the Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County (FL), national and state library systems, and statewide child care resource and referral networks.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Jane Tewksbury Esq
CEO Term Start Nov 2015
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience The Brazelton Touchpoints Project, Inc. does now employ staff. This position is the Managing Director, as well as the Executive Director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation does not have employees or employ staff, nor does it have a nondiscrimination policy. The managing director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation is under contract with the foundation and is also executive director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center. The foundation also contracts with an outside firm to provide financial accounting and reporting. The foundation does not have a separate strategic plan; in essence, the fundraising plan functions as the strategic plan for the foundation.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Dr. Betty Bardige Ed.D.
Board Chair Company Affiliation N/A
Board Chair Term Dec 2009 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Betty Bardige Ed.D. N/A Voting
Kristie Brandt C.N.M, M.S.N, N.D. N/A Voting
T. Berry Brazelton M.D. N/A Voting
Thomas Brazelton M.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.P. N/A Voting
Susan A. Buffett N/A Voting
James Burke N/A Voting
Catherine Buttenwieser LICSW N/A Voting
Sheila B. Johnson N/A Voting
David Saltzman N/A NonVoting
Dan Shamdasani N/A Voting
Lavina Shamdasani N/A Voting
Joshua Sparrow M.D. N/A Voting
Maximilian D. Stone N/A Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation does not employ staff; the foundation contracts with an outside firm to provide financial accounting and reporting. The executive director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center (also managing director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation) provides the day-to-day financial management.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $1,899,461 $784,286 $1,190,320
Total Expenses $1,428,514 $1,733,860 $1,816,211

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,838,977 $755,264 $1,087,928
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $58,098 $33,813 $92,876
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,386 $-4,791 $9,516
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $1,248,827 $1,528,815 $1,623,899
Administration Expense $153,541 $143,160 $157,649
Fundraising Expense $26,146 $61,885 $34,663
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.33 0.45 0.66
Program Expense/Total Expenses 87% 88% 89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 1% 8% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $1,176,795 $770,174 $1,654,296
Current Assets $864,868 $583,132 $1,240,239
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $29,934 $94,260 $28,808
Total Net Assets $1,146,861 $675,914 $1,625,488

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 28.89 6.19 43.05

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Brazelton Touchpoints Center generates annual revenues (over and above support provided by the Brazelton Touchpoints Foundation) of approximately $7 million through fee-for-service and other private and public funding.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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